The Lazarus Prophecy
There is a killer loose on the streets of London, one that evades security cameras, is not held by locks, and savagely mutilates his victims. When the murderer switches from unknown prostitutes to Julie Longmuir, a beautiful actress at the height of her success, no woman feels safe. As the press begin to draw uncomfortable comparisons with Jack the Ripper, Jane Sullivan, heading up the police investigation, grudgingly has to agree. But the religious writing, scrawled on the wall in Julie Longmuir’s blood, is outside Jane’s area of expertise. Roping in Jacob Prior, a disillusioned theologian, they attempt to pick apart the demonic delusions of this Ripper copycat. They must act quickly, as events are spiralling out of control, and Jane is next on the killer’s list.Jane will be tested beyond the limits of standard police work, as the esoteric insinuates itself into the investigation. For events are linked to the clandestine Priory in the Pyrenees, the home of a secret Christian sect that pre-dates the Knights Templar. Jane and Jacob are faced with a deeper mystery than they had ever dreamed of; are they simply dealing with a psychopath, or is this something bigger, is this The End of Days?

The Lazarus Prophecy Details

TitleThe Lazarus Prophecy
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 9th, 2014
PublisherBloomsbury
ISBN-139781448214556
Rating
GenreHorror, Mystery, Thriller, Fantasy, Supernatural, Crime

The Lazarus Prophecy Review

  • Maxine (Booklover Catlady)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review. Hold the press! What a read! This seriously has to be one of my best reads so far in 2014, I was totally engrossed and enthralled by this clever, creepy novel, I predict this one will be a hit. There is a killer loose on the streets of London, one that evades security cameras, is not held by locks, and savagely mutilates his victims. When the murderer switches from unknown prostitutes to Julie Longmu I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review. Hold the press! What a read! This seriously has to be one of my best reads so far in 2014, I was totally engrossed and enthralled by this clever, creepy novel, I predict this one will be a hit. There is a killer loose on the streets of London, one that evades security cameras, is not held by locks, and savagely mutilates his victims. When the murderer switches from unknown prostitutes to Julie Longmuir, a beautiful actress at the height of her success, no woman feels safe.As the press begin to draw uncomfortable comparisons with Jack the Ripper, Jane Sullivan, heading up the police investigation, grudgingly has to agree. But the religious writing, scrawled on the wall in Julie Longmuir’s blood, is outside Jane’s area of expertise. Roping in Jacob Prior, a disillusioned theologian, they attempt to pick apart the demonic delusions of this Ripper copycat. They must act quickly, as events are spiralling out of control, and Jane is next on the killer’s list.Jane will be tested beyond the limits of standard police work, as the esoteric insinuates itself into the investigation. For events are linked to the clandestine Priory in the Pyrenees, the home of a secret Christian sect that pre-dates the Knights Templar. Jane and Jacob are faced with a deeper mystery than they had ever dreamed of; are they simply dealing with a psychopath, or is this something bigger, is this The End of Days? If you are a bit squeamish, avoid this one, there are mutilations, oh yes indeed, there are many, but so brilliantly written is this book that it is only but a part of the intricate storytelling involved. This book combined religious secret sects with historical crime (The Whitechapel Murders), alongside modern day police work, political agendas and throw in a bit of demonology for good measure and voila! We have The Lazarus Prophecy!The bad guy in this book is so well fleshed out (ha ha, I made an in joke there) and so intriguing yet revolting that you will go through a great love/hate rollercoaster. The book does compare to some of Dan Brown's work I don't argue with, but in my opinion I thought it was better. The book paints the background gradually and swings across historical timelines into today, but not in a way that you get confused or lose your way, you will be hanging on to every word (at least I was). The grand finale, the final few chapters just blew me away, I was horrified, delighted and cheering whilst needing a stiff drink all at the same time. Just read it, at night, on your own. I dare you. Brilliant fiction! Put this one on your to read list for sure! And I hope this gets made into a movie too.
    more
  • Blair
    January 1, 1970
    Review originally published at Learn This Phrase.I am (as most people reading this probably know) a fan of F.G. Cottam, and have enjoyed all of his books. I enjoyed The Lazarus Prophecy, though, more than anything he's written since the unbeatable Dark Echo. It's both a return to form and a departure for the author: the former because it feels very original, very considered and carefully crafted, has more than one perspective and type of narrative, and takes so many turns before the conclusion i Review originally published at Learn This Phrase.I am (as most people reading this probably know) a fan of F.G. Cottam, and have enjoyed all of his books. I enjoyed The Lazarus Prophecy, though, more than anything he's written since the unbeatable Dark Echo. It's both a return to form and a departure for the author: the former because it feels very original, very considered and carefully crafted, has more than one perspective and type of narrative, and takes so many turns before the conclusion is reached; the latter because it is not a straightforward (if there is such a thing) supernatural/horror narrative, it also has mystery and historical elements and a background which allows the social and political ramifications of the story's events to be explored. The basic premise is that a murderer is targeting women in London, confounding the police because he seems impervious to detection - leaving no incriminating trace of himself at his crime scenes despite his habit of scrawling blasphemous messages, written in archaic languages, above the bodies of his victims. The detective leading the investigation enlists the help of a theologian, leading to the discovery that all of this has some connection with a secretive order of Catholic priests located somewhere in the Pyrenees. Meanwhile, the lack of resolution of the murder case leads an extremist right-wing organisation to whip up antagonism among Londoners, adding a very real edge to the 'end of days' atmosphere that permeates the story. This portrayal of a city on the brink of chaos brought to mind two of my other favourites from this year: Sarah Lotz's The Three, in which inexplicable events precipitate political dissent and the breakdown of international relations, and Louise Welsh's A Lovely Way To Burn, which depicts a nightmarish version of present-day London ravaged by a pandemic.The blurb on Goodreads doesn't make the setup sound great; the description on NetGalley, which likens this book to The Da Vinci Code, is possibly worse (the comparison may attract certain readers, but it does the book a bit of a disservice - Cottam's writing is not the by-numbers style of Dan Brown). Although there is a serial killer angle to the plot, it is handled well, and the violence (which is actually minimal) is not gratuitous. As usual with Cottam's books, the characters are believable and likeable, and there are numerous strong and complex female characters. It's these characters who drive the plot forward, and that does help to balance out the fact that the villain tends to target women. I don't think the blurb does the best job of getting this across, so I feel it's important to underline here that the women in this story are not just victims: it is largely a female-driven book. In fact, the main male character, while he does make a contribution, plays the sort of sidekick/love interest part which might traditionally be the only significant sympathetic role available to a female character in a thriller.I could have devoured this book in a few hours, but I tried to make it last longer, stretching it over several days, because I felt there was much to savour. I particularly liked the scenes taking place at the remote French monastery, a place perfectly created in its sense of atmosphere, eeriness and import. There's also a historical diversion - delving into an apparent connection between the modern-day London killer and Jack the Ripper - which is executed well and retains its own distinct character, while still fitting with the rest of the narrative. If you're a fan of the author already, I'm confident you'll love The Lazarus Prophecy. If you're a fan of either horror or mystery and would like to try something that has an element of both, I enthusiastically recommend it.
    more
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I have now read several of Cottam's books and this did not disappoint. In fact it provided a welcome, if somewhat horrific at times, alternative to some of my other reading. I do appreciate a well-written fantasy/horror/demonic/ whatever book and Cottam has become my go-to author in this area.As the book begins, there has been a string of recent murders of women in London in recent weeks, with only the deaths of prostitutes being known. But the killer is changing course and moving into the world I have now read several of Cottam's books and this did not disappoint. In fact it provided a welcome, if somewhat horrific at times, alternative to some of my other reading. I do appreciate a well-written fantasy/horror/demonic/ whatever book and Cottam has become my go-to author in this area.As the book begins, there has been a string of recent murders of women in London in recent weeks, with only the deaths of prostitutes being known. But the killer is changing course and moving into the world of "movers and shakers" and leaving behind clues in long dead languages. He is also mimicking crimes from the 19th century. The cast of characters who stand to meet this threat is varied and also quite interesting, each with strengths and weaknesses, motives all their own and personal goals. The question is who is the killer and can they find him before more die. The police lead is DCI Jane Sullivan, known for her skill in such cases. Who the others are --- it would reveal too much to reveal who they all are. But it is an interesting cast.My only qualm--the violent crimes against the women victims. I realize that it is a part of the history here as well as the overall story. But I have read too much of this elsewhere lately and have become sensitized. I do know from reading Cottam's other books that he does not victimize women. He writes by his plot. So, I found that at a certain point I could not stop reading and had to see what the ending was going to be. And no hints here. Of course not. A advanced copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.
    more
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Lazarus Prophecy is the first book that I have read by F.G. Cottam although he is popular among my book friends. Now I can certainly see why. It is an accurate description to call this a supernatural crime story but it is much more than that. The Lazarus Prophecy really elevates the form, like The Club Dumas did years ago. And it does it with fine writing, great characters, a horrifying villain, and a very intricate, laye I received an ARC copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Lazarus Prophecy is the first book that I have read by F.G. Cottam although he is popular among my book friends. Now I can certainly see why. It is an accurate description to call this a supernatural crime story but it is much more than that. The Lazarus Prophecy really elevates the form, like The Club Dumas did years ago. And it does it with fine writing, great characters, a horrifying villain, and a very intricate, layered plot that reaches back to the time of Christ. He also does it with tremendous description and sense of place. I had a strong sense of London (both present and 1880’s) and that mountain keep that houses the monks of the Order of , who we have never heard of but who nonetheless have literally saved the world many times over.Cottam begins by flipping back and forth between two story lines. The first is a really well done police procedural with the difference being that the killer is supernatural, although they don’t know that yet. The second story line deals with a secret order of monks living in a mountain keep. Ordained by St. Peter himself, they remain secret because if the general population knew of their existence and more importantly WHY they exist it would be too much. Sort of a “You can’t handle the truth” situation if ever there was one. They are accurately described as "God's gaolers." At this point in the novel I was impressed by how well Cottam handled both aspects—the crime story and the supernatural one. I think it is quite rare to be this versatile. John Connolly does it. So does Cottam. The plotting was especially well done. Slowly building tension to a climax and then, right near the end of the book (judging by the amount of chapters left) we suddenly are dropped down a rabbit hole into 1888 London. Distracting? Jarring? Not at all. It was my favorite part of the book. So go ahead and add a strong and equally well done historical aspect to the description of this novel. I went from really liking this book to loving it. And when we returned to present for what could be called “round 2’” Cottam has set up a no holds barred white knuckle ride to the finale.
    more
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    In London, DCI Jane Sullivan is involved in a string of murders which have just become public, after the perpetrator turned from killing high class call girls and turned his attention to a famous actress. On the border of France and Spain, a priory stands alone in a remote, mountainous region, charged with guarding an ancient prophecy. Half forgotten about, the Church – modern, forward looking, sceptical – find this ancient order an embarrassment and send Father James Cantrell to disband them. F In London, DCI Jane Sullivan is involved in a string of murders which have just become public, after the perpetrator turned from killing high class call girls and turned his attention to a famous actress. On the border of France and Spain, a priory stands alone in a remote, mountainous region, charged with guarding an ancient prophecy. Half forgotten about, the Church – modern, forward looking, sceptical – find this ancient order an embarrassment and send Father James Cantrell to disband them. Forced with abandoning their rituals at the same time the murders started, this seems to be a coincidence. Although, at this time, Jane Sullivan is unaware of these events, she doesn’t believe in coincidences...This is a riveting read – part crime novel, part supernatural story and with a link to the 1888 Jack the Ripper murders, which I found irresistible. At first, it seems the murderer is mimicking the Ripper murders, as he turns his attention to more and more high profile women. Jane Sullivan turns to Professor Jacob Prior, a theologian, for advice on what the strange words – in ancient languages – left at the scene mean. However, it is not only Sullivan who needs his help. Before long, Prior is embroiled in a fight against something much worse than a serial killer. Meanwhile, the killings are causing rising religious and political tensions, as fog descends on London. Throw in excellent characters – including a psychic ballet star, spies, odd religious orders, an intelligent and strong female lead and you have an excellent novel. I have enjoyed many of F G Cottam’s books, but this is certainly the best so far. Highly recommended. Lastly, I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review.
    more
  • Mj Huzefa
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first ever book review but here it goes. I wasn't even sure I was reading the same book as everyone else. Thrice during the read I came to the reviews to see if anyone else felt the way I did. Alas, I finished this book just because I couldn't live with myself knowing that I had left a book un-read.I'm not going to give details of the story but this was my second F.G Cottam book and I was beyond impressed by the first one and my expectations from this one were over the top. Unfortunat This is my first ever book review but here it goes. I wasn't even sure I was reading the same book as everyone else. Thrice during the read I came to the reviews to see if anyone else felt the way I did. Alas, I finished this book just because I couldn't live with myself knowing that I had left a book un-read.I'm not going to give details of the story but this was my second F.G Cottam book and I was beyond impressed by the first one and my expectations from this one were over the top. Unfortunately there was nothing in the whole book to keep me hooked. I just kept waiting page after page to see if it got any intriguing. From the first chapter we come to know who the villain is and although the way murders were performed were gruesome I didn't feel any sympathy for the victims at any level. It was as if there was absolutely no connection between the reader and the characters. The entire plot was weak, the middle somewhere reminded me of Dan Brown's DaVinci and other "read-alike" books and ending was unacceptably short and without climax. All in all, it was a thriller without the thrill.
    more
  • Bettie☯
    January 1, 1970
    (view spoiler)[Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)]
  • Frankie
    January 1, 1970
    I was very much looking forward to The Lazarus Prophecy, and the plot is quite promising: a serial killer on the loose in London who is being compared to Jack the Ripper, written clues left behind in languages two thousand years old, and a woman detective who is determined to catch him. This should be fun.There is a bit of fun, but it’s outweighed by tedium. We’re teased with what the Lazarus Prophecy could be for chapters, but it’s nothing shocking. Basically, Satan wants to take over the earth I was very much looking forward to The Lazarus Prophecy, and the plot is quite promising: a serial killer on the loose in London who is being compared to Jack the Ripper, written clues left behind in languages two thousand years old, and a woman detective who is determined to catch him. This should be fun.There is a bit of fun, but it’s outweighed by tedium. We’re teased with what the Lazarus Prophecy could be for chapters, but it’s nothing shocking. Basically, Satan wants to take over the earth. I’ve never been much for organized religion, but it was my impression that a belief in a literal devil means believing he literally wants to take over after the “having been cast down” part - so I don’t think I’m giving much away here. There’s also plenty to raise an ex-history major’s blood pressure. It’s starts off well, with a strong, brilliant female lead - but we know this because we are told (by her) that she’s a brilliant copper and great detective. She does nothing to show the reader why she and other characters constantly restate this.For instance, the first time we meet DC Jane Sullivan she’s come to an unsecured crime scene alone. No one apparently knows she’s there, and not till halfway through does she consider the killer could still be there … and her completely unarmed; his next victim if he is. It’s certainly not the first time the lead likes to go through a crime scene to get into the murderer’s head (see Red Dragon), but how hard would it have been to bring along a couple of uniforms to guard the door? It got me off to a rough spot with Jane, and is compounded that she never really does much throughout the book. If a character is supposed to be an example of a brilliant, strong woman I much prefer it if she behaves this way instead of the author telling the reader how awesome she is.The work and interpretation of the written clues left by the killer are interpreted for her by Jacob, an historian who intended to become a priest and is also very buff and handsome. I’d leave that out, except it seems to be mentioned every chapter. I love the idea of historians working with coppers to sort out the clues, but for all his language knowledge, Jacob doesn’t know his stuff. A connection is discovered to a monastery in the Pyrenees where the monks are still communicating with Morse code and Jacob thinks of the Titanic. Morse code was “still a novelty” in 1912 and the other ships hearing the Titanic’s distress signals were “famously unfamiliar with it.”Since Morse code was invented in the 1830s and was used throughout the 19th century for telegraphing, this is quite a bizarre statement. Everyone who heard the CQD/SOS that night understood the calls; it was just a matter of getting there in time.As mentioned, the serial murders are being compared to Jack the Ripper, and a religious angle is brought in. Jacob (hot off his Titanic musings) quickly concludes the murderer could not be a priest or ex-priest as Catholics revere Mary, and therefore all women; they would not be misogynists as this killer clearly is. Another pretty jaw-dropping statement, as revering Mary and female saints is quite different from having respect for regular human women. These strange historic opinions are juxtaposed with our knowledge of the characters being conveyed by a laundry list of their possessions; we’re told what they have, what they do, and how attractive and brilliant they are, how often they work out. What makes them tick and why they behave in certain ways is left out, other than Mr. Cottam needs them to do/say whatever to keep the plot perking along.It’s not all bad. Charlotte (an unwilling psychic) does have some interesting moments tracking the killer by picking up historic vibes from places the original Jack the Ripper visited. A good twist that Cottam used is that of Jack the Ripper being none of the myriad and endlessly debated suspects. However, that the killer has been sent by the devil himself to bring about a Hell Takeover falls kind of flat—having managed to murder a dozen or so people in over a century and getting locked up when he falls for the hero’s tricks, he’s quite inefficient as a basic serial killer, much less as the emissary to … ok, I’m not sure exactly how his spree killing is supposed to bring about the End of Days. There are vague hints the modern murders are supposed to start a religious war, but since that never happens he’s doomed to come off as sort of a Charles Manson figure: orchestrating murders to kick off The End, having it not work and being imprisoned.To top it off, the entire plot only works if you can believe that Catholic doctrine — and very conservative Catholic doctrine — is the one true religion that can save us all from a literal hell taking over. I just can’t buy it.In closing, the many biblical references got one verse in my head that could very well substitute rather cryptically for all the paragraphs above: John 11:39. “Lord, by this time he stinketh, for he hath been dead four days.”
    more
  • May Fungi From Yuggoth
    January 1, 1970
    Review: THE LAZARUS PROPHECY by F. G. COTTAMA high-minded, theologically-founded, literary horror tale, the sheer implacability of THE LAZARUS PROPHECY gave me chills not unlike those I experienced reading TURN OF THE SCREW as a youngster, so many decades past. One of its major themes is my "favorite" historical serial slaughterer, the Whitechapel killer of 1888 London. Here he receives an identity, and it's a very unfortunate one: nearly impossible to overcome or avoid (hence the implacability) Review: THE LAZARUS PROPHECY by F. G. COTTAMA high-minded, theologically-founded, literary horror tale, the sheer implacability of THE LAZARUS PROPHECY gave me chills not unlike those I experienced reading TURN OF THE SCREW as a youngster, so many decades past. One of its major themes is my "favorite" historical serial slaughterer, the Whitechapel killer of 1888 London. Here he receives an identity, and it's a very unfortunate one: nearly impossible to overcome or avoid (hence the implacability); and we are also introduced to a secret order of millennias-duration, isolated in.the high Pyrenees; Vatican politicos; and geopolitics spreading like a pond's ripples from the current dystopian political climate of.modern London in the wake of continued unspeakable atrocities.
    more
  • Sumeetha Manikandan
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this book after reading a glowing review in Goodreads. With a fantastic medley mix of history, gothic, blood and gore, the author keeps us turning the page until the very end.My ReviewRight from the first page, the author pulls the reader into the plot and holds us there until we have learned the mystery of the killer. Lone women, achievers, talented artists and accomplished personalities are being targeted by a savage killer who leaves no clues about himself at the crime scene. Dete I picked up this book after reading a glowing review in Goodreads. With a fantastic medley mix of history, gothic, blood and gore, the author keeps us turning the page until the very end.My ReviewRight from the first page, the author pulls the reader into the plot and holds us there until we have learned the mystery of the killer. Lone women, achievers, talented artists and accomplished personalities are being targeted by a savage killer who leaves no clues about himself at the crime scene. Detective Jane Sullivan is at her wit’s end and seeks the help of a priest to understand the arcane symbolism and the taunting words left by the killer.I like the way Cottam brings in the enduring mystery of Jack the Ripper’s identity to play in this book and gives it a all-new dimension. The theory behind Lazarus’s resurrection is very interesting and is utilized beautifully in this crime novel. This is a riveting read that would keep you turning page after page until you know the truth about this ruthless killer. I like the way the author has balanced the supernatural elements with the elements of crime novel to give us something unputdownable.
    more
  • Martin Belcher
    January 1, 1970
    Cottam has written another gem of thrilling fiction. Cleverly intricate and complex with addictive page turner qualities. It teases you page after page and sucks you in. DCI Jane Sullivan finds herself involved in a case of tracking down a killer in London. A celebrity female has been brutally murdered and dissected in her Central London flat. The killer has left notes scrawled on the walls in ancient text with a religious link. Why is there seemingly a link with the Victorian serial killer, Jac Cottam has written another gem of thrilling fiction. Cleverly intricate and complex with addictive page turner qualities. It teases you page after page and sucks you in. DCI Jane Sullivan finds herself involved in a case of tracking down a killer in London. A celebrity female has been brutally murdered and dissected in her Central London flat. The killer has left notes scrawled on the walls in ancient text with a religious link. Why is there seemingly a link with the Victorian serial killer, Jack the Ripper? Can Jane along with help from a theologian named Jacob Prior unscramble the messages and put together the clues to track down the killer before he kills again? The novel unwraps itself slowly and moves cleverly from character point of views and links in with the 1800's, the present day and a religious element.I absolutely loved this one, one of Cottam's finest to date. A beautifully conceived detective/ horror/ supernatural chiller of a novel. I found it difficult to put down and read it for hours without stopping, I felt involved and drawn in to the wonderful descriptions of the sometimes rawness and nasty underbelly of London. Brilliant and highly recommended. F.G. Cottam never disappoints.
    more
  • Leah Polcar
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed Cottam's latest. Wonderfully written with interesting characters and an intriguing plot. The mystery here is engaging and once again Cottam delights by presenting the supernatural as natural, though there was less cause to do that in The Lazarus Prophecy than in some of his other work. I deduct a point because, surprisingly for Cottam in my opinion, some situations/characters were just trite and/or superfluous. For example, a psychic is introduced that really seemed over the t I really enjoyed Cottam's latest. Wonderfully written with interesting characters and an intriguing plot. The mystery here is engaging and once again Cottam delights by presenting the supernatural as natural, though there was less cause to do that in The Lazarus Prophecy than in some of his other work. I deduct a point because, surprisingly for Cottam in my opinion, some situations/characters were just trite and/or superfluous. For example, a psychic is introduced that really seemed over the top -- it didn't necessarily detract from the story, but it seemed sort of unnecessary. While there were a few moments like this, my major complaint was that the story wasn't developed more so it would have lasted longer -- which is hardly a real complaint.
    more
  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, audiobook full review to follow soon.
  • John Wiltshire
    January 1, 1970
    I've read quite a few of this author's books and I highly recommend them to anyone who wants to discover something a bit different. This one had an extremely interesting premise at its core: that Lazarus not only came back from the dead, but that he brought a message from the Devil with him--a warning. Hearing this prophecy, Peter (Christ's rock, upon whom he built his Church) established a secret order of Brethren with the sole purpose of preventing this terrible prophecy from coming true. Cut I've read quite a few of this author's books and I highly recommend them to anyone who wants to discover something a bit different. This one had an extremely interesting premise at its core: that Lazarus not only came back from the dead, but that he brought a message from the Devil with him--a warning. Hearing this prophecy, Peter (Christ's rock, upon whom he built his Church) established a secret order of Brethren with the sole purpose of preventing this terrible prophecy from coming true. Cut to modern day, secular, world-weary Cardinal orders the rituals to be stopped and all hell breaks loose. All of this was superbly done in the novel. I wasn't quite so convinced with the working in of a modern-day serial killer story which in turn linked back to Jack the Ripper, as it seems to me there are better ways to bring about the end of the world than killing a few women. I heard the story the other day of "the man who saved the world", Colonel Stanislav Petrov. seems to me a flash of sun on a satellite lens would be a much better way to precipitate armageddon. That aside, this is an excellent read with some really great characters. Highly recommended.
    more
  • Nushki
    January 1, 1970
    Rounded up from 2.5. This was a creepy crime thriller, with fantasy aspects that I wasn't expecting. I quite liked main female DCI, she was a no bullshit kind of woman who got things done. I listened to the audio book instead of reading this and I regret it so much! I think I would have enjoyed this so much more if I read this instead. I don't understand how the voice actor could make this crime thriller sound so dry.
    more
  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    If we believe in the freedom to read, we must also accept that people can stop reading anything that makes them uncomfortable.Oh, no. The Internet is going to come after me with pitchforks and torches. People will screech, "But how will you learn??? You are prejudiced! How can you call yourself a librarian if you limit what you reeeeeaaad???" The Internet gets a little hysterical at times. Just a wee bit. In case you haven't noticed.I requested an ARC of F.G. Cottam's newest book, The Lazarus Pr If we believe in the freedom to read, we must also accept that people can stop reading anything that makes them uncomfortable.Oh, no. The Internet is going to come after me with pitchforks and torches. People will screech, "But how will you learn??? You are prejudiced! How can you call yourself a librarian if you limit what you reeeeeaaad???" The Internet gets a little hysterical at times. Just a wee bit. In case you haven't noticed.I requested an ARC of F.G. Cottam's newest book, The Lazarus Prophecy, because I've had Dark Echo (another book by Cottam) on my to-read list for a while. The summary for The Lazarus Prophecy intrigued me: a Jack the Ripper-esque serial killer stalks London, while DCI Jane Sullivan stalks him. His murders are horrifying, because they involve muliation and sacreligeous writings. Jane and the Yard enlist the help of a seminary dropout turned theologian named Jacob.Meanwhile, an ultra-modern emissary from the Vatican climbs up a mountain in the Pyrenees to confront an order cloistered there. They had received instructions from a cardinal in Rome to cease their rituals immediately, and the guard dog priest had been dispatched to ensure that the elderly men of the priory heeded the edict. He's exceedingly proud of his athletic prowess and pragmatism when it comes to spiritual matters. This guy is the worst houseguest ever. He just stomps in, yells at the elderly friars, takes their sacred text, climbs back down the mountain, and gets hit by a car.Now things started taking a turn for the truly bizarre, and I started feeling like this wasn't the book for me.The titular Lazarus Prophecy isn't some sort of metaphor (which I erringly assumed from the get-go). Nope, it's an actual prophecy (in the book) uttered by Lazarus. Yes, that Lazarus. Back-from-the-dead Lazarus. From the Bible. According to the brothers living in the Pyreneean priory, "Lazarus was a sinner, judged before the Almighty and found wanting. They believed the real miracle was that Lazarus was summoned back, not from death, but from hell. They believed he had learned something there of Satan's plans for humankind." Whoa whoa whoa. What?After Jesus' death, Lazarus goes to Peter (Saint Peter) and is very distressed by his "burden" of knowing what's going to happen. Peter, being a rather bang-up fellow, relieves him of this burden, absolves him of sin (?), and creates a Super Special Secret Society to deal with the threat relayed by Lazarus. This threat is that Satan, being rather bored down in Hell, is going to send demons to the Earth. The Super Special Secret Society basically just has to pray really hard and this keeps demons locked in the basement of their Super Strong Fortress. At this point, I just said no.I'm uncomfortable reading books about demons. Now, obviously this is a work of fiction, and it's not meant (at least, I don't think it is) to replace a person's religious beliefs. However, that aspect of the story really caught my attention and made me think. And when we got into the fact that there was an actual demon running around, I decided this wasn't something I wanted to read anymore. And okay, I cheated and skipped to the end, and it seemed pretty lame.Since I read an ARC and not the final copy, all of my quotes may be slightly different. But I did notice, too, that some of the writing was rather awkward. I expected this to be on par with Tana French and S.J. Bolton. I struggled through sentences like, "His cell was lit by votive candles in a metal holder from which wax palely drooled." How does something drool "palely"? Candles are by nature pale and this detail doesn't really need to be there. I also really loved this gem: "Even a renegade Jesuit would not naturally be misogynistic." Excuse. Me. Anyone can be a misogynist (not to encourage people or anything). I didn't realize that being a Jesuit automatically meant that you were incapable of being a misogynist. Neither did I find the characters particularly compelling, and you could totally see the romance coming a mile away. Jane Sullivan is the stereotypical successful-yet-socially-awkward-and-repressed woman. As far as I can tell, she hasn't any hobbies or close friends. But she is, of course, extremely sexy. Duh. You can't be a main character if you are not super-hot (authors try to get around this by making the character unaware that he or she is hot, but that doesn't fool me).All in all, I'd recommend it for fans of the author, and also people who don't mind reading about demons, but I'm not ashamed to say I just didn't feel comfortable (and really compelled) to finish.I received an ARC of this title from Netgalley.The full review of this book appears on my blog here.
    more
  • SoWrongItsRANDI {Bell, Book & Candle}
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from Net Galley and Bloomsbury Publishing in exchange for an honest reviewBell, Book & Candle | Lazarus Prophecy ReviewThe Lazarus Prophecy proves to be a thrilling ride for the reader. It features the Jack the Ripper legend with a supernatural twist, and is multi POV. I kept having heart palpitations and thinking who was next to be killed, every time the POV changed to a brand new character. As a detective murder-mystery, discovering the clues was pretty fun; in a non-m I received this ARC from Net Galley and Bloomsbury Publishing in exchange for an honest reviewBell, Book & Candle | Lazarus Prophecy ReviewThe Lazarus Prophecy proves to be a thrilling ride for the reader. It features the Jack the Ripper legend with a supernatural twist, and is multi POV. I kept having heart palpitations and thinking who was next to be killed, every time the POV changed to a brand new character. As a detective murder-mystery, discovering the clues was pretty fun; in a non-morbid way. The tie in with the Catholic priests and the new Ripper killings was out of this world. I definitely didn't see it coming. I liked the chemistry between Jacob and Jane; the banter was very playful and engaging. All throughout the story, I wasn't sure how the author was going to wrap it all up nice and neat; this is a demon they are dealing with after all, and this is not the show Supernatural. However the book ended pretty good. I really enjoyed it.
    more
  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a crime novel which comes into contact with religion/supernatural elements. It gives a fresh twist on an occasionally exhausted genre. The murders are gruesomely detailed, and the characters are fleshed out, regardless of how small their involvement with the plot was.I found myself gripped by the book. Despite the frequent changes in points of view, sometimes not naming the character until a few paragraphs in, I found I was able to discover who the character was based on their actio This book is a crime novel which comes into contact with religion/supernatural elements. It gives a fresh twist on an occasionally exhausted genre. The murders are gruesomely detailed, and the characters are fleshed out, regardless of how small their involvement with the plot was.I found myself gripped by the book. Despite the frequent changes in points of view, sometimes not naming the character until a few paragraphs in, I found I was able to discover who the character was based on their actions and mannerisms. This is a compliment to Cottam’s character development, as as a reader I frequently struggle to keep up with who is who in books.I loved this book. I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in crime, religion or the supernatural. It also features a strong female lead, and actually doesn’t contain a love storyline too, which is refreshing. This is such a gripping book.
    more
  • LocalPeanut
    January 1, 1970
    A riveting, diabolical page turner of a book – took me 3 days to read only because I had to go to bed and make a living to get more of Cottam’s books! Sadly, I had to stop reading, while I was walking the dog because I ran into a streetlight! Very embarrassing! Although this book is worth very lump on my head! Yeah, I know I can’t write anything that’s worth a damn! But F.G. Cottam can! I wish this book was longer but I might end up in hospital if it was! Maybe he can write about the other myste A riveting, diabolical page turner of a book – took me 3 days to read only because I had to go to bed and make a living to get more of Cottam’s books! Sadly, I had to stop reading, while I was walking the dog because I ran into a streetlight! Very embarrassing! Although this book is worth very lump on my head! Yeah, I know I can’t write anything that’s worth a damn! But F.G. Cottam can! I wish this book was longer but I might end up in hospital if it was! Maybe he can write about the other mysterious characters in this book like that Peter fellow or those monks on that mountaintop! To paraphrase a certain orphan with a craving for gruel: Please sir, we want some more!
    more
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    The Lazarus Prophecy is a character-driven supernatural thriller with characters so real I wanted to buy them all drinks at the end of the book. I especially like Cottam's smart, savvy detective, Jane Sullivan and a surprisingly striking minor character that has stayed with me days after the book was finished--An Irish boxer with a heart as strong and wit as quick as his fists and feet. I can safely say F.G. Cottam has become a one-click buy for me. His books always deliver thrills and chills an The Lazarus Prophecy is a character-driven supernatural thriller with characters so real I wanted to buy them all drinks at the end of the book. I especially like Cottam's smart, savvy detective, Jane Sullivan and a surprisingly striking minor character that has stayed with me days after the book was finished--An Irish boxer with a heart as strong and wit as quick as his fists and feet. I can safely say F.G. Cottam has become a one-click buy for me. His books always deliver thrills and chills and heart…three things I can't resist.
    more
  • Karma♥Bites ^.~
    January 1, 1970
    * ARC provided by author/publisher via NetGalley *Hmmm... What was bumping ’round in my mind the past few months that I ended up w/ several books w/ biblical tie-ins? *scratches head*ETA: Interesting concept melding certain biblical themes w/ the events surrounding Jack the Ripper. Very visual writing. But ultimately, not a completely engaging suspense/thriller for me, primarily due to large chunks of introspection & observations (some of which were unnecessary/irrelevant) dragging down over * ARC provided by author/publisher via NetGalley *Hmmm... What was bumping ’round in my mind the past few months that I ended up w/ several books w/ biblical tie-ins? *scratches head*ETA: Interesting concept melding certain biblical themes w/ the events surrounding Jack the Ripper. Very visual writing. But ultimately, not a completely engaging suspense/thriller for me, primarily due to large chunks of introspection & observations (some of which were unnecessary/irrelevant) dragging down overall pace/feel of read.Full review to come.
    more
  • Kim Switzer
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the story idea, and DCI Jane Sullivan was an interesting character. But the story was slow paced and quite flat. There was no ascending action. The descriptions often read like the proverbial laundry list, and there was too much of it in too many spots. The ending was also disappointing because the resolution relied on a stroke of luck rather than any actions by the protagonists. I really wanted to like this so much more than I did.
    more
  • Margo
    January 1, 1970
    Decent enough horror story in the good old fashioned sense of good vs evil. But - and this lost it a star in my rating - let down by the last chapter which was basically a sum-up of what the chatactors went on to do, and included some interesting add-ons the plot which were not explored in the novel. It felt like the author had great ideas but was rushing to meet a deadline.
    more
  • Sam Mlyniec
    January 1, 1970
    The Dan Brown comparison, the secret Templar-esque order, and the Jack the Ripper concept initially made me leery. Whatever misgivings I had were almost immediately dispelled. Cottam's skill at weaving the story together, despite some of its more hackneyed elements, is exceptional. It's a great thriller and definitely one of Cottam's best. I couldn't put it down.
    more
  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    really enjoyed this latest book is where jack the ripper meets horror in this crime thriller style book and the author doesn't disappoint with this plot of a copy cat style killer but is he and a fast paced storyline
  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    Oh man. This was pretty terrible. The full extent of its far fetched premise isn't really captured in the description, or I don't think I would have read it.
  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    Serial killer resembling Jack the Ripper,secret religious order I the Pyrenees,Satan,Couldn't put it down
  • J.F. Penn
    January 1, 1970
    An ancient priesthood protects a secret from the time of Christ and guard a prisoner linked to Jack the Ripper. Now that prisoner has escaped and London is terrorized by dark murder ...
  • miss.mesmerized mesmerized
    January 1, 1970
    Three prostitutes have already been killed in London. Since the police do not publish anything about the serial killer, he chooses a much more popular victim: the actress Julie Longmuir. Women do not feel secure anymore and Jane Sullivan, head of the investigation, and her team are under pressure. The parallels with Jack the Ripper are stunning, but of course, the Ripper has been dead for decades. Has he? At the same time in the French Pyrenees region. A couple of old monks try to keep a secret Three prostitutes have already been killed in London. Since the police do not publish anything about the serial killer, he chooses a much more popular victim: the actress Julie Longmuir. Women do not feel secure anymore and Jane Sullivan, head of the investigation, and her team are under pressure. The parallels with Jack the Ripper are stunning, but of course, the Ripper has been dead for decades. Has he? At the same time in the French Pyrenees region. A couple of old monks try to keep a secret and fulfil their sole task as a clandestine order, but there has been a major incident and now they have to face the consequences.F.G. Cottam’s thriller combines a murder story with religious aspects and paranormal elements. What I found most interesting were actually the killer’s message at the crime scene, his knowledge – there is a clear reason why they named him “The Scholar” – about ancient languages and the holy books. The cross references and allusions of course are not very singular, but I like these kind of books and I appreciated that not all is based on this but that we also have other interesting aspects in the novel. The protagonist, Jane Sullivan, is an interesting character. She is not the super hero but struggles with the case, sometimes close to giving up, but then again following her intuition and striving to solve this case. She is open for the paranormal and goes a road not often travelled in police work. Yet, this is also the point which left me not completely satisfied with the novel. I would have preferred a more down to earth solution for the case. In the novel’s development, it was all logic and stringent, but readers who are avid of mystical explanation will not really appreciate it.
    more
  • M. Sprouse
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first F. G. Cottam book, so I wasn't sure what I was getting. Surprisingly it drew me in from the very first, at times a mystery, at times a horror story, but in the end I'd call it a supernatural thriller. I kept expecting this book to ratchet down the suspense, but fortunately that didn't happen even during the conclusion, which can be hard to do. I had two minor complaints. First, Jacob's character was not developed fully. We even got to know the persona of Daniel Barry who was on This was my first F. G. Cottam book, so I wasn't sure what I was getting. Surprisingly it drew me in from the very first, at times a mystery, at times a horror story, but in the end I'd call it a supernatural thriller. I kept expecting this book to ratchet down the suspense, but fortunately that didn't happen even during the conclusion, which can be hard to do. I had two minor complaints. First, Jacob's character was not developed fully. We even got to know the persona of Daniel Barry who was only a character in a literary flashback better. My other peeve was that the ending on the floating casino seemed a bit rushed. I know endings on a suspenseful tale like this are hard to write. Overall, if you're in the mood for a supernatural thriller with historical and political overtones, this books for you.
    more
Write a review