The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 3 (The Umbrella Academy, #3)
With a new Netflix series, the best-selling graphic novels return--with the original creators!Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance, Doom Patrol) and Gabriel Bá (Two Brothers, Casanova) have earned awards and accolades on their separate projects, and finally return to their breakout 2007 hit, for the latest chapter in the bizarre lives of their former teen superhero team.Faced with an increasing number of lunatics with superpowers eager to fight his own wunderkind brood, Sir Reginald Hargreeves developed the ultimate solution ...Now, just a few years after Hargreeves's death, his Umbrella Academy is scattered. Number Five is a hired gun, Kraken is stalking big game, Rumor is dealing with the wreckage of her marriage, an out-of-shape Spaceboy runs around the streets of Tokyo, Vanya continues her physical therapy after being shot in the head--and no one wants to even talk about what Séance is up to ...The award-winning and best-selling superhero series returns, stranger than ever--And their past is coming back to hunt them.

The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 3 (The Umbrella Academy, #3) Details

TitleThe Umbrella Academy, Vol. 3 (The Umbrella Academy, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 17th, 2019
PublisherDark Horse Comics
ISBN-139781506711423
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Graphic Novels Comics, Fantasy, Fiction

The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 3 (The Umbrella Academy, #3) Review

  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    The artwork is definitely the redeeming quality of this comic, sadly not nearly enough.It was nice to get back in touch with the members of The Umbrella Academy, but to what purpose??This volume was all over the place! It started with all the characters in different places, doing their own thing (of course explanations are never thought necessary so don't start looking for them here) and only met up for a final, and linked, resolution THAT DIDN'T HAPPEN. The volume ends with an unnecessary cliff The artwork is definitely the redeeming quality of this comic, sadly not nearly enough.It was nice to get back in touch with the members of The Umbrella Academy, but to what purpose??This volume was all over the place! It started with all the characters in different places, doing their own thing (of course explanations are never thought necessary so don't start looking for them here) and only met up for a final, and linked, resolution THAT DIDN'T HAPPEN. The volume ends with an unnecessary cliffhanger, as if all the new questions left unanswered weren't enough. I'm so upset with this comic building up expectations it doesn't live up to.I've said it once and I'll say it again: I enjoyed the tv show a lot more. sorry not sorry
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  • Shog Al Maskery
    January 1, 1970
    I finished it faster than what I thought! Im still a beginner in the world of reading comics so it’s a good sign that I was able to get through it all. I can’t wait to ready volume three to put the puzzle pieces together.
  • Michael Cook
    January 1, 1970
    It's been a decade since the second volume of Gerard Way's wonderfully weird superhero series, The Umbrella Academy, hit stores and it's been almost as long since the title of this third volume was announced. Since that initial announcement, there had been a lot of radio silence as Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá got busy with other projects. Thankfully, though, this third volume of The Umbrella Academy has come out and, in many ways, it feels like no time has passed. It's very much the third installm It's been a decade since the second volume of Gerard Way's wonderfully weird superhero series, The Umbrella Academy, hit stores and it's been almost as long since the title of this third volume was announced. Since that initial announcement, there had been a lot of radio silence as Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá got busy with other projects. Thankfully, though, this third volume of The Umbrella Academy has come out and, in many ways, it feels like no time has passed. It's very much the third installment in this ongoing series - and that's both a good thing and a bad thing.Viewers of the recent Netflix adaptation of The Umbrella Academy might be surprised to find just how strange the comics are. The TV show wasn't exactly "normal", but the comics have always been their own special blend of strange and this third volume of the series continues that strangeness perfectly from the very first page. The Umbrella Academy has always been more about the journey than the actual story being told and that remains true for Hotel Oblivion. At the center of this story lies a prison in a pocket dimension that holds all of the Umbrella Academy's defeated villains. In the wake of the events of the previous volume, Dallas, The Umbrella Academy is fractured. They've all gone off in their own directions but the events within this volume will bring them together again, perhaps on an even stronger footing than ever before. The first several issues allow readers a chance to really explore what's going on with each of the characters and those end up being the best parts of the series. The mystery introduced at the beginning is interesting, but these characters and their relationships with each other are the best parts of this series and that remains true with this series. Each character gets a new, interesting development in their overall arcs and I'm really excited to see how they continue to grow - especially Allison and Vanya.Like the previous two volumes of The Umbrella Academy, it takes Hotel Oblivion the vast majority of its 7-issue run for the plot to really make itself known and for the various dangling threads to start to coalesce into a discernible whole. This can be frustrating for those who read the series month-to-month (or, as happened frequently in this run, month-to-gap-month-to-release month as the series featured a few delays. It can often feel like nothing is really happening and the series is just dragging its feet, but as the final two issues of the series unfold, you quickly realize that those slower-paced earlier issues were laying the foundation for the bombastic finale. Unfortunately, as is often the case with The Umbrella Academy, the ending does end up feeling a bit rushed, which robs it of a bit of its excitement. Additionally, for the first time, Hotel Oblivion ends on a pretty major cliffhanger which does rob the series of feeling like an entirely complete story. We are left with the promise that a new series will start early next year, but it does end up feeling like a bit of a let down if you've read each issue as they've come out between October 2018 and June 2019. That being said, it's still an interesting story and the final issue beautifully sets up future stories to explore the world of The Umbrella Academy in even more new and exciting ways.A highlight for this series has always been Gabriel Bá's artwork and that remains the case here. He perfectly blends Way's more surreal writing style with the level of groundedness that is needed to ensure readers can connect with all of this weirdness. Bá excels at portraying giant action sequences and creating really interesting locales. Every single page of this series is a joy to behold and Bá has clearly only gotten better as the years have gone on and he's immersed himself even more in this world. Bá, also, isn't afraid to show the violence that often accompanies this series - but he frequently keeps it from feeling too grotesque. It's always highly stylized - as is his style in general - and it turns these potentially gross images into true beauty. Additionally, this series, in particular, has really given Bá the opportunity to play around with character design. With so many villains held prisoner within the Hotel Oblivion, each of them needed a design and most of them never appeared for more than a few panels, yet Bá manages to make each of them feel like wholly distinct characters, each with their own history and power set. His imagination is boundless and it runs freely throughout this series.All in all, The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion is a welcome return to this deeply creative and interesting world from Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá. While it still contains many of the same problems that impacted the previous volumes, it's a whole lot of fun. The sheer creativity and strangeness present within these pages makes this comic feel unlike anything else currently being published. The ending of the story does leave a bit to be desired, but it perfectly sets up the next series (which has been promised for release next year) so that can be forgiven. Gabriel Bá's artwork continues to be the shining star of this series. Every single page of the series is a joy to behold and I'm just so happy to see the return of this truly remarkable series. Hopefully with the success of the Netflix adaptation, the comic will continue to see increased success. I love the new elements Way and Bá introduced in this volume and I'm really excited to see where they take it with the next one.
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  • Chris Greensmith
    January 1, 1970
    "Gross--!There's never an umbrella around when you need one." Meh, this was OK, i feel it kept teetering on the edge of being something great but never made it. There was no more character development, and I think that could be because the amount of characters that appeared in this compared to the other two runs has at least tripled. There were a lot of threads that were left blowing ion the wind, so I feel there may be more issues to come, well I know there will be with that cliff hanger endin "Gross--!There's never an umbrella around when you need one." Meh, this was OK, i feel it kept teetering on the edge of being something great but never made it. There was no more character development, and I think that could be because the amount of characters that appeared in this compared to the other two runs has at least tripled. There were a lot of threads that were left blowing ion the wind, so I feel there may be more issues to come, well I know there will be with that cliff hanger ending, Number 1!?...3🌟
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  • Chloe Simpson-White
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved this series so far! It is wonderful to see the plot thicken and have several different story lines and vantage points at once! It is safe to say that have become obsessed! I cannot wait to see the rest of the story unfold and develop
  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.If you thought that writers who gave up on their series are not likely to come back to continue where they left off, here comes another creative team who looks to prove you wrong and make a comeback in the comic book business. After a decade of waiting, with each individual issue released intermittently, the dynamic duo that developed the hit comic book series that is now an original Netflix TV series is back with their third volume, just as exp You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.If you thought that writers who gave up on their series are not likely to come back to continue where they left off, here comes another creative team who looks to prove you wrong and make a comeback in the comic book business. After a decade of waiting, with each individual issue released intermittently, the dynamic duo that developed the hit comic book series that is now an original Netflix TV series is back with their third volume, just as explosively ridiculous, bizarre and splashy as ever. Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá now look to revisit their heroes by steering this story into some of the rowdiest directions unimaginable while keeping the complex family dynamics at the foundation of Hotel Oblivion.What is The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion about? Taking place after the events in Dallas, the story now looks at a suspicious and ambitious creation by the founding father of the Umbrella Academy, Sir Reginald Hargreeves, that is the mysterious Hotel Oblivion. While the idea behind it is mind-boggling, it now comes back to haunt our heroes, a fractured team troubled by recent events who have not had the chance to reconnect in a while. In fact, Number Five is back as a hired gun doing the unimaginable, Spaceboy is battling crime as an out-of-shape crime-stopper in the streets of Tokyo, Vanya struggles through her physical therapy following the near-fatal injury she was inflicted, Rumor continues to reflect on her marriage, Séance remains in a pitiful state as he deals with questionable individuals and the Kraken is off looking for answers. With only their bond as a family still holding them together, they are once again brought to reassemble their broken selves to face new revelations that are bound to change their lives.While fans of this original series have waited pretty long for this volume to finally release (and probably not the last), it doesn’t deliver the dramatic and sensational return you’d have wished for it. The story introduces many new characters while splitting it in almost half a dozen arcs that imperfectly stitches together by the end, leaving you in awe at the unwarranted cliffhanger. It’s only around the halfway mark that the story finally starts to make any sense, although it isn’t surprising with this series to see its readers being tossed around in unpredictable directions, as they finally grasp Sir Hargreeves intention behind the Hotel Oblivion and what is actually going on in this volume. Nonetheless, the underlying theme of family continues to run through this series but unfortunately see a lot less development as the focus is centered around setting the table for what will come next.What’s interesting about this volume is that it doesn’t necessarily look to blow anyone’s minds by revolutionizing the genre but it does introduce the Afterspace, an unknown portion of the universe, which essentially expands the world in uncharted territory. It is not surprising from Gerard Way to pull the story in that direction, considering that the previous volume looked into time traveling. What this volume indubitably does for this series is getting the pieces moving once again for something fun to come in the next story arc. Where this volume does not disappoint, however, is Gabriel Bá’s artwork, beautifully complemented by Nick Filardi’s colouring. It continues to portray the colourful, frenzied and anarchic universe in which unfolds this series, and they achieve it with even more vitality and glamour this time around.The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion is an exuberant yet unstable continuation of the dysfunctional superhero family’s story as it shovels up buried truths culminating to a confrontation with a reality they are unprepared to face.Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: https://bookidote.com/
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I'm counting this as finished for not even though the final issue doesn't come out until June 5th.
  • Almeyda Tara
    January 1, 1970
    I love the art so much, but for real tho, the plot is messy in this one. The places keep switching and it makes me so confused.
  • Eya ☾
    January 1, 1970
    I had to read most of this twice to understand it and I still didn't. I was confused most of the time. Hopefully everything starts to make sense in the next 2 issues.I might change my rating then.
  • Arjun Iyer
    January 1, 1970
    Blurb: Gives you a room with a view and a half. Hotel Oblivion is a welcome departure from its two predecessors, Apocalypse Suite and Dallas, in that unlike them, Hotel Oblivion isn't a self-contained story. It is in fact a statement of intent by its creators to see the wonderful world of the Umbrella Academy expand.For me, the art of Gabriel Ba has always been one of the biggest points of appreciation of the whole series, and Hotel Oblivion continues its stellar record of delivering panels tha Blurb: Gives you a room with a view and a half. Hotel Oblivion is a welcome departure from its two predecessors, Apocalypse Suite and Dallas, in that unlike them, Hotel Oblivion isn't a self-contained story. It is in fact a statement of intent by its creators to see the wonderful world of the Umbrella Academy expand.For me, the art of Gabriel Ba has always been one of the biggest points of appreciation of the whole series, and Hotel Oblivion continues its stellar record of delivering panels that are hectic but never crowded. When it comes to the story, Gerard Way successfully expands the universe and beyond and removes some of the veils that cover the life and exploits of the enigmatic "Monocle", Sir Reginald Hargreeves. What I felt lacking in the story is the sense of an ending. Granted, there isn't meant to be an ending since the events of Hotel Oblivion are setting things up for the next story-arc. However, I couldn't help but feel like someone who was reading an excellent story and suddenly found the final chapters missing from the book. Was this outcome Gerard Way's intention? If so, he's succeeded beyond expectations. Will the siblings of The Umbrella Academy survive the fallout of Hotel Oblivion? I can't wait to check-in and find out.
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  • Arkham Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    This volume did take a bit of getting into as it felt quite disjointed, spreading out the protagonists and introducing a new set of villains without preamble. It was a bit like trying to dive into a long running series at random, only knowing that that I hadn't missed anything that came before and I must admit that I felt lost for a good couple of issues.However, it is amazing how well things came together. The personal development of the characters in this volume - particularly Alison and Vanya This volume did take a bit of getting into as it felt quite disjointed, spreading out the protagonists and introducing a new set of villains without preamble. It was a bit like trying to dive into a long running series at random, only knowing that that I hadn't missed anything that came before and I must admit that I felt lost for a good couple of issues.However, it is amazing how well things came together. The personal development of the characters in this volume - particularly Alison and Vanya - is subtle and it was very satisfying how the plot threads eventually converged on a very exciting climax. I also really loved what this volume set up. While I'm a little sad that there is no fourth season currently in the works, I am excited to find out what Way intends to do with this as the cliffhanger is more than a little tantalising.The sketchy art may not be to everyone's taste but I still think that this gives the series a lot of character. I really can't wait to see where things will go next.
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  • Philip
    January 1, 1970
    Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá are back with more of the weirdest superhero family you've ever seen. I loved seeing these characters again, after a hiatus of nearly ten years. Hotel Oblivion picks up in the aftermath of the Dallas arc, with the Umbrella Academy still recovering from time travel. Plot threads that began in the first two volumes are continued through book three, with Mr. Perseus and Doctor Terminal returning to threaten the family once more. There's some elements here that we've seen p Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá are back with more of the weirdest superhero family you've ever seen. I loved seeing these characters again, after a hiatus of nearly ten years. Hotel Oblivion picks up in the aftermath of the Dallas arc, with the Umbrella Academy still recovering from time travel. Plot threads that began in the first two volumes are continued through book three, with Mr. Perseus and Doctor Terminal returning to threaten the family once more. There's some elements here that we've seen pop up in the Netflix adaptation, as Way laid out quite of bit of his ongoing plans for the comics to give the showrunners room to work. There are also lots of loose ends left at the end of this volume, and I'm thrilled to know that it's because there is so much more planned to come. The world of The Umbrella Academy is big, and we're really just getting started (again). (Read as single issues)
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  • Chris Browning
    January 1, 1970
    (Bought individually, rated as a collective). Has essentially the same problem I had with John Wick 3 in that it's a stop-gap story, reliant on the audience's familiarity with past volumes and willingness to continue following the series. Doesn't really work on an individual issue basis because because there's too much going on (i.e. the two pages set with Jennifer in Wisconsin who I assume will become a character in later arcs but doesn't really have anything to do here) and none of it even st (Bought individually, rated as a collective). Has essentially the same problem I had with John Wick 3 in that it's a stop-gap story, reliant on the audience's familiarity with past volumes and willingness to continue following the series. Doesn't really work on an individual issue basis because because there's too much going on (i.e. the two pages set with Jennifer in Wisconsin who I assume will become a character in later arcs but doesn't really have anything to do here) and none of it even starts to connect till part six of seven. Still, the Umbrella Academy has always had a place in my heart (mostly because of its connection to MCR; the Netflix show is abysmal, at least in my opinion) and it's nice to have Gerard and Gabriel back even if there's no scenes as iconic as ones in the "Apocalypse Suite" and "Dallas" arcs (I think about the deaths of Pogo and JFK at least once a week), plus I'm genuinely interested in the reveal at the end (which definitely opens up storylines not just for the comic but the show as well); I'm just not really that interested in this arc itself. One star added solely for the letters page at the back of the last three issues; all comics should have them. I'm not mad that this series got me buying monthlies again, but if we're being honest, I'd probably wait for the library to get the trades for any future arcs. But I could always change my mind.
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  • Alexander Peterhans
    January 1, 1970
    This book feels like an excuse for Way to let his freak flag fly and create a bunch of supervillains - just a bunch of one-note weirdos (this one has an eye for a head, these two have cat heads, etc) without any backstory or any depth.So it's more of the same, really. The ending might make the next arc more interesting, as it brings the story back to the family, which seems to be the only element in UA that has any layers.I still like Gabriel Ba's artwork, but this volume also shows his limits - This book feels like an excuse for Way to let his freak flag fly and create a bunch of supervillains - just a bunch of one-note weirdos (this one has an eye for a head, these two have cat heads, etc) without any backstory or any depth.So it's more of the same, really. The ending might make the next arc more interesting, as it brings the story back to the family, which seems to be the only element in UA that has any layers.I still like Gabriel Ba's artwork, but this volume also shows his limits - with a large amount of characters, sometimes his art becomes a bit too crude, and action scenes become hard to follow.2,5 stars(Read as seven single issues)
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  • Jordan Barclay
    January 1, 1970
    What the hell Gerard? The first volume had so much great potential; the second volume was a wannabe Alan Moore headache; and now this volume is a freaking Michael-Bay-esque version of the first volume.This shit is pointless action, with so many subplots it's giving me Spiderman-3-PTSD. The art is freaking incredible, but that definitely doesn't make up for it.Please don't mess up the second season of the show at least, okay?Art: A-Story: F+Overall: C-{im sry if i was mean to u Daddy Gerard Way y What the hell Gerard? The first volume had so much great potential; the second volume was a wannabe Alan Moore headache; and now this volume is a freaking Michael-Bay-esque version of the first volume.This shit is pointless action, with so many subplots it's giving me Spiderman-3-PTSD. The art is freaking incredible, but that definitely doesn't make up for it.Please don't mess up the second season of the show at least, okay?Art: A-Story: F+Overall: C-{im sry if i was mean to u Daddy Gerard Way you saved my life when i was little with my chemical romance and i'll never forget that i wuv u xoxoxoxox <33333}
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  • Luke Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    I was much happier with the finale than I thought I’d be, considering they went the route of a major cliffhanger, thereby preventing what I thought would be a messily hasty issue #7. I’m glad to know that we’re getting the fourth story arc by the beginning of 2020, as well! Things are on track finally so I can’t wait to see where things go from here.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE NEW CHARACTERS NOWWWWW.
  • Nadiah Razali
    January 1, 1970
    At first I was annoyed with the story, as it was all over the place. As the story progressed each character finally meet up. I think the next volume will be more clear and progressed. Too much thing is happening 😅
  • Ian Roditi
    January 1, 1970
    WTF WAS THAT "ENDING"? D:
  • Sara Bakhshi
    January 1, 1970
    Mom plotting something?!!Can't wait to see the series version of these stories.
  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    I really like this series (hence four stars) and yet have a lot of criticism to offer in most categories...Art: hit/miss. Conceptually it’s illuminating and brings ideas to life in a great way with a fun attention to weird detail, (perhaps at the expense of failing to explain what should be some pretty significant details) but simultaneously I feel like the quality of the art appears at times to have the aesthetic of a concept art that was inked. The drawing seems lazy at tomes. I don’t need Spa I really like this series (hence four stars) and yet have a lot of criticism to offer in most categories...Art: hit/miss. Conceptually it’s illuminating and brings ideas to life in a great way with a fun attention to weird detail, (perhaps at the expense of failing to explain what should be some pretty significant details) but simultaneously I feel like the quality of the art appears at times to have the aesthetic of a concept art that was inked. The drawing seems lazy at tomes. I don’t need Space-boy/Kraken’s face to be super detailed in every panel, but there are many panels where the visual could serve to bolster the story MUCH more (I.e the intro of a dozen ish villains in one panel that otherwise have zero text introduction save for one who was profiled in the title page). Story concept: brilliant ideas through and through, this is what will keep me coming back. It’s the execution that is sometimes lacking. Pace: good and fast, but perhaps too fast for its own good at times as it gets ahead of itself and sometimes I wonder if the authors forget that we aren’t with them in the drawing room let alone inside their heads with all the details of the characters, their backstories, whereabouts etc Characters: phenomenal, relatable, very different from each other and likable for different reasons and they experience some development throughout despite there being a lot of main characters— even if most are conveniently numbered. Plot: scattered, this is where the comic needs the most improvement. The writers invite you to concede a LOT of unknown details to the story and just hold on for the ride. I’m in for now but will say that if I stick this out for a few more volumes and major pieces don’t start coming together...I may just go back in time to prevent the JFK assassination myself. As an aside, I think this comic lends itself well to screen adaption for two reasons (being perhaps its greatest strength and pitfall respectively). One: the concept is freaking brilliant and flirts with so many realms of the fantastic world of super heroism that there’s a solid foundation to be based upon and inspired by with a clear direction already laid out. Two: given the speedy pace, many plot holes, and reaching in SO many directions (talking monkeys; aliens; zombie robots; surgically enhanced powers; world travel; space travel; time travel; wild technology; resurrection; creepy hotel prison; injury; family trauma; multi generation villains; multiple unnamed villains with ambiguous powers; multiple yet unnamed superheroes with ambiguous powers etc. Etc etc) this leaves a screenwriter/Director/producers to take a lot of creative liberties in leaning harder into some story fodder while less so on others. Ie they can really develop key developments that could have used more explication in the comics and can entirely abandon other details so as to narrow in focus. I don’t explain how the show has already seems to do some of this. This review is open for dialogue but I say go ahead and read UA, you’ll be entertained at the least and perhaps frustrated at times but perhaps also as enthralled as with the story as I’ve been.
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  • i.
    January 1, 1970
    Continuing, almost directly, from the Volume Two: Dallas, Hotel Oblivion continues to expand the world of the Hargreeves siblings, both internal and external. In this volume, children thread through the plot, motivating multiple arcs forward. An infant child is the motivating factor for Umbrella Academy villains to plot an escape from the titular Hotel Oblivion. A child of an Umbrella Academy nemesis becomes a new nemesis. And, as always, the Hargreeves children aren't doing well, with Vanya sti Continuing, almost directly, from the Volume Two: Dallas, Hotel Oblivion continues to expand the world of the Hargreeves siblings, both internal and external. In this volume, children thread through the plot, motivating multiple arcs forward. An infant child is the motivating factor for Umbrella Academy villains to plot an escape from the titular Hotel Oblivion. A child of an Umbrella Academy nemesis becomes a new nemesis. And, as always, the Hargreeves children aren't doing well, with Vanya still in recovery after her stint as apocalypse-bringer, Alison struggling with her personal life (involving her own child, to boot), Klaus trapped in a Satanic Biker cult, and so on. While the Hargreeves siblings are, more or less, in the same positions as they have been throughout the series, they seem in no way static or one-note, especially as their relationships, emotions, and non-superhero lives are more fleshed-out in this volume. As usual, Way's writing is emotive and weird in all the right ways, and Gabriel Bá's art is stellar. Nick Filardi's color work adds a life to this series that is ever-so-fitting for the hyper-reality of this world, especially as it acts as a critique of the tropes and moments unshown in other superhero team books. I wouldn't argue that Hotel Oblivion is the strongest book of the series so far, but it definitely has a character depth to it that felt different from those of previous books. That said, this arc very much does feel like a chapter of an ongoing project, unlike the previous ones. The cliffhanger ending telegraphs that, yes, but even in spite of the great character development work in this arc, there are some characters that get more time and development than others, some plot points that feel rushed (even for Way's "Just-go-with-it" ethos of this book, which I do love!), and some threads left hanging that--given the revelation of the last panel--may or may not be resolved. I have to reread Apocalypse Suite and Dallas for a fuller picture, but generally, there do feel like more remaining unknowns in this book than others. And in a way, knowing--or, at least, hoping--that there is more Umbrella Academy on the way, that's okay.Overall, Hotel Oblivion is both wonderfully weird and hauntingly human, and I am excited to see where in this world Way and Bá take us next.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Volume 3 isn't actually out yet, but I bought each issue individually because my Umbrella Academy obsession is still... never-ending... and so I started reading them at around 1am this morning, and didn't stop until I finished. Each issue is just so short, not even 30 pages each, so it's easy to tear right through them even as you're left with a really scattered plot, all of the siblings going in disjointed directions: there's Vanya in physical therapy; Allison picking through the dregs of her m Volume 3 isn't actually out yet, but I bought each issue individually because my Umbrella Academy obsession is still... never-ending... and so I started reading them at around 1am this morning, and didn't stop until I finished. Each issue is just so short, not even 30 pages each, so it's easy to tear right through them even as you're left with a really scattered plot, all of the siblings going in disjointed directions: there's Vanya in physical therapy; Allison picking through the dregs of her marriage and teaming up with Five; Luther and Diego off on an interdimensional quest of their own; Klaus running seances for hire; and then even a plot thread following the villains.The Hotel Oblivion itself is actually my favourite concept here: it's a nightmarish pocket dimension, an eerie hotel at the end of the universe (where you can check out but you can never leave), where Sir Reginald Hargreeves stashed all of the villains that the Academy took down. They're trapped, and hankering for an escape.3.5 stars. I still think the TV show improved on the source material and delved deeper into each of the characters -- this volume gets to dip briefly into some feelings, like the relationship between the sisters Vanya and Allison, or the unexpected synchronicity between Vanya and Grace, or the unexpected sympathetic arc for the Murder Magician(!)... but there isn't enough depth here because the issues/volumes just aren't long enough to get into it, alas.It's still a zany fun series though, and I'm definitely along for the ride. There's also a cliffhangery tantalising beat riiiight at the very end that makes me desperate for more!!
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  • Adam Stone
    January 1, 1970
    This is a pretty terrible follow up to a potentially decent series. What once seemed like Way was telling a story through complex, non-traditional pacing, now seems like he doesn't know how to tell a story. The characters' motivations seem to change issue to issue with no explanation. The plots are mostly uninteresting callbacks to the previous stories. I've read that there is a major reveal at the end of this volume that will change everything, but if the creators aren't going to go to the work This is a pretty terrible follow up to a potentially decent series. What once seemed like Way was telling a story through complex, non-traditional pacing, now seems like he doesn't know how to tell a story. The characters' motivations seem to change issue to issue with no explanation. The plots are mostly uninteresting callbacks to the previous stories. I've read that there is a major reveal at the end of this volume that will change everything, but if the creators aren't going to go to the work to write a story interesting enough to keep me reading until the reveal, I'm not going to waste my time reading up to the reveal.Ba's art was also disappointing in this volume. I'm pretty sure this is the first time I haven't appreciated his work. It looked rushed. Like he chose not to worry about facial grammar or body language, just slapped the characters into action.Even the coloring on this book is subpar, with the shadows seeming to bear no consistency. Sometimes they're bright purple, sometimes they're orange, they rarely to never correspond to what's around them. With better art, it could be an interesting conceptual choice, but here it just feels like the letterer was the only one on this book who put in any effort.Don't waste your time on this book unless you're a Gerard Way or Gabriel Ba completist.
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  • Joey Nardinelli
    January 1, 1970
    For being a bit longer than the previous two volumes by Gerard and Ba, I was left feeling like this story was still halfway to being finished. A lot is left unexplained, from side characters that appear in their own narratives that never connect back to anything in the core plot, to characters who behave in ways that seem permanently changed by the whims of Gerard just for this story. There are also elements in this story that occur by the midpoint of the television adaptation, which I thought w For being a bit longer than the previous two volumes by Gerard and Ba, I was left feeling like this story was still halfway to being finished. A lot is left unexplained, from side characters that appear in their own narratives that never connect back to anything in the core plot, to characters who behave in ways that seem permanently changed by the whims of Gerard just for this story. There are also elements in this story that occur by the midpoint of the television adaptation, which I thought were a bit strange. I loved how weird and cosmic some of this story was, but the core five characters feeling detached and otherwise unutilized for broad swaths of the story with very little character growth just felt at odds with the first two stories that despite their temporal scopes felt grounded in the familial and the essence of the characters. I’ve waited so, so long for more of this story and even though I liked elements, this just feels so underdeveloped compared to the tight nature of the storytelling of yore.
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    A year or two back I'd not really been expecting any more of this, especially not once Gerard Way got the keys to the book which clearly inspired it, DC's Doom Patrol. But then that petered out (though has since returned), while Umbrella Academy's Netflix adaptation became a big deal – despite (at least so far as I've got) half-drowning an excellent cast and some beautifully done sequences of action and music in a weirdly drab visual palette. So for whatever combination of creative and commercia A year or two back I'd not really been expecting any more of this, especially not once Gerard Way got the keys to the book which clearly inspired it, DC's Doom Patrol. But then that petered out (though has since returned), while Umbrella Academy's Netflix adaptation became a big deal – despite (at least so far as I've got) half-drowning an excellent cast and some beautifully done sequences of action and music in a weirdly drab visual palette. So for whatever combination of creative and commercial reasons, here we are. Our heroes are still monumental messes, of course, but increasingly I read it less for them than for the casual strangeness around them, the stuff the show (initially, at least) doesn't really capture, from the whole creepy room of doll's houses to the fighters and bombers in the Egyptian Wing of the local museum.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Please do not watch the Netflix adaptation of The Umbrella Academy. It is a poor interpretation of the weird and wonderfully bizarre universe that is the comic book series. They are dark and gory at times, but there is also a lot of twisted humor, fascinating artwork, and a self-awareness of the genre they play in. It's good stuff. This wasn't my favorite of the volumes, but that's mostly because it seemed to be mostly set up for the next one. Volumes 1 and 2 had much cleaner, defined story arcs Please do not watch the Netflix adaptation of The Umbrella Academy. It is a poor interpretation of the weird and wonderfully bizarre universe that is the comic book series. They are dark and gory at times, but there is also a lot of twisted humor, fascinating artwork, and a self-awareness of the genre they play in. It's good stuff. This wasn't my favorite of the volumes, but that's mostly because it seemed to be mostly set up for the next one. Volumes 1 and 2 had much cleaner, defined story arcs that could stand on their own. With this one, you definitely have to know the previous volumes and you get a bit of a cliffhanger. But, hey, that just means the promise of more to come, which I plan on showing up for.
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  • Marc *Dark Reader of the Woods*
    January 1, 1970
    After a ten year break, brought back from comic book cancellation to ride the marketing wave of the Netflix series, we get a continuation of the prior volumes of The Umbrella Academy. Not much has changed...Art: fabulous. Dramatic blocking. Vivid colors. Psychedelic scenes reminiscent of Jack Kirby's most mind-bendy work. Bloody as all get out. Points for Gabriel Ba.Story: a mess. Stilted, random, unengaging. Completely devoid of character development, other than a shave and a haircut for Spaceb After a ten year break, brought back from comic book cancellation to ride the marketing wave of the Netflix series, we get a continuation of the prior volumes of The Umbrella Academy. Not much has changed...Art: fabulous. Dramatic blocking. Vivid colors. Psychedelic scenes reminiscent of Jack Kirby's most mind-bendy work. Bloody as all get out. Points for Gabriel Ba.Story: a mess. Stilted, random, unengaging. Completely devoid of character development, other than a shave and a haircut for Spaceboy. Meaningless enemy character concepts. Masturbatory. And another dang cliffhanger... ugh I am so not interested in another volume.
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  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    Sooo I've been waiting almost 10 years for this comic to be published and I have to say I am a little bit disappointed. Compared to Vol. 1 and 2, this volume seems very incoherent and almost pointless. There are some interesting plot delevopments, but all in all Vol. 3 seems like a transition story to what is about to happen in the fourth installment of the Umbrella Academy. Hopefully the next one will be better!
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  • Bibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    I love the show, and also thoroughly enjoyed the first two books of this series. This one was very odd. I’m still not quite sure of what I was reading. There didn’t seem to be any cohesion in the stories, it was all over the place. I honestly felt like there was a volume between Dallas and this one, that’s how scattered it was. The visuals are stunning, Gabriel Ba does an amazing job putting together great imagery to go with this hodgepodge of a “story”
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