The Bulletproof Diet
In his midtwenties, Dave Asprey was a successful Silicon Valley multimillionaire. He also weighed 300 pounds, despite the fact that he was doing what doctors recommended: eating 1,800 calories a day and working out 90 minutes a day, six times a week. When his excess fat started causing brain fog and food cravings sapped his energy and willpower, Asprey turned to the same hacking techniques that made his fortune to "hack" his own biology, investing more than $300,000 and 15 years to uncover what was hindering his energy, performance, appearance, and happiness. From private brain EEG facilities to remote monasteries in Tibet, through radioactive brain scans, blood chemistry work, nervous system testing, and more, he explored traditional and alternative technologies to reach his physical and mental prime. The result? The Bulletproof Diet, an anti-inflammatory program for hunger-free, rapid weight loss and peak performance. The Bulletproof Diet will challenge—and change—the way you think about weight loss and wellness. You will skip breakfast, stop counting calories, eat high levels of healthy saturated fat, work out and sleep less, and add smart supplements.In doing so, you'll gain energy, build lean muscle, and watch the pounds melt off. By ditching traditional "diet" thinking, Asprey went from being overweight and sick in his twenties to maintaining a 100-pound weight loss, increasing his IQ, and feeling better than ever in his forties. The Bulletproof Diet is your blueprint to a better life.

The Bulletproof Diet Details

TitleThe Bulletproof Diet
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 2nd, 2014
PublisherRodale Books
ISBN-139781623365189
Rating
GenreHealth, Nonfiction, Food and Drink, Food, Diets, Self Help, Nutrition

Readers also enjoyed


The Bulletproof Diet Review

  • Sean Liu
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to give this 2 stars but hey, I'm drinking the coffee so let's go for 3. Unfortunately, Asprey is extremely salesy and if you're not into used car salesman-types, he's going to make you very uncomfortable. He also loves to tout the benefits the Bulletproof Diet will have on your body as if it is going to shred you up with minimal exercise—I can promise you much of his fitness tips are misguided. Aside from dubious testimonials sprinkled throughout the book, he offers no numbers, I really wanted to give this 2 stars but hey, I'm drinking the coffee so let's go for 3. Unfortunately, Asprey is extremely salesy and if you're not into used car salesman-types, he's going to make you very uncomfortable. He also loves to tout the benefits the Bulletproof Diet will have on your body as if it is going to shred you up with minimal exercise—I can promise you much of his fitness tips are misguided. Aside from dubious testimonials sprinkled throughout the book, he offers no numbers, statistics, case studies, or evidence that his readers have dropped in body fat percentage OR gained muscle mass using his program. Bottom line: If you're looking for tips on physical training, look elsewhere. The pros is that Asprey has absolutely done his homework regarding mold toxins that typically go unrecognized as well as the benefits of healthy fats in the system (disappointed he didn't talk about ketosis even once, though).The net: Worth a read, but with a healthy amount of skepticism.
    more
  • Jeff Zapotoczny
    January 1, 1970
    My wife and I were interested in this to see if we could learn anything to augment the mostly primal/paleo way we've been eating the last few years. We picked up a few great ideas (mainly realizing we may have been eating too much protein and not enough saturated fat), but were mostly left disappointed.Dave Asprey is reaching very hard to brand every salable aspect of his lifestyle while simultaneously avoiding identifying it with the paleo/ancestral movements. He's not paleo, he's a "biohacker. My wife and I were interested in this to see if we could learn anything to augment the mostly primal/paleo way we've been eating the last few years. We picked up a few great ideas (mainly realizing we may have been eating too much protein and not enough saturated fat), but were mostly left disappointed.Dave Asprey is reaching very hard to brand every salable aspect of his lifestyle while simultaneously avoiding identifying it with the paleo/ancestral movements. He's not paleo, he's a "biohacker." Great. So every idea he has that he can possibly market becomes "Bulletproof X" or "Upgraded Y." Yuck. And the constant dropping of his geek hacker cred gets tiresome.Having let the contents of this book stew around in my head for a few weeks, I've got two unique and positive ideas left that I can say I picked up from reading it:1) It's possible to get the benefits of intermittent fasting and ketosis without outright starving via the "hack" that ingesting saturated fat alone doesn't cause the body to leave ketosis. This is cool, and actually seems to work. We've been doing the nothing-but-butter-coffee approach to breakfast and going about 15-18 hours a day without eating anything else and it really is causing fat loss without corresponding energy loss. I don't weigh myself but after only a week my not-sure-i-should-have-bought-them tight pants fit comfortably. I write code for a living and wouldn't take on a diet that leaves me foggy headed and this does not. In fact I feel wonderfully focused at work.2) Mold and other "toxins" may be serving as digestion or endocrine disruptors for you, depending upon your sensitivity. I've been well aware of the phytate/lectin issues with the grain family of foods but not so with the mycotoxins found in an apparent host of vegetables and spices. That said, I think he over exaggerates the importance of this point. The takeaway should be "test and see how you feel by removing and reintroducing these foods from your diet one at a time" but instead comes off as "you'd be crazy to keep eating mushrooms if you knew how TOXIC they are, but if you really can't live without them, test and see how tolerant you are!" I'm not going to stop eating onions and garlic because they land in his "suspect" group due to likelihood of mold contamination. My gut can handle some spores in the name of flavor.Which leads to the food. Dave Asprey says he does most of the cooking for his family and, if so, I feel sorry for them. His recipes are rather bland due to the fact that he likes pretty much only salt and turmeric as spices and avoids everything else that tastes interesting, whether due to mycotoxin sensitivity or other factors. Black pepper? Nope: toxic! We ate his recipes for 4 days and couldn't take it anymore: drowning everything in turmeric while otherwise leaving it flavorless, then coating it in butter and MCT oil was kind of...yuck. It seems quite possible to honor his basic approach to diet while eating much more flavorful recipes, which we immediately embarked upon.
    more
  • Annmarie (Annie) Kostyk
    January 1, 1970
    There are always naysayers. I also think it's a bad idea to skip breakfast. Being vegetarian twice in my life, I had to stop both times. Why? Deep depression, anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, and my skin looked old and crappy. Back on animal protein and a high good fat diet and I feel great again. AND... I lost quite a bit of weight, no inflammation and no puffiness. For vegans, sorry. Every vegan I know starts to look super unhealthy after some time. Even Pres Clinton's doc told him he needed There are always naysayers. I also think it's a bad idea to skip breakfast. Being vegetarian twice in my life, I had to stop both times. Why? Deep depression, anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, and my skin looked old and crappy. Back on animal protein and a high good fat diet and I feel great again. AND... I lost quite a bit of weight, no inflammation and no puffiness. For vegans, sorry. Every vegan I know starts to look super unhealthy after some time. Even Pres Clinton's doc told him he needed to get some animal protein back in his diet as his health was suffering from a vegan diet. Here's the thing. Besides the breakfast thing and the amount of MCT oil, I'm on board. Not everyone is the same, but people don't realize that your body treats fruit just like a Snickers bar. It's also very important for organic and pasture raised food. If you add sugars, alcohol and/or dessert items to this diet, yes, your bad cholesterol will go up. There's a reason for that. Interestingly enough, the foods he tells you to stay clear of are all the foods I tested a sensitivity to. Has to be something to it. Yes, I am allergic to mold.
    more
  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    Asprey's Bulletproof Diet is worth paying attention to.I've gone through several diets in my life. And just when I thought there was nothing better than Tim Ferriss' Slow-Carb diet mentioned in the 4-Hour Body, I came across Dave's work. That marked a significant moment in my approach to nutrition and health, and changed a lot of things in my life.Dave is an unusual wealth of information. He had his own struggles with nearly every health problem imaginable until he started hacking his health in Asprey's Bulletproof Diet is worth paying attention to.I've gone through several diets in my life. And just when I thought there was nothing better than Tim Ferriss' Slow-Carb diet mentioned in the 4-Hour Body, I came across Dave's work. That marked a significant moment in my approach to nutrition and health, and changed a lot of things in my life.Dave is an unusual wealth of information. He had his own struggles with nearly every health problem imaginable until he started hacking his health in his 20s. This guy has been everywhere from intense neurofeedback centers to Tibetan monasteries. His experience is unique, which is one of the main reasons this book is special.The Bulletproof Diet is reminiscent of many of the Paleo books out there. There's emphasis on healthy fats, grass-fed proteins, and a good amount of vegetables, but Asprey is also very concerned with the very real aspect of food contamination by mold toxins in particular. His damaged immune system is extremely sensitive to mold toxins, which forces him to remove certain foods from his diet, and why he has his own product line with specially produced coffees and other foods. These toxins have varying effects on everyone, and are linked to a wide array of health problems, including cancer. One of the reasons Paleo works is because it removes grains from the diet, which are a very high source of mold contamination. Getting toxins out of your diet can dramatically help you reduce inflammation and lose weight, even if you're not particularly sensitive.The backbone of the Bulletproof Diet is Bulletproof Coffee, a delicious, filling, high fat drink to be consumed in the morning. This curbs cravings, helps your body burn fat (literally, as well as ketones). Bulletproof Coffee alone is a powerful diet hack that helps followers of the Bulletproof Diet keep their willpower throughout the day. Honestly, a lot of diets out there are not realistic, and basically require good genes and an excessive amount of willpower, while not providing the calories to fuel that willpower. The Bulletproof Diet totally fixes this problem.This book is a great sit-down read, as well as a reference guide. There's a comprehensive index that covers many things that other diet books don't even get near. Also, topics such as exercise, sleep, and supplementation are covered extensively in their own chapters.My favorite section is Dave's killer refutations of the most common diet myths, not commonly covered in other books:1. If you're not losing weight, you're not trying hard enough2. You're not as hungry as you think you are3. A low-fat diet is healthy4. Eating fat will make you fat5. Cutting calories is the best way to lose weight6. Everything natural is good for you7. You have to work out a lot to lose weight8. Coffee is bad for you9. Salt is a hazardous substance10. Moderation is the key to success when dieting
    more
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    In many ways he is the George Foreman of the coffee drinking world. He sells coffee and sells it well, he's come up with one idea and is so proud of it he's put his brand on it. in every paragraph.The guy is a hack, a used car salesman. This book is an overloaded with broscience, celebrity endorsements and bulletproof branding, with little or no empirical data to back up its claims. He is selling the bulletproof brand and the dream of an upgraded lifestyle which can be obtained through his butte In many ways he is the George Foreman of the coffee drinking world. He sells coffee and sells it well, he's come up with one idea and is so proud of it he's put his brand on it. in every paragraph.The guy is a hack, a used car salesman. This book is an overloaded with broscience, celebrity endorsements and bulletproof branding, with little or no empirical data to back up its claims. He is selling the bulletproof brand and the dream of an upgraded lifestyle which can be obtained through his buttery mould free coffee, and his bland recipes.
    more
  • Lisamarie Landreth
    January 1, 1970
    Five-star reviews are reserved for books that are a life-changing, paradigm-shattering force to be reckoned with that I'm compelled to force on everyone I know. The Bulletproof Diet delivers on all counts. I started this book while in bed with terrible back pain because if pain is the truest roadmap to where God is working in our lives, somethings gotta give with my diet and exercise routine. Throughout the course of the next couple weeks I started incorporating minor Bulletproof principles and Five-star reviews are reserved for books that are a life-changing, paradigm-shattering force to be reckoned with that I'm compelled to force on everyone I know. The Bulletproof Diet delivers on all counts. I started this book while in bed with terrible back pain because if pain is the truest roadmap to where God is working in our lives, somethings gotta give with my diet and exercise routine. Throughout the course of the next couple weeks I started incorporating minor Bulletproof principles and wow, I'm a new woman. This book not only confirms principles I've known from my own experience that are frowned upon by pop-culture (and the food manufacturing conglomerates polluting our food supply) but also has the "missing links" to fuel my body so I can live fully, engaged, alive, and "bulletproof."
    more
  • Johnny
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve never been interested in health. I’ve tried a couple of fad diets in order to shed pounds quickly (often too quickly) and I’ve exercised myself into health problems on more than one occasion (particularly memorable was the ankle problem related to jogging and the heart symptoms related to cardio workouts). So, when a friend insisted that he was concerned about me and recommended this book, I was skeptical but purchased the book out of respect for the friend. The Bulletproof Diet isn’t so mu I’ve never been interested in health. I’ve tried a couple of fad diets in order to shed pounds quickly (often too quickly) and I’ve exercised myself into health problems on more than one occasion (particularly memorable was the ankle problem related to jogging and the heart symptoms related to cardio workouts). So, when a friend insisted that he was concerned about me and recommended this book, I was skeptical but purchased the book out of respect for the friend. The Bulletproof Diet isn’t so much a diet (though it has lots of dietary information, suggestions, and imperatives) as a wealth of body-hacking information. Combined with the exercise (careful exercise this time) under another friend’s tutelage, the information in this volume has given me new strength and energy. And that’s without making all the changes I need to make in order to conform more closely with this plan.Even if one only learns that coffee (not cheap coffee because of its potential for mold content) is good for you (especially when blended with butter from grass-fed cows and concentrated coconut oil), The Bulletproof Diet is well worth the price of admission. As for me, I was completely ignorant of the 2012 discovery that the glymphatic system (Loc. 1694) uses mitochondria in our brain cells to cleans cellular waste from those brain cells as we sleep (Loc. 1700). Ketones, in the bullet-proof diet stimulated by MCT oil, are an extremely efficient fuel for said mitochondria (Loc. 1704). Drinking the “bulletproof” coffee with MCT oil is an investment in better sleep and more efficient brain function.I also didn’t know that using MCT8 assured that ketosis would continue burning fats, even when used with carbohydrates (Loc. 1765). Otherwise, carbohydrates tend to tell the body that it doesn’t have to burn fat. Of course, one optimal way to burn fat is to use Audrey’s Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting (Loc. 4014) where the coffee is supplemented by two meals which need to be consumed in a six-hour window. Also, while some diets recommend tiny snacks in order to reduce the hunger pangs, this book recognizes that those tiny snacks may not pack a lot of calories or carbs, but they have a tendency to actually stimulate rather than satiate one’s appetite (Loc. 4022). The author tells us that snack-craving is a definite sign that he is doing something wrong (Loc. 4024).The Bulletproof Diet will stay in my Kindle library for a long, long time. I haven’t implemented much of what is in the book, but everything I have implemented has made measureable improvements in my quality of life. It has reduced my appetite, made me more alert, and given me a desire to exercise. Physically, I’m still a mess, but there is a bit of hope after reading this volume—some sections more than once.
    more
  • Eric Vance Walton
    January 1, 1970
    No matter how much I tried to silence it much of the nutritional advice given in this book made my psyche scream, "NO!". If I wouldn't have already been reading research supporting the amazing health benefits of grassfed butter and beef I probably wouldn't even have tried the diet. Disclaimer: I'm not drinking the bulletproof coffee but have introduced 2tbsp (sometimes more) grassfed butter into my breakfast and on my vegetables throughout the day and am eating more grassfed beef and other healt No matter how much I tried to silence it much of the nutritional advice given in this book made my psyche scream, "NO!". If I wouldn't have already been reading research supporting the amazing health benefits of grassfed butter and beef I probably wouldn't even have tried the diet. Disclaimer: I'm not drinking the bulletproof coffee but have introduced 2tbsp (sometimes more) grassfed butter into my breakfast and on my vegetables throughout the day and am eating more grassfed beef and other healthy fats.The author ranks fruits and veggies according to their overall healthfulness. He explains much of our produce is contaminated by myotoxins which cause health problems as well as brain fog. Much of the advice contradicts what modern (traditional) nutritionists are telling us. On the recommendation of the author I also started taking 2,000mg of vitamin D3 in the morning. All I can say is it sure seems to me like what we've been told is a healthy diet for the last 40 or more years (low fat, low cholesterol) is dead wrong and potentially harming us.Let me share you a little about my personal experience a few weeks into just loosely following the diet. I'm 43 years of age and not overweight but I've noticed my muscle tone is getting better, my shoulders are more broad and my waist is smaller. I'm sleeping more restfully than I have in decades and my mental acuity and recall have been greatly improved. I'm a writer by trade and my creativity has been off the charts. I could never follow this diet to the letter but can vouch at least for the short term benefits of what Mr. Asprey is teaching and plan on continuing to experiment with his nutritional philosophy. I'm going to get a physical soon and will be anxious to see how the diet has changed my blood readings. This book will give you lots things to consider and will improve the quality of your life.
    more
  • Sean Cameron
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book to be very informative. He gives away a one page PDF of the diet's principles for free which I have been using and feeling the benefits. Now the books out I could learn the story and science behind it all.People complain that he pushes his products but I feel he lays out what to get and how to get the right quality and offers his version. You can do it all without buyin his brand, it's just easy to buy his brand.I've only dabbled with the diet for a month for a meal or two each I found this book to be very informative. He gives away a one page PDF of the diet's principles for free which I have been using and feeling the benefits. Now the books out I could learn the story and science behind it all.People complain that he pushes his products but I feel he lays out what to get and how to get the right quality and offers his version. You can do it all without buyin his brand, it's just easy to buy his brand.I've only dabbled with the diet for a month for a meal or two each day and have been more productive than the last year. I believe this really is a performance enhancing diet.
    more
  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to "look and feel fabulous" they say. A little skeptic, but price drop to $1.99 on 5/4/17https://www.amazon.com/Bulletproof-Di...I've had this on my wish list since a PT I worked with suggested it to me for health reasons. The coffee part at least sounds good.
    more
  • John b Reno
    January 1, 1970
    Dave delivers againI have been listening to the bulletproof radio podcast since 2012. Since I started just basic changes that year I saw a huge difference in my athletic performance. I took this all the way to triathlon and full ironman distance with great results. I am now not training at all and maintaining my weight and lean mass (I actually look better than when just was exercising 10hrs a week) and excelling mentally since the past few weeks I have integrated bulletproof intermittent fastin Dave delivers againI have been listening to the bulletproof radio podcast since 2012. Since I started just basic changes that year I saw a huge difference in my athletic performance. I took this all the way to triathlon and full ironman distance with great results. I am now not training at all and maintaining my weight and lean mass (I actually look better than when just was exercising 10hrs a week) and excelling mentally since the past few weeks I have integrated bulletproof intermittent fasting. Wow, this book is great for me to give out when they ask me how I do what I do. I will be buying extra copies just for this reason. I feel I need to share the wealth! Highly highly recommend.
    more
  • Aj Warner
    January 1, 1970
    scares you straight First book I read on my new kindle. Could not put it down. Back on track after losing my way over the last 5 months and adding 20 pounds of weight and feeling brain fog again after 2 years of living awesome. Anyone and everyone should read the book and then make their own life decision after having more information to guide them.
    more
  • Doug
    January 1, 1970
    Since I followed the diet for a month, I thought I'd come back and revise my original review (in its entirety below)...as well as my rating (downgraded from a 4 to a 3). The diet is NOT the easiest, nor most palatable I've ever been on - one gets tired of a greasy mouth feel to almost everything ON the diet. That's the bad news... the GOOD is that I did lose a total of 12 lbs in 4 weeks - not bad. However, it ISN'T a diet I can realistically stay on until I lose all the weight I'd like to - so a Since I followed the diet for a month, I thought I'd come back and revise my original review (in its entirety below)...as well as my rating (downgraded from a 4 to a 3). The diet is NOT the easiest, nor most palatable I've ever been on - one gets tired of a greasy mouth feel to almost everything ON the diet. That's the bad news... the GOOD is that I did lose a total of 12 lbs in 4 weeks - not bad. However, it ISN'T a diet I can realistically stay on until I lose all the weight I'd like to - so am gradually weaning myself back onto a more feasible long-term eating plan. The 4 star rating is ONLY a reflection of how I feel about the book as a reading experience, since I have not yet TRIED to implement the diet - although I will be soon. The book walks a fine line between being easily understood and a bit 'technical', but is a fairly quick read, and though some of Asprey's assertions appear counter intuitive to lose weight (i.e., 50-70% of one's calories from fat), he does tend to 'make sense' once you've gone through his data. I am skeptical of one of his main concerns however, i.e., that coffee, as well as many of the OTHER foods he either prohibits or insists you need to buy expensive versions of, are riddled with mold toxins - wouldn't such be totally DESTROYED by the boiling water one uses in coffee, or by COOKING the other foods in question, rendering the mold harmless? My other main complaints are that the diet is NOT terribly vegetarian friendly, and he could have easily given some pointers on how to make it so; the diet itself is really not all that 'new' - more of a combo of Paleo/low carb eating, but he does have a nice 'gimmick' going with the Bulletproof Coffee that starts each day; and third, although it isn't ESSENTIAL to get your products and supplements from Asprey's website, it strongly implies that for best results you purchase his fairly expensive products off his website. Once I've actually gone through his 2 Week indoctrination program, I may revise my rating...
    more
  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    I seemed to be spotting lots of claims but either no or poor evidence to support them. It shows an inadequate understanding of evidence by an author and reader when correlation between two or more factors is held as causation as is frequently done in this book.I have abandoned this book, some readers might find it helpful but I am not convinced by Asprey's claims. The book starts well and held my attention but soon its general lack of evidence irritated me. I have no doubt that Asprey is an inte I seemed to be spotting lots of claims but either no or poor evidence to support them. It shows an inadequate understanding of evidence by an author and reader when correlation between two or more factors is held as causation as is frequently done in this book.I have abandoned this book, some readers might find it helpful but I am not convinced by Asprey's claims. The book starts well and held my attention but soon its general lack of evidence irritated me. I have no doubt that Asprey is an intelligent man but I can't help but this this book is a gross over simplification. Somewhere around the paragraphs recommending endless vitamins/minerals/heaven knows what else in a bottle I gave up. As others have commented, Asprey's continual selling of his own products gets very tiresome too. I really wanted to enjoy this book as an alternative take on diet and health but it's just lacking.
    more
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting! After reading this I joined a Bulletproof FB Group to get some more information on real people's results. It definitely intrigued me based on the science behind this diet. I have tried and do enjoy the Bulletproof Coffee.
  • Lani
    January 1, 1970
    I guess I should be happy that I read this in 2017 instead of the year it was published. This book claimed that most coffee has mold! There was even an explanation of the research it took to find this out. Of course I had to look this up! Relax, it's not true. Even Folgers uses a wet processing to prevent any mold from growing on the beans. Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't have been drastic enough to stop drinking the only liquid that lets me deal with other people, but I might have cut back to on I guess I should be happy that I read this in 2017 instead of the year it was published. This book claimed that most coffee has mold! There was even an explanation of the research it took to find this out. Of course I had to look this up! Relax, it's not true. Even Folgers uses a wet processing to prevent any mold from growing on the beans. Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't have been drastic enough to stop drinking the only liquid that lets me deal with other people, but I might have cut back to only 4 cups a day. Thank goodness for Google because a lot of his findings were later debunked and I can still enjoy mold-free coffee.Let me save you some time and money by giving you the basics of the diet:You only "eat" twice a day. But you get fancy coffee!Drink the special $25 a pound Bulletproof coffee with grass fed butter and MCT (Medium Chain Triglycerides) oil. Sound good?Begin by grinding the beans, brew the coffee, heat your blender with hot water, pour out the hot water, pour in the brewed coffee with the oil and butter and blend until frothy. (This guy is not a half awake mom with kids who want breakfast and can't find their shoes or favorite shirt in the wee hours before school!) This IS your breakfast. This beverage is 450 calories. Lick the cup because you don't eat lunch for another 6 hours! No snacks. Lunch and dinner are basically Atkins diet recipes anyone can look up for free. Do that for two weeks and watch your hidden abs appear like magic!One thing that was especially tiresome about the book were the infomercial type praises from random people on EVERY FREAKING PAGE telling me how great Dave Asprey and the diet are. Since those endorsements were several years ago, I wonder if all of them are still following the diet today or if they are all on Lipitor for high cholesterol?
    more
  • Lynda
    January 1, 1970
    'Biohacking' is a word that conjures up something very technologically advanced and only reserved for geeks. This is not true. I am glad I read through the entire book. There is much wisdom to be found in this book, not to mention that my grocery bills will go down because I will cut spending on cheese, alcohol, certain nuts, nut milks, gluten free bean chips, and certain fruits. Many so-called foods are not helping us in terms of optimizing health and providing important key nutrients. Most boo 'Biohacking' is a word that conjures up something very technologically advanced and only reserved for geeks. This is not true. I am glad I read through the entire book. There is much wisdom to be found in this book, not to mention that my grocery bills will go down because I will cut spending on cheese, alcohol, certain nuts, nut milks, gluten free bean chips, and certain fruits. Many so-called foods are not helping us in terms of optimizing health and providing important key nutrients. Most books today that talk about the connection between health and diet usually cannot avoid making a reference to wheat (yeah, yeah). I always knew that wheat was bad for me, speaking from personal experience. But one of the new things that I learned about it is that wheat, when digested in our guts, produces an opioid compound known as gluteomorphin 'that trigger the same receptors in your brain as opiate drugs like heroin' (page 61). I had to pause for a moment when I read that: wheat is not only bad for you (a fact that is hard for many people to accept), it is also addictive (an even scarier fact). I was diagnosed with wheat allergy ten years ago, but I continued to eat 'delicious' foods like pizza and apricot Danish, all the while not knowing why my bloating did not go away, and why wheat was hard to give up. I have only been largely wheat free for the last year, and it took some effort. It's perhaps a nice coincidence that my gluten-free diet has largely followed the recommendations in the BulletProof Diet. The difference in how I feel, look and behave (my husband may have something to say on that) is noticeable. My husband and I prepare our own meals using organic and fresh ingredients. We enjoy grass-fed beef, grass-fed butter and use coconut oil in a lot of our cooking. Cooking one's own meals is a great habit to develop, and is a lot more economical. There is some information in the book that I don't completely agree with; for example, where are the studies showing that Himalayan Pink Salt contains iodine? I could not find any on the Internet. I continue to use iodized salt on my boiled egg for breakfast. Also, quinoa gets a bad rap in the book; the argument against it is rather weak.Overall, the positive comments about the book exceed the constructive. The BulletProof Diet contains highly researched information and the author collaborates with a lot of medical practitioners to have his material stand under scrutiny. The back of the book includes recipes as well.We borrowed the book from our local public library, and we plan to buy our own hardcopy.
    more
  • Danny An
    January 1, 1970
    I must say that this is the most thorough and powerful diet book I have read so far.You'll learn the basic science behind boosting your mental performance while losing weight, staying young, and extending your life span.If there is one health/diet book you want to read, read this one. It'll change your life. I've already lost 5+ pounds easily in the past week following this diet about 85% of the time.
    more
  • Ryan Hawkins
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't read this because I wanted to loose weight. Rather, I love reading about food/nutrition, I had heard of Asprey and Bulletproof Coffee, and I had started doing it in the morning and really enjoying it for a week or so. So, I decided to officially read the book. I think it is unfortunate to call this a 'diet' book. It is more a revolutionary nutrition book, with some practicalities about what to do.As a background, Asprey was a Silicon Valley multimillionaire who was way overweight. He tr I didn't read this because I wanted to loose weight. Rather, I love reading about food/nutrition, I had heard of Asprey and Bulletproof Coffee, and I had started doing it in the morning and really enjoying it for a week or so. So, I decided to officially read the book. I think it is unfortunate to call this a 'diet' book. It is more a revolutionary nutrition book, with some practicalities about what to do.As a background, Asprey was a Silicon Valley multimillionaire who was way overweight. He tried many diets and then decided he wanted to 'biohack' his body and see what really works best. He says he spend over $300,000 biohacking and trying new things, and landed on what he calls this Bulletproof Diet (which is famous for the coffee morning drink). He lost hundreds of pounds on it. His whole goal is to produce something that makes people feel less brain fog, have more energy, and also be as health as possible. He claims that many of us simply don't know what it is like to have the energy we were meant to have, because of all we eat in the SAD (standard American diet). He thinks about 80-90% of how we feel is due to what we put in (the other 10-20% is exercise and sleep, but mainly sleep actually; exercise last). I love this idea for sure.But that being said, so much could be said about this book. For the most part, I loved it. It really was intriguing, and I think he is right about much of what he writes. However, the only reason I give it 4 stars is that it became very impractical in a lot of ways toward the end. That being said, there is a handful of beneficial ideas I received from it that I'll always remember.First, he is the first person to really introduce me to the idea that fats aren't bad in a diet. In fact, they are the best thing we can eat. He even pushes good (emphasis on the good, not just any) saturated fats. Especially grass-fed butter and MCT oil (refined coconut oil). He backs this up with a lot of evidence, and shows that the connection between saturated fats and high cholesterol/hearth disease isn't well founded at all. Rather, it is carbs. And then I went to Barnes and Noble and saw that many, many other modern nutrition books are saying the exact same thing. In fact, I'd say that is the way most think now. Asprey aims for 60-80% of his diet being good fats--even and mainly saturated fats.Second, his Bulletproof Coffee is truly great. I love it. It is coffee, 1 tbs of grass-fed butter (or ghee, if one is lactose intolerant), and 1 tbs of MCT oil. Then blended until frothy. It is amazing how it consistently makes me energetic and truly not hungry for exactly 5 hours. People online rave about it being 400 calories, but that is only if you do 2 tbs each. I do 1, which he recommends in the book at some point, and it is around 230. (But, calories aren't as important anyways, which he gets too).Third, as written above, calories aren't the be all and end all of nutrition. In fact, he shows that they really aren't anywhere near the top. He shows that certain oils--like canola, vegetable--and certain carbs--flour and especially sugar--are so much worse for you in many ways than other foods. Calories really don't matter here. Moreover, it isn't true that 3500 calories is equal to a pound. He shows how we all know this isn't true, and it isn't really supported. And again, it is because calories aren't just calories. Food, nutrition, weight gain/loss, and how our bodies receive food is way more complicated. I loved this aspect because I was always skeptical about the 3500 calorie idea. In an interview is Asprey, I heard him talk about how we know that 1 gram of Fish Oil a day can cause so much benefit. And so this proves how it isn't just calories, but nutirition, correct fats, etc. So if one gram of fish oil can be so good, what does 1 gram (or 300 grams!) of vegetable oil do to our bodies? He says it is hugely detrimental.Fourth, his bringing it all back to inflammation is something I have heard before and is convincing. On this, his writing on gluten is sadly convincing. I don't intend to become gluten free, but the studies seem to show that gluten (mainly, today's gluten) simply doesn't react well with our bodies.Fifth, his denouncing of carbs isn't anything new, but it makes sense. Sixth, his introducing of MCT oil and grass-fed butter is really helpful. It is famous in his coffee, but he recommends eating these things throughout the day. Again, he is unashamed to talk about a high, high fat diet.Seventh, his logic about cholesterol is intriguing. I heard more about this in an interview between him and a Dr. Moore on his Bulletproof Podcast (which surprisingly was the number 1 health and nutrition podcast in the nation for a while). Basically, they both were arguing that much of our science about cholesterol might be wrong. That high total cholesterol isn't the issue, but rather the amount of LDL in ratio to HDL and especially the amount of triglycerides. I have much to look into here, but once again, if you look this up, it seems many, many nutritionists are agreeing. Both Asprey and Moore had cholesterol over 300, and have very healthy arteries. They think much of it is due to the huge phrama market for cholesterol medicine. Again, I'm not entirely convinced, but it is interesting. They did show that countries with much lower heart attack rate have cholesterol on average of 250, and close to 300 when they get older. Interesting info.Eighth, I think him talking about eating foods at the right time was interesting. He had a whole chapter about this. He shows that we definitely should have fat in the morning (hence, his coffee) and no carbs, and that the small amount of carbs we eat should be at the evening (as they help one sleep). He says we have this backward, which we might.Ninth, what he really focuses on throughout the book is mold. Mold on food which leads to us feeling fog and not feeling so good. I think he is on to something here, but it gets extreme.Which leads to some things I didn't love. I loved the emphasis on fat, less carbs, eating at the right times, etc. But then when he discusses different foods, it is depressing! Now, he is just being honest, and he is a biohacker and he has tested like every food to see what it does to us, its mold and toxin content, etc. But he puts so many foods in a category of not-eat (aka. Kryptonite) that it is almost impossible to follow the diet. And his recipes towards the end are pretty weak.That all being said, I love the Bulletproof Coffee, and I love a lot of the ideas he introduced. I intend to read more books about some of the ideas he introduces--such as inflammation, fats, and cholesterol-- from other nutritionists to keep digging.I would wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone. It changed my view on a lot of things, or at least got me thinking.
    more
  • Stéfano
    January 1, 1970
    Um livro pra te fazer repensar a forma como você se alimenta. Parece radical e faz você ficar meio paranoico com os alimentos. As referências citadas dão credibilidade à teoria e não custa tentar para ver os resultados. Já estou colhendo alguns.
    more
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I was definitely intrigued by this book, and have even incorporated some of this diet into my daily routine. However, this diet is 50-75 percent fat and my husband who is a registered dietitian with a masters in sports nutrition said that no matter what this guy claims, he says there is no way this can be safe for long-term. Then I started listening to the authors bulletproof radio podcast and realized he is kind of a dick. He has these awesome guests on and only talks about himself and when peo I was definitely intrigued by this book, and have even incorporated some of this diet into my daily routine. However, this diet is 50-75 percent fat and my husband who is a registered dietitian with a masters in sports nutrition said that no matter what this guy claims, he says there is no way this can be safe for long-term. Then I started listening to the authors bulletproof radio podcast and realized he is kind of a dick. He has these awesome guests on and only talks about himself and when people try to disagree with his claims or tell him a study was de-bunked he dismisses them. Also, in the episode about eating for your skin he claimed that he got a brain eating amoeba.. YES THE SUPER RARE BRAIN EATING AMOEBA that only a handful of people have acquired in the US with only ONE known survivor. He swears he had it and that his bulletproof way of eating saved his life. Bullshit. It concerns me that SO many popular health bloggers are touting this “lifestyle” when it appears to be pretty dangerous.
    more
  • Palimpest Living
    January 1, 1970
    I have mixed feelings about this book. The pros: - It was well organized and contained a lot of great information, often in unexpected areas such as which fruits/veggies are highest in fructose, highest in pesticides, most likely to be GMO, etc.- The author was very honest about places where he hated what he had to write (such as pointing out the beer is simply not “bulletproof”.- Much of the dietary advice was very sound, and the author was upfront about some nasty food production habits that p I have mixed feelings about this book. The pros: - It was well organized and contained a lot of great information, often in unexpected areas such as which fruits/veggies are highest in fructose, highest in pesticides, most likely to be GMO, etc.- The author was very honest about places where he hated what he had to write (such as pointing out the beer is simply not “bulletproof”.- Much of the dietary advice was very sound, and the author was upfront about some nasty food production habits that people need to know about but are often unaware of. - Asprey took a great approach to “falling off the wagon” in explaining that once started, one is always “on the diet”. Poor eating choices simply mean you're veering towards the end of the spectrum that is not the best for promoting health, and one can always choose to veer back towards better options. This seemed like great and encouraging approach to take.- He was also totally unapologetic about doing what it takes to improve one's health, and set a great example in that. The cons: - I was not a fan of the “executive” and “performance” geared language. Asprey typically works with high powered (read: wealthy) executives, performers, and professional athletes, etc., so much of his language fell along the lines of dominating, performing, and other “power” positions. This isn't inherently bad, but if you're not a fan of that kind of lifestyle, it can get old.- The “bio-hacking” language also got a bit irksome. I'm all in favor of people listening to their bodies, learning to read their bodies' feedback, and tailoring their choices to what they specifically need. But I didn't feel like the idea of bio-hacking quite lined up with that.- Questionable advice, coupled with apparent gappy knowledge of body chemistry. The author had some excellent points and has clearly done a lot of research. But he strategically researched “hacks”, rather than working on a deeper and broader understanding of the underlying body chemistry in many cases. This resulted in suggestions that sounded great, and may work in some cases, but that could also potentially cause serious problems. A great example was the idea that one can simply train oneself to sleep less (say, 5 hours a night), which is problematic on several levels. First, everyone is unique and although some may be able to sustain such a behavior, it may be completely inappropriate for others. Second, he either ignores, fails to mention, or doesn't know a lot of important body chemistry realities related to this practice which have the potential to seriously harm someone. Proper sleep is essential to reducing stress and cortisol, and therefore weight loss; decided to sleep less can directly sabotage readers' many other efforts to lose weight. Similarly, your body does a toxin dump at a certain time every night. If you're not asleep before this happens, you can seriously impair your ability to detoxify; get in the habit of it because you've decided to function long term on little sleep, and the potential for damage goes up significantly. I could go on, but you get the idea.- Impractical/expensive advice. The author has access to a lot of “anti-aging” physicians who are apparently very happy to run blood panels and other tests upon request, allowing him to specifically review his levels of various vitamins, etc. on a whim. Most of us (particularly those in difficult states) don't have access to this.All things considered, if you're in fairly good health to begin with and looking for an edge this can be a good book to read if you take it with a healthy dose of salt and a willingness to research his suggestions on your own before implementation to make sure they're right for you. If you are NOT healthy to begin with – particularly if you're dealing with complex issues like yeast, IBS, and other gut damage – it is absolutely in your best interest to start somewhere else to heal those issues first, and then come back to this later!!
    more
  • Fab Mackojc
    January 1, 1970
    I specifically waited until after following this diet properly for two weeks before writing this review. I feel pretty good generally but it was tiring cooking two meals a day for two weeks when I normally don't cook at all. There were also times where I didn't feel so amazing because my body was adjusting to a very different approach to eating.I'll try my best to review just the book, but I wanted to talk about aspects of the diet as well. Overall, I like the idea of what Dave is selling but pu I specifically waited until after following this diet properly for two weeks before writing this review. I feel pretty good generally but it was tiring cooking two meals a day for two weeks when I normally don't cook at all. There were also times where I didn't feel so amazing because my body was adjusting to a very different approach to eating.I'll try my best to review just the book, but I wanted to talk about aspects of the diet as well. Overall, I like the idea of what Dave is selling but put together it's a pretty radical change for most people's lifestyle. The first chapter is very salesy and totally worth skipping if you're already sold on the idea. What I liked about this book is that he covers a lot of different and important concepts involved with what humans decide to put into their bodies. It's definitely a book that makes you more aware of how your body works, which is great. At times the scientific evidence for what he's talking about can be patchy but he does try to cover himself with relevant studies for most of what he advocates.Be warned again that this diet can be a very extreme change. There are elements of what he suggests that I didn't like. Intermittent fasting involves a lot of time spent not eating. You'll feel hungry a lot and when you do eat you'll devour big portions of food in very short periods of time, so you'll probably feel a bit lethargic afterwards while it all starts to digest. I believe this is a big reason that so many people lose wait on this diet. You basically go from eating throughout the day to eating only two huge meals. If you don't push yourself to eat as much during those meals as you normally would throughout the whole day then you'll probably lose weight.Overall I found my experience reading this book and trying the diet to be a net-positive experience even if following the regime to the letter didn't suit me perfectly. I would recommend those who care about diet and want to try and gain an edge to give this a proper shot. The ideal outcome is that you'll find a few things that make your life better, are easy to incorporate in your lifestyle and you foster an approach to eating and exercise that is designed for continual self-improvement.
    more
  • Zain
    January 1, 1970
    I had heard a lot of good things about this book and diet and was hoping that it wasn't too good to be true. Unfortunately, after doing some digging around there are many rabbit holes one can go down to find the fallacies in Asprey's claims. The book itself is an easy enough read, although like everyone else commented on, the used car salesman attitude gets old really fast. I'm pretty sure every other sentence started with "As a biohacker, I...".On a base level, nobody will argue against cutting I had heard a lot of good things about this book and diet and was hoping that it wasn't too good to be true. Unfortunately, after doing some digging around there are many rabbit holes one can go down to find the fallacies in Asprey's claims. The book itself is an easy enough read, although like everyone else commented on, the used car salesman attitude gets old really fast. I'm pretty sure every other sentence started with "As a biohacker, I...".On a base level, nobody will argue against cutting out processed sugars and eating healthy, organic foods. This diet is a cousin of paleo, focusing more on healthy fats as a primary source of energy. This comes close to many of the ketogenic diets out there, but Asprey does little to talk about their benefits and how to take advantage of ketosis. I think my biggest qualm, which many others commented on as well, is the lack of statistical evidence provided. It's a little absurd to make so many health related claims without providing the statistical evidence to back it up. Saying "I felt better after eating this" or "I noticed inflammation when eating these foods" is great on a personal level, but I don't find it to be scientific or statistically significant. The last thing I'll mention is the Bulletproof coffee. I'm not even a fan of coffee and I really wanted to buy into the claims Asprey made, but do a quick Google search of Joe Rogan and his investigation of Asprey's coffee claims and you'll see it's not worth the hype. Still, I wouldn't say it's a bad alternative to regular coffee loaded with processed creamer and sugar. In my opinion, there are other diets or lifestyles out there which can provide a better road map to healthy living.
    more
  • Edward
    January 1, 1970
    Dave Asprey is a former high-tech entrepreneur turned biohacker and the creator of Bulltetproof coffee and the Bulletproof brand. He has a popular podcast, Bulletproof Radio, which I listen to regularly. This book summarizes a lot of his philosophy in biohacking and how lifestyle, especially diet can affect how you can improve how you feel, your physical and mental performance and overall health. Overall, there are many excellent tips and advice on diet and lifestyle that promise to lead to heal Dave Asprey is a former high-tech entrepreneur turned biohacker and the creator of Bulltetproof coffee and the Bulletproof brand. He has a popular podcast, Bulletproof Radio, which I listen to regularly. This book summarizes a lot of his philosophy in biohacking and how lifestyle, especially diet can affect how you can improve how you feel, your physical and mental performance and overall health. Overall, there are many excellent tips and advice on diet and lifestyle that promise to lead to healthy and high performance living. Some of his views are a bit extreme and hard for me to accept (really? we should stay away from mushroom because of it encourages the growth of yeast in the body?) and others I am glad that I am starting to follow (eating cheese does makes me not feel well afterwards). Our bodies have been telling us in subtle ways that some of the food that we are eating is not good but somehow it is hard for us to connect the dots.My wife and I have been following healthy practice (good sleep habits, meditation, wheat-free diets, grass-fed meat, whole and organic produce) and reading this book further reinforces some of our habits. Dave Asprey classifies foods into three kinds: bulletproof (those we should eat plenty of), kryptonite (those we should avoid if at all possible) and questionable (those we should eat moderately). I treat the advice in this book as a template and I am beginning to embark on the journey into biohacking on my own by figuring out what works for me and what doesn't.
    more
  • Mike Harmon
    January 1, 1970
    What does your Mom get you for your birthday?...I now get books on healthy eating. Yea - thanks mom. I actually already follow many of the guidelines set forth in the book, but did pick up a few tweaks and inspiration to be more disciplined. Asprey doesn't provide any hard statistical evidence; it's all based on his extensive first-person experimentation. He's also quite the used car salesman. When reading books like this, I always look for several diet tweaks I can take away, but I never start What does your Mom get you for your birthday?...I now get books on healthy eating. Yea - thanks mom. I actually already follow many of the guidelines set forth in the book, but did pick up a few tweaks and inspiration to be more disciplined. Asprey doesn't provide any hard statistical evidence; it's all based on his extensive first-person experimentation. He's also quite the used car salesman. When reading books like this, I always look for several diet tweaks I can take away, but I never start purchasing any pushed products as a rule. Just because he's selling something doesn't make him wrong though. I found validation when reviewing his section on sleep enhancing supplements. I looked in the cabinet at the regimen I began this year which has drastically improved my quality of sleep and noticed I was taking many of the exact supplements listed in the book. Adjustments I plan to make after reading this book: 1) drinking more coffee/green tea in the morning, 2) increase the saturated fat in my diet, 3) try to eat more grass-fed protein, 4) protein fasting day every other week, 5) may try a full fast day once a month, 6) further reduce starches in exchange for vegetables, 7) better timing of when I take in carbs
    more
  • Joshua Pitzalis
    January 1, 1970
    I was a little disappointed. It's not a bad book, it's just that I'd been waiting a while for it.I purposely didn't read about the bulletproof lifestyle because I wanted a coherent story that starts from the beginning instead of riffling through his blog.I was disappointed because it's too technical to be enjoyable for laypeople but too simple to appeal to the sports scientist in me. There is a lot of talk about the scientific rigour he went though to build the diet but it was never really expla I was a little disappointed. It's not a bad book, it's just that I'd been waiting a while for it.I purposely didn't read about the bulletproof lifestyle because I wanted a coherent story that starts from the beginning instead of riffling through his blog.I was disappointed because it's too technical to be enjoyable for laypeople but too simple to appeal to the sports scientist in me. There is a lot of talk about the scientific rigour he went though to build the diet but it was never really explained, just referenced to. Most annoying he name drops being able to eat 4000 calories a day and grow a six pack but that's it, he never talks about it again. Seeing as that is the holy grail for most men, I expected a bit more on that.The word "bulletproof coffee' gets printed an awful lot more than it needs to and there is a lot of product placement. The diet itself sounds great and I'll definitely give it a try. It sounds like a relaxed ketogenic diet combined and intermittent fasting meet bulletproof coffee.
    more
  • Mikeila
    January 1, 1970
    After trying a ketogenic diet for a couple weeks and feeling great (except for the one time I slipped up) I remembered I had this book and thought it might be a more sustainable version of the diet. To be blunt, it's really not. It *did* show me that yogurt makes me feel gross, but the addition of more carbs in the form of sweet potatoes and white rice have me feeling bloated, tired and almost hungover this morning. Overall it just seems like most things these days, which is the "expert" using t After trying a ketogenic diet for a couple weeks and feeling great (except for the one time I slipped up) I remembered I had this book and thought it might be a more sustainable version of the diet. To be blunt, it's really not. It *did* show me that yogurt makes me feel gross, but the addition of more carbs in the form of sweet potatoes and white rice have me feeling bloated, tired and almost hungover this morning. Overall it just seems like most things these days, which is the "expert" using technical jargon and sales tactics to freak you out and then sell you the only "good" products on the market....theirs. To follow his diet exactly, including all the supplements and tech would be hundreds of dollars a month! And that doesn't even include the high quality food you're supposed to be eating! The book says Dave is a millionaire, so I guess he wrote this book for all his millionaire buddies, because normal people just can't afford his proposed lifestyle.
    more
  • Johnny
    January 1, 1970
    I owe a debt of gratitude to Dave Asprey as I learned the bulk of what I know about the paleo diet from listening to his podcast. The man has done his homework for sure and is a wealth of information. Further, I am a huge fan of bulletproof coffee (absolutely yum!) and use it just as Dave suggests – as a tool for intermittent fasting. That said, the book reads at times like an infomercial and I found myself cringing with embarrassment. Also, there is a lot of paranoia about mycotoxins, which I b I owe a debt of gratitude to Dave Asprey as I learned the bulk of what I know about the paleo diet from listening to his podcast. The man has done his homework for sure and is a wealth of information. Further, I am a huge fan of bulletproof coffee (absolutely yum!) and use it just as Dave suggests – as a tool for intermittent fasting. That said, the book reads at times like an infomercial and I found myself cringing with embarrassment. Also, there is a lot of paranoia about mycotoxins, which I believe borders on outright hypochondria.A lot of good information here and I consider it a valuable addition to my library, but it's not the book I would recommend to anyone curious about paleo. For a more balanced approach, see Perfect Health Diet, by Paul and Shou-Ching Jaminet.
    more
  • Marian
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting guy, interesting book. He is very focused on the results of "biohacking" his own body and life, but he's also worked with many clients at this point, and has done a lot of research. He is also focused on toxins & myotoxins--whey they are in your food, what they might be doing to you if they are, how to avoid them (or "hack" them, I suppose). Accessible reading style. I felt like he got bored at the end of the book... the diet itself is laid out in just a few pages near the end, w Interesting guy, interesting book. He is very focused on the results of "biohacking" his own body and life, but he's also worked with many clients at this point, and has done a lot of research. He is also focused on toxins & myotoxins--whey they are in your food, what they might be doing to you if they are, how to avoid them (or "hack" them, I suppose). Accessible reading style. I felt like he got bored at the end of the book... the diet itself is laid out in just a few pages near the end, with a small number of recipes. I think the book could be helped with some FAQs, more on how to maintain, more recipes, etc.
    more
Write a review