Resonant Leadership
The co-authors of "Primal Leadership" now provide an indispensable guide to overcoming the vicious cycle of stress, sacrifice, and dissonance that afflicts many leaders. "Resonant Leadership" offers the inspiration and tools to spark and sustain resonance in leaders and those who follow them.

Resonant Leadership Details

TitleResonant Leadership
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 1st, 2005
PublisherHarvard Business Review Press
ISBN-139781591395638
Rating
GenreLeadership, Business, Nonfiction, Self Help, Management

Resonant Leadership Review

  • Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    This was really quite an amazing book. It was so honest and addressed things that most business books don't talk about, compassion, hope and mindfulness. But this book is so much bigger than the title suggests. I had no idea I would love this book so much but this has quickly become one of the favorite leadership books I have read. Highly recommend.
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  • Hans
    January 1, 1970
    "Sharpen as you Saw" - Basically something straight out of Stephen Covey's "7 Habits of Highly Effective People". This book could have been titled "Leadership Burn Out: How to avoid it". It addresses the rise and fall of many leaders and how they arrive at the pinnacle of their ability through dedication and persistence, only to crash once they get there from mental and spiritual fatigue. The author calls this the self-sacrifice cycle that leaders get caught in and it happens because they aren't "Sharpen as you Saw" - Basically something straight out of Stephen Covey's "7 Habits of Highly Effective People". This book could have been titled "Leadership Burn Out: How to avoid it". It addresses the rise and fall of many leaders and how they arrive at the pinnacle of their ability through dedication and persistence, only to crash once they get there from mental and spiritual fatigue. The author calls this the self-sacrifice cycle that leaders get caught in and it happens because they aren't doing anything to rejuvenate themselves. They aren't taking time to pause, reflect and spend quality time caring for those they love. It seems contradictory since the recipe for their success was hard-work so one usually assumes that if they only work harder and harder they will achieve more and more but in fact they end up growing more irritable, losing clarity of thought, and lashing out emotionally more and more at those they work with as well as their loved ones.The vaccine against this pitfall is for leaders to make sure they set aside time for meditation/reflection, that they ponder and think out where they want to go and why, and that they take time to spend with those they love, this is how to refresh and revitalize their emotional and spiritual capacity to keep moving forward.
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  • Chelsea Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    Way too many exercises. Not enough organization or integration. This book (workbook) was exhausting, and certainly not meant for audio
  • Justin Jaeger
    January 1, 1970
    This is a self-help book for people in charge of things. I read it for a Leadership Effectiveness and Development course in my MBA program. The major issue I have with it is that its recommendations are vague and left without conclusion. To paraphrase, much of the book is about the need for leaders to de-stress with "renewal." Although, Boyatzis and McKee reiterate multiple times that your traditional happy places are not de-stressful enough if you are forced to endure a leader's "sacrifice synd This is a self-help book for people in charge of things. I read it for a Leadership Effectiveness and Development course in my MBA program. The major issue I have with it is that its recommendations are vague and left without conclusion. To paraphrase, much of the book is about the need for leaders to de-stress with "renewal." Although, Boyatzis and McKee reiterate multiple times that your traditional happy places are not de-stressful enough if you are forced to endure a leader's "sacrifice syndrome." They offer general concepts that can assist, but neglect the specificity that would satisfy their instruction to create regular and significant "renewal." The book details how stressed leaders are "dissonant" as opposed to "resonant." It's a great way to validate the need for days off and it also does its due diligence redefining leadership language into words of the authors' choosing. (Hence the quoted words in this review.) They tended to contradict themselves though, at one point saying exercise couldn't provide enough relief, but in another, describing a successfully resonant executive's regular running to be his specific meditative practice. I do want to rid myself of "dissonance" to be a "resonant leader." This book did not give me the tools necessary to get there, It only reminded me that if I don't chill out, I won't get better.
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  • sillimant
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this book is a good starting place to develop skills, goals, and self awareness to create balance and fight burnout. I liked the backing up of claims with data and research they did. I think some key themes are very valuable and it is worth reading to find the parts that help you think about balance in your own life. My critique is that there are many more corporate examples than everyday ones and I think it could benefit from adding more smaller scale local examples. This would help p I thought this book is a good starting place to develop skills, goals, and self awareness to create balance and fight burnout. I liked the backing up of claims with data and research they did. I think some key themes are very valuable and it is worth reading to find the parts that help you think about balance in your own life. My critique is that there are many more corporate examples than everyday ones and I think it could benefit from adding more smaller scale local examples. This would help people see themselves as leaders in more than just corporate settings.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Very helpful. This book explains that leaders need to build resonance within their teams, not dissonance. To foster one's ability to CONSISTENTLY maintain resonance & CONSISTENTLY be compassionate toward others, leaders must take care of themselves. It is so logical that leaders are lulled into sacrificing themselves for their jobs, goals, etc. However,that only leads to failure. In your leadership role, don't feel guilty about sharpening your own saw.
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  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    READ MAY 2010Practical take on emotional intelligence for traditional leaders. Best quote, "leaders who pay attention to the whole self--mind, body, heart, and spirit--can literally be quicker, smarter, happier, and more effective than those who focus too narrowly on short-term success" (p. 74).
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  • Alexander Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    This is really a self-help book with a good approach to renewing your professional life by thinking about your values, drifting from them, and returning to them with mindfulness, hope and compassion.I suppose there was a degree of self-deception on the part of the authors to present the book as a new management approach Resonant Leadership –leadership by being in tune to the feelings and personalities of the people of the enterprise, or applying emotional intelligence to leadership. Doubtless em This is really a self-help book with a good approach to renewing your professional life by thinking about your values, drifting from them, and returning to them with mindfulness, hope and compassion.I suppose there was a degree of self-deception on the part of the authors to present the book as a new management approach Resonant Leadership –leadership by being in tune to the feelings and personalities of the people of the enterprise, or applying emotional intelligence to leadership. Doubtless emotional intelligence is useful to leaders, but in accordance with Jeffrey Pfeffer (2015) Leadership BS, it is questionable whether fostering mindfulness, hope and compassion is a good leadership approach.The discussion on mindfulness is strongest as it is easier to grasp how self-awareness leads to insight on your emotions and decision drivers.Hope was not distinguished from positive psychology and the instances cited considered successes and did not include what must be many failed hopes. Optimism is important if you are to see and take advantage of opportunities and some degree of hope is needed to persevere in the face of failure. But is it really hope that causes recovery after disaster? Surely, it is survival instinct that drives victims of natural disasters to restore their homes, communities and lives?Being compassionate is part of being a good person and leading a good life. But is it necessary to be a good person to be a good leader? The book did not discuss this more interesting question but rather assumed it and supported it with gross extrapolations from medical psychology.Are organizations really healthier if mindfulness, hope and compassion are encouraged? Are not business enterprises fundamentally transactional, and therefore employees more effective when they fully understand the terms of their employment and the aims of the organization. In other words, being compassionate may be good for leaders, but compassionate actions may not be good leadership.
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  • Ryan Scicluna
    January 1, 1970
    It is a good book with very useful advice. The Examples and Theory sounds easy enough. In order to truly make use of such book one must practice being a leader. This book also includes exercies one can do to guage his leadership skills.Suggested Further Reading:Primal Leadership: Realising the Power of Emotional Intelligence Daniel GolemanThe NTL Handbook of Organizational Development and Change Annie McKee and Frans JohnstonWinning the Service Game Benjamin Schneider and David BowenA General Th It is a good book with very useful advice. The Examples and Theory sounds easy enough. In order to truly make use of such book one must practice being a leader. This book also includes exercies one can do to guage his leadership skills.Suggested Further Reading:Primal Leadership: Realising the Power of Emotional Intelligence Daniel GolemanThe NTL Handbook of Organizational Development and Change Annie McKee and Frans JohnstonWinning the Service Game Benjamin Schneider and David BowenA General Theory of Love Thomas LewisEmotional Contagion Elain HatfieldEmotion Inside Out Paul EkmanEmotions in the Workplace: Research, Theory and Practice Lyndall StrazdinsEmotions Revealed: Recognizing Faces and Feelings to Improve Communication and Emotional Life Paul EkmanDestructive Emotions: How Can We Overcome Them? A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama Daniel GolemanThe Competent Manager: A Model for Effective Performance Richard BoyatzisCompetence at Work: Models for Superior Performance Lyle Spencer Jr. And Signe SpencerPromoting Emotional Intelligence in Orginazations: Make Training in Emotional Intelligence Effective Cary Cherniss and Mitchel AdlerWorking with Emotional Intelligence Daniel GolemanThe Fifth Discipline Peter SegnePower in Management: How to understand, Acquire and Use It John KotterThe General Managers John KotterPower: The Inner Experience David McClellandLeadership in Organizations Gary A. YuklHuman Motivation David McClellandStrategy, Change and Defensive Routines Chris ArgyrisLosing Control: How and Why People Fail at Self-Regulation Roy BaumeisterWell-Being: The Foundation of Hedonic Psychology Robert SapolskyStress, Workload and Fatigue Peter HancockDepression: Clinical, Experimental and Theoretical Aspects Aaron BeckLearned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life Martin E. P. SeligmanAuthentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment Martin E. P. SeligmanManagerial Style as a Behavioural Predictor of Organizational Climate Stephen Kelner Jr.The Leadership Factor John KotterThe Human Spirit: Beyond Capitalism: A Quest for Purpose in the Modern World Charles HandyThe Psychology of Gratitude Robert EmmonsPositive Organizational Scholarship Kim CameronThe Life Cycle Completed: A Review Erik EriksonThe Seasons of a Man's Life Daniel LevinsonThe Seasons of a Woman's Life Daniel LevinsonCareer Dynamics: Matching Individual and Organization Needs Edgar ScheinNew Passages: Mapping Your Life Across Time Gail SheehyCareer Frontiers: New Concepts of Working Lives Maury PeiperlReclaming the Fire: How Successful People Can Overcome Burnout Steven BerglasThe Resilience Factor: How Changing the Way You Think Will Change Your Life for Good Karen ReivichDe Anima AristotleThe Art of Happiness Dalai LamaThe Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals Charles DarwinComing of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Wester Civilisation Margaret MeadThe Integration of Personality Carl JungNew Seeds of Contemplation Thomas MertonThe Nature of Human Value Milton RokeachThe Talent Management Handbook: Creating Prganizational Excellence by Identifying, Developing and Positioning High-Potnetial Talent Lance BergerThe Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Cary ChernissLearning that Lasts: Integrating Learning, Development and Performance in College and Beyond Marcia MentkowskiEmotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ for Character, Health and Lifelong Achievement Daniel GolemanVital Lies, Simple Truths: The Psychology of Self-Deception Daniel GolemanThe Wisdom of the Ego George E. VaillantThe Measurement of Emotional Intelligence Glenn GeherA Theory of Goal Setting and Task Performance Edwin LockeThe Career is Dead: Long Live the Career Douglas T. HallThe Power of Mindful Learning Ellen J. LangerMindfulness Ellen J. LangerFull Catastrophe Living: Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain and Illness Jon Kabat-ZinnWherever You Go There You Are: Minfulness Meditation in Everyday Life Jon Kabat-ZinnFive Archeteypes of Leadership Clint SidleThe Fourfold Way: Walking the Paths of the Warrior, Teacher, Healer and Visionary Angeles ArrienEmotional Alchemy: How the Mind Can Heal the Heart Tara Bennett-GolemanThe Success Syndrome: Hitting Bottom When You Reach the Top Steven BerglasThe Imposter Phenomenon: Overcoming the Fear That Haunts Your Success Pauline ClanceFeeling Like a Fraud Peggy McIntoshThe Anatomy of Hope: How People Prevail in the Face of Illness Jerome GroopmanWhy We Feel: The Science of Human Emotions Victor S. JohnstonThe Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal Jim LoehrHandbook of Positive Psychology Snyder and LopezFinding Our Way: Leadership for an Uncertain Time Margaret J. WeatleyLeadership and The New Science: Discovering Order in a Chaotic World Margaret J. WeatleyChaos: Making a New Science James GleickThe Set Up to Fail Syndrome Jean Francois ManzoniHelplessness: On Depression, Development and Death Martin E. P. SeligmanSelf-Efficacy, Adaptation and Adjustment MadduxWhat Should I do with My Life? Po BronsonThe Purpose-Driven Life Rick WarrenThe Plain Dealer Karen Sandstorm
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  • Colleen Marquis
    January 1, 1970
    I keep going back and reading and re-reading this book. I really like how it underscores that to be a leader you need to empathetic and to be empathetic you need to be rested and recharged - not over worked and blind to what's going on around you.
  • Brett
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fascinating read and brings together my interests in mindfulness, compassion and leadership. I will use the book's lessons to further my work and contributions to my community. The world seems wrought with dissonant leadership so I will aim to make positive, resonant change.
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  • Daria
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent balance of research and case studies to demonstrate the value of resonant leadership, the personal and professional costs of dissonance, and how to achieve/return to a state of resonance and maintain it long-term. I'll be recommending this book to my clients!
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  • Tyler Olson
    January 1, 1970
    A good read for any leader who seeks to be present and connected to those you are working with!
  • Christopher Chandler
    January 1, 1970
    From a business perspective these two authors discuss common characteristics of burnout and strategies for correcting those behaviors. Really practical read.
  • Moayad Taibah
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly believe that empathy is a key attribute that defines great leaders and what it takes to truly motivate and inspire the new generation of hard workers.Resonant leadership is a book about emotional intelligence as a core platform to competent leadership. It goes through 3 skills a resonant leader must have explaining how these skills effects oneself and others around him/her. It builds on the fundamentals of emotional intelligence and utilizes it in a professional context that include I thoroughly believe that empathy is a key attribute that defines great leaders and what it takes to truly motivate and inspire the new generation of hard workers.Resonant leadership is a book about emotional intelligence as a core platform to competent leadership. It goes through 3 skills a resonant leader must have explaining how these skills effects oneself and others around him/her. It builds on the fundamentals of emotional intelligence and utilizes it in a professional context that includes understanding one’s personal vision and competencies, and how they can be improved, having the compassion and empathy to understand that colleagues are undergoing personal challenges and are striving in their own way, and being equipped with hope that carries you and Those you lead towards the goal you want to achieve.As the authors were going through each of these three pillars (mindfulness - hope - compassion) they shared real life examples, based on consulting and research, of both types of leaders who were practicing resonance and/or dissonance and how it affected those they lead. Although I do take these sorts of examples at a grain of salt, they were logical and believable in the sense of how their actions lead to certain reactions from their subordinates and colleagues and how shifting one way or the other lead to their success.The narration of the book was good enough for what it is and maintained my attention at most times. Although I might end up getting a physical version as a reference and perhaps to do some of the exercises at the end of each chapter.All in all, this was a pretty good book in leadership. I found comfort in how it applied emotional intelligence practically instead of giving abstract notions and further clarifying it with examples from real life. So far this is my go to book whenever I’m recommending something on leadership.
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  • Reynaldo
    January 1, 1970
    Well written, combines theory with real cases and practical exercises/guides, because as Dr Boyatzis states, leadership is not about common sense but common practice. It covers leadership from a original perspective combining studies from different fields like : physiological , physiological , social science. Because as human beings leadership is not only about business it is about all aspects of life integrating body, mind , heart and spirit. Love it !
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  • Al Young
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting thought for a business book- How do leaders fight burnout? As with most business books, I don't think the objective is to give you the answers but to facilitate good discussion about the subject.I think that this generally does that. It's a subject that you don't always think about. it draws heavily on a few concepts you might already be aware of- Servant Leadership and What color is your Parachute? to name two. Important stuff, but again, nothing new.That said, I am hesitant to An interesting thought for a business book- How do leaders fight burnout? As with most business books, I don't think the objective is to give you the answers but to facilitate good discussion about the subject.I think that this generally does that. It's a subject that you don't always think about. it draws heavily on a few concepts you might already be aware of- Servant Leadership and What color is your Parachute? to name two. Important stuff, but again, nothing new.That said, I am hesitant to recommend this. It treads like a business book, but it also tries to be a business textbook, and a psychology/self-help book, the textbook elements drag the whole thing down. the self-discovery exercises may be helpful, but also take up a large portion of the book, giving you a smaller amount of material than you would expect from 300 pages.
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  • Angelique Scharine
    January 1, 1970
    This book really "resonated" with me. I want to reread it again in a year or so, as I think that it has some messages that I need to hear and re-hear. Probably the most important message is that you need to build relationships with other people, your family, your co-workers, etc. When stresses and crises occur, this is the time to rely on those relationships and attack problems head on. Many people fail when they withdraw and deny problems. Good leaders succeed because of how they work with othe This book really "resonated" with me. I want to reread it again in a year or so, as I think that it has some messages that I need to hear and re-hear. Probably the most important message is that you need to build relationships with other people, your family, your co-workers, etc. When stresses and crises occur, this is the time to rely on those relationships and attack problems head on. Many people fail when they withdraw and deny problems. Good leaders succeed because of how they work with others during this time. There is also a component of this that underscores the need to manage ones' health and relationships in all areas of one's life. Ignoring ones' family or self in a crisis will eventually bankrupt you emotionally.
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  • David Mullens
    January 1, 1970
    I love the concept of resonant leadership and decentralized leadership. The authors do an excellent job of describing what is required of resonant leaders. I plan on going back and spending more times with the themes, concepts, and exercises. This is a great book on leadership especially if you don't fall into the "command" mode of leadership. Those who want lead in a more open style focusing on mentoring and coaching may especially resonate with this book.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    This book offered a few more insights than some. The central premise is that effective leaders find ways to renew themselves mentally, physically, intellectually, and spiritually by their mindfulness of their own needs and those of others, their ability to remain optimistic and inspire hope, and the compassion they show for colleagues. The appendix contains some exercises readers can complete to learn more about their own leadership philosophies and styles.
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  • Bank
    January 1, 1970
    Very insightful book about leadership. And the kind of leaders we all wish we had , but rarely experience. : Coaching people for their development/ benefit as opposed to the organization's or the leader's benefit.Think of the people who helped you most in your life and career; the ones who you can say without this person , i would not be the person i am today. This book perhaps captures the magical quality of those people.
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  • Tom Buratovich
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very good book but one that is almost inaccessible to me. Not in the writing but the lofty achievements are left with the sense of how to become that kind of person. It is a little short on method. There are many things to do but little to get to do the rhythm of character change. It is very well written and very helpful.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I read this as part of a course on Coaching a Culture of Leadership at Case University in the Spring of 2006. The course and book were affirming of the many beliefs about leadership I had formed over 20 years. I searched for a course to help myself and others adopt a formal process of leadership development for a 21st century company.
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  • Crysta
    January 1, 1970
    Mindfulness, hope and compassion are important for leadership. Boyatzis explains the how and why extraordinarily thoroughly. Some of the exercises were helpful, while others seemed redundant. Overall, I appreciated the concept, but it could have been much more concise.
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  • Randall
    January 1, 1970
    A great follow up to Primal Leadership and a lot more practical, allows the reader to experiment with exercises in trying to develop leadership skills. Clear and concise, focuses more in why leaders fail and how to keep track, and less in the the Emotional Intelligence model like the previous book.
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  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    This book is probably fine; but it wasn't what I thought it was, it wasn't what I WANTED it to be, and it was generally "meh." There wasn't anything that I read here that I thought was surprising or even really compelling.
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this one. It gave such good examples on how to become a resonant leader. Renewal an important part of leadership especially when feeling as if you are sacrificing too much. Practice mindfulness , Hope and compassion.
  • ACRL
    January 1, 1970
    Read by ACRL Member of the Week Gerald Holmes. Learn more about Gerald on the ACRL Insider blog.
  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    not as good as primal leadership but good
  • Bjørn Peterson, PhD
    January 1, 1970
    Mindfulness, hope, and compassion are all of great interest to me. This book still lacks insight and depth for me.
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