Autumn, All the Cats Return
Inspector Sebag is a policeman in the South of France with an unparalleled sixth sense, who excels at slipping into the skin of killers and hunting them down. However, when a retired French Algerian cop is discovered in his apartment with the symbol OAS left near his body and few indications who killed him or why, Sebag's skills are put to the test. Days later, when a controversial monument is destroyed and another French Algerian is shot down, Sebag begins to put the pieces together. Bringing to light the horrors, hopes, and treasons committed during the war in Algeria fifteen years ago, in this sequel to Georget's Summertime, All the Cats Are Bored, Lieutenant Gilles Sebag discovers more than just a killer, but an entire secret history that not everyone wants revealed.

Autumn, All the Cats Return Details

TitleAutumn, All the Cats Return
Author
ReleaseOct 7th, 2014
PublisherEuropa Editions
ISBN-139781609452261
Rating
GenreMystery, Cultural, France, Crime, Fiction

Autumn, All the Cats Return Review

  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    "Autumn, All the Cats Return" which I won through Goodreads Giveaways is a stylish blend of murder, mystery, history and clever detective work. It begins in the town of Perpignan France when Inspector Gilles Sebag is called in to investigate the murder of a member of the Pied Noir Circle; the only clue, an OAS (Organization of the Secret Army) symbol beside the body. A man of keen instincts and brilliant deductive skills Gilles begins to delve into the mysterious death of an old man once linked "Autumn, All the Cats Return" which I won through Goodreads Giveaways is a stylish blend of murder, mystery, history and clever detective work. It begins in the town of Perpignan France when Inspector Gilles Sebag is called in to investigate the murder of a member of the Pied Noir Circle; the only clue, an OAS (Organization of the Secret Army) symbol beside the body. A man of keen instincts and brilliant deductive skills Gilles begins to delve into the mysterious death of an old man once linked to a French paramilitary organization involved in a French Algerian war fifty years earlier. The threads of the plot follow a murder investigation, the hit and run death of a young boy, destruction of a controversial monument as well as the horrific actions of a commando unit in the Algerian war. Slowly the author builds suspense and intrigue as old wounds and painful memories are reopened, old hatreds and anger are revived. Although the mood of the narrative can be dark and threatening with the historically vicious acts of not only the OAS but the FLN (Front Liberation Nationale) it's often diluted by the sarcastic wit or humor of the characters. With skilful dexterity the author brings to life a complicated plot that twists and turns with every diversion as Gilles Sebag gets closer to unraveling the identity of the killer. Although the Inspector has a sharp intelligence and sixth sense about the motives and actions of the killer, the appeal of the investigation lies in its realism. Sebag is very human with his insecurity about his wife's possible faithlessness, his daughter's hero worship and his natural reliance on the expertise of his team for information and fresh theories.Like the plot the characters are well-developed and complex with all their faults, flaws and strengths. Gilles Sebag is clever, level-headed and calm, although at times dubious and even melancholic. He's close to his partner Jacques Molina who can be blunt, acerbic and sarcastic, and works well with other members of the police team like the perceptive, go-getter Julie Sadet and the hard-working Francoise Ménard. I liked the family dynamics in this story; Sebag's jealousy of the possible infidelity of his wife, Sévérance's love and confidence in her father and Léo's ongoing dispute with his overly protective parent about his scooter. I often wondered why Sebag's sensibility never overcame his fear when dealing with his suspicions about his even-tempered, easy-going wife who has a zest for life and a deep love for her family. Like these main characters all the personalities involved in this intoxicating tale add their own brand of drama, passion and energy.I thoroughly enjoyed "Autumn, All the Cats Return, a fascinating murder mystery with an historical undercurrent to the French Algerian war.
    more
  • Antonomasia
    January 1, 1970
    [3.5] Like many of my own Goodreads posts, this book is way longer than is justifiable on the basis of its content and style - and like those posts, I've no idea what I'd actually cut. It should just shrink whilst being essentially the same thing, like a concertina, or a jumper washed on hot.Lt. Gilles Sebag is a change from most other fictional detectives, by being a laid-back sort who's not overly obsessed with his job. He even makes excuses for not going into work any earlier in the morning t [3.5] Like many of my own Goodreads posts, this book is way longer than is justifiable on the basis of its content and style - and like those posts, I've no idea what I'd actually cut. It should just shrink whilst being essentially the same thing, like a concertina, or a jumper washed on hot.Lt. Gilles Sebag is a change from most other fictional detectives, by being a laid-back sort who's not overly obsessed with his job. He even makes excuses for not going into work any earlier in the morning than he absolutely has to. You wouldn't catch many others of his species doing that. (Unless they had a far worse than usual hangover, perhaps...) He's fairly nice, and not unbelievably brilliant, although his colleagues seem to think he is for some reason. (That bitchy quip about Stephen Fry, " a stupid person's idea of a clever person", which came up in a reivew discussion the other day, suits Sebag's character rather better than it does the ubiquitous comedian...)I reluctantly picked this up again whilst suffering withdrawal symptoms from the second TV series of Arne Dahl, which I'd watched over the last week. That brought home to me just how much liking the recurring characters makes a reader/viewer bond with procedurals. Whilst this Perpignan lot are okay, I don't especially look forward to spending time with then the way I did with Ida, Gunnar and Sara in particular, and even sometimes Jennifer Aniston and Boring Paul (who, in fairness, became a bit less boring near the end.) Inevitably I had a look at Arne Dahl book samples - and was disappointed by the style/translation; Georget is significantly better, although not up there with the likes of Ian Rankin. It's one of the contemporary trends in crime fiction to make the brilliant new arrival to the team a young woman (like Ida in Arne Dahl), and there's another one in this book, Julie, who finally says things that some readers have been thinking for a while, e.g. that a criminal might use a different car to carry out each crime. How shockingly unusual. This book is oddly titled to make it match its predecessor - what would have been wrong with the semi literal "The Violence of Autumn" (for Les Violents de l'Automne) I've no idea. This book was curiously suited to the current peculiar British autumn weather: characters who've moved to Rousillon from further north in France aren't quite used to the Catalan autumn, with temperatures still above 14°C - and lashings of torrential rain which the author appears to forget about half way through.The book's main interest turns out to be cultural; readers became acquainted with this semi-Catalan corner of southern France during a summer holiday in the first volume, now Georget tells them about the local Pied-Noir community of old colonials, who settled there after France withdrew from Algeria in the 60s - there is tons here about culture and politics and different subtypes, attitudes of insiders and outsiders. It was all much too interesting to feel like an infodump - though perhaps it might to someone familiar with this subculture. It made fascinating reading not long after The Meursault Investigation - this fleshes out the characters and events of the war of indepenence that were in the background of Kamel Daoud's book.The murder victims do not inspire huge sympathy - old men with reactionary views who were ruthless paramilitaries when young, and who've since had decent and full lives - but rather than playing for outrage on heartstrings, this is a thriller plot featuring a variety of Retired Badasses. (These aren't the most fun examples ever, albeit of one of my favourite action tropes - and for some reason Georget's characters keep finding these old gunslingers to be bizarre rather than, well, action-movie-like.) The tension sags at times because there's just too much damn book, but I always did want to know what was going to happen.Like the various Nordic crime fiction plots involving white far right or far left terrorists, these historical events provide an oblique and relatively 'safe' way (less immediately stressful to viewers, and less potentially offensive and stereotypical) to allude to contemporary concerns with similar violence from other sources - and in this case a background to French relations with the Arab world, which became horribly topical when I was already part way through the book.
    more
  • Katharina
    January 1, 1970
    That was even worse than the first one. Did not get into the story or the characters at all.
  • Cooper
    January 1, 1970
    A sweet slow burn, a mystery that brings a brutal piece of somewhat forgotten history to the forefront. An old man kills another old man; a shot to the stomach and the kill shot to the heart. Inspector Sebag is called to the scene and quickly we become involved with old wounds that haven't healed. OAS (dissident organization fighting to keep Algeria under French regime) is scrawled on the door of the victims home and so begins the history lesson of the Algerian War (Algeria fighting for it's ind A sweet slow burn, a mystery that brings a brutal piece of somewhat forgotten history to the forefront. An old man kills another old man; a shot to the stomach and the kill shot to the heart. Inspector Sebag is called to the scene and quickly we become involved with old wounds that haven't healed. OAS (dissident organization fighting to keep Algeria under French regime) is scrawled on the door of the victims home and so begins the history lesson of the Algerian War (Algeria fighting for it's independence from France from 1954-62) and those who fought for it and against it and those who are still fighting it. It's a complex story that weaves the various stories together bringing us a well-told and thoughtful mystery. Throughout I was constantly asking myself questions; who, why, why now, who is this old man? Walking the story with Inspector Sebag was a walk I enjoyed! Not only were we privy to being a part of the investigation, but were privy to his internal struggle with his personal life, especially with his wife.The people who worked with the Inspector were a dysfunctional bunch. Some not coming into work when the didn't feel like it and others who cut corners because they couldn't be bothered. But when push came to shove, they had each others back. And thanks to the Inspectors pushing them, they murders, past and present, where solved.Truly enjoyed this book! The story kept me vested in the investigation, the characters where believable and flawed, the history of the Algerian War was intriguing (weaving history within a contemporary story), and the style in which it was told was unique and welcomed.I love Donna Leon's Commissario Guido Brunetti series, and this reminded me somewhat of those books.
    more
  • Lis
    January 1, 1970
    Second in the series. Very well done. The central ensemble of police characters in southwestern France, including Lieutenant Gilles Sebag as the key character, continues. The main plot centres on searching for a killer who appears to be motivated by events fifty years earlier in the Algerian civil war. Interesting picture of the milieu of French people in Algeria who did not consider themselves colonizers, thought of Algeria as their country, and thought they were betrayed by de Gaulle and Franc Second in the series. Very well done. The central ensemble of police characters in southwestern France, including Lieutenant Gilles Sebag as the key character, continues. The main plot centres on searching for a killer who appears to be motivated by events fifty years earlier in the Algerian civil war. Interesting picture of the milieu of French people in Algeria who did not consider themselves colonizers, thought of Algeria as their country, and thought they were betrayed by de Gaulle and France for negotiating independence for Algeria (ie Arab Algerians.) And, having moved to France (and other countries) they still consider themselves an isolated and misunderstood community. Lots of nuances here. A related sub-plot has Sebag searching for the cause of an accident in which his daughter's schoolmate was killed. And a side plot of Sebag's relationship with his wife Claire continues.
    more
  • Darius Ostrowski
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the book - well written, interesting mystery, a great introduction to a part of the history of France that was mostly unknown to me, the characters continue to grow from the first book.My two (minor) complaints: Inspector Sebag's personal life problem needs to get resolved - it's just a distraction at this point. It added absolutely nothing to the story and just broke the rhythm of the book.And finally, the first book did such a wonderful job at setting a palpable mood that I was disappo I liked the book - well written, interesting mystery, a great introduction to a part of the history of France that was mostly unknown to me, the characters continue to grow from the first book.My two (minor) complaints: Inspector Sebag's personal life problem needs to get resolved - it's just a distraction at this point. It added absolutely nothing to the story and just broke the rhythm of the book.And finally, the first book did such a wonderful job at setting a palpable mood that I was disappointed when this book couldn't do the same - it's a great read but without that additional layer of the first.
    more
  • Wayne
    January 1, 1970
    Philippe Georget, the author, is a journalist and newsman and has a keen eye for facts and procedures, police procedures. What he hasn't got a handle on yet is action...creating it and describing it. Police procedurals can at times get bogged down, not unlike actual investigations, but readers don't want nor do they have to spend a tedious amount of time in them. The over emphasis on procedures and the unnecessary depth to which he explains the cultural and historical ramifications of the Algeri Philippe Georget, the author, is a journalist and newsman and has a keen eye for facts and procedures, police procedures. What he hasn't got a handle on yet is action...creating it and describing it. Police procedurals can at times get bogged down, not unlike actual investigations, but readers don't want nor do they have to spend a tedious amount of time in them. The over emphasis on procedures and the unnecessary depth to which he explains the cultural and historical ramifications of the Algerian War were the deal breakers for me. I will read the next book in the Inspector Sebag series and hope for a lighter touch and more action.
    more
  • Sharron
    January 1, 1970
    If this book had been 25% shorter, at least 100 pages fewer, it would have warranted 4.5 stars. The story, however, didn't warrant 400 plus pages. It bogged down in irrelevant details. That said, the setting, southwestern France, was interesting and the cast of characters likewise. The interminable references to the protagonist's jealousy regarding his wife grew tedious though. The most intriguing thing about this mystery though was its focus - the French Algerian War, a conflict that I knew nex If this book had been 25% shorter, at least 100 pages fewer, it would have warranted 4.5 stars. The story, however, didn't warrant 400 plus pages. It bogged down in irrelevant details. That said, the setting, southwestern France, was interesting and the cast of characters likewise. The interminable references to the protagonist's jealousy regarding his wife grew tedious though. The most intriguing thing about this mystery though was its focus - the French Algerian War, a conflict that I knew next to nothing about before picking up this book.
    more
  • Ken
    January 1, 1970
    Learning some of the story of the France and Algeria conflict was interesting, but I thought it was quite a bit too long (as in about 100 pages) and Sebag's wife was mentioned too much for the story of her affair not to be resolved, in my opinion.
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps it was somewhat lost in translation, but I found the plot slow, the characters stilted, and the title bemusing. I did learn a bit about the French/Algerian war of the early 1960s. I would not read another in this French mystery series.
  • Ann Tonks
    January 1, 1970
    Before I start, what does the cover of the English version of this book have to do with anything. If it'ssupposed to be Inspector Sebag's daughter, the model is too old. And there's no other character whom she could be. Putting aside that whinge, this is a perfectly readable police procedural. It's not as strong as the first in the series but finding out more about this part of France and it's Catalonia culture is interesting as is the history lesson about the Algerian Civil War. However, one do Before I start, what does the cover of the English version of this book have to do with anything. If it'ssupposed to be Inspector Sebag's daughter, the model is too old. And there's no other character whom she could be. Putting aside that whinge, this is a perfectly readable police procedural. It's not as strong as the first in the series but finding out more about this part of France and it's Catalonia culture is interesting as is the history lesson about the Algerian Civil War. However, one does want Sebag to get on with sorting out his relationship problems because that is just an irrigating sub-theme that no longer serves to enhance the story line.
    more
  • Vontel
    January 1, 1970
    Finally this second book in the series came in. I'll have to review my notes for the first one before I read much further than the few chapters read last evening.Another interesting book in this series, better now that I'm more familiar with the characters. Fascinating incorporation of the history of Algeria as a French colony & the ultimate Civil wars, particularly 1961-62 that led to the withdrawal of France in 1962. I was aware of that fact, but too young to know much of that era other th Finally this second book in the series came in. I'll have to review my notes for the first one before I read much further than the few chapters read last evening.Another interesting book in this series, better now that I'm more familiar with the characters. Fascinating incorporation of the history of Algeria as a French colony & the ultimate Civil wars, particularly 1961-62 that led to the withdrawal of France in 1962. I was aware of that fact, but too young to know much of that era other than there was violence. The exploration of what it meant to the French population who were born there, perhaps after generations, as well as the "true believers" & those who take personal advantage of the situation, have resonance now in many other areas of the world, as well as finally 50 years later getting at least a segment of the French population to consider that part of their history.
    more
  • Ellen Turner Hall
    January 1, 1970
    Inspector Sebag states that his job is not to make moral judgments but to elucidate the facts. That is what makes Georget's book such a luxurious read. The complexity of the plot, involving adversaries in the Algerian war of independence from France and a promise Sebag made to his daughter, stimulates the curiosity of the reader and encourages each person to draw his own conclusions about right and wrong.
    more
  • Jeannette
    January 1, 1970
    Dogged police work, twists and turns and a short history lesson in which many of us know nothing about.
  • Caroline Ingvaldsen
    January 1, 1970
    The charming Inspector Sebag returns in this sequel: a mysterious series of murders rooted in the dark past of the French colonization of Algeria.
  • Malarie
    January 1, 1970
    It was OK. Hence the two stars. It wasn’t addicting or something I couldn’t put down, yet it wasn’t all horrible.
  • Kim Fay
    January 1, 1970
    I reviewed the Inspector Sebag mysteries for the "Los Angeles Review of Books." https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/t...
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Twice as rewarding to finish an interesting book in French. The story also contains historical background surrounding the Algerian war and its aftermath in France.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I very nearly rated his first book (Summertime, All the Cats are Bored) 5 stars but feel I must do with this one. Feeling like you are living the life of Inspector Gilles Sebag and being part of his investigation is just like sitting down with an old friend now, even after just one previous book - his home life seems to be happy but he is still tormented by the fear that his wife has cheated on him. On the professional front, Gilles is confronted by a murder that seems to have its root cause in I very nearly rated his first book (Summertime, All the Cats are Bored) 5 stars but feel I must do with this one. Feeling like you are living the life of Inspector Gilles Sebag and being part of his investigation is just like sitting down with an old friend now, even after just one previous book - his home life seems to be happy but he is still tormented by the fear that his wife has cheated on him. On the professional front, Gilles is confronted by a murder that seems to have its root cause in the Algerian War of Independence, fought during the late 1950s and early 1960s. I found this element absolutely fascinating as I knew very little about this conflict before - the acts of terrorism committed against the general population by the rival terrorist organisations, the FLN and the OAS, were probably typical of most such conflicts but I just found it strange that I had never heard much about it before. It is apparent that, when Algeria became independent from France, people of French descent were repatriated to France, even though they had been born and raised in Algeria - these people are referred to as 'pieds-noirs' or 'black feet' by the resident French, even in Sebag's home town of Perpignan where there is a large population of such people. When an old 'pieds-noirs' man is murdered in his apartment, investigations reveal that he was a member of the OAS, an organisation that was trying to prevent Algeria from becoming independent and used to commit terrorist acts against the Arab population and against the local French police. Sebag and his colleagues try to work out who would have wanted to kill this man after so long but are distracted by acts of vandalism and threats to local 'pieds-noir' organisations. But when another man is murdered in similar circumstances, the pressure on the police to solve the case mounts. Loved the way the investigation evolves even though, as with the previous book, on several occasions I worked something out before the police did - but strangely this does not detract from the overall impression of the book, which I really enjoyed. Reminds me a lot of the Pierre leMaitre books involving a Parisian police inspector which I also love - 9.5/10.
    more
  • Kristine Brancolini
    January 1, 1970
    Almost exactly two years ago, I read the first book in this series, Summertime All the Cats Are Bored, and I loved it. I was happy to find the second book in the series, Autumn, All the Cats Return. Inspector Gilles Sebag and his partner Molina are back. The book picks up pretty close to where the first one left off: Gilles still suspects that his wife was having an affair. He would love to know the truth, but since it seems to be over, maybe not. Gilles has much more pressing matters on his min Almost exactly two years ago, I read the first book in this series, Summertime All the Cats Are Bored, and I loved it. I was happy to find the second book in the series, Autumn, All the Cats Return. Inspector Gilles Sebag and his partner Molina are back. The book picks up pretty close to where the first one left off: Gilles still suspects that his wife was having an affair. He would love to know the truth, but since it seems to be over, maybe not. Gilles has much more pressing matters on his mind. Autumn is much darker than Summer. It begins with an assassination of an elderly man and the death of a 14-year-old boy in a scooter accident; soon other assassinations follow. The death of Matthieu seems to be unrelated to the murder of the old man, but skillfully Georget reveals the connections between the two deaths. The reader "knows" the murderer, but not his identity. In the beginning. Once again, the location is key to the murders and their unraveling. Everything is connected to the Algerian Wars (1954-1962) and the French Algerians who were forced out of the country in its aftermath. The murder victims were all members of the OAS, "a dissident paramilitary organization that sought to prevent Algeria from gaining independence from France during the Algerian War" (p. 28). The reader learns about the OAS and the four-member cell that is at the center of the mystery through fascinating flashbacks. Georget does an excellent job with these flashbacks, placing them strategically throughout the book and slowly revealing clues to solving the murders in the present.In true Mediterranean Noir style, politics plays a large role in Autumn. We meet members of the pied noir community in Perpignan, descendants of the French Algerians who returned to France after the Algerian War. Many feel more Algerian than French and feel discrimination in France. Perpignan is near the border with Spain, and the murderer moves back and forth, so I read with an atlas open to get a better feel for the distances and the terrain. Catalan culture also comes into play with characters who identify as Catalan, not French or Spanish. This meshes well with the pieds noirs, who attempt to maintain their identity, even though many in the community barely remember Algeria -- if at all. I enjoyed this book even more than the first one in the series. Sebag is not an entirely likeable guy but he's devoted to his wife and children and committed to justice. He's borderline obsessed with his wife and it's a little weird [read: sexist], but believable. Georget simultaneously creates an evocative mood, compelling characters, and a well-crafted murder mystery. Congratulations, M. Georget! I'm anxious to learn what the cats do next...
    more
  • Jill Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    French author Philipe Georget's novel, "Autumn, All The Cats Return" is the second in his series of police procedurals, set in the southern France city of Perpignan. Featuring detective Gilles Sebag and his fellow-policemen, the story combines murder with history. Actually, the murders ARE the history, as the OAS and the Algerian War feature prominently in the story more than 50 years after the war's end and the French Algerians moving to France.In 2012, old men living in Perpignan are turning u French author Philipe Georget's novel, "Autumn, All The Cats Return" is the second in his series of police procedurals, set in the southern France city of Perpignan. Featuring detective Gilles Sebag and his fellow-policemen, the story combines murder with history. Actually, the murders ARE the history, as the OAS and the Algerian War feature prominently in the story more than 50 years after the war's end and the French Algerians moving to France.In 2012, old men living in Perpignan are turning up dead...murdered, actually. The killer does nothing to disguise his fingerprints and Sebag and his partner and other policeman begin to trace the murderer by tracing the lives of the victims. Both - so far - had fought in the war and it's quickly determined that the murdered men were part of a group of four who had fought together. One had been killed in Algiers; the other three had returned to France in 1962 to rebuild their lives. Now, two are dead and the third is threatened by the unknown assassin. Another, seemingly unrelated case Sebag is also working on, concerns a 14 year old boy killed when his motor bike is hit by a reckless driver.Perpignan is located on the French side of the French/Spanish border. It is considered Catalan, though I don't quite understand the French relationship with the Spanish Catalonia and the political actions in Spain. Some of the action in the book takes place in the Spanish city of Girona. So Georget's novel is actually about two political movements in history; France and it's long-time colony, Algeria, and the Catalonia independence movement. (You can get an idea of the French/Algerian/OAS history by reading Frederick Forsyth's excellent novel, "The Day of the Jackal").Georget's novel is also an excellent look at how police work affects the personal lives of those doing the work. Sebag has a somewhat troubled relationship with his family, though it appears to be one-sided and a figment of his imagination. I don't know what the title means as there aren't any cats important in the story. Oh well, I have Georget's first novel, "Summertime, All the Cats are Bored" on order, so maybe I'll know then where the cats are and why they're important. I'll report back. In any case, this book is an excellent read for those international crime lovers.
    more
  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    Autumn, All the Cats Return is the 2nd book in Philippe Georget's Inspector Sebag mystery series set in Southern France. This was my first experience with Georget's writing. As far as I know there is one other book in this series, plus one other book by Georget that has been translated into English. This story has an interesting back story exploring the transfer of Algeria back to the Arab majority by General de Gaulle. The story deals with the historical battle for Algeria by the French nationa Autumn, All the Cats Return is the 2nd book in Philippe Georget's Inspector Sebag mystery series set in Southern France. This was my first experience with Georget's writing. As far as I know there is one other book in this series, plus one other book by Georget that has been translated into English. This story has an interesting back story exploring the transfer of Algeria back to the Arab majority by General de Gaulle. The story deals with the historical battle for Algeria by the French national OAS and the Arab FLN. It's a nasty, vicious period in French history. In the story, an ex-OAS fighter now living in France is murdered. Inspector Sebag and his team of investigators begin an investigation to find the killer. The story moves from Inspector Sebag to the killer and then back in the past to the battle within Algeria. At the same time, Sebag has told his young daughter that he will check out an auto accident where her school mate was killed and as well, he is examining himself and his relationship with his wife, Claire, who he thinks has cheated on him.It's not a perfect story by any means but the subject matter is unique and the characters are all interesting and the investigation is conducted methodically and comprehensively. I liked learning about that area of France and found the historical references especially interesting. I did partially come up with some of the solutions but that didn't take away from my overall enjoyment of the story. The translation was more than satisfactory and did not affect my enjoyment. I'll try and find the first book, Summertime All the Cats are Bored. (3.5 stars)
    more
  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    The background for this case - the war in Algeria in the 1960's, the vicious acts of the OAS and the FLN is a grim bit of history that is mostly forgotten, but not by everyone. The murder of an elderly man gets Sebag and his team investigating the history and trying to find out who would be hunting down veterans of that fight 50 years later. There is a concurrent story line dealing with the death of a young boy, a friend of Sebag's daughter who was struck and killed by a drunken driver. The two The background for this case - the war in Algeria in the 1960's, the vicious acts of the OAS and the FLN is a grim bit of history that is mostly forgotten, but not by everyone. The murder of an elderly man gets Sebag and his team investigating the history and trying to find out who would be hunting down veterans of that fight 50 years later. There is a concurrent story line dealing with the death of a young boy, a friend of Sebag's daughter who was struck and killed by a drunken driver. The two stories come together in a not quite tidy way at the end.The history and the multicultural, polygot setting in Perpignan is fascinating.I still like Sebag, his fellow cops and his family. I'm getting a bit tired of his insecurities about whether his (apparently) devoted wife may or may not have had an affair a year earlier. If he can manage to either resolve or forget that issue in the next book, that would be a good thing in my opinion.
    more
  • Kimber Brosseau
    January 1, 1970
    I won, "Autumn All the Cats Return" through Goodreads Giveaways. It is a murder mystery that includes Algerian history. Inspector Gilles Sebag is called in to investigate the murder of a member of the Pied Noir Circle; the only clue, a symbol beside the body. The plot that twists and turns has complex characters with flaws and strengths that bring them to life. I recommend reading this one.
    more
  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    These books were a total pleasant surprise, especially, Autumn. Admire the honesty—from a man' point of view—the lead character, Sebagh, and the good, if not complex, plot, as well as the historical and geographic facts. An introduction to not only Catalan, but the Algerian war and the Pied Noir. Has got me reading up on the subject.
    more
  • Mom
    January 1, 1970
    Another Inspector Sebag mystery dealing with the French/Algerian conflict from the 1960s. Again, the inspector's personal life is a large compenent of the story though not directly related to the mystery to be solved. The lack of closure in his relationship with his wife keeps you coming back for more since you know you will get a good police procedural to solve as well.
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Not as good as reviews had encouraged me to believe. I found the translation into English really clunky and unsophisticated, so much so that it interfered with my enjoyment of the plot. It was also poorly edited, with enough errors to also spoil the reading experience. A bit of a disappointment.
    more
  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the mystery and learned a bit about French Algeria, pieds-Noirs and the war for independence, but I felt the story lost a bit in translation. I'm hoping to read the first Inspector Sebag novel in French
  • Melanie McKissock
    January 1, 1970
    Atmospheric, stylish novel set in Perpignan, but harking back to the end of French control of Algeria. The ramifications of actions carried out in that period are far reaching and well explained and explored here; an enjoyable read.
  • Cindy Smith
    January 1, 1970
    who'da thunk I'd enjoy a mystery involving French Algerian political intrigue?
Write a review