Long Way Down
A cannon. A strap.A piece. A biscuit.A burner. A heater.A chopper. A gat.A hammerA toolfor RULEOr, you can call it a gun. That’s what fifteen-year-old Will has shoved in the back waistband of his jeans. See, his brother Shawn was just murdered. And Will knows the rules. No crying. No snitching. Revenge. That’s where Will’s now heading, with that gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, the gun that was his brother’s gun. He gets on the elevator, seventh floor, stoked. He knows who he’s after. Or does he? As the elevator stops on the sixth floor, on comes Buck. Buck, Will finds out, is who gave Shawn the gun before Will took the gun. Buck tells Will to check that the gun is even loaded. And that’s when Will sees that one bullet is missing. And the only one who could have fired Shawn’s gun was Shawn. Huh. Will didn’t know that Shawn had ever actually used his gun. Bigger huh. BUCK IS DEAD. But Buck’s in the elevator?Just as Will’s trying to think this through, the door to the next floor opens. A teenage girl gets on, waves away the smoke from Dead Buck’s cigarette. Will doesn’t know her, but she knew him. Knew. When they were eight. And stray bullets had cut through the playground, and Will had tried to cover her, but she was hit anyway, and so what she wants to know, on that fifth floor elevator stop, is, what if Will, Will with the gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, MISSES.And so it goes, the whole long way down, as the elevator stops on each floor, and at each stop someone connected to his brother gets on to give Will a piece to a bigger story than the one he thinks he knows. A story that might never know an END…if WILL gets off that elevator.

Long Way Down Details

TitleLong Way Down
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 24th, 2017
PublisherAtheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books
ISBN-139781481438254
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Poetry, Contemporary, Fiction, Realistic Fiction

Long Way Down Review

  • Jesse (JesseTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    wow wow wow wow i loved this so much. i've read several books written in verse now and this one was superior to all the ones i've read before. the characters were fleshed out so well and the story itself was engaging and rather suspenseful. i highly recommend this if you're looking to try a book written in this style.
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  • Kat O'Keeffe
    January 1, 1970
    a fast read (only took about an hour to get through) but still very powerful and impactful. jason reynolds has a way with words, and the free-verse format really suits his talents. i haven't read a ton of books in verse, but this is by far my favorite--the word choice, the imagery, the message, the emotional punch--it was all so good. the ending was a little abrupt, but i think it works for the story, and that bit of ambiguity can open up some really interesting discussions. definitely looking f a fast read (only took about an hour to get through) but still very powerful and impactful. jason reynolds has a way with words, and the free-verse format really suits his talents. i haven't read a ton of books in verse, but this is by far my favorite--the word choice, the imagery, the message, the emotional punch--it was all so good. the ending was a little abrupt, but i think it works for the story, and that bit of ambiguity can open up some really interesting discussions. definitely looking forward to reading more by reynolds!
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  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. A haunting cautionary tale delivered in verse, in which fifteen-year-old Will is forced to consider the potential consequences of his actions as he, armed with a gun and seeking revenge, waits for the elevator in his building to reach the ground floor. THEN THE YELLOW TAPEthat says DO NOT CROSSgets put up, and there's nothing left to do but go home. That tape lets people knowthat this is a murder scene, as Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. A haunting cautionary tale delivered in verse, in which fifteen-year-old Will is forced to consider the potential consequences of his actions as he, armed with a gun and seeking revenge, waits for the elevator in his building to reach the ground floor. THEN THE YELLOW TAPEthat says DO NOT CROSSgets put up, and there's nothing left to do but go home. That tape lets people knowthat this is a murder scene, as if we ain't already know that. The crowd backs its way into buildings and down blocksuntil nothing is left but the tape. Shawn was zipped into a bag and rolled away, his blood addedto the pavement galaxy ofbubblegum stars. The tape framed it like it was art. And the nextday, kids would play mummy with it.
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  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
    January 1, 1970
    If you're in a slump and you want a quick interesting read, I would totally recommend this book!It's all about the cycle of violence and written in verse. Really liked it!
  • Trin
    January 1, 1970
    Me on Page 1: Oh great, another novel in verse.Me on Page, like, 5: HOLY SHIT.Then I read the whole thing in one sitting.Incredibly powerful, beautifully written. Reynolds doesn't use the device of verse as a crutch; he wields it like a weapon. I think I held my breath for the entire book, and the ending left me gasping. Truly unforgettable.
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  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    Uncle Mark should’ve just bought his camera and shot his stupid movie after the first day. Unfortunately, he never shot anything ever again. But my father did. This was incredible. Not only is it so emotional and well-developed, but oh my god, the writing is so good.Ellen Hopkins’ use of verse and poetry is dead and Jason Reynolds killed it, personally, by himself. The double meanings alone are perfect. Jason Reynolds has a way with double meanings. Look at the top quote. A camera shoots. A man Uncle Mark should’ve just bought his camera and shot his stupid movie after the first day. Unfortunately, he never shot anything ever again. But my father did. This was incredible. Not only is it so emotional and well-developed, but oh my god, the writing is so good.Ellen Hopkins’ use of verse and poetry is dead and Jason Reynolds killed it, personally, by himself. The double meanings alone are perfect. Jason Reynolds has a way with double meanings. Look at the top quote. A camera shoots. A man can also shoot. I feel as if there’s not much else to say about a book that took me an hour to read. Perhaps that’s both the best and worst thing about this book. Although paced extremely well, it was such a quick read that I didn't have time to properly digest what I was reading. "ANOTHER THING ABOUT THE RULESThey weren't meant to be broken.They were meant for the brokento follow." But let’s be honest: this book is also a good read simply for being so necessary. The stories here need to be told. And they need to be told to teens who might be going through things like this. The verse format is a great way to spread messages that might not always get to certain teens. I'm sorry to keep mentioning this on reviews, but: I am so proud of how far we've gone.The coolest thing about this book to me, and something I don't think I really noticed until I saw my favorite booktuber's review, is that this book doesn't try to be about right and wrong. It's not that simple, and Jason Reynolds knows that. I think this book has a lot of layers that don't come through at first, but that kill you more and more the deeper you look.Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    240 pages67 seconds7 floors6 visitorsEach with a pieceof the storynot knownuntil now.Will grievinghis brotherwith a gunand a targetthinking he knowswhat he has to dofollowingThe Ruleswondering what to dowhoto beand what comes next.Jason Reynolds is masterful in the way he can use such sparse language in these free verse poems for such a powerful and emotional impact. I'm going to be talking about and sharing this book for a very long time. Jason's skill at putting words together that grab your h 240 pages67 seconds7 floors6 visitorsEach with a pieceof the storynot knownuntil now.Will grievinghis brotherwith a gunand a targetthinking he knowswhat he has to dofollowingThe Ruleswondering what to dowhoto beand what comes next.Jason Reynolds is masterful in the way he can use such sparse language in these free verse poems for such a powerful and emotional impact. I'm going to be talking about and sharing this book for a very long time. Jason's skill at putting words together that grab your heart and head, bringing you into the lives of his characters, kids just trying their best to do what's right and live the way they've been taught, astounds me. Long Way Down is no different. This book is going to have an impact. The type of impact that makes you question what you thought you knew and how life can be. This is a must-read and must-share in classrooms (7th & up), especially in those rooms where you have teens who are living Will's life with the rules he's been taught to life by.I can't wait to get my hands on a finished copy, to reread, sit with his words and turns of phrase, and find the spots that bear repeating to kids in our classrooms. I can picture the faces in my head of the former students I wish were still in my classroom so I could put this book right into their hands.
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  • C.G. Drews
    January 1, 1970
    This was so so emotional and brutal and just wow. I'm kind of torn with what to think though because I didn't really understand the ending?! I read it twice and I'm still not entirely sure what happened. MAYBE THIS IS JUST ME!??Anyway! It's a book about violence and murder and it's so freaking sad. Basically Will's brother Shawn was just shot and killed and Will gets his gun and goes out for revenge. But he gets in the elevator to go downstairs and shoot this guy...and the elevator just fills wi This was so so emotional and brutal and just wow. I'm kind of torn with what to think though because I didn't really understand the ending?! I read it twice and I'm still not entirely sure what happened. MAYBE THIS IS JUST ME!??Anyway! It's a book about violence and murder and it's so freaking sad. Basically Will's brother Shawn was just shot and killed and Will gets his gun and goes out for revenge. But he gets in the elevator to go downstairs and shoot this guy...and the elevator just fills with all these ghosts who've been shot throughout Will's life.Things to note:A) there are so so many ghosts in Will's life and this makes me so sad I justB) I just got really choked up when this girl steps into the elevator and Will remembers her from his childhood...they were two kids (8 I think??) playing at a playground and she literally got shot and died while his big brother tried to cover them with himselfC) I didn't think the book was preachy, but these ghosts were definitely sending Will the message that keeping the cycle of revenge-killing STOPS NOTHING and helps no oneD) I think it also really explained some of the reasoning behind why there's so much gang violence and shooting. This one focused on a black community, obviously, but there's so so many people who are just hurt and absolutely destroyed because someone they love was killed and the cycle goes on and on and on.DO YOU WANT A TISSUE? I THINK WE ALL WANT TISSUES THIS WAS SO SAD AND I THINK SENT A VERY IMPORTANT MESSAGE. Also the author's bio at the end was basically saying he's tired of kids feeling invisible and unseen and their pains ignored, but every time someone reads his books and feels SEEN and heard...then he becomes a little less tired. And this is so good. And I'm so glad there are authors like this here.I do have to admit though, some things kind of landed me in a bucket. Like I didn't understand the ending, AND the book is so shot. It's in verse, but it's like...wow a 30min read?! And all I kept thinking is "this elevator is taking like one heck of a long time to get to the bottom and I would've just taken the stairs after the ghosts started getting in". But ahem. Shsuhshssh cait that's not the point.ANYWAY GO READ THIS IF YOU WANT TO BE REMINDED WHAT EMOTIONS ARE AND ALSO HAVE THEM MELT ALL OVER YOUR FACE.
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  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)
    January 1, 1970
    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/In case you haven’t heard, jasonwritesbooks(.com). More specifically, jasonwritesIMPORTANTbooks. Books that are RELEVANT and NOW and REAL and HEARTBREAKING. Books that make my non-book-lovin’ kid not fight me when it comes to reading. Books that give a voice to a population who so often is rendered voiceless. Books that when I muttered to myself on Sunday morning “what should I read next?” had said non-book-lovin’ kid running to his ba Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/In case you haven’t heard, jasonwritesbooks(.com). More specifically, jasonwritesIMPORTANTbooks. Books that are RELEVANT and NOW and REAL and HEARTBREAKING. Books that make my non-book-lovin’ kid not fight me when it comes to reading. Books that give a voice to a population who so often is rendered voiceless. Books that when I muttered to myself on Sunday morning “what should I read next?” had said non-book-lovin’ kid running to his backpack and returning with Long Way Down in hand and yelling “THIS!” A book that he finished on his own instead of the fifteen pages a night clip he is obligated to read. A book that I read in less than half an hour due to its written in verse format. A powerful book. An IMPORTANT book that will let children know this is not true as far as Jason Reynolds is concerned . . . . Every star. If Reynolds writes it we’ll read it.ORIGINAL "REVIEW"Because when your non-book-reading kid tells you that you HAVE to read this one right now you put your fluffy romance aside and listen to the boy.
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  • Laurie Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely genius writing & storytelling, plus so much heart it will drive you to your knees.
  • Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Such a fast and powerful read. Wow.
  • Korrina (OwlCrate)
    January 1, 1970
    That was incredibly powerful. I can’t wait to read more from this author.
  • Whitney Atkinson
    January 1, 1970
    I downloaded this intending on possibly getting to it sometime, but I opened it up out of curiosity and ended up reading the entire thing in about an hour. I don't have too much to say other than I think this is a really effective coming of age story about how violence and toxic masculinity affects so many young black teens. Reynolds writes really honestly and the directness of this is such a well-needed nudge in the side. My only issue is that I struggled with the plot of this book a bit becaus I downloaded this intending on possibly getting to it sometime, but I opened it up out of curiosity and ended up reading the entire thing in about an hour. I don't have too much to say other than I think this is a really effective coming of age story about how violence and toxic masculinity affects so many young black teens. Reynolds writes really honestly and the directness of this is such a well-needed nudge in the side. My only issue is that I struggled with the plot of this book a bit because I'm not a fan of books that require the suspension of disbelief, and this straddled that line throughout its duration. I understand the meaningfulness of the actions that occurred, but it's still just a personal preference.
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  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    January 1, 1970
    Really powerful and unputdownable.
  • Imane
    January 1, 1970
    “ANOTHER THING ABOUT THE RULESThey weren't meant to be broken.They were meant for the brokento follow.” ― Jason Reynolds, Long Way DownLong Way Down is a novel written in verse that tells the story of fifteen-year-old Will who seeks to venge his murdered brother Shawn. But as he takes the elevator down, with a gun tucked in his pants, it stops on each floor and a ghost from Will's past enters, all victims of gun violence, but will that be enough to change his mind ?This was a powerful and unique “ANOTHER THING ABOUT THE RULESThey weren't meant to be broken.They were meant for the brokento follow.” ― Jason Reynolds, Long Way DownLong Way Down is a novel written in verse that tells the story of fifteen-year-old Will who seeks to venge his murdered brother Shawn. But as he takes the elevator down, with a gun tucked in his pants, it stops on each floor and a ghost from Will's past enters, all victims of gun violence, but will that be enough to change his mind ?This was a powerful and unique book , but the reason I’m giving it 3 stars is because it somehow missed the mark for me. What had me was the ENDING! I was not expecting it at all and was a little bit annoyed.
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  • destiny ☠ howling libraries
    January 1, 1970
    “ANOTHER THING ABOUT THE RULES:They weren't meant to be broken.They were meant for the broken to follow.” I’ve always loved stories written in verse, so when I heard about this own-voice tale of the struggles that toxic masculinity and systemic racism place upon young black men, I was immediately interested. I wanted to focus on supporting as many new-to-me black authors as possible in February, and Jason Reynolds was at the very top of my list. This man has a writing voice that absolutely need “ANOTHER THING ABOUT THE RULES:They weren't meant to be broken.They were meant for the broken to follow.” I’ve always loved stories written in verse, so when I heard about this own-voice tale of the struggles that toxic masculinity and systemic racism place upon young black men, I was immediately interested. I wanted to focus on supporting as many new-to-me black authors as possible in February, and Jason Reynolds was at the very top of my list. This man has a writing voice that absolutely needs to be heard. “But if the blood inside you is on the inside of someone else,you never want to see it on the outside of them.” Will’s words are so haunting and broken; he’s lost his big brother, his hero, and now all he wants is to follow the rules – the rules that he’s been taught his whole life. The rules that say the only fair response to the wrongful death of a loved one… is revenge. Will knows his mission is probably going to leave him in the same state as his brother, but it’s all he’s equipped to do. It’s such a powerful metaphor for toxic masculinity and the ways in which it prevents boys and men from knowing how to cope with trauma in meaningful, productive ways – not through their own faults, but because they’re never been shown a better way. “Just remember, whenyou're walking in the nighttime,make sure the nighttimeain't walking into you.” My only complaint about this incredible little book, and the reason that I only gave it 4 stars, is that it was so short that it was incredibly difficult to connect to the story or characters. While the events were hard to stomach, things moved so quickly and with so little development or preamble that, by the time I felt attached to Will or his pain, I was turning the last few pages. I would’ve loved to have seen this story fleshed out a bit more; most of the pages have only 10-20 words printed on them, and I just think that, had this been written like most verse novels, where there was a solid paragraph or two per page, it would’ve carried the impact across so much better and would have meant that much more. That said, I still absolutely loved this book and cannot wait to see what Jason Reynolds releases next.You can find this review and more on my blog, or you can follow me on twitter, bookstagram, or facebook!
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  • Kassidy
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely powerful and important. I absolutely loved the poetry.
  • joey (thoughts and afterthoughts)
    January 1, 1970
    *incoherent screeching here*Is this one of the first verse books I've read? Yep. And damnit to hell because Long Way Down just set the bar pretty high for other poetry books. Speaking to the verse (and I don't know if all poetry is like this so I could be grossly misguided on this front), what I appreciated the most was how it read like a fully formed story stripped of frivolity where only the bare-bones -- the meat and potatoes -- of the story remained. It's almost wizardry how so much power ca *incoherent screeching here*Is this one of the first verse books I've read? Yep. And damnit to hell because Long Way Down just set the bar pretty high for other poetry books. Speaking to the verse (and I don't know if all poetry is like this so I could be grossly misguided on this front), what I appreciated the most was how it read like a fully formed story stripped of frivolity where only the bare-bones -- the meat and potatoes -- of the story remained. It's almost wizardry how so much power can come from such few words. This book is only 300+ pages, and in truth, will only take you an hour+ to read, but the dialogues summoned by this story speaks volumes to the social climate today.I'm honestly at a loss for words as to how to review this kind of book because is this really a fictional story? I mean, it may be, but Long Way Down is yesterday and today and tomorrow. That in itself is what makes this book important even if it doesn't offer any cookie cutter answers. And should it? I say nay.Although paced extremely well, it read so quick that I guess I didn't really have time to properly digest what I was reading as I just needed to know how it ended. That's completely on me though and shouldn't discount this story for the range of timely discussions it offers.And I actually don't know how to properly rate this so let's just go with mid 4's for now. Full review to come.
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  • Mariah
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book because it was suggested to me as a YA diversity book. I really enjoyed it. This book is written in a poetic form and is easy to follow. The main character is fifteen-year-old Will and he witnesses his brother Shawn get shot and killed. This makes will mad and he wants revenge so gets a gun and rides an elevator up to the seventh floor to kill his brother's murder. As the elevator travels upward it keeps stopping and new "ghosts" (people from his life that have passed away) get I read this book because it was suggested to me as a YA diversity book. I really enjoyed it. This book is written in a poetic form and is easy to follow. The main character is fifteen-year-old Will and he witnesses his brother Shawn get shot and killed. This makes will mad and he wants revenge so gets a gun and rides an elevator up to the seventh floor to kill his brother's murder. As the elevator travels upward it keeps stopping and new "ghosts" (people from his life that have passed away) get on. They all talk him through his choices and if killing his brother's murder is really such a good idea.I really enjoyed this book and suggest it to everyone!
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  • Colleen Fauchelle
    January 1, 1970
    I started this book 3 days ago. Wow this is a good story and it is written in verse which is a very efective way of telling it.Its about this boy who's brother is shot dead, his mother is heartbroken and he is out for revenge.He grabs the gun. Then he gets into the elevator to go down.He is following the rules that have been handed down from generation to generation, but what if the rules are wrong and all your left with is more heartache.As he goes down at each floor someone gets on that he has I started this book 3 days ago. Wow this is a good story and it is written in verse which is a very efective way of telling it.Its about this boy who's brother is shot dead, his mother is heartbroken and he is out for revenge.He grabs the gun. Then he gets into the elevator to go down.He is following the rules that have been handed down from generation to generation, but what if the rules are wrong and all your left with is more heartache.As he goes down at each floor someone gets on that he hasn't seen in a lifetime.They talk, they tell and in some ways they challenge.This is a story about truth, second chances and choice. An important book in a world full of heartbreak.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This book was absolutely phenomenal.The audiobook, which is narrated by Reynolds, was especially good. I often have trouble with books written in verse because I read them in my own voice, and that sh*t is NOT beautiful to listen to (sorry to everyone who watches my channel...). I'll also get hung up on which words to emphasize, the proper cadence of phrases, and trying to figure those things out takes me out of the book. Reynolds' narration solves those problems for me, plus it's just superb.Wh This book was absolutely phenomenal.The audiobook, which is narrated by Reynolds, was especially good. I often have trouble with books written in verse because I read them in my own voice, and that sh*t is NOT beautiful to listen to (sorry to everyone who watches my channel...). I'll also get hung up on which words to emphasize, the proper cadence of phrases, and trying to figure those things out takes me out of the book. Reynolds' narration solves those problems for me, plus it's just superb.While I can understand some people's issues with the brevity of this book (It took less than 2 hours to listen to the whole audiobook), I think it lends the story a sense of urgency. I had no issues with character development, or any of the other criticisms short books tend to get. In fact, I was impressed with how much development we got given the fact that the book is so short.This was a very visual, very sensory read. We follow Will as he rides down an elevator, on his way to exact revenge and kill his brother's murderer, and on each floor a new ghost join's Will, each of them victims of gun violence that he knows. It felt like a play to me, with these characters entering the "stage." In this case, the elevator provides an immediate metaphor--it's a steel box, a cage, alternately a coffin and a prison cell. As Will descends, it seems likely that he will end up in one or the other.Reynolds examines the impacts of gun violence in lower income, urban black communities, and how they're often cyclical in nature. He looks at each character with empathy, something so often denied to black people in America.It's a beautifully written, incredibly powerful book. 100000% recommend.
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  • Glitterbomb
    January 1, 1970
    This was outstanding.Written in verse, it was a deeply moving and disturbing read.The timeline is just 60 seconds long, the space of an elevator ride. Each floor representing a turning point, a course of events, that leads the main character, Will, to this moment in time.A short read, but brilliantly executed.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Short, but so powerful and thought-provoking. A must read IMO!The entire book is written in verse and covers the time span of 60 seconds, all starting with an elevator ride.Who gets on, and more importantly who gets off, is what makes this read so powerful.Storytelling at it's best!!
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  • Trina (Between Chapters)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm most definitely not the intended audience, so take my review with a grain of salt. I personally just find with every book in verse I read that it isn't a style that works well for me no matter how much I try it. I chose to listen to the audiobook, which the author himself reads and hearing him read it the way he intended was amazing. However, I was still left pondering this style because it left me a bit confused by the ending. Maybe I was reading too much into things, looking for structure I'm most definitely not the intended audience, so take my review with a grain of salt. I personally just find with every book in verse I read that it isn't a style that works well for me no matter how much I try it. I chose to listen to the audiobook, which the author himself reads and hearing him read it the way he intended was amazing. However, I was still left pondering this style because it left me a bit confused by the ending. Maybe I was reading too much into things, looking for structure that verse doesn't abide by, or maybe the audio format caused me to miss something.Nonetheless, I feel this is a raw and powerful story and would highly recommend it!Personal enjoyment: 3 starsAudiobook narration: 5 stars
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  • Haley
    January 1, 1970
    You coming?
  • Maria (Big City Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    *Disclaimer: An ARC of Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds was provided to me by Simon & Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way.--Initial post reading thoughts:This is one of those stories that will stay with you forever. Even though it was a super quick read, it was completely engaging and I'll definitely be thinking about this one for a long time. The story is so uniquely written and it hits you hard. Loved it!--What I LikedThe pacing. This *Disclaimer: An ARC of Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds was provided to me by Simon & Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way.--Initial post reading thoughts:This is one of those stories that will stay with you forever. Even though it was a super quick read, it was completely engaging and I'll definitely be thinking about this one for a long time. The story is so uniquely written and it hits you hard. Loved it!--What I LikedThe pacing. This book probably took me a total of an hour and half to read. It was EXTREMELY fast paced and gripping. It was also written in prose which probably helped with how fast I was able to read this novel. The fast pace worked really well with the themes of the story and made it feel all the more realistic.The concept/execution. Long Way Down tells the story of a young boy named Will who has just lost his older brother due to gun violence. He decides to get revenge on the person he believes killed his brother and this novel takes place on the elevator ride down from his apartment to the ground floor. I LOVED this concept. To have a story take place literally within a few minutes is such an interesting and unique take on storytelling. To then have the elevator stop on every floor only to give Will time to think about what he is about to do. To think about everyone he knew that has been affected by gun violence. This concept was just so smart. As mentioned above, the pacing of this novel was extremely quick. This worked perfectly in making me believe that this was all happening within just a few minutes.The realness. Long Way Down felt extremely realistic. It was so raw and heart wrenching and I just could not get enough of it. It hurts me to know that situations like the ones that were presented in this novel are all too real. That gun violence is so common and that someone, a teenager, could have so many experiences with it. Long Way Down does a fantastic job in making these issues known, but also in making sure that teens who read this novel realize how gun violence, and making one terrible decision, can change your life forever.--What I Didn’t LikeLoved it all. Clearly, I thought that this book was amazing. There really wasn’t anything that I didn’t like about it. It was real and raw and fast, but it hit you hard. Long Way Down is one of those books that will stay with you for a long time.--Overall, this book was fantastic. It’s such an important read that everyone should pick up. I absolutely loved it.
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  • Hamad
    January 1, 1970
    “And you knowit's weird to knowa person you don't knowand at the same timenot knowa person you know,you know?"-Will” Wow, this was beautiful and powerful.I believe this is the best book written in verse that I have read!!The core of the book is important and I went into it without high expectations but it surpassed those expectations anyway...Maybe not the best ending in the world but it was good nevertheless :)
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    ...I...I don't know if I can actually explain how absolutely amazing this book is. Just buy, read it.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Audiobook performed by author, Jason Reynolds. 1h 43 After reading The Hate U Give at the end of 2017, two educators told me that Jason Reynolds was a must. I feel so many words swimming around my mind after listening to the author himself present this beautiful story. But I am going to keep it really simple.READ. THIS. BOOK.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Holy. Flipping. Cannoli.Just read this book, guys. I don't have enough superlatives for it, but trust me.
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