Ein ganzes Leben
Als Andreas Egger in das Tal kommt, in dem er sein Leben verbringen wird, ist er vier Jahre alt, ungefähr – so genau weiß das keiner. Er wächst zu einem gestandenen Hilfsknecht heran und schließt sich als junger Mann einem Arbeitstrupp an, der eine der ersten Bergbahnen baut und mit der Elektrizität auch das Licht und den Lärm in das Tal bringt. Dann kommt der Tag, an dem Egger zum ersten Mal vor Marie steht, der Liebe seines Lebens, die er jedoch wieder verlieren wird. Erst viele Jahre später, als Egger seinen letzten Weg antritt, ist sie noch einmal bei ihm. Und er, über den die Zeit längst hinweggegangen ist, blickt mit Staunen auf die Jahre, die hinter ihm liegen.

Ein ganzes Leben Details

TitleEin ganzes Leben
Author
LanguageGerman
ReleaseJul 28th, 2014
PublisherHanser Berlin
ISBN-139783446246454
Rating
GenreFiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, European Literature, German Literature

Ein ganzes Leben Review

  • Ilse
    January 1, 1970
    A touch of Alpenglow“The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” – Ralph Waldo EmersonThe Austrian author Robert Seethaler gingerly depicts the austere life of a man, Andreas Egger, living and working in a remote alpine village where he has arrived in his early childhood as an orphan. He glances through Egger’s working life, his marriage and his encounters with social change A touch of Alpenglow“The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” – Ralph Waldo EmersonThe Austrian author Robert Seethaler gingerly depicts the austere life of a man, Andreas Egger, living and working in a remote alpine village where he has arrived in his early childhood as an orphan. He glances through Egger’s working life, his marriage and his encounters with social change and World History - war imprisonment and labour camp in the East. Modest and unassuming, Egger is a man of few words, a physically strong man of no distinction. Seethaler’s simple and collected narrative style excellently matches the serene sobriety of Egger’s life. Although the novel is written from Andreas Egger’s perspective, Seethaler makes it very clear that in his philosophy of life there is no place for haughty anthropocentrism. The world does not revolve around his protagonist and Egger is fully aware his life is futile and insignificant within the scope of the universe. He is at peace with what life is prepared to give him and does not frantically pursue happiness.(view spoiler)[(my curiosity lured me into reading a little about happiness these days, which brought me to the hilarious quote by Nietzsche that “Man does not strive for happiness; only the Englishman does that”, from the Twilights of the Idols, or, How to Philosophize with a Hammer, in his critique of Utilitarianism) (hide spoiler)]. The most lyrical passages consider the place of man in nature, man being in awe of the beauty and the power of Nature. Nature and especially the mountains are paramount in this novel, which perhaps expounds to some extent why this quiet novel about an unspectacular life has enchanted so many readers. In our times of environmental threats to our planet and complex demands of modern life, people probably come to treasure again the Romantic view on Nature as a place where one can go to reflect and contemplate the many questions of life, a place where one can find solace and happiness in its purity. In the mountains we find a place of exquisite beauty, where we can experience what John Ruskin called the 'endless perspicuity of space; the unfatigued veracity of eternal light', enabling us to get in touch with the Sublime. Mountaineering and hiking in mountainous landscapes induce humbleness and sharpens one’s consciousness of the small place we take in the universe. As Robert Macfarlane writes in Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination, his book about how mountains became such a preoccupation for the modern western imagination: Mountains return to us the priceless capacity for wonder which can so insensibly be leached away by modern existence, and they urge us to apply that wonder to our own everyday lives. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. (Caspar David Friedrich, Trees in the Moonlight, 1824) In a certain sense Seethaler has composed a present day variation on the beauteous and meditative 19th century German notion of Waldeinsamkeit , the untranslatable feeling of woodland solitude, of being alone in the woods and contemplating one’s existence, transposing this literary and musical motif from Romanticism to the awe-inspiring grandeur of the mountain scenery. Seethaler’s novel wonderfully connects with poems like Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Waldeinsamkeit, Karl Lemcke’s Ich saß zu deinen Füßen (put to music by Brahms in his lovely Lied In Waldeseinsamkeit, op. 85, no. 6), and Joseph Freiherr von Eichendorff’s In der Fremde , put to music by Robert Schumann, the ultimate composer of the Waldeinsamkeit, in his Liederkreis Op. 39. Just listen to Schumann’s Lied In a Distant Land – don’t even try not to weep. In der FremdeAus der Heimat hinter den Blitzen rot Da Kommen die Wolken her,Aber Vater und Mutter sind lange tot,Es kennt mich dort keiner mehr. Wie bald, ach wie bald kommt die stille Zeit,Da ruhe Ich auch, und über mir Rauscht die schöne Waldeinsamkeit, Und keiner kennt mich mehr hier. In a Distant LandFrom my homeland beyond the red flashes,That’s where the clouds come from,But my father and mother are long dead,And no one knows me there now.How soon, oh, how soon the quiet time will come,Then I will rest, too, and over meWill murmur the lovely forest solitude,And no one will know me here either.(translation by Celia Sgroi)The superbly lyrical nature imageries set aside, Seethaler doesn’t sentimentalize or glorify nature and the mountains like in Romanticism. Distinctly Romantic in his view on nature, there is no rebuking of modernising life or syrupy nostalgia about the ‘good old days’. Nature is indifferent towards man’s fate, and man is ‘a small but not unimportant cog in a gigantic machine called Progess’ – thoughts which can bring about melancholia at times, but doesn’t impede Egger in cherishing the mere pleasure of existing. Instead of dreaming of a grand and compelling life like the Romantic artist, there is the modern theme of the interpretation of the concept of the good life in absence of God. What really counts is that Egger has lived life to the fullest, and has reached a state of grace and a deep sense of fulfilment: Yet in truth he didn’t much care about the villager’s opinions or their outrage. to them he was just an old man who lived in a dugout, talked to himself, and crouched in a freezing cold mountain stream to wash every morning. As far as he was concerned, though, he had done all right, and thus had every reason to be content. He would be able to live well for quite some time from the money from his tour-guiding days; he had a roof over his head, slept in his own bed, and when he sat on his little stool outside the front door he could let his gaze wander until his eyes closed and his chin sank onto his chest. In his life he too, like all people, had harboured ideas and dreams. Some he had fulfilled for himself; some had been granted to him. Many things had remained out of reach, of barely had he reached them than they were torn from his hands again. But he was still here. However a simple life close to nature might look alluring, perhaps few of us would in the end feel at ease in Andreas Egger’s shoes and persist in his choice for a semi-hermit existence (before you think you would, dear reader, no cheating though, imagine an almost secluded life without books…).I honestly thank the publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux, NetGalley and Robert Seethaler for providing me with an ARC of this novel.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    Set in an Austrian mountain valley, Andreas Egger lives a simple existence. He is thoughtful, although his father was unkind to him, and he is kind and gentle. In his younger years, he worked farms, and then as modern conveniences began to approach even this small hidden valley, he worked in construction of cable cars to lure tourists. He loves and is loved in return. After his youth is gone, and after he’s once been rejected for service, he’s sent off to war. Endures hardships.Returning to the Set in an Austrian mountain valley, Andreas Egger lives a simple existence. He is thoughtful, although his father was unkind to him, and he is kind and gentle. In his younger years, he worked farms, and then as modern conveniences began to approach even this small hidden valley, he worked in construction of cable cars to lure tourists. He loves and is loved in return. After his youth is gone, and after he’s once been rejected for service, he’s sent off to war. Endures hardships.Returning to the valley after captivity, so much has changed. His world has changed, but also the world, his neighbors. The to and fro of the valley has changed and people are sequestered in their homes, watching this creation that came into being when he was who knows where, and these new lights, electricity! But, he’s safe. He’s in his valley. He appreciates his life as it is. The days pass, slowly in an almost spiritual reverence, although his veneration is for everything. The beauty of Nature, the gift of awakening each day, the gift of fatigue at the end of the day. The sense of having a purpose, even if he’s not quite sure what it is. He believes sharing his love of nature might be his purpose, and so he begins to act as a guide for tourists, and for a time, he is content. It feels as though this was written with great consideration for each word, each sentence. There’s nothing extraneous. There’s some joy, although his joy is without highs or lows, what we might view as contentment. He is appreciative of a kind word or deed sent his way, a gesture of the smallest kindness is noticed and appreciated. And so, this is his life, all these small moments that add up over time to become a life. Time passes slowly at first, but then it seems to pass like a boulder rolling down a hillside, picking up momentum as it approaches the end. Beautiful in its simplicity, atmospheric, lovely.Pub Date: 13 September 2016Many thanks to Farrar, Straus and Giroux, NetGalley and to the author, Robert Seethaler for providing me with an advanced copy
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  • بثينة العيسى
    January 1, 1970
    نصٌ آسر، وناعم، تنزلق على سطحهِ بسرعةٍ يمكن أن تخيفك أحيانًا. تشعر بأنه يقبض هشاشة الحياة بيدين حريريّتين، يجعل القصة تسيلُ ببساطة ويخيفك هذا التلاشي البطيء لحكايةٍ مثل هذه، لحياةٍ كاملة.
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  • İntellecta
    January 1, 1970
    Robert Seethaler can tell and write fantastically and his language is clear and beautiful. But why doesnt he look deep into his figure, why does he remain so strange and far away from his Protagonist Egger? Ive waited for a depth throughout his whole novel, but unfortunately it didnt happened. This book was highly praised and I had been looking forward to it, but sadly I expected too much. Because of this, I stopped reading the book after page seventy and started reading all over again to give t Robert Seethaler can tell and write fantastically and his language is clear and beautiful. But why doesn´t he look deep into his figure, why does he remain so strange and far away from his Protagonist Egger? I´ve waited for a depth throughout his whole novel, but unfortunately it didn´t happened. This book was highly praised and I had been looking forward to it, but sadly I expected too much. Because of this, I stopped reading the book after page seventy and started reading all over again to give the story a second chance, especially because I didn´t want to give justice to the author. Unfortunately it didn´t touch me again.
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  • Issa Deerbany
    January 1, 1970
    رواية رائعة عن التأقلم والإنجاز ، لست بحاجة الى الأموال والإمكانيات التكنولوجية لتحقيق إنجاز ما.فحياة بطل الرواية بكاملها والتي كانت في قربة صغيرة في جبال الآلب حيث الطبيعة القاسية، فقد نجا وتأقلم في طفولته القاسية وعمل وانجز ارضه وكوخه في وسط جبال الآلب الرائعة والجمال الساحر في وصف اروع من رائع لهذا الجمال ، الشتاء القاسي والربيع المزهر والصيف الأجمل وذوبان الجليد .شارك في إنجاز التلفريك وشق الطرق لتزحف المدنية البغيضة الى قريته. وشارك في الحرب وتأقلم معها، وتأقلم كأسير.وبفطرته اصبح دليلا سياح رواية رائعة عن التأقلم والإنجاز ، لست بحاجة الى الأموال والإمكانيات التكنولوجية لتحقيق إنجاز ما.فحياة بطل الرواية بكاملها والتي كانت في قربة صغيرة في جبال الآلب حيث الطبيعة القاسية، فقد نجا وتأقلم في طفولته القاسية وعمل وانجز ارضه وكوخه في وسط جبال الآلب الرائعة والجمال الساحر في وصف اروع من رائع لهذا الجمال ، الشتاء القاسي والربيع المزهر والصيف الأجمل وذوبان الجليد .شارك في إنجاز التلفريك وشق الطرق لتزحف المدنية البغيضة الى قريته. وشارك في الحرب وتأقلم معها، وتأقلم كأسير.وبفطرته اصبح دليلا سياحيا لمعرفته للطبيعة والجبال عن ظهر قلب.مات وهو راض عن نفسه وعن إنجازاته ومساهمته.رواية بأسلوب سلس وهاديء وبسيط
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  • Sidharth Vardhan
    January 1, 1970
    "Scars are like years, he said: one follows another and it’s all of them together that make a person who they are.""My thigh hurts a bit, but that’s all. Now the two of us can limp down to the valley side by side.’‘No,’ said Egger, and stood up. ‘Every one of us limps alone!' And that is what this book is. The story of a man limping through his life. His is a life that most of us lead. With a number of uneventful years between two eventful memories. The eventful itself being either something or "Scars are like years, he said: one follows another and it’s all of them together that make a person who they are.""My thigh hurts a bit, but that’s all. Now the two of us can limp down to the valley side by side.’‘No,’ said Egger, and stood up. ‘Every one of us limps alone!' And that is what this book is. The story of a man limping through his life. His is a life that most of us lead. With a number of uneventful years between two eventful memories. The eventful itself being either something ordinary yet powerful because it touches one personally - wars and accidents, loves and could-have-been-loves, deaths and marriages (the last one - childbirth doesn't occur in story) or something great but that only one experiences from far - like watching men first walk on moon.And, in between, one lives through years of solitude and work, of delusions and confusions of thinking about one's past - about what was and what could have been. Eggar, our protagonist doesn't succumb down to that third misery of 'what should have been' - and thus finds fulfilment and dignity even in his empty life. Not the life of Avengers or Harry Potter or Doctor Who. And in this case, he did not even have a family for long that he could love and feel loved, couldn't leave his neighborhood except for war and work, did not have the consolation of enjoying arts and books; yet Eggar is not complaining.
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  • فايز Ghazi
    January 1, 1970
    - رواية بسيطة عن انسان بسيط يتيم يصل لإحدى القرى الألبية، حيث يعيش ويعمل من دون كلل، من دون كلام. يمضي معظم عمره فيها متنقلاً من عمل لآخر عبر احداث صغيرة تخلو من الدهشة كما اعتدنا، حتى الأحداث التي ترآى انها ستكون مفصلية مرّت مرور الكرام!- شخصية "اندرياس إيجر" شخصية متواضعة وبسيطة (هو ليس بطل والعالم يدور من حوله!)، صلبة جسدياً، قليلة الكلام، تسير بالفطرة بهدوء ورصانة دونما تعقيدات كثيرة ذلك لان إيجر يتكيف مع ما تقدمه الطبيعة انكان عملاً، او حباً، او حرباً او موتاً فلا فرق!- الرواية رومانسية انط - رواية بسيطة عن انسان بسيط يتيم يصل لإحدى القرى الألبية، حيث يعيش ويعمل من دون كلل، من دون كلام. يمضي معظم عمره فيها متنقلاً من عمل لآخر عبر احداث صغيرة تخلو من الدهشة كما اعتدنا، حتى الأحداث التي ترآى انها ستكون مفصلية مرّت مرور الكرام!- شخصية "اندرياس إيجر" شخصية متواضعة وبسيطة (هو ليس بطل والعالم يدور من حوله!)، صلبة جسدياً، قليلة الكلام، تسير بالفطرة بهدوء ورصانة دونما تعقيدات كثيرة ذلك لان إيجر يتكيف مع ما تقدمه الطبيعة انكان عملاً، او حباً، او حرباً او موتاً فلا فرق!- الرواية رومانسية انطباعية، حيث تنقل للقارئ سكينة الجبال ونقاءها، وتحفزه لتلك الحياة الهادئة بعيداً عن الضوضاء وبين احضان الطبيعة الأم.
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  • Fionnuala
    January 1, 1970
    The title of Robert Seethaler’s novel is very eloquent - there is a whole life between the covers of this powerful little book. The life of the title is that of Andreas Egger, a quiet man whose name evokes ancient trees and remote valleys lying in the lee of mountains. The power in the story comes from Egger being at a complete remove from the modern world in spite of his being directly implicated in allowing the modern world, via cable cars, access the remote and ageless places he embodies not The title of Robert Seethaler’s novel is very eloquent - there is a whole life between the covers of this powerful little book. The life of the title is that of Andreas Egger, a quiet man whose name evokes ancient trees and remote valleys lying in the lee of mountains. The power in the story comes from Egger being at a complete remove from the modern world in spite of his being directly implicated in allowing the modern world, via cable cars, access the remote and ageless places he embodies not only in his name but in his entire being.
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  • Sherif Metwaly
    January 1, 1970
    واحدة من الروايات التي ما أن تفتح صفحتها الأولى حتى تغرق في عالمها بالكامل، رغم صغر حجمها إلا أنها حَوَت بين صفحاتها صراعًا عجيبًا وفريدًا بين برودة الشتاء ودفء الحب، وبين تأمل الطبيعة الجليدية وتأمل الذات المنطوية على نفسها تمضي حياة كاملة، هادئة، وبسيطة. مرت سنوات عُمر بطلها بسرعة الساعات التي قضيتها في قراءتها فارتجفت كأنها سنوات عمري وقد هربت مني دون أن أشعر، ثم اكتشفت في النهاية أني كنت هادئًا ومسترخيًا وأنا أقرأها كأني كنت أستمتع بنسمة ربيع خاطفة وآسرة توقف عندها الزمن للحظات، فخدّرت أعصاب واحدة من الروايات التي ما أن تفتح صفحتها الأولى حتى تغرق في عالمها بالكامل، رغم صغر حجمها إلا أنها حَوَت بين صفحاتها صراعًا عجيبًا وفريدًا بين برودة الشتاء ودفء الحب، وبين تأمل الطبيعة الجليدية وتأمل الذات المنطوية على نفسها تمضي حياة كاملة، هادئة، وبسيطة. مرت سنوات عُمر بطلها بسرعة الساعات التي قضيتها في قراءتها فارتجفت كأنها سنوات عمري وقد هربت مني دون أن أشعر، ثم اكتشفت في النهاية أني كنت هادئًا ومسترخيًا وأنا أقرأها كأني كنت أستمتع بنسمة ربيع خاطفة وآسرة توقف عندها الزمن للحظات، فخدّرت أعصابي وأطربت قلبي بشكلٍ يصعب وصفه بالكلمات. تمت
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  • Mevsim Yenice
    January 1, 1970
    Bütün Bir Ömür Robert Seethaler ile ilk tanışmam. Man Booker Ödülü’nün finalistleri arasında yer almıştı ancak okumayı şu ana kadar beklettim. Bu hafta planlarımda Tütüncü Çırağını okumak olmasaydı daha da bekleyecekti ama iyi ki beklememiş. Sebebine gelince benim için çok kişisel olacak ama yine de paylaşmadan edemeyeceğim.Efendim şöyle ki, Bütün Bir Ömür’e başlamadan son okuduğum kitap “Büyülü Dağ” idi. Kendisini okurken en sevdiğim filmlerden biri olan “Youth” dan sahneler sürekli kafamda can Bütün Bir Ömür Robert Seethaler ile ilk tanışmam. Man Booker Ödülü’nün finalistleri arasında yer almıştı ancak okumayı şu ana kadar beklettim. Bu hafta planlarımda Tütüncü Çırağını okumak olmasaydı daha da bekleyecekti ama iyi ki beklememiş. Sebebine gelince benim için çok kişisel olacak ama yine de paylaşmadan edemeyeceğim.Efendim şöyle ki, Bütün Bir Ömür’e başlamadan son okuduğum kitap “Büyülü Dağ” idi. Kendisini okurken en sevdiğim filmlerden biri olan “Youth” dan sahneler sürekli kafamda canlanmıştı ve hatta artırıp yönetmeni Sorrentino’nun kesinlikle Büyülü Dağ’dan etkilenerek bu filmi çektiğini düşünmüş, herkese de bunu savunmuştum. Neyse şimdi fark ettim ki, Robert Steehlar Youth’da oynamış. Acaba hangi roldeydi diye bir baktım, Luco Moroder imiş. Yani “dağcı” rolünde. Anımsadığım sahne şuydu filmden: Lena Ballinger(Rachel Weisz) ile konuşuyorlar. Youth’da otelde kalan ve sürekli küvetlerden çıkmayan ve küvetlerin içinde felsefi konuşma yapanlar için bir imada bulunuyor ve Lena’ya Küvetlerin Everest’ten daha tehlikeli olduğunu söylüyordu. Tıpkı Büyülü Dağ’da dönen sanatoryum sohbetleri gibi.Yani anlayacağınız şu anda Bütün Bir Ömür, Youth ve Büyülü Dağ sarmal halde zihnimde dolaşmakta. Edebiyatın en güzel yanı da bu sanırım. Bazen birbirine hiç uymayan puzzle parçalarını birbirine uydurması bazense bir bütünü tekrar birleştirmek için acımadan dağıtması.Neyse gelelim Bütün Bir Ömür’e. Dili sade ve çok akıcı. Betimlemeler sadelikle, neyi anlatmak için görevlendirildilerse, amacını aşmadan başarıyla işlerini bitirip sahneyi terk ediyorlar. Karakter Egger zihinde tertemiz canlanıyor. Hatta köşeleri hatları öyle net ki, coğrafyanın yaşanılanların bize uzaklığına rağmen Egger “bizden biri” oluyor.Yazar kısacık bir kitapta bütün bir ömrü anlatmayı vaat ediyor ve başta verdiği söz tutuyor. Kitapta Egger’ın bütün bir ömründeki kayıplar anlatılıyor ama alt katmanda doğanın da kayıpları var. Hatta bana yer yer doğa ve Egger’ın serüveni özdeşleşti gibi geldi. "Peki bütün bir ömürde sadece acılar ve kayıplar mı var?" sorusuna da kendimizce bir cevap bulduruyor Egger. "Eh öyle de diyebiliriz," diyor bana sorarsanız çünkü kitapta mutluluk anları kısacık ve sürekliliği yok. Tıpkı bizim de hayatlarımızda olduğu gibi.Benim kitapta en başarılı bulduğum kısım, yazarın kolaylıkla ajite ederek nakavt yumruğunu çakabileceği bizi bir anda yere sereceği çoğu yeri hiç çaktırmadan böğre, bele, ard arda yumruklar şeklinde ince çalışarak direncimizi yavaş yavaş çökerterek uzun zamana yayarak yapması oldu. ☺ Hemen ölmedik, Egger ile birlikte direndik. Kitabın ismini de öyle güzel bir anda çat diye karşımıza çıkardı ki, ben buna benzer bir hazzı bir de Zambra okurken “Bonzai” nin çıktığı anda yaşamıştım. Uzun lafın kısası, kesinlikle okumanızı tavsiye ediyorum. Ve yorumuma son verirken, şuraya kitap hakkında Robert Seethaler ile yapılan bir söyleşiden bir parça bırakmak istiyorum çünkü bence kitabı ve yazarın duruşunu inanılmaz güzel özetliyor. Bayıldım!-Doğa kitabınızda önemli bir yere sahip. Soğuktan, kardan ölen karakterler… İlk sayfalarda Boynuzlu Hannes ölüm kendisine yaklaştıkça dağlara doğru kaçıyor. (Bu satırlar anında kedileri aklıma getirdi: Onlar da sanki ölüm yaklaşıyormuş gibi olduğunda karanlık ve ıssız yerlere koşar.) Sizce insanlar artık ait olmadıkları doğaya özlem mi duyuyor? Doğayla insan arasındaki ilişkiyi nasıl değerlendirirsiniz?İnsanların birçoğu için doğa yalnızca özlem duyulan bir yer olarak vardır. Bu yüzden doğayı yüceltmekten hoşlanırlar. Ama bu durumu duygusallaştırmaya gerek yok. Dağlar orada duruyor ve hiçbir şey istemiyor. Güzel oldukları kadar çirkinler. Biz onları nasıl görmek istiyorsak öyleler. Uzaktan bakıldığında ya da hayalde canlandırıldıklarında son derece güzeller. Ama onlara yaklaşınca hele bir de tırmanmaya kalkınca huzursuz, meşakkatli, sert, rüzgârlı, soğuk ve bazen tehlikeli olduklarından bu düşünce hızla değişiyor. Doğanın asıl anlamı her zaman bir imtihandır. Aynı sevgi gibi.-Peki kitapta bu imtihanı, ya da insanla doğanın çatışmasını mı okuyoruz?Doğanın duyguları yoktur. Çığ insanlardan intikam almak için köyü basmıyor. Bu olay yalnızca karların fizik kurallarını takip etmesi sonucu meydana geliyor. Zehirli bir yılan kötü olduğundan sokmuyor insanları. O bir yılan hepsi bu.-Kitabın kahramanı Egger, önce bacaklarını ardından evini ve eşini kaybediyor. Fakat tüm bu felaketlerden sonra tutumunda bir değişim görmüyoruz. Demek istediğim, bir dinî inanca yakınlaşmıyor ya da yüce bir motivasyona ihtiyaç duyuyor gibi görünmüyor. Tanrısız bir Eyüp gibi aslında. Yaşam motivasyonunu nereden buluyor? Platon’un, Phaidon’daki bir ifadesini hatırlıyorum: Bir şeyin kusurlu olarak algılanması için zihnimizde bir kusursuz tanımı olması gerekir. Egger’in kusursuz bir hayat arayışında olmayışını böyle bir tanıma sahip olmamasıyla bağdaştırabilir miyiz? Egger sıradan bir adam mıdır?İyi bir noktaya değindiniz. Daha doğrusu Platon iyi bir noktaya değinmiş. Açıkçası ben böyle bir çıkarım yapmadım. Ben ve kahramanım Egger bu tür şeyleri düşünemeyiz. Evet, Egger sıradan bir adam. Bunun yanı sıra insanın idealleri yaşamı sırasında değişir. Genç ve güçlü bir adamın idealleri bir hastalıkla ya da ölümle karşılaştığı anda değişebilir. Bir gencin ideali olimpiyat şampiyonu olmaktır, yaşlı birinin ise ertesi sabah yardıma ihtiyaç duymadan mutfağa gidebilmek.Söyleşinin bütünü için: http://t24.com.tr/k24/yazi/robert-see...
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  • Jan-Maat
    January 1, 1970
    I read this story in a morning, mostly before breakfast - it was filling enough even if not quite breakfast shaped.It is the story of a life almost from beginning up to the end, a life almost completely lived inside one mountain valley, almost without intimacy with any other person.The central character, Andreas Egger, spends most of his time in one place, doing a very limited range of manual work, his life is extremely basic on a material level - most of it he spends living in various hovels wi I read this story in a morning, mostly before breakfast - it was filling enough even if not quite breakfast shaped.It is the story of a life almost from beginning up to the end, a life almost completely lived inside one mountain valley, almost without intimacy with any other person.The central character, Andreas Egger, spends most of his time in one place, doing a very limited range of manual work, his life is extremely basic on a material level - most of it he spends living in various hovels with barely a stick of furniture, at one point in the story Egger is suddenly aware that it is a long time since his jacket was washed - we can wonder too how long it was since he had a wash himself.I wonder how far there is an element of parody to the story, we can read the valley as Austria, constricted, navel gazing, dependent on outsiders to be pushed into change, smelly, rather lonely. The story certainly is an ironic take on the ideal of Heimat, and I'll point out in passing that the Austrian Seethaler lives in Berlin - as far from the Austrian mountain valleys as you can get while remaining in the German speaking world. Family here is virtually irrelevant - an encumbrance. Faith in God is something that Egger is glad to have avoided. The valley and valley life become dependent on tourism but these outsiders are also just annoying the only incidents that stick in Egger's mind are incidents of their silly behaviour. Perhaps something has been smoothed over in translation but the valley does not have even a distinctive linguistic culture (view spoiler)[ Andreas himself is late to start talking, and one feels that he could have saved himself the bother of that struggle - this is a story about the unsaid and what is difficult for a person to express (hide spoiler)].Further everywhere that Egger lives is prison like, maybe because it actually is a prison camp or because he is subject to punitive and severe beatings or because he dwells in simple cells in self imposed solitary isolation. One grows into such a regime - see what happens to him when he leaves it late in life. Also we see him shy away from attempts by other people to get closer to him. The beaten child is the father of the isolated man as Wordsworth did not exactly observe.In some way the landscape, or the idea of the landscape stands in for character and any interior life. The mountain slope is majestic but dangerous, cable cars climb up it, but don't substantially change it's character. The soil beneath the mountain is stony, if you have the patience to clear it perhaps you can grow a few vegetables there, and that I felt was Andreas Egger (view spoiler)[ with potatoes growing behind his ears (hide spoiler)]. And that was the book too, there's not much to it, but from the right angle it certainly feels like a whole life. Lyrical and funny in places, a lesson in consistent understatement.
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  • ·Karen·
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely, dark and deep.A quiet, respectful tribute to a gentle life of stoic self-sufficiency. Sort of Austrian Stoner, I imagine, set not in academia but in a remote (fictional) mountain valley where Andreas Egger works first as a general farm hand, then on the construction of wondrous, novel beasts known as cable cars that bring the twin benefits of modernity: tourism and electricity. Call-up papers to fight in WW2 come as a surprise as he had been declared unfit for service back at the beginni Lovely, dark and deep.A quiet, respectful tribute to a gentle life of stoic self-sufficiency. Sort of Austrian Stoner, I imagine, set not in academia but in a remote (fictional) mountain valley where Andreas Egger works first as a general farm hand, then on the construction of wondrous, novel beasts known as cable cars that bring the twin benefits of modernity: tourism and electricity. Call-up papers to fight in WW2 come as a surprise as he had been declared unfit for service back at the beginning of the war. But when the young and fit have all been killed, even the lame are sent, not to return for years. Not to return at all, really, for the valley he finds his way back to from captivity in a Russian internment camp has changed beyond his imagination. Villagers sit in their brightly lit rooms, staring at strange moving images in the box in the corner. Strangers swoop down the snowy slopes on pieces of waxed wood in winter, and in summer get themselves lost. They need guidance. They need to stop chattering. Silence.
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  • Laysee
    January 1, 1970
    I love how books take me to new places. A Whole Life is set in an alpine village in Austria. I found it a treat to vicariously hike the mountains and take in the fresh air, sunshine, and wild flowers in the Austrian Alps. I also learned how arduous and treacherous life could be in the mountains, particularly in winter, during those years when there was no electricity, automobiles or cable cars, and modern amenities. The mountains can be "once so beautiful and so terrifying" at the same time. Abo I love how books take me to new places. A Whole Life is set in an alpine village in Austria. I found it a treat to vicariously hike the mountains and take in the fresh air, sunshine, and wild flowers in the Austrian Alps. I also learned how arduous and treacherous life could be in the mountains, particularly in winter, during those years when there was no electricity, automobiles or cable cars, and modern amenities. The mountains can be "once so beautiful and so terrifying" at the same time. Above all, I was moved by its portrayal of how life can be fully lived in spite of hardship, want, and loss.A Whole Life is a German best seller and the first of four books by Austrian writer, Robert Seethaler, to be translated into English. The translation by Charlotte Collins wonderfully captured the spare and quiet quality in Seethaler’s prose. The novel traces the life of Andreas Egger from the early 1900s to the 1970s. It is not a life any of us would want. Egger’s childhood is blighted by the loss of his mother and physical abuse from his foster father. He gets paid poorly as a laborer who does heavy wood-cutting jobs in the mountains and later as a cable-car maintenance worker, and finally as a mountain guide. A model employee, he takes pride in his work and regards himself as “a small but not unimportant cog in a gigantic machine called Progress." An avalanche killed his wife and left him with two broken legs. He also spends 8 years as a prisoner of war during WW2. It would have been easy to turn Egger’s life into an epic pity party. It would also have been tempting for Seethaler to write a sentimental story. Instead, Seethaler crafted an understated story about Egger eking out his existence, one day at a time. Not much happens but there is much to admire in Egger’s acceptance and contentment. He is a man of few words, a lonely outsider, a gentle and restrained soul who is grateful for small things. As long as "there is work and something to eat", he is content. In a letter he wrote to his deceased wife, Egger says, "…the only really bad thing is the cold…But I don't mean to complain. There are people lying still and cold in the snow and I am still looking at the stars." A Whole Life may not be everyone’s cup of tea. A nature lover will likely enjoy it. This strikes me as a book one may read in quiet contemplation, in a mountain retreat, perhaps. I left the Austrian mountains feeling a little wiser. Thank you, Mr. Seethaler.
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  • Tony
    January 1, 1970
    There seemed something bland about the title of this novella to me, although it sounds grander in the original German: Ein ganzes Leben. And a whole life, like an opera, has a lot of filler in between the arias. That phrase popped up three times in this story, by my count, but was put on display when the protagonist is about to be hired for a job, and the general manager tells him this:"You can buy a man's hours off him, you can steal his days from him, or you can rob him of his whole life, but There seemed something bland about the title of this novella to me, although it sounds grander in the original German: Ein ganzes Leben. And a whole life, like an opera, has a lot of filler in between the arias. That phrase popped up three times in this story, by my count, but was put on display when the protagonist is about to be hired for a job, and the general manager tells him this:"You can buy a man's hours off him, you can steal his days from him, or you can rob him of his whole life, but no one can take away from any man so much as a single moment. That's the way it is. Now leave me in peace!"Things happen in a whole life. Here, Andreas Egger lost hold of a dying goatherd, helped scar his mountains for a cable car, joined Hitler's army; he spooked at voices but did not mind the cold; he limped; he loved, and only once. Brutality, accident, modernity came, robbed him. He survived it all, moment by moment, by moment, by moment.
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  • ArturoBelano
    January 1, 1970
    Thomas Bernhard bir röportajında " yazdıklarımı okumak için Almanca bilmeniz gerekiyor, çevirilerimden mesul değilim" minvalinde bir şeyler demişti. Bütün Bir Ömür, sayfalarını bitirdiğim ama okumayı bitiremediğim bir kitap oldu benim için. Bu kitabı okurken 90'ların ilk yarısında Süleyman Nazif Lisesi kütüphanesinden aldığım o eski ve özensiz, çevirmeni meçhul onlarca kitap geçti gözümün önünden ki onların hiçbiri okundu ibaresiyle goodreads' de yer almıyor. Yayınevi, Türkçe'ye ve okura saygısı Thomas Bernhard bir röportajında " yazdıklarımı okumak için Almanca bilmeniz gerekiyor, çevirilerimden mesul değilim" minvalinde bir şeyler demişti. Bütün Bir Ömür, sayfalarını bitirdiğim ama okumayı bitiremediğim bir kitap oldu benim için. Bu kitabı okurken 90'ların ilk yarısında Süleyman Nazif Lisesi kütüphanesinden aldığım o eski ve özensiz, çevirmeni meçhul onlarca kitap geçti gözümün önünden ki onların hiçbiri okundu ibaresiyle goodreads' de yer almıyor. Yayınevi, Türkçe'ye ve okura saygısından ötürü bu kitabı raflardan kaldırmalı ve türkçe söyleyecek bir yazara çevirtmeli. Bu ürünü( kitabı değil) okuyamadığım için kimseye önermiyorum, bir tutam bal için arı kovanına çomak sokmanın hiç gereği yok.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5Then he said something that, although he didn’t understand it at the time, Egger was to remember all his life: ‘"You can buy a man's hours off him, you can steal his days from him, or you can rob him of his whole life, but no one can take away from any man so much as a single moment…’Whether the devastation wrought by Nature and Man has robbed Egger of his whole life is debatable, the devastating beauty and simplicity of the ending proves the truth of those single moments.
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  • Araz Goran
    January 1, 1970
    حكاية كاملة ، حكاية إنسان، ذكريات متبعثرة على هيئة ما يسمى حياة طويلة تبدو كومضة، كلمح البصر ، مواقف وأشخاص مبعثرون هنا وهناك ، لحظات من العزلة واخرى من الحرب، لحظات اللقاء الأول واللمسة الاولى والشغف الاول والبدايات، ذكريات تمثل الشق الحي من وجود الإنسان أثناء حضوره في هذا العالم ، وكأنه ضيف هامشي على مائدة عشاء ملكية .. تهزني من الأعماق مثل هذه الحكايات، حكايات الرجل البسيط ، الرجل صاحب الحياة الهادئة والمملة جداً، لا أنتظر هنا مغامرات كبيرة ولا ابطالاً، بل مجرد حياة وأشخاص في الواقع نراهم هنا حكاية كاملة ، حكاية إنسان، ذكريات متبعثرة على هيئة ما يسمى حياة طويلة تبدو كومضة، كلمح البصر ، مواقف وأشخاص مبعثرون هنا وهناك ، لحظات من العزلة واخرى من الحرب، لحظات اللقاء الأول واللمسة الاولى والشغف الاول والبدايات، ذكريات تمثل الشق الحي من وجود الإنسان أثناء حضوره في هذا العالم ، وكأنه ضيف هامشي على مائدة عشاء ملكية .. تهزني من الأعماق مثل هذه الحكايات، حكايات الرجل البسيط ، الرجل صاحب الحياة الهادئة والمملة جداً، لا أنتظر هنا مغامرات كبيرة ولا ابطالاً، بل مجرد حياة وأشخاص في الواقع نراهم هنا يتحركون على الورق يخرجون من بين الكلمات ليخبرونا، أن هؤلاء هم ابطال الحكايا الحقيقيون، الذين نسيهم البشر ولكن لم تنسهم حكايتهم ، تذكرت فجأة رواية (الإحساس بالنهاية) والتي يتشابه فيها الموضوع مع هذه الرواية والتي تسرد ايضاً حياة رجل يعيش أيامه الأخيرة في تساؤلات عن النهاية والخوف من الموت وعن الرغبة في معرفة الحياة عن طريق الذكريات المبعثرة ..على كل حال، يقدم لنا (زيتالر) هنا لوحة جميلة دافئة مفعمة برائحة الطبيعة والشتاء والعزلة والحب والبساطة والغربة، يقدم لنا الحرب والرعب والموت وأشياء أخرى تفيض بها الحياة بلا توقف، أبدع في رسم شخصياته، أسلوب سلس وحكاية أمتنعت في الدخول الى المتاهات السردية المعقدة، كتب لنا قصة حياة كاملة، إنها كاملة بكل ما فيها من بساطة وهدوء وعزلة ابدية ..
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    It is always interesting to see what books inflame the European imagination. This novel by the Austrian writer Robert Seethaler took Germany by storm, and was released in translation last year in the United States and Canada. It really is the story of Andreas Egger’s whole life, though it runs less than one hundred and fifty pages. The orphan Andreas Egger was given to a mean old relative, Hubert Kranzstocker, who crippled him in youth. Egger hardly ever spoke, but when he was eighteen he refuse It is always interesting to see what books inflame the European imagination. This novel by the Austrian writer Robert Seethaler took Germany by storm, and was released in translation last year in the United States and Canada. It really is the story of Andreas Egger’s whole life, though it runs less than one hundred and fifty pages. The orphan Andreas Egger was given to a mean old relative, Hubert Kranzstocker, who crippled him in youth. Egger hardly ever spoke, but when he was eighteen he refused to be beaten by the old man, “If you hit me, I’ll kill you,” he said in the time-honored way of abused youth everywhere.There is more, much more, but Andreas died in that village where he grew up. One February night the Cold Lady came for him. He did not resist. She looked like his wife, who was killed years before in an avalanche that also destroyed his house, his future child, and his dreams.Perhaps the metronome quality of the writing is what draws readers to this work. It is patient, unheroic, daily. Moments of grief and joy are told with the same tone of ordinariness that describe winning a job, losing a job, working a job. The step-by-step inevitability of the end calms us. Egger still had plans—greatly diminished plans—when the Cold Lady came for him:“…buy a couple of candles, seal the draughty crack in the window frame, dig a ditch in front of the hut, knee-deep and at least thirty centimeters wide, to divert meltwater…He was overcome by a feeling of warmth at the thought of his leg, that piece of rotten wood that had carried him through the world for so long.”He did not suffer.A life does not have to be loud to be meaningful. Egger was a strong and useful member of his society, and though he lived alone, he was not particularly lonely. “He had all he needed, and that was enough.” He talked to himself when he wanted to share a thought, and it gave him pleasure. Sometimes he laughed to himself…laughed until his eyes filled with tears.This novel has a very European feel to it, so unlike the kind of large and spectacular and verbose novels we have tended to lionize in America. And the language is so European, capitalizing at least partially on the setting: "Sometimes he would pass his old plot of land. Over the years scree had accumulated on the spot where once his house had stood, forming a sort of embankment. In summer white poppies glowed between the lumps of stone, and in winter the children jumped over it on their skis."I’ve looked everywhere I can think of to find interviews with Seethaler, and found one in German on youTube, which didn’t help me much. Picador promises us one on their website, but I couldn't find one. Seethaler is fifty years old, has written four previous novels, and occasionally works as an actor. The translation by Charlotte Collins seems particularly excellent to me.
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  • Hakan
    January 1, 1970
    hepsi 139 sayfa türkçede. uzun öykü mü, novella mı, kısa roman mı diye tartışılabilecekken yazar 139 sayfada bir “büyük roman” yaratmış.bir hayat hikayesi, içinde felaketler, içinde dünya savaşı ve tabii büyük küçük mutluluklar, acılar, kayıplar ve bir hayat süresinde değişen, başkalaşan dünya sığmış bu küçük kitaba. eksiği kalmadan, hatta fazlasıyla sığmış. 79 yıllık bir ömür, insan kendi hayatını nasıl düşünür ya da hatırlarsa yazar öyle anlatmış çünkü: kişiyi kendisi yapan büyük olaylar ya da hepsi 139 sayfa türkçede. uzun öykü mü, novella mı, kısa roman mı diye tartışılabilecekken yazar 139 sayfada bir “büyük roman” yaratmış.bir hayat hikayesi, içinde felaketler, içinde dünya savaşı ve tabii büyük küçük mutluluklar, acılar, kayıplar ve bir hayat süresinde değişen, başkalaşan dünya sığmış bu küçük kitaba. eksiği kalmadan, hatta fazlasıyla sığmış. 79 yıllık bir ömür, insan kendi hayatını nasıl düşünür ya da hatırlarsa yazar öyle anlatmış çünkü: kişiyi kendisi yapan büyük olaylar ya da hiç olaysız ama zamana anlamını ve ruhunu veren manzaralar, tablolar ve yılları tanımlayan, belirleyen anlar. bunlar da art arda gelişigüzel sıralanmamış, boşluk yaratacak her adım-her mesafe okurun tamamlayabileceği-anlamlandırabileceği bir alan olarak konumlanmış. olaylardan, manzaralardan, anlardan oluşan bir bütün var sonuçta, ki o bütün romanın asıl meselesi.savaşlar, felaketler olur, aşklar, mutluluklar, kayıplar, birçok şey yaşanır, birçok şey, birçok parça hayatını oluşturur insanın ama insan geride bıraktığı hayatı düşündüğünde bazen, bunların oluşturduğu ama bunların üstünde-ötesinde bir bütünü düşünür. bu bütün, bu romanın meselesi. bir yol alınmış, bir mesafe aşılmış, bir noktaya varılmıştır artık, hayatı oluşturan parçaların yeri, uzunluğu, ağırlığı değişmiş, zaman ölçüsünü şaşırmıştır, her şey birbirine karışmış da bir ömür oluşturmuştur. ömür, bütün bir ömür bu romanın meselesi ve sessizliği dinlemek, yağan karı seyretmek ve yürümek, soğukta ve soğuğa yürümek.
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  • Banushka
    January 1, 1970
    kuzey avrupalılar nasıl bu kadar etkileyici metinler yazabiliyor bilmiyorum. kısacık bir roman. son 1-2 yıldır zorlu doğa şartlarının biçimlendirdiği hayatlar üzerine yalın ama bir o kadar da güzel o kadar çok kitap okudum ki...çoğu da kuzey avrupadan. karşılaştırmaya gıcık olsam da kars gibi doğu karadeniz gibi hayatın zorlu olduğu yerlerden niye böyle romanlar çıkmaz diyorum kendi kendime... 70'lerin toplumcu romanlarından sonra kentleşmeyle belki, doğa -yapıcılığı ve yıkıcılığıyla- edebiyatım kuzey avrupalılar nasıl bu kadar etkileyici metinler yazabiliyor bilmiyorum. kısacık bir roman. son 1-2 yıldır zorlu doğa şartlarının biçimlendirdiği hayatlar üzerine yalın ama bir o kadar da güzel o kadar çok kitap okudum ki...çoğu da kuzey avrupadan. karşılaştırmaya gıcık olsam da kars gibi doğu karadeniz gibi hayatın zorlu olduğu yerlerden niye böyle romanlar çıkmaz diyorum kendi kendime... 70'lerin toplumcu romanlarından sonra kentleşmeyle belki, doğa -yapıcılığı ve yıkıcılığıyla- edebiyatımızdan çıktı sanki...
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  • Tugba
    January 1, 1970
    Kitabın kapağını kapatır kapatmaz sanki bir süredir izlediğim film sona ermiş, ışıklar kararmış ve Robert Seethaler'ı ayakta alkışlama zamanı gelmiş gibi hissettim. Olağanüstü yeteneğiyle 79 yıllık koca bir insan ömrünü en hatırlanası haliyle birkaç sayfaya sığdırabilmiş dahası vermek istediği mesajı hakkıyla okuyucusuna ulaştırabilmiştir.Yetim ve üstelik bir miktar da bedensel engeli (topallayarak yürüyor) olan bir çocuğun, Egger'in, hayatını konu alan hikaye, muhteşem bir kurguyla donatılmış. Kitabın kapağını kapatır kapatmaz sanki bir süredir izlediğim film sona ermiş, ışıklar kararmış ve Robert Seethaler'ı ayakta alkışlama zamanı gelmiş gibi hissettim. Olağanüstü yeteneğiyle 79 yıllık koca bir insan ömrünü en hatırlanası haliyle birkaç sayfaya sığdırabilmiş dahası vermek istediği mesajı hakkıyla okuyucusuna ulaştırabilmiştir.Yetim ve üstelik bir miktar da bedensel engeli (topallayarak yürüyor) olan bir çocuğun, Egger'in, hayatını konu alan hikaye, muhteşem bir kurguyla donatılmış. Egger'in hayatı boyunca yaşadığı zorluklar ve yaşamındaki eksik yanlar kronolojik bir düzende aktarılırken, yapılan muhteşem doğa tasvirleri ile ana karakterimizin olaylar karşısında hiç değişmeyen, kanaatkar kişiliği insanı adeta büyülüyor. Andreas Egger'in fiziksel engeline rağmen en zor işlerde çalışması, gönüllü olarak savaşa katılması, çok severek sahiplendiği kadını çığ düşmesi sonucu kaybetmesi gibi zorlu ve üzücü olaylara mutluluk duyduğu anlardan daha fazla yer veren bu yaşam hikayesi bizi oldukça anlamlı bir mesajla sona ulaştırıyor: Herkesten büyük ya da kusursuzca yaşanılan bir ömrün değil, sahip olduklarınla doyasıya, "keşke" demeden yaşadığın bir ömrün insanı gerçek mutluluk ve huzura kavuşturabileceğini anlatıyor. Hem mesajın kendisi hem de okuyucuya iletilme şekli açısından çok etkileyici bir kitap olduğunu söylemeliyim. Kitabın kendisi ile ilgili yorumum dışında bir yorum da Türkçe çevirisine gelecek. Ne yazık ki ben de çeviriyi başarısız bulanlardanım. Bu nedenle değerlendirmemden 1 yıldız düşürdüm. Sanki çeviri, Seethaler'ın ustaca kullandığı dili bize aktarırken daha bir basite indirgiyor dolayısıyla da kitabın okunmasını zorlaştırıyor gibi. Bu noktada kitabı Almanca aslından okuyan bir okurun aldığı hazzı alamıyoruz maalesef. Bunun dışında her daim elimizin altında, en yakınlamızda bir yerde bulundurmamız gereken bir kitap olduğunu düşünüyorum. Son olarak Egger'in yaşamını özetleyen, benim en etkilendiğim kısımı paylaşmak istiyorum:"Damga mürekkebinin bile bir kıymeti olmadığını düşündüğü doğum belgesine göre Egger yetmiş dokuz yaşındaydı. Kendisi için öngördüğü süreden daha uzun dayanmıştı ve genel olarak memnun olabilirdi. Çocukluğunu, savaşı ve çığı yaşamıştı. En pespaye işleri yapmakta hiçbir mahzur görmemişti, kayaları patlatarak sayısız delikler açmıştı ve belki de tüm kasabanın sobalarına yetecek kadar ağaç kesmişti. Çoğu zaman hayatı gökyüzü ile yeryüzü arasındaki ipe bağlı kalmıştı ve rehber olarak geçirdiği son yıllarında insanlar hakkında anlayabileceğinden daha fazlasını öğrenmişti. Bildiği kadarıyla kendini sorumlu addeceği bir suçu yoktu, dünyevi cazibelere, ayyaşlık, fuhuş ya da harislik batağına kapılmamıştı. bir ev inşa etmişti, sayısız yataklarda, ahırlarda, kamyon arkalarında ve hatta birkaç gece Rus yapımı bir tahta kasada uyumuştu. Sevmişti. Ve aşkın nelere kadir olabileceği konusunda fikir sahibi olmuştu. İnsanın aydaki yürüyüşünü görmüştü. Ve Tanrı'ya inanmaktan hiç çekinmemişti. Ölüm de onu korkutmuyordu. Nereden geldiğini hatırlayamadığı gibi nereye gideceğini de bilmiyordu. Ama aradaki süreye, bütün ömrüne hiç pişmanlık duymadan, yırtık bir gülüş ve müstesna bir hayranlıkla bakabilirdi. Andreas Egger bir şubat akşamı öldü." T.
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  • Sinem A.
    January 1, 1970
    iyi ki yazarın dili sade de çevirinin kötülüğü kitabın önüne geçmedi. birkaç yerde zorlasa da kitap buna rağmen akıcıydı.yazarın okuduğum ilk kitabı ve gerçekten çok sade ve güsel bir anlatımı var. okurken bazen izliyorum hissine kapıldım. İnsanın bütün bir ömür dediği şeyin doğayla bu kadar içiçe geçmesi, en merak ettiklerinin doğa tarafından kulağına fısıldanması ne kadar da güsel.
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  • Ludmilla
    January 1, 1970
    Çeviriyi çok beğenmedim, kötü değil ama aksayan yanlar var. Kitap ise şahane. Yılın -benim açımdan- ilk favorisi.
  • Antonomasia
    January 1, 1970
    [4.5] The opening pages transfixed me with a mountain rescue scene that could have as easily happened in the time of Ötzi as in the 1920s, involving a primally named goatherd, Horned Hannes. (Its only grounding in the second millennium CE is a single exclamation of "Jesus!", though I'm sure the people of 3000BC similarly swore by some deity of long-lost name.) As the story then flashed back to begin at the beginning of our hero, the writing turned somewhat pedestrian and clunky. Andreas Egger's [4.5] The opening pages transfixed me with a mountain rescue scene that could have as easily happened in the time of Ötzi as in the 1920s, involving a primally named goatherd, Horned Hannes. (Its only grounding in the second millennium CE is a single exclamation of "Jesus!", though I'm sure the people of 3000BC similarly swore by some deity of long-lost name.) As the story then flashed back to begin at the beginning of our hero, the writing turned somewhat pedestrian and clunky. Andreas Egger's early life is tough, its main feature severe beatings from his dead mother's farmer brother-in-law, who brought him up. This Austrian tyrant is far from Heidi's benevolent Swiss Alm-Uncle - but in a more general sense the scenario too closely resembles hundreds of other books, especially those written for older children of a few decades ago. When, as they said in those days, Andreas grows to man's estate, the book became a rarer beast: the contemporary novel of manual work, and of working class life that stays working class. And what a refreshing draught, as nearly all the fiction I've read in the last couple of months has been about writers, big readers or both. It also became clear that this was a book with its feet on the ground; beyond the first scene, there were few other intimations of outright mysticism beyond the working relationship of people with the land, and some stunning views. In the choice of Seethaler's novella for the Booker International longlist, I'm sure the influence of the 'new British nature writing' is at work; A Whole Life is 'just spiritual enough', fundamentally pragmatic, appreciative of beauty, simplicity and the psychological benefits of the outdoors, and is centred on an authentically rooted character that the middle-class, originally urban, authors of those nature books can never actually be, only respect and admire. This book has been compared to John Williams' Stoner, which if you read Anglo-American broadsheet book coverage over the last couple of years, you have probably heard enough about already. I haven't read Williams' whole novel, only extracts and many quotes in reviews: still, enough to form some sense of the style. And I can see what they are getting at, with the rhythms of many of Seethaler's paragraphs, especially those in which less happens - and labourer Andreas Egger feels like a more suitable subject for a novel of stoicism than a literature professor. Perhaps there is, nonetheless a similar personality. I recognise Egger as a type - albeit he has his own variations - and several of the people on which I base that recognition have academic talent alongside a willingness to take on work others shun and do it well, turn up at times when most wouldn't, and a romantic streak that seems counterintuitive at first, but coexists with these traits too often to seem merely coincidental. (I found myself wondering if instances of this sort of introverted, stoic, near-indestructibility will still exist among those who grew up on social media and on-demand everything - but such griping is merely a symptom and a privilege of near-middle-age.)Would I have enjoyed reading A Whole Life quite as much if, going in, I'd known more detail about what happens to Andreas Egger? I'm not sure, hence spoiler tags for the things I found it most interesting to hear about. (view spoiler)[Whilst some of the hardships involved in building cable car routes were similar to other building, or to mining, I'd never thought about the job of cleaning the actual cables once they were up and running. This might have been the first time I'd read about an avalanche in a book for adults - a strange experience, and makes one realise how sanitised and purely factual the accounts for children are. And it makes perfect sense that the German army would have sent Austrian mountain men to fight in the Caucasus - this is also handy plotwise as it means Egger is never involved in anything morally repugnant - but again, I'd never thought about it. I was so glad that when he was recruited as an impromptu guide by tourists, the author didn't take the cliche route and have them give him a fortune. I particularly appreciated his reinvention as a guide for the less athletic hiker: walking tours for the elderly, disabled and children, as one of the lines on his board. (The issue of his speaking only German and probably some Russian never appears as an obstacle to business.) Even at my best, my knees won't stand more than two or three hours' walk now, but y'know, I still like the walk, and it's just nice to be a recognised market in context with someone who may have some limitations, but is far from feeble. (hide spoiler)]I read most of A Whole Life directly after finishing the 2015 Independent Foreign Fiction prize winner, Jenny Erpenbeck's The End of Days; it wasn't a conscious decision to pair them, but in retrospect they matched excellently: the protagonists are near contemporaries and are in the same countries at the same time, twice. Both authors take a widescreen view of history, but Seethaler's is more subtle: Andreas Egger's life and consciousness is purely local, to an extent that almost none is now in Western Europe, but change shows up in his world from time to time: war, the growth of tourism, occasional glimpses of television and of changed gender roles. The Erpenbeck has many good points, but as yet another story about a writer, and concentrating on regions and experiences more frequently trodden in historical fiction (as found in the UK), it lacks something of this one's freshness.I grew to like this book more and more as it wore on, and welled up a couple of times in the second half. However, it's not one I can imagine many of my Goodreads friends enjoying; the writing is not spectacular in style, it's not a playful or fantastical story; when it's funny it's apparently unintentional, but in a way I found loveable. Some will find the British newspaper review pull-quotes unappealingly conservative in outlook, but the novel itself is not preachy. (Rather than as a recommendation for friends, I might mention it to someone considering book gifts for a retired relative.) It draws the reader into its world, and is, I think, easiest to appreciate immersively read in one or two goes. Consumed in small bits and pieces, it may seem less remarkable: individual quotes do not have the power I felt they had at time of reading and highlighting; the whole is more than... etc. etc. For 24 hours I was embarrassed to round up to five stars rather than down to four - but then I did, as a reflection of how I felt about the book rather than to mean "you should read this, it's amazing". ---One of the few other examples of a recent 'literary' novel concentrating on manual workers - that I know of: Site Works.And in case you're also interested in pre-Christian Alpine traditions which turned out to play no part in the book [and you are not likely to be freaked out by eerie masks and costumes]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Chr... , http://www.oberstdorf.de/kultur-tradi...---A couple of reviews I've seen since writing the above suggested that Egger shouldn't have been content with his lot. Which highlights the potentially political dimensions of the book. The conservative could see this as a story of their ideal hard-working, resilient bootstraps voter. Yet I think it's possible to appreciate the character from the other side too. I don't think the book argues that it is okay for parents and employers to treat people as they do the young Andreas. Regardless, bad things do happen and some people find ways to survive. It is a survival skill, a talent, even, to be happy with some things experienced whilst life is difficult and/or what we may call limited; it comes more naturally to some than to others - the temperament created by nature/nurture interaction varies more than is convenient for those who would like to think everyone in such circumstances should be happy or should be unhappy. It's obvious that Andreas is more physically robust than average and that this must be a matter of inheritance, environment and luck; he is not impervious to damage but able to continue usefully despite it. Psychologically he is just the same. These abilities are in their way as enviable as more obvious gifts and privileges. Also, most of our ancestors had lives with horizons similar to Egger's: I see this book as an illustration of how some people managed - whilst some must have been overwhelmed with frustration at not having more education, power, or money, others found ways to be content even whilst things weren't perfect. He also illustrates the small-c conservatism about change that such a life may engender. It's positive that Andreas is naturally not materialistic (and therefore does not need a lot of money). He takes his own path, caring little for social trends (view spoiler)[e.g. he never remarries (hide spoiler)]; as an old man in particular he doesn't give a fig what others think, c.f. the poem When I am an old woman I shall wear purple With a red hat that doesn't go.
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  • Ola Al-Najres
    January 1, 1970
    لم يكن باستطاعته أن يتذكر من أين أتىو في النهاية لم يكن يعرف إلى أين سيمضيلكنه كان يستطيع أن ينظر خلفه ، إلى الزمن الممتد بينهما ، و إلى حياته بلا أسف .. بضحكة مجلجلة .. و بذهول كبير لا مثيل له . بين يتم مبكر ، عجز ، ظلم ، جهد ، حب ، فقدان ، حرب ، أسر ، حاجة ، ألم ، وحدة .... يقضي أندرياس إيجر حياته ، حياة كاملة من المسرات البسيطة و اللحظات العصيبة و الأحداث التي تضرب جذورها عميقاّ في النفس ...حياة تثبت أن التأقلم و التماهي مع اللوحة أفضل ما قد يقدمه الإنسان لنفسه ، و أنّ غيابهمها يفرغ خزينته ا لم يكن باستطاعته أن يتذكر من أين أتىو في النهاية لم يكن يعرف إلى أين سيمضيلكنه كان يستطيع أن ينظر خلفه ، إلى الزمن الممتد بينهما ، و إلى حياته بلا أسف .. بضحكة مجلجلة .. و بذهول كبير لا مثيل له . بين يتم مبكر ، عجز ، ظلم ، جهد ، حب ، فقدان ، حرب ، أسر ، حاجة ، ألم ، وحدة .... يقضي أندرياس إيجر حياته ، حياة كاملة من المسرات البسيطة و اللحظات العصيبة و الأحداث التي تضرب جذورها عميقاّ في النفس ...حياة تثبت أن التأقلم و التماهي مع اللوحة أفضل ما قد يقدمه الإنسان لنفسه ، و أنّ غيابهمها يفرغ خزينته الحياتية مهما اجتهد في ملئها ..لعلّ أفضل ما قيل في الرواية هو هذه الجملة (هذه الرواية تجعلنا نقدر حيواتنا بشكلٍ أفضل مهما كانت توجهاتنا) .
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  • Sevgi K.
    January 1, 1970
    9/10 Yu Hua'nın Yaşamak romanı gibi insanı samimiyeti ile içine çeken, neredeyse gerçek olduğunu düşündüren bir hayat hikayesi...
  • Pınar
    January 1, 1970
    4/5
  • Diane Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    A quiet, contemplative story of one unremarkable man's life. From youth to old age in the Austrian Alps during the first 3/4 of the 20th century, we get Egger's simple tale of a life well-lived. Not for anyone who needs a plot or lots of action, but for me, being inside this man's head was a peaceful place to be.
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  • Afaf Ammar
    January 1, 1970
    الذكريات عجيبة، بحوافها الناعمة الملساء، ودروبها الوعرة المتعبة، وبنسماتها الربيعية، وعواصفها الثلجية، مهما حاولنا أن نفلت منها، لا تفلتنا هي أبدًا، كندف الثلج التي تلتصق بعناد برموشك، ومهما حاولت ابعادها تتجمع مرة أخرى. تعيد ترتيب الذهن تارة، وتتركه مضطربًا تارة أخرى. تجعل القلب دافئًا مرة، ومرة تتركه في انهيار جليدي. ولكن رغم كل شيء نعيش عليها ونستمر راضيين، حتى ولو كانت فتاتًا كفتات الخبز الذي تلتقطه العصافير. هذه الذكريات عاش عليها رجل بسيط وضعيف للغاية، ولكنه رغم كل شيء... رغم طفولة قاسية، الذكريات عجيبة، بحوافها الناعمة الملساء، ودروبها الوعرة المتعبة، وبنسماتها الربيعية، وعواصفها الثلجية، مهما حاولنا أن نفلت منها، لا تفلتنا هي أبدًا، كندف الثلج التي تلتصق بعناد برموشك، ومهما حاولت ابعادها تتجمع مرة أخرى. تعيد ترتيب الذهن تارة، وتتركه مضطربًا تارة أخرى. تجعل القلب دافئًا مرة، ومرة تتركه في انهيار جليدي. ولكن رغم كل شيء نعيش عليها ونستمر راضيين، حتى ولو كانت فتاتًا كفتات الخبز الذي تلتقطه العصافير. هذه الذكريات عاش عليها رجل بسيط وضعيف للغاية، ولكنه رغم كل شيء... رغم طفولة قاسية، وحرب باردة، وانهيار جليدي عاش مستقيمًا، وأمينًا، وصامدًا، وراضيًا، واستطاع أن ينجو بنفسه... مع ذكرياته عاش حياة شاقة وقاسية، ولكنه بها عاش حياة كاملة. رواية رقيقة ودافئة برغم قسوة وبرودة الألم فيها. 24.01.2019
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  • Heba
    January 1, 1970
    إلى أين ؟...حتى المحطة الأخيرة، أبعد من ذلك ليس ممكناً....ثمة لحظات فارقة في حياتنا هى بذاتها حياة كاملة تلك اللحظات التي عاشها "اندرياس إيجر" تقاسم شيء ما جميعها ألا وهو توقف قلبه لوهلة...لا تظن ان القلب يتوقف لحظة وقوعه فى الحب فحسب، لا ..بل عندما يداهمه الخوف والاحساس بالفقد، وعندما يخطو الخطوة الأولى في درب جديد من دروب الحياة..عندما تعي كونك وحيداً..، وعندما تحدث نفسك عما كانت الحياة ستؤول إليه وفقاً لأحلامك..أي لحظة من تلك اللحظات يمكن أن تعد بذاتها حياة كاملة..ما بالك لو ان بطلنا هاهنا ع إلى أين ؟...حتى المحطة الأخيرة، أبعد من ذلك ليس ممكناً....ثمة لحظات فارقة في حياتنا هى بذاتها حياة كاملة تلك اللحظات التي عاشها "اندرياس إيجر" تقاسم شيء ما جميعها ألا وهو توقف قلبه لوهلة...لا تظن ان القلب يتوقف لحظة وقوعه فى الحب فحسب، لا ..بل عندما يداهمه الخوف والاحساس بالفقد، وعندما يخطو الخطوة الأولى في درب جديد من دروب الحياة..عندما تعي كونك وحيداً..، وعندما تحدث نفسك عما كانت الحياة ستؤول إليه وفقاً لأحلامك..أي لحظة من تلك اللحظات يمكن أن تعد بذاتها حياة كاملة..ما بالك لو ان بطلنا هاهنا عايشها جميعها ، تراها حياة واحدة ام حيوات كاملة ؟!...
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