Instruments in the Redeemer's Hands
We might be relieved if God placed our sanctification only in the hands of trained professionals, but that is not his plan. Instead, through the ministry of every part of the body, the whole church will mature in Christ. Paul David Tripp helps us discover where change is needed in our own lives and the lives of others. Following the example of Jesus, Tripp reveals how to get to know people, and how to lovingly speak truth to them.

Instruments in the Redeemer's Hands Details

TitleInstruments in the Redeemer's Hands
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 1st, 2002
PublisherP & R Publishing
ISBN-139780875526072
Rating
GenrePsychology, Counselling, Christian, Christian Living, Religion, Theology, Christianity, Nonfiction, Faith, Discipleship, Christian Non Fiction

Instruments in the Redeemer's Hands Review

  • Natalie Vellacott
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about Biblical counseling and explains the process for helping people to see themselves and their issues as God sees them in the light of Scripture. I can see how it can be useful and the author obviously has a wealth of personal experience in this area which he is now using to instruct others through his writing. It is a helpful resource.The author rightly explains that the root of all problem behaviour is sin in the heart. However, he doesn't allow for medical/neurological problem This book is about Biblical counseling and explains the process for helping people to see themselves and their issues as God sees them in the light of Scripture. I can see how it can be useful and the author obviously has a wealth of personal experience in this area which he is now using to instruct others through his writing. It is a helpful resource.The author rightly explains that the root of all problem behaviour is sin in the heart. However, he doesn't allow for medical/neurological problems which may contribute to wrongful thinking and behaviour. These can be deeply ingrained and the approach of the author in places is too simplistic/overlooks reality.For a Christian, balance is needed to ensure we do not place too much emphasis on secular psychology and its solutions, but also where there are medical issues these need to be recognised and treated properly and not just explained away as sin in the heart. The bottom line is that God can change anyone and deal with any of these issues but how God chooses to work in the life of a person may be different in each case.
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  • Ivan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fantastic book! Often times illustrations or stories in a book detract from the overall quality in the book; they are usually comprised of fluff, intended only to add pages to the book. Thankfully, Tripp’s book does not do that. Every illustration powerfully or clearly brought a point or truth home. His illustrations and stories obviously stem from many years of his own personal sanctification journey and also his own ministry to others. Tripp throughout the book emphasizes the role of This is a fantastic book! Often times illustrations or stories in a book detract from the overall quality in the book; they are usually comprised of fluff, intended only to add pages to the book. Thankfully, Tripp’s book does not do that. Every illustration powerfully or clearly brought a point or truth home. His illustrations and stories obviously stem from many years of his own personal sanctification journey and also his own ministry to others. Tripp throughout the book emphasizes the role of ‘homework’ in the task of coming alongside the counseling process in a powerful and transformative way. I very much appreciated this practical insight of assigning ‘homework’ to the counselees. Too often people are under the impression that their meetings with the counselors are the most significant times in their attempts at life and mind renewal. That, of course, is true in a sense as the counselor uniquely comes alongside the counselee with the searchlight of Scripture and begins to ask the right sort of questions that expose sinful thoughts, attitudes, and such. But the real battle continues (often times in full force) once the counselee leaves their meetings. Throughout the week that individual is confronting his or her struggles at a constant rate. The astute counselor, then, strategically assigns homework that best suits the counselee given their unique contexts. It puts the responsibility on the lap of the counselee, ensuring that they diligently own the work to which they have already professed commitment to. Additionally, 'homework' provides a wonderful opportunity for follow-up conversation with the counselor. In other words, the sanctification process is not operating in a vacuum; in real and tangible ways it is occurring within the daily life of the counselee. The homework only serves as an aid and accountability to that end.Time and again as I read through this book I was convicted with how much I can be selfish in ministering to others. On any given day I can serve others as long as it does not interfere with my hobbies or cross into my comfort zone. It is painful to write those words, but they are true. This book has impressed upon me the reality that personal ministry is exactly that: personal. As Tripp states, “We offer people a living, loving presence that puts real flesh and blood on the presence of the Lord” (131). We are indeed the instruments in the Redeemer’s hands, called to incarnate the presence of Christ in an honest and powerful manner.Another key insight I gleaned from this reading was the fact that as counselors we are simply in the task of showing fellow sinners what is already taking place in their own hearts. We are not called to be those who stand over people, positioning ourselves as sanctification gurus; we instead are sinners called to minister to fellow sinners as we apply the Bible into the various and often messy matters in their lives. As I read Tripp’s book, I could not help but pick up on the pastoral tone with which he communicates. There’s an evident love for the Word of God and for people as one reads, which is instructive for me as I seek to minister to others. I must strive to serve others out of the abundance of my own communion with God as he shapes and transforms my life into the image of Christ.
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  • Lynn Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    I highly recommend it. The author, Paul David Tripp, has a humble attitude, realizing that we are all broken vessels and we need each other for our sanctification. He gets to the root of our human problem by asserting that we are all worshipers - if not of God then of something in His place. We can see how personal trouble and relational disorders come from wrongly-directed worship.Tripp definitely keeps God at the center of his attempts to help others in need, and does not add to the message of I highly recommend it. The author, Paul David Tripp, has a humble attitude, realizing that we are all broken vessels and we need each other for our sanctification. He gets to the root of our human problem by asserting that we are all worshipers - if not of God then of something in His place. We can see how personal trouble and relational disorders come from wrongly-directed worship.Tripp definitely keeps God at the center of his attempts to help others in need, and does not add to the message of Christ but teaches us rather to apply more of Christ as the only true and lasting solution to life's struggles.
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  • Molly Whelan
    January 1, 1970
    I would benefit from reading this book again and again.
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Quotes that sturck me as I read:Ch. 1: THE BEST NEWS: A REASON TO GET UP IN THE MORNING"We must not offer people a system of redemption, a set of insights and principles. We offer people a Redeemer. In his power, we find the hope and help we need to defeat the most powerful enemies. Hope rests in the grace of the Redeemer, the only real means of lasting change." (pg. 8)"In rejecting a biblical view of people, the world eliminates any hope of answering the 'what is wrong?' question accurately." ( Quotes that sturck me as I read:Ch. 1: THE BEST NEWS: A REASON TO GET UP IN THE MORNING"We must not offer people a system of redemption, a set of insights and principles. We offer people a Redeemer. In his power, we find the hope and help we need to defeat the most powerful enemies. Hope rests in the grace of the Redeemer, the only real means of lasting change." (pg. 8)"In rejecting a biblical view of people, the world eliminates any hope of answering the 'what is wrong?' question accurately." (pg. 9)"Sinners tend to respond sinfully to being sinned against." (pg. 11)"Sin not only causes me to respond sinfully to suffering, it causes me to respond sinfully to blessing." (pg. 12)"Independence, self-sufficiency, and self-absorption lead us to think of ourselves first and to climb over the fences between ourselves and our desires." (pg. 14)"Sin also produces foolishness in us. Foolishness believes that there is no perspectives, insight, theory, or 'truth' more reliable than our own." (pg. 14)
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  • Ben Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Tripp presents a compelling, biblical vision for Christian ministry - each member of the local body being used by God to change each other more and more into the image of their Redeemer. Every church member should read this book.Here are just a few quotes from the book's Preface which summarize the main point well:* "Many of us would be relieved if God had placed our sanctification in the hands of trained and paid professionals, but that simply is not the biblical model. God’s plan is that throu Tripp presents a compelling, biblical vision for Christian ministry - each member of the local body being used by God to change each other more and more into the image of their Redeemer. Every church member should read this book.Here are just a few quotes from the book's Preface which summarize the main point well:* "Many of us would be relieved if God had placed our sanctification in the hands of trained and paid professionals, but that simply is not the biblical model. God’s plan is that through the faithful ministry of every part, the whole body will grow to full maturity in Christ. The leaders of his church have been gifted, positioned, and appointed to train and mobilize the people of God for this “every person, everyday” ministry lifestyle."* "The paradigm is simple: when God calls you to himself, he also calls you to be a servant, an instrument in his redeeming hands. All of his children are called into ministry, and each of them needs the daily intervention this ministry provides."* "That is what this book is about: how God uses people, who are themselves in need of change, as instruments of the same kind of change in others. This book’s goal is not just that people’s lives would be changed as they give help and receive it. The goal is to help change the church’s very culture."* “We could never hire enough paid staff to meet the ministry needs of the average local church."
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  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book. I think almost every page has highlighting or notes of some sort. This book is for everyone, truly life-changing, and I especially found it helpful as a parent. Tripp is so full of grace, and you can't help but feel his passion for his subject and his compassion for his readers.
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  • Shane Williamson
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps what I am about to say needs to be qualified: this is the third Paul Tripp book I've read this year. I appreciate Tripp's ministry and I know many speak of how this book and many others have been beneficial, however I seem to struggle to connect with him as an author/reader. I find him particularly wordy and disconnected in his presentation. It's more a stylistic critique than anything. This book is helpful at times, a few chapters and sections were educational, though for the most part Perhaps what I am about to say needs to be qualified: this is the third Paul Tripp book I've read this year. I appreciate Tripp's ministry and I know many speak of how this book and many others have been beneficial, however I seem to struggle to connect with him as an author/reader. I find him particularly wordy and disconnected in his presentation. It's more a stylistic critique than anything. This book is helpful at times, a few chapters and sections were educational, though for the most part there wasn't anything that I hadn't already heard or read elsewhere. That being said, I realize that this book has served as the bedrock for many other additional resources. I'd encourage others to read this but it could easily have been 100 pages shorter and more punchy. Regarding the actual content, this books provides a basic introduction to Christian relationships and how to help others in their Christian walks. It certainly is an introduction and not much more. It's fairly wide reaching but could have spent more time with case studies and not just short stories and illustrations here and there. The other thing Tripp seems to do in his books is present some scary scenario with hardly ever sharing how it resolved (or didn't) or progressed, leaving the reader with some cliff-hangers. I think if I could have it my way I'd substitute this book for Welch's 'Side by Side' and Powlison's 'How Does Sanctification Work' and maybe also Emlet's 'Prescriptions and Descriptions' (to address the medical side). All three books make up less than this one and would present just as good a picture whilst covering more ground.
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  • Ernie
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite Tripp books. Chapter four is worth the price of the book.
  • Becky Pliego
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this one. Hard to read and then put away in a bookshelf, though. This is a book that needs to be revisited many times.
  • Brett Mclaughlin
    January 1, 1970
    Every bit of good news must stem from a bad state or situation. News cannot be good if it is not relative to a state that is not good, or at the least, not as good. Humans strive and seek for better marriage, more money, greater happiness; all of these seekings, then, are for improvements in an initial condition. Tripp implicitly acknowledges this when he begins his treatment of the redemptive work in and through humans with an extended discussion of sin.The gospel saves and redeems people. That Every bit of good news must stem from a bad state or situation. News cannot be good if it is not relative to a state that is not good, or at the least, not as good. Humans strive and seek for better marriage, more money, greater happiness; all of these seekings, then, are for improvements in an initial condition. Tripp implicitly acknowledges this when he begins his treatment of the redemptive work in and through humans with an extended discussion of sin.The gospel saves and redeems people. That is the Christian message. And the gospel is, by its nature and definition, “good news.” If good news requires a relatively worse initial state, though, what is the gospel saving from? Most Christians would point out their personal problems: abusive pasts, issues with anger, chemical imbalances, or consistently hurtful relationships. Tripp digs much deeper, though, and identifies one single common problem that all mankind faces: sin. Before the gospel can be effective good news, the bad news must be acknowledged: sin is present in all humans.Tripp goes further, though. “Scripture [defines] sin as a condition that results in behavior” (10). Using this definition, there is no ability to shuttle sin into a corner of a particular area of life. Sin cannot be seen as “bad choices” or “trouble with the past.” Instead, sin is rightly pictured as an all-pervasive, all encompassing disease that affects all behavior. Tripp puts it this way: “Because sin is my nature as a human being, it is inescapable” (10). This is the bad news that must be accepted and recognized before the gospel can be seen as good news.So what is the good news? It must come to us from an external source. "Humans need truth from outside themselves to make sense out of life" (45). This is a monumental statement from Tripp, bearing both spiritual and philosophical ramifications. If humans cannot define truth, then all of life is a decision-making process of the most important degree: who defines truth? There are numerous sources that would claim to provide truth: the news, religions, a pantheon of gods, spiritual beings, fellow humans, even espn.com and the iPhone. If truth must be received from outside of oneself, then the decision to listen to one source over another, or to amalgamate various sources, is the decision to believe one truth--or version of truth--over another.This can all seem a bit philosophical and heady; theoretical, and best for writing but perhaps for not living. However, there is a practical and essential component of living wrapped up in these realizations. If humans must decide on a particular set of truths to truth, and then choose an interpreter for those truths, then man is deeply dependent upon the claimant and interpreter they choose. The Christian--choosing God for both truth-giver and truth-interpreter--is often inconsistent, believing God for some truths but rejecting him for many others. The pagan--choosing some other religion, and ultimately himself as at least truth-interpreter--must be shown the contradictions in their own beliefs. This all must occur before a particular relationship or need can be addressed. Truth must be determined before lives can be changed.
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  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    I am actually re-reading this book and am learning just as much this time through as I did the first time through. Any believer, counselor or not, who is personally involved with other believers would benefit from what this book has to say. Paul Tripp repeatedly drives home the theme that we are called to be involved in each other's lives for the glory of God. I especially appreciate the humble attitude Tripp uses when giving examples from his life. It makes him seem so much more real, and makes I am actually re-reading this book and am learning just as much this time through as I did the first time through. Any believer, counselor or not, who is personally involved with other believers would benefit from what this book has to say. Paul Tripp repeatedly drives home the theme that we are called to be involved in each other's lives for the glory of God. I especially appreciate the humble attitude Tripp uses when giving examples from his life. It makes him seem so much more real, and makes me believe that I too can be an instrument used by the Redeemer in the life of those around me. As a counselor, I think this is my favorite book because it helps me focus on making those all important connections with counselees. Often I will reread appropriate sections of the book before I meet with a counselee for the first time. It is more than just a guide book, however. It is a genuine appeal to make the counseling encounter a personal one that is Christ centered, not counselor centered. After all, as Tripp says, we are not what this person needs, God is.
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  • Paul Mackey
    January 1, 1970
    A good book with great insights, but written more like a textbook or a manual than an easy to access read (as I find typical of most of Tripp's writings). This book provided some great insights into the role of our hearts in relational conflicts, as well as what it means to be instruments in God's hands for His work in other's lives. Tripp does a great job of providing a grace centered approach to ministering to others. Perhaps my favorite aspect of this book is the way that Tripp takes passages A good book with great insights, but written more like a textbook or a manual than an easy to access read (as I find typical of most of Tripp's writings). This book provided some great insights into the role of our hearts in relational conflicts, as well as what it means to be instruments in God's hands for His work in other's lives. Tripp does a great job of providing a grace centered approach to ministering to others. Perhaps my favorite aspect of this book is the way that Tripp takes passages of Scripture, and then spends an entire chapter unpacking the meaning, and various applications of the text. This is especially true of his treatment of James 4. His chapter on James 4 is one I find myself returning to often.
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  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    A 5 star book on applying the gospel to everyday ministry to individuals. Paul Tripp combines a thoroughly gospel-centred approach (many of the main points are made via extended exgesis of biblical passages) with the strengths of a 'personal counselling' approach. Probably the most practical / real life book about the gospel that I've ever read, and certainly the most biblical, gospel-centred book on counselling I ever read. I'll re-read this one a few more times in the next few years! 1. Love p A 5 star book on applying the gospel to everyday ministry to individuals. Paul Tripp combines a thoroughly gospel-centred approach (many of the main points are made via extended exgesis of biblical passages) with the strengths of a 'personal counselling' approach. Probably the most practical / real life book about the gospel that I've ever read, and certainly the most biblical, gospel-centred book on counselling I ever read. I'll re-read this one a few more times in the next few years! 1. Love people, 2. Really get to know people, 3. Speak the truth in love and 4. Help them do something about it.
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  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. I liked it. He had a lot of good things to say. I just wish I could have read the abridged version of the abridged version. After some chapters I'd close the book and think "now what was he actually try to say?"....I guess I wish he didn't go on and on sometimes, not really with the theme to his chapter...none that I could find anyways. I hope my disappointment with the book doesn't have anything to do with a subconscious unwillingness to change :-)
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  • Christine Hoover
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really helpful and practical book for anyone who counsels others (not just professionally) and would like to learn how to do it better.
  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Many people call this a counseling book and I get that from the examples that are used throughout, but really this is a book about how to change the culture of the church (starting with yourself) to reflect a community of believers who help each other change through informal ministry, a "covenantal model" rather than the typical "bandaid Scripture verses method." There are many practical suggestions and good illustrations in this book to work through this process. . . . "This is not just an aspe Many people call this a counseling book and I get that from the examples that are used throughout, but really this is a book about how to change the culture of the church (starting with yourself) to reflect a community of believers who help each other change through informal ministry, a "covenantal model" rather than the typical "bandaid Scripture verses method." There are many practical suggestions and good illustrations in this book to work through this process. . . . "This is not just an aspect of the formal ministry of the local church, but a lifestyle to which God has called each of."
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    Very useful and encouraging, but verbose.
  • Chad Warner
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic resource for biblical counseling, providing both principles and practices. It brings Scriptural principles to the problems of life, showing how to bring about personal change. There are plenty of specific examples showing how to apply the concepts. It's written for every Christian, not only pastors and other formal counselors.Tripp says biblical counseling (AKA biblical personal ministry) is, in a nutshell, "speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up into … Christ" (Eph Fantastic resource for biblical counseling, providing both principles and practices. It brings Scriptural principles to the problems of life, showing how to bring about personal change. There are plenty of specific examples showing how to apply the concepts. It's written for every Christian, not only pastors and other formal counselors.Tripp says biblical counseling (AKA biblical personal ministry) is, in a nutshell, "speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up into … Christ" (Eph 4:15). The focus isn't on external behavior ("fruit"), but on the internal heart change ("root") which drives external behavior.Tripp gives this summary of biblical counseling: "Love people. Know them. Speak truth into their lives. Help them do what God has called them to do." Tripp says the most basic question in personal ministry is "for whose glory are you living?" He says Col 3:12-17 describes what we're called to do in personal ministry.Tripp makes it clear that biblical counseling isn't only the domain of pastors and other formal counselors. He says,This book is first of all a call to live a daily ministry lifestyle rooted in God's Word. … Second, this book is rooted in the belief that God has called and positioned all of his children to live as his ambassadors.He also says,If you are alive on this planet, you are a counselor! You are interpreting life, and sharing those interpretations with others. The issue is not who is counseling. All of us are. The core issue is whether that counseling is rooted in the revelation of the Creator.NotesThe Best of News: A Reason to Get Up in the MorningOur only hope is a Redeemer. "We need more than love and encouragement, information and insight. We need rescue."In the Hands of the Redeemer"God uses ordinary people to do extraordinary things in the lives of others.""God transforms people's lives as people bring his Word to others."If you want God's full perspective on a particular subject, you cannot limit yourself to the Bible passages that specifically focus on it. … If I handle Scripture topically, I will miss the overarching themes at the heart of everything else God wants to say to me.3 grand themes of redemption: God's sovereignty, grace, glory.We're to "rest in [God's] sovereignty, rather than establishing our own; and to submit to his glory rather than seeking our own."Do We Really Need Help?"My self-perception is as accurate as a carnival mirror. If I am going to see myself clearly, I need you to hold the mirror of God's Word in front of me." See Heb 3:12-13; Matt 7:3-5.We need loving courage of honestly; to love others more than ourselves and with humble, patient love help them see what they need to. We also need thankful humility of approachability; to forsake defensiveness and be ready to receive help.The Heart Is the Target"Change that ignores the heart will seldom transform the life. For a while, it may seem like the real thing, but it will prove temporary and cosmetic." See Luke 6:53-45; Matt 23:25-26.People and situations don't determine our behavior; they cause our behavior to reveal our hearts. Lasting change must come from changing thoughts and desires of heart ("fruit change is the result of root change"). We pray for God to change our hearts and use us to produce change in hearts of others.Sin always involves loving, worshipping, serving something other than God.The deepest issues of the human struggle are not issues of pain and suffering, but the issue of worship, because what rules our hearts will control the way we respond to both suffering and blessing.Everyone seeks some kind of treasure. Your treasure controls your heart, which controls your behavior (Matt 6:19-24).Understanding Your Heart StrugglePeople and situations don't force us to be angry. Anger comes from your heart (Jas 4:1-10; Luke 6:45).You get angry at someone when they stand between you and a desire.Jas 4:1-10 isn't about evil desires but inordinate desires (those that may be legitimate, but inappropriately rule your heart).Following the Wonderful CounselorWe experience anger and conflict because we think of our lives as our own, and we're more committed to our own kingdoms than to God's.4 Elements of Biblical Personal Ministry1. Love: build strong relationships with person2. Know: know person deeply, at heart level (beliefs, goals, values, desires)3. Speak: speak God's truth in love to help person see their life clearly4. Do: help person act on God's truths (apply to life)Building Relationships by Entering Their WorldThe church is not a theological classroom. It is a conversion, confession, repentance, reconciliation, forgiveness and sanctification center, where flawed people place their faith in Christ, gather to know and love him better, and learn to love others as he designed.We must be willing to make personal sacrifices out of love for others, as Christ was.To transition from casual relationship to life-changing relationship, focus not on the problem itself, but on the person's experience of their situation/problem (fear, anger, guilt, anxiety, hopelessness, loneliness, envy, etc.).Recognizing entry gates (opportunities to converse)1. Emotional words ("I'm angry")2. Interpretive words ("This shouldn't happen")3. Self talk ("I'm a failure")4. God talk ("How could God let this happen?")Offer love that's "specific and personal, not aimless and platitudinous." Let them know:• You've heard their struggle• God's there and understands their struggle• You'll stand with themEntry gate questions• What are you struggling with most right now?• What are you feeling?• How do you see God right now?Building Relationships by Identifying with SufferingGod is sovereign over all, even suffering (Ex 4:11; 1 Sam 2:2-7; Dan 4:34-35; Prov 16:9; Ps 60:3; Isa 45:7; Lam 3:28; Amos 3:6; Acts 4:27-28; Eph 1:11).Suffering doesn't hinder our redemption; God uses it in His redemptive purposes (Rom 8:17; 2 Cor 1:3-6; Phil 2:5-9; Jas 1:2-8; 5:10-11; 1 Peter).Getting to Know PeopleTo avoid assumptions• Ask person to define their terms• Ask them to clarify what they mean with concrete, real-life examples of terms they've used• Ask them to explain why they responded as they did in the examples they gaveAsking good questions• Always ask open-ended questions that require them to examine themselves.• Ask combination of survey and focused questions. Survey questions are about life broadly (themes, patterns). Focus questions dive deep to uncover roots and causes.• Ask different kinds of questions (what, how, why, how often, where, when).• Ask progressive line of questions, filling gaps in your knowledge as you go.Discovering Where Change Is NeededPersonal ministry is not about always knowing what to say. It is not about fixing everything in sight that is broken. Personal ministry is about connecting people with Christ so that they are able to think as he would have them think, desire what he says is best, and do what he calls me to do even if their circumstances never get 'fixed.'"Biblical personal ministry is more about perspective, identity, and calling than about fixing what is broken."How to organize info• Situation (what is/was going)• Responses (what person does in response to situation)• Thoughts (what person thinks about situation)• Motives (what person wants out of situation)The Goals of Speaking the Truth in Love"True love is neither idle nor timid. It is other-centered and active."God's intolerance of sin doesn't cause Him to move away from us; He moves towards us in redemptive love. We must do same for sinning neighbors.2 realities of gospel• Comfort. Justification (Rom 8:1-11). Grace of acceptance with God. Hope.• Call. Sanctification (Rom 8:12-17). Grace of conformity to Christ. Obligation.The Process of Speaking the Truth in LoveWhose agenda drives your confrontation? Are you trying to get people to do what pleases you, or what pleases God?4 steps of confrontation1. Consideration. What does the person need to see (about self, God, others, life, truth, change) that they don't see? How can you help them see it? 5 questions:• What was going on?• What were you thinking and feeling as it was going on?• What did you do in response?• Why did you do it? What did you want to accomplish?• What was the result?2. Confession. Lead person to humbly, specifically confess sin and ask for forgiveness from God and people affected by their sin.3. Commitment. 1st step of "put on" phase of repentance. What new ways of living and thinking is this person called to?4. Change. How should these new commitments be applied to daily living?Most basic questions in personal ministry: "for whose glory are you living?"Biblical confrontation is interactive, conversational (Luke 7:36-50; 14:1-14; 2 Sam 12:1-7).Tell stories, ask and answer questions, guide person's thinking, enter conversation, use metaphors, wait for self-confronting responses.Communicate general principles of Scripture in concretely applicable ways so person has clear sense of conviction and calling.Only move from interaction/conversation to declaration/confrontation if person refuses to listen and consider (Matt 18:15-20; 23:13-39; Amos 6).Establishing Agenda and Clarifying Responsibility4 objectives of "Do" element of personal ministry1. Establish personal ministry agenda2. Clarify responsibilities3. Instill identity in Christ4. Provide accountabilityObjective 1: Establish personal ministry agenda1. What does Bible say about info that has been gathered?2. What are God's goals for change for this person in this situation?3. What are some biblical methods for accomplishing God's goals of change?Objective 2: Clarifying responsibility• Responsibility (obey): inner circle of things God has called person to do that can't be passed on to anyone else.• Concern (trust): outer circle of things that concern a person but are beyond their ability, so aren't their responsibility. These must be entrusted to God.Instilling Identity with Christ and Providing AccountabilityObjective 3: Instill identity in ChristRemind person of their new identity in Christ, to stimulate hope, courage, faith (Rom 6:15-17; 1 John 3:1-3; 2 Pet 1:3-9; Phil 2:1-12).Christian life isn't just about what you'll get at end of your wait (Heaven), but who you'll become as you wait (a sanctified Christian).Objective 4: Provide accountabilityProvide loving structure, guidance, encouragement, warning to person committed to change. Don't try to do work of Holy Spirit, be person's conscience, force person to obey, or chase person who is running away.Appendix 3: Strategies for Data Gathering3 Strategies in Data Gathering (2 Cor 10:3-5)1. Locate strongholds. Where does person fail to see what God wants them to see? What effect does that have on their dealings with self, others, God, circumstances?2. Demolish pretensions (false beliefs that appear true).3. Take every thought captive. Help person thinking biblically about life.How to locate strongholds• Listen for issues that make person angry or defensive. Help them become aware of those issues and what person is protecting.• Look for times that person is closed and self-protective. Rephrase question to uncover heart.• Look for instances when person blames others. Ask, "Are you really saying that …?"• Listen for when person has set up logical defense of their view. Urge person to inspect entire life biblically. Ask questions to help them do this.How to demolish pretensions• Uncover evidence of an inaccurate view of self. Ask person to journal about each situation (see 4 steps of confrontation above for journal questions).• Uncover functional distortions in person view of God. Reframe their assumptions with biblical ones.Assignment based on 1 Cor 10:131. Declaration: "No temptation has seized you except what is common to man." Question: "Where have you been tempted to think that your situation is unique and that you have been singled out for particular suffering?"2. Declaration: "God is faithful." Question: "Where have you tended to believe that God has been unfaithful to his promises to you?"3. Declaration: "He will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear." Question: "Where have you thought that you have been given more than you can handle or that the extreme pressures of the situation have caused you to sin?"4. Declaration: "He will also provide a way out so that you can stand up under it." Question: "Where have you tended to feel trapped, with no reasonable way to deal with your situation?"Uncover distortions in way person thinks about their situation. Listen for interpretations, evaluations, purposes and goals, doctrine or theology, emotions.How to take every thought captive to ChristHelp person live in thankful obedience to Christ.Appendix 5: Homework and Four Phases of Counseling4 Phases of Counseling1. Welcome. Goal: build relationship of understanding with counselee while building counselee's hope in God.2. Understand. Goal: gain firsthand knowledge and refocus attention on what matters.3. Confront and comfort. Goal: help counselee see self biblically and embrace God's promises.4. Action. Goal: assist counsellee to apply truths learned about God, self, and others to their situation, instituting new biblical habits.Instructional studies1. What does Scripture say about heart? (Prov 4:23; Luke 6:43-45; Jas 4:1-5)2. What is idolatry? (Ezek 14:1-6; Rom 1:18-31; 1 Cor 10:1-14; Eph 5:3-7)3. What is counselee's identity in Christ? (Rom 6:1-14; Eph; 2 Pet 1:3-9)4. Who is God and what is he doing? (Ps 34; 46; Isa 40; Rom 8)5. How should you understand trials and suffering? (Rom 5:1-5; Jas 1:1-8; 1 Pet)6. How should you deal with being sinned against? (Matt 5; 18:15-35; Rom 12:9-21)
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  • Matt Sauls
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best ministry "how to" books I've ever read! If ministry is your jam, read this book!!
  • Daniel Markin
    January 1, 1970
    Very insightful and enormously practical. Could be a little shorter. The second half of the book is where I found most of the Gold!
  • Troy Solava
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very helpful book for a local church. Tripp establishes practical and simple steps for Christians to apply. He hopes to instill a vision of not just pastors but members helping other members see their identity in Christ in the midst of suffering and struggles.
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  • John Rimmer
    January 1, 1970
    This book is like a jar of peanut butter (and I love peanut butter), and what I mean by that is it is super thick, infinitely applicable, and would probably be best served in small doses spread out over bread. Regarding the thickness: Dr. Tripp's book could easily be a college textbook for biblical counseling (in fact, it probably is), and builds the justification for and application of its methods on top of a full orbed biblical worldview argument...which in reality one must do if they're reall This book is like a jar of peanut butter (and I love peanut butter), and what I mean by that is it is super thick, infinitely applicable, and would probably be best served in small doses spread out over bread. Regarding the thickness: Dr. Tripp's book could easily be a college textbook for biblical counseling (in fact, it probably is), and builds the justification for and application of its methods on top of a full orbed biblical worldview argument...which in reality one must do if they're really going to tackle human problems with any kind of real hope for change. Regarding infinitely applicable: there are no simple solutions or counseling tricks offered here. Instead the common and not-so-common problems people encounter are shown to be from a common root in all, our sinful hearts that oppose God's grace. The answer is in the Gospel Jesus gave, that we could be redeemed and changed by God's act on us, resulting in our responding to that grace in changed lives. Regarding it being best served in small doses: like a jar of peanut butter it should probably take you a while to get to the bottom of this one. The dense material NEEDS to be unpacked and practiced in order to get the good stuff out. If not there is just no way that its wisdom will not go in one ear and out the other. Fortunately this book is immediately applicable to the person reading it! As the subtitle says, we are people in need of change that seek to help others in the same spot. Best to start on one's self...which is what I intend to do.
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  • Calley
    January 1, 1970
    Please read this!
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This is a terrific book, but a tough book. It really digs into places that many times we as Christians prefer not to go. This book is meant for both lay people and professional counselors. There are challenges in here that apply to every Christian, whether in a formal counseling ministry or simply trying to learn to be a better, authentic Christian friend. I found it immensely helpful to have read this book as part of a Bible Study that included both our church counselors and other lay people li This is a terrific book, but a tough book. It really digs into places that many times we as Christians prefer not to go. This book is meant for both lay people and professional counselors. There are challenges in here that apply to every Christian, whether in a formal counseling ministry or simply trying to learn to be a better, authentic Christian friend. I found it immensely helpful to have read this book as part of a Bible Study that included both our church counselors and other lay people like myself. Few of us were looking at volunteering in the counseling ministry, but ALL of us are called to be in biblically-based relationships. I think the insights brought forth from both lay and professional perspectives were quite helpful to everyone.The book itself is well written and quite thorough. There are going to be parts that likely make you uncomfortable, as the author begins to peel back the many layers we construct around ourselves and our relationships. Be prepared to feel badly about some things, but don't worry - he, like Jesus, also gives you hope [and methods] for change!I recommend this book to any one who is looking to discover what it really means to be in community, have a biblical friendship, and what speaking the truth and confronting in love really means. I also recommend you don't read it alone, but read it with a friend or small group with whom you can wrestle through some of the more difficult concepts and passages.
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  • Neil Geisel
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book. One of my favorite themes in this book was the use of "reframing" situations to God's sovereign plan. As people in need and works in progress, we tend to blame situations and others for our depressions and life circumstances. It was helpful for Paul David Tripp to point out passages of scripture that prove and illustrate how God has shown us his heart and character. Like the Bible says in Romans 8:28 that God is redemptively active in my life "in all things". If we do not make th Excellent book. One of my favorite themes in this book was the use of "reframing" situations to God's sovereign plan. As people in need and works in progress, we tend to blame situations and others for our depressions and life circumstances. It was helpful for Paul David Tripp to point out passages of scripture that prove and illustrate how God has shown us his heart and character. Like the Bible says in Romans 8:28 that God is redemptively active in my life "in all things". If we do not make that connection and take His word as ultimate truth, we are deceiving ourselves and letting the enemy have his way. I have learned a valuable way to help and counsel others through this reframing of thinking that is so simple and profound. It took some time to digest this books information, but I believe this is one of those books that needs a second read in the future.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I have been looking for a curriculum to train my volunteers in the Care Ministry at my church. I've looked and looked and my pastor said maybe I'd just have to write one!! Definitely want a Bible centered approach, but being a therapist, I also want it to have techniques for helping people that genuinely help create change!! Could not for the life of me find something already written that was exactly what I wanted --- UNTIL, that is, I found Paul David Tripp. This book is EXACTLY what I was look I have been looking for a curriculum to train my volunteers in the Care Ministry at my church. I've looked and looked and my pastor said maybe I'd just have to write one!! Definitely want a Bible centered approach, but being a therapist, I also want it to have techniques for helping people that genuinely help create change!! Could not for the life of me find something already written that was exactly what I wanted --- UNTIL, that is, I found Paul David Tripp. This book is EXACTLY what I was looking for -- and if every single Christian approached their hurting friends this way, the church would have an entirely different reputation in the world. I can only change my corner, but this is the book. Look no further if you are looking for the same.
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  • Megan Hession
    January 1, 1970
    Interestingly, I disagree with some of his basic theology (i.e. that the Fall was not part of God's ordained will), but so far I find his application of Scripture to be very appropriate. He begins the book by looking at how the basic outline of God's redemptive plan (Creation - Fall - Salvation) gives us clues for counseling. For example, at the Creation, God talks to Adam & Eve and gives them instructions; this is a unique approach that God takes with his creation. Until making humans, God Interestingly, I disagree with some of his basic theology (i.e. that the Fall was not part of God's ordained will), but so far I find his application of Scripture to be very appropriate. He begins the book by looking at how the basic outline of God's redemptive plan (Creation - Fall - Salvation) gives us clues for counseling. For example, at the Creation, God talks to Adam & Eve and gives them instructions; this is a unique approach that God takes with his creation. Until making humans, God did not talk to His creation or give it assignments; this interaction between God and people could be called "counseling".
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best resources on discipleship around. Great book. This book emphasizes getting to the heart and pointing people to Christ and provides practical wisdom for doing so. The author makes it clear that discipleship is not for the paid pastors but part of the life of every Christian. I also appreciated the emphasis of discipleship best taking place in the context of the local church and among people you have (or are intentionally building) a relationship with. My one criticism is that some One of the best resources on discipleship around. Great book. This book emphasizes getting to the heart and pointing people to Christ and provides practical wisdom for doing so. The author makes it clear that discipleship is not for the paid pastors but part of the life of every Christian. I also appreciated the emphasis of discipleship best taking place in the context of the local church and among people you have (or are intentionally building) a relationship with. My one criticism is that some of the processes and strategies, especially in the second half of the book aren't as clearly tied to Scripture as I would like.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    I learned that each of us play a roll in carrying the Gospel to others (whether we realize it or not), and some of us carelessly give advice or act in ways that don't bring Glory to God. We must be careful in all we do, because we either draw people to Jesus or push them away. I also learned that sin is so deceitful that it fools each and everyone of us into thinking that our version of reality is right and true, when in actuality, God created us to need community with each other so we can help I learned that each of us play a roll in carrying the Gospel to others (whether we realize it or not), and some of us carelessly give advice or act in ways that don't bring Glory to God. We must be careful in all we do, because we either draw people to Jesus or push them away. I also learned that sin is so deceitful that it fools each and everyone of us into thinking that our version of reality is right and true, when in actuality, God created us to need community with each other so we can help each other identify where sin has strongholds in our lives. Awesome book!
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