The Best American Mystery Stories 2014
“With so many great authors contributing to this fiction collection . . . it doesn’t take detecting skills to discover the gem. And every story dazzles . . . These stories, in prose both elegant and compelling, get to the heart of why people do what they do.” — USA TodayThe Best American Mystery Stories 2014 will be selected by “writing powerhouse” (USA Today) Laura Lippman. With her popular Tess Monaghan series and her New York Times best-selling standalone novels, Lippman has greatly expanded the boundaries of modern mystery fiction and psychological suspense.

The Best American Mystery Stories 2014 Details

TitleThe Best American Mystery Stories 2014
Author
ReleaseOct 7th, 2014
PublisherMariner Books
ISBN-139780544034648
Rating
GenreMystery, Short Stories, Fiction, Anthologies

The Best American Mystery Stories 2014 Review

  • Jenny Miller
    January 1, 1970
    The first story was great. The second story was really good, too. Then there's a lot of Terrible Things Happening to Girls. Not much mystery. Plenty of grisly crime. Maybe two stars is kind of harsh, but I'd say it reflects the drop-off after the first story and my growing disappointment/anger as I went on.
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  • Cybercrone
    January 1, 1970
    Not really impressed with most of the stories.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Some amazing stories in this collection. Well worth a read if you enjoy short fiction and can deal with the dark stuff.
  • Terri
    January 1, 1970
    Some were enjoyable, some were ok, and some were just plain weird. I don't think I'll ever understand why some stories are thought to be good enough to be included in a "Best" book.
  • Laura Chase
    January 1, 1970
    I am generally not a fan of short stories. However, since I recently broke a wrist, I'm finding holding books, especially hardcovers difficult and since i had this lying around, i figured I'd give it a shot. I really liked a few of them and they were by writers I have read before and enjoyed. The others, I found myself just skipping over after reading the first page.
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  • Sarah Toppins
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series of short stories and savor over each entry. I think the mystery and short stories are the best books. I also enjoy the travel and essay books. It's the way to get the best of the best without having to subscribe to a lot of magazines. Laura Lippman is also one of my favorite authors.
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  • Lisa Tollefson
    January 1, 1970
    More horror than mystery for the most part, though at least she's pretty clear about that upfront. She says that she tends to the dark. Still, I found myself starting but not finishing several of the stories in here. The ones I read through were without fail well written, so if you don't mind mysteries that chill, you'll probably like this collection.
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  • Brad Hodges
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second volume of The Best American Mystery Stories that I've read, and the same holds true: mystery is a vague term that encompasses a lot of types of stories. That's at least as chosen by Laura Lippman, this year's editor. None of these stories are the "whodunit" variety, which kind of eliminates the word "mystery" from the picture, but they are about crime and the darkness of the soul.My favorite stories were those that had a noir edge to them, or those that were funny, or both. Wh This is the second volume of The Best American Mystery Stories that I've read, and the same holds true: mystery is a vague term that encompasses a lot of types of stories. That's at least as chosen by Laura Lippman, this year's editor. None of these stories are the "whodunit" variety, which kind of eliminates the word "mystery" from the picture, but they are about crime and the darkness of the soul.My favorite stories were those that had a noir edge to them, or those that were funny, or both. What I did not expect was a posthumous story by Joseph Heller, the author of my favorite novel, Catch-22, and a very funny man. He wrote a story called "Almost Like Christmas" that has no laughs at all, and is brutal in its presentation. Another tough story is "Going Across Jordan," by James Lee Burke, a very well-established crime author, about itinerant workers in the 1950s. He opens his story with the following: "Who would believe somebody could drive a car across the bottom of ancient glacial lake at night, the high beams tunneling in electrified shafts of yellow smoke under the surface, but I stood on the bank and saw it, my head still throbbing from a couple of licks I took when I was on the ground and couldn't protect myself."Continuing with noir, how can you beat an opening like Ernest Finney's "The Wrecker": "I'm sitting at the bar in the semigloom of the Silver Dollar, as far away as I can get from the loud music. A babe comes through the door. It's still before nine; too early for anyone else to eyeing the sign taped to the bar mirror: NOBODY'S UGLY AT 2 A.M." Unfortunately, the story doesn't match that socko start.Other authors from outside the mystery genre participate. Pulitzer Prize-winner Annie Proulx takes us to the founding of Quebec in "Rough Deeds," which showcases chicanery in the logging business and has a grisly end. Roxane Gay has "I Will Follow You," which is about twin sisters who are very close, even though one marries a no-goodnick. The story is both menacing and a tad funny, such as when the narrator describes her brother-in-law, Darryl: "Carolina married when she was nineteen. Darryl, her husband, was a decade older, but he had a full head of hair and she thought that meant something." Or, "Darryl worked nights managing a small airfield on the edge of town. It was a mystery how he had fallen into the job. He knew little about managing, aviation, or work."Also in the funny vein, there is Nancy Pauline Simpson's "Festered Wounds," set in a small Southern town in the year 1900, with a sheriff investigating the death of a man who took a header from a railroad bridge. It's full of cornpone humor like saying of the undertaker, "Penrose could make a ninety-year-old scrofula victim look like a Floradora girl.Also set at the turn of the century is "The Covering Storm," by David H. Ingram, which has a man planning to commit the perfect murder, but he's undone by something unforeseen: the devastating hurricane that pummeled Galveston, Texas.Two very good stories concern fathers and sons. Russell Banks' "Former Marine" has the title character spending his retirement robbing banks, but his son is a policeman. An even better story is "Pleasant Grove" by Scott Loring Sanders, which also is about a bank robbery and a father and a son, and is very, very dark: "The events of those few days, of the truck crashing, of him taking the money, of finding out the man's identity, of then blowing the guts out that same man, his father, of dragging him through the snow and burying him him in a makeshift grave, all of those events had haunted him." Any story that contains the words "makeshift grave" is bound to be dark.Perhaps the best story is one that really can't qualify as a mystery, or even a crime thriller, but it's here. That's "Snuff," by Jodi Angel. It's about a teenage boy who is over at some friend's house with some boys watching what they think is a snuff movie. He ends up needing a ride, so calls his sister, who picks him up and hits a deer. It's dead, but it's pregnant, and she tries to deliver the fawn. It's a great story that connects on a number of levels. But I do believe there has never an authenticated snuff film ever found by law enforcement.So, this is a pretty good collection. I can't go without mentioning Charlaine Harris, the author of the novels that True Blood is based on, with "Small Kingdoms," about avenging teachers. As a teacher, I can relate.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    This is not usually a collection I would be looking for but I was able to purchase at a huge discount on the Kindle. Overall it was a pretty enticing collection of stories. Some of those most notable included- in the story " Collectors ", Daniel Alarcon shows why reading one of his novels is on my list. This story features Henry and Rogelio, two men in the famous Mexican prison. We see how Henry grows up, gets involved with crime, and sentenced to prison. He meets Rogelio in prison and the two b This is not usually a collection I would be looking for but I was able to purchase at a huge discount on the Kindle. Overall it was a pretty enticing collection of stories. Some of those most notable included- in the story " Collectors ", Daniel Alarcon shows why reading one of his novels is on my list. This story features Henry and Rogelio, two men in the famous Mexican prison. We see how Henry grows up, gets involved with crime, and sentenced to prison. He meets Rogelio in prison and the two become friends and more. Navigating the prisons social structure is difficult but eventually Henry finds his way. When he is released he misses his friends, especially Rogelio. A fire at the prison ends any thought of a reunion. - Meghan Abbot's " My Heart is Nearly Broken" takes a look at the tabloid journalism that pops up around a missing child case while " Former Marine " by Russell Banks shows us an aging vet, facing foreclosure and insolvency, who comes up with a unique way to raise money. - James Lee Burke writes a fantastic story called " Going Across Jordan." This is a story I can already see the movie of in my head. Featuring two drifters trying to make something of themselves who end up on the wrong side of a tyrannical rancher we see the story develop into a revenge plot that works much better than most. - in the story " The Wrecker" written by Ernest Finney a middle aged tow truck driver is hit on by an attractive, wealthy, younger woman. He does not understand it but determines to enjoy the ride. A couple of months later he is in jail and realizing what an elaborate frame job she has done to pin him for a murder. - Charlaine Harris in writing " Small Kingdoms" let's us meet a high school principal who in some former life was a hired killer. Funny to think those skills might come in useful in her small town high school - Joseph Heller's " Almost Like Christmas" is a sad story set in the days of overt racism and segregation. Bravery comes in many forms. - Another story set in the past is David H Ingram's " The Covering Storm." A man decides to take care of a situation where his wife's honor has been besmirched. He creates the perfect alibi but one thing goes wrong. It starts to rain and blow that day in Galveston. - The always readable Anne Proulx adds a story called " Rough Deeds." In this story we visit woodsman in the territory of Maine as they battle and jump each other's claims for prize wood. There is money to be made and that usually brings corruption and violence. - Ending the collection is Laura Van Berg's story " Antarctica". A woman visits the continent to explore what happened to her scientist brother as he has been killed in an accident at a research facility. As she learns more we also revisit her past relationship with her brother which had gone from incredibly close to a drifting away she now, of course, regrets.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 2.5 of 5I've really come to like the "Best American ____" series of books, though I typically go in for the non-fiction series'.Because of recently become much more interested in reading mystery genre books, I was hoping to broaden my reading by becoming quickly acquainted with some of the new mystery writers through a collection such as this. This particular collection is not one of my favorites. I struggled to get through this This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 2.5 of 5I've really come to like the "Best American ____" series of books, though I typically go in for the non-fiction series'.Because of recently become much more interested in reading mystery genre books, I was hoping to broaden my reading by becoming quickly acquainted with some of the new mystery writers through a collection such as this. This particular collection is not one of my favorites. I struggled to get through this book and very few of the stories stands out to me. In fact this book challenged my understanding of what a mystery genre story is (or should be). I don't know that I would have classified everything here as a mystery. This is neither good nor bad, except that I was expecting mysteries.My favorite story here was "Antarctica" by Laura van den Berg. Yes, being the last story in the book makes it the easiest to remember, but because it features the location of Antarctica (a place I've long wished to visit) and a subject of theatre (my profession), I held a special affinity for the story.I also enjoyed "Princess Anne" by Jim Allyn, which takes on a tone of a 'typical' mystery story.Patricia Engel's "Aida" also caught my attention and was a worthy read.This collection contains:"My Heart is Either Broken" by Megan Abbott"Collectors" by Daniel Alarcon"Princess Anne" by Jim Allyn"Snuff" by Jodi Angel"Former Marine" by Russell Banks"Going Across Jordan" by James Lee Burke"Aida" by Patricia Engel"The Wrecker" by Ernest Finney"I Will Follow You" by Roxanne Gay"Bush-Hammer Finish" by Michelle Butler Hallett"Small Kingdoms" by Charlaine Harris"Almost Like Christmas" by Joseph Heller"The Covering Storm" by David H. Ingram"A Good Marriage" by Ed Kurtz"Gauley Season" by Matthew Neill Null"Rough Deeds" by Annie Proulx"Pleasant Grove" by Scott Loring Sanders"Festered Wounds" by Nancy Pauline Simpson"Satan's Kingdom" by Dennis Tafoya"Antarctica" by Laura van den BergWhile this wasn't my favorite collection in the "Best American" series, it certainly won't stop me from checking new volumes. An individual editor's taste can definitely set the tone for a collection such as this and the "Best American" series rotates their editors.Looking for a good book? Best American Mystery Stories 2014 is not the strongest collection in the Best american Mystery Stories series, but it's still worth a look if you're looking to sample the mystery short-fiction market.I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Alisa
    January 1, 1970
    Really solid collection. Standouts for me were:-- Roxane Gay's "I Will Follow You"--Laura van den Berg's "Antarctica"--Annie Proulx's "Rough Deeds"--Jim Allyn's "Princess Anne"
  • Bojan Tunguz
    January 1, 1970
    I am a longtime reader (and reviewer) of “The Best American Short Stories” series. These days when I have very little time to dedicate to reading high-quality fiction they server the purpose of keeping my interest in literature aflame. However, that collection has been very uneven in terms of quality of writing. Some years I would read one amazing story after another, while with a different guest editor I would struggle to go through the entire collection. My biggest complaints would always revo I am a longtime reader (and reviewer) of “The Best American Short Stories” series. These days when I have very little time to dedicate to reading high-quality fiction they server the purpose of keeping my interest in literature aflame. However, that collection has been very uneven in terms of quality of writing. Some years I would read one amazing story after another, while with a different guest editor I would struggle to go through the entire collection. My biggest complaints would always revolve around the same issue: even though I appreciate good writing in its own right, I still insist that the stories I read be in fact stories. They need to tell something consequential. That usually, but not always, means that I want “something to happen.” Too many of the stories that have been coming out of literary workshops in recent years have been incredibly well crafted, but ultimately sterile. This is the first year that I had branched out and decided to check out “The Best American Mystery Stories.” I don’t know why I didn’t do this before. The very title of this collection suggests a very dynamic and eventful assortment of stories. Indeed, in that regard the collection has lived up to its premise. However, there is more to a mystery story than some very exciting set of events, involving often (but not always) some kind of surprise. The editors of this collection seem to have understood “mystery” to mean a crime of some kind. Therefor it would be a big stretch to call most of the stories in this collection a “mystery.” Don’t get me wrong: these are all very well written and interesting stories. Most of them are very dark and even depressing though, so this is not necessarily a “fun” book to read. If they made movies or TV series based on these stories they would most accurately be described as dramas. I feel that the editors, when deciding between the literary value of the stories and their merit as true mysteries may have given the first of these two criteria much more weight. Nonetheless, this is a very good collection of short fiction. Now I will look into reading the collections from the previous few years, and hopefully at least some of them will be dominated by “true” mystery stories.
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  • Billie Pritchett
    January 1, 1970
    The truth about these sorts of collections is that they are going to be a hodgepodge. Sometimes it feels worth it because I'll read one really amazing story that I am very glad that I did. In this collection The Best American Mystery Stories 2014, I was very happy to have read the first story in the book, "My Heart Is Either Broken" by Megan Abbott. It is a true modern-day mystery story, with lots of twists and turns. It tracks a husband's perspective about his daughter going missing and the que The truth about these sorts of collections is that they are going to be a hodgepodge. Sometimes it feels worth it because I'll read one really amazing story that I am very glad that I did. In this collection The Best American Mystery Stories 2014, I was very happy to have read the first story in the book, "My Heart Is Either Broken" by Megan Abbott. It is a true modern-day mystery story, with lots of twists and turns. It tracks a husband's perspective about his daughter going missing and the question of whether the wife was responsible for getting rid of the baby. Incredibly compelling.Here are some of the other stories in the book that I thought were worth reading:"Going Across Jordan" by James Lee Burke. Powerful story about a couple of rabble-rousers traveling around America and promoting unionization. The big conflict comes when they run afoul with the law while trying to protect someone."Small Kingdoms" by Charlaine Harris. This is the story of a woman who has some mysterious background, kind of James Bondish, but who moonlights/covers as a school principal. Really fun."Pleasant Grove" by Scott Loring Sanders. Pretty good story about a strange encounter that leads to coming into some money, which leads to more problems after that. Country people getting into trouble for doing bad deeds.Other than those few, I didn't really enjoy the collection much, to tell you the truth. But I really liked these stories.
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  • Frank
    January 1, 1970
    Another good collection, though somehow the high points didn't seem quite as high as in the 2005 collection edited by Joyce Carol Oates. There seemed to be more stories here that fell squarely into the genre, straight-ahead mystery stories instead of literary stories that happened to contain a mystery. Maybe that's the difference between Oates and Lippman as editor. I also noticed a recurrence of violence toward women—women and girls kidnapped, held capitive, tortured, murdered. At the same time Another good collection, though somehow the high points didn't seem quite as high as in the 2005 collection edited by Joyce Carol Oates. There seemed to be more stories here that fell squarely into the genre, straight-ahead mystery stories instead of literary stories that happened to contain a mystery. Maybe that's the difference between Oates and Lippman as editor. I also noticed a recurrence of violence toward women—women and girls kidnapped, held capitive, tortured, murdered. At the same time, in this collection 9 of the 20 stories were written by women, as opposed to only 3 in the other. Overall, this is a darker, more noir collection than the 2005 one.Favorite Stories"My Heart is Either Broken," by Megan Abbott—creepy story about a daughter's kidnapping and its effect on a woman and her husband's perception of her "Going Across Jordan," by James Lee Burke—a lyrical story about two drifters (a la Of Mice and Men, except one patterns himself after Woody Guthrie or Tom Joad) who come up against an evil cowboy actor"Almost Like Christmas," by Joseph Heller—a posthumously published story about an incipient lynching"Gauley Season," by Matthew Neill Null—exquisitely written story about a West Virginia town and the whitewater rafting industry created by a dam"Festered Wounds," by Nancy Pauline Simpson—delightfully narrated if somewhat predictable story set in a small Southern town in the early twentieth century
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  • Andy Henion
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished The Best American Mystery Stories 2014, edited by Laura Lippman. A lot of big names in this edition: Russell Banks, Annie Proulx, Joseph Heller, James Lee Burke. For my money, though, the best story was "Aida" by Patricia Engel. The story, which originally appeared in the Harvard Review, is written from the viewpoint of a teenage girl whose identical twin sister Aida has disappeared -- apparently taken -- from their small town ..."I waited for the pain. Something to tell me what wa Just finished The Best American Mystery Stories 2014, edited by Laura Lippman. A lot of big names in this edition: Russell Banks, Annie Proulx, Joseph Heller, James Lee Burke. For my money, though, the best story was "Aida" by Patricia Engel. The story, which originally appeared in the Harvard Review, is written from the viewpoint of a teenage girl whose identical twin sister Aida has disappeared -- apparently taken -- from their small town ..."I waited for the pain. Something to tell me what was happening to Aida. I tried to feel her. I wanted to make our bodies one again. Remember that her veins were once my veins and her heart was my heart and her brain was my brain and her pain was mine. I waited for the sensations. I wanted them to hit me and within them I'd be able to know the story of her disappearance. I'd know who stole her. What they were doing to her. How they were punishing her."Other gems: Dennis Tafoya's "Satan's Kingdom" (from Needle), Scott Loring Sanders' "Pleasant Grove" (Floyd County Moonshine) and Megan Abbott's "My Heart is Either Broken" (Dangerous Women).Overall, a solid edition, with noir well represented. "If my final selection veers to the dark ones ... that's my personal taste," Lippman writes in the intro. Amen, sister.
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  • Richard Brand
    January 1, 1970
    While it is difficult to review a collection of stories, I must confess that most of them were not like the mystery stories that I was accustomed to. Maybe it is the short story part of it, that the limit on size means that the mystery has to be different. While I did not have to force myself to read the book, I did find that most of the stories were about missing people and what auction and abuse do to the victim and to the victim's family. There were a couple of stories where I wondered why th While it is difficult to review a collection of stories, I must confess that most of them were not like the mystery stories that I was accustomed to. Maybe it is the short story part of it, that the limit on size means that the mystery has to be different. While I did not have to force myself to read the book, I did find that most of the stories were about missing people and what auction and abuse do to the victim and to the victim's family. There were a couple of stories where I wondered why the obvious response was not the one picked by the characters in the story. There were stories where the deed done early returned to inflict its own punishment on the doer. I do not take any of the magazines in which these kinds of stories would appear so I do not know the standards for their publication. I have often enjoyed these The Best American....... series and I will not let this one end that willingness to buy others. This collection was not bad, it was just a surprise and less than satisfying because of that.
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  • Ellen Behrens
    January 1, 1970
    I love this collection for reminding me that mysteries surround us, in all shapes and types of stories. Too often I think of short mystery stories as who-dunnits from the Ellery Queen & Alfred Hitchcock magazines, so this volume opened up the genre to me in ways I hadn't expected. The final story in the collection, "Antarctica" by Laura Van Den Berg (originally published in Glimmer Trail) has especially stayed with me -- the edgy, unusual setting; the puzzling incident that took the life of I love this collection for reminding me that mysteries surround us, in all shapes and types of stories. Too often I think of short mystery stories as who-dunnits from the Ellery Queen & Alfred Hitchcock magazines, so this volume opened up the genre to me in ways I hadn't expected. The final story in the collection, "Antarctica" by Laura Van Den Berg (originally published in Glimmer Trail) has especially stayed with me -- the edgy, unusual setting; the puzzling incident that took the life of the narrator's brother; his spooky (at least I thought so) wife combined to submerge me in a world where an icy sheen covers and distorts the truth. Van Den Berg reminded me, in "Antarctica," that the most profound mysteries are those closest to us, the ones we're least likely to solve. I'll be looking for this "Best" volume on an annual basis!
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  • Grady McCallie
    January 1, 1970
    This year's Best American Mystery Stories includes some mysteries, but in general, these are more crime stories than mystery stories, and several of them focus primarily on the effects of crime on the family members of the victims or the perpetrators. Overall, the collection is pretty dark, which is probably why I only enjoyed it moderately - folks who like dark stories may love this. I did very much like James Lee Burke, 'Going Across Jordan', which uses slang to great effect; Charlaine Harris, This year's Best American Mystery Stories includes some mysteries, but in general, these are more crime stories than mystery stories, and several of them focus primarily on the effects of crime on the family members of the victims or the perpetrators. Overall, the collection is pretty dark, which is probably why I only enjoyed it moderately - folks who like dark stories may love this. I did very much like James Lee Burke, 'Going Across Jordan', which uses slang to great effect; Charlaine Harris, 'Small Kingdoms', with its offbeat backstory and loopy plot; and Daniel Alarcon, "Collectors", an unsentimental story of despair, love, and prison brutality.
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  • Mitsuru
    January 1, 1970
    Nowadays, this series consist of quite good stories. I felt the meaning of the mystery was wider than ever. It's not a bad thing. I like "Aida" by Patricia Engel, "Rough Deeds" by Annie Proulx, and "Pleasant Glove" by Scott Loring Sanders. Especially, "Rough Deeds" by Annie Proulx. The feelings of protagonist are floating on between the lines. I've ever read her story, "Them Old Cowboy Songs" in Best American Short Stories 2009, and PEN/O'Henry Prize Stories 2010. It was also the great story. I Nowadays, this series consist of quite good stories. I felt the meaning of the mystery was wider than ever. It's not a bad thing. I like "Aida" by Patricia Engel, "Rough Deeds" by Annie Proulx, and "Pleasant Glove" by Scott Loring Sanders. Especially, "Rough Deeds" by Annie Proulx. The feelings of protagonist are floating on between the lines. I've ever read her story, "Them Old Cowboy Songs" in Best American Short Stories 2009, and PEN/O'Henry Prize Stories 2010. It was also the great story. If I had the time, I'd like to read her novels.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I only dip into short stories a few times a year, but I find myself consistently returning to this series for a sampler of what I've invariably missed in the realm over the previous 12 months. Lippman's a favorite of mine, and her esthetic comes through in this collection as the stories center on themes she works in her own fiction - buried secrets, tough women, and dark domestic crimes. Many of the authors here were new to me, but stand up well alongside favorites like Megan Abbott.
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  • Bess
    January 1, 1970
    Really was thinking more like 3 1/2 stars, but why be picky - some of these were absolutely amazing!Sadly, some of them weren't, but overall I was really glad to have read it and would definitely recommend it to other mystery lovers.(Also, to be honest, I was able to buy it for $1.99 for Kindle, which made it all the sweeter.)
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  • Lisa Hern
    January 1, 1970
    Lisa Lippman has a dark heart. I love a good mystery, but some of these stories relied too much on violence against women for plot. Granted, the helpless waif is a common theme of old noir, most of those featured tough women. These stories are just bleak. I have enjoyed this anthology series for years, but this is the weakest offering thus far. Antarctica is the best of the bunch.
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  • Beth Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    When you choose stories for an anthology, I think you have to choose a representative sample of different types of stories to please various subgroups of your audience. And the result is very few people liking all of the stories. I really liked Aida and Antarctica. I liked several others. And a couple I didn't like starting with the first paragraph.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    None of the stories made me think "wow!" I didn't quite feel like most were mysteries but psychological detritus. I was left with constantly feeling like I somehow missed the point or the "mystery". Maybe the stories were just to cerebral and not what I was expecting.
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  • Andy
    January 1, 1970
    I'm definitely going to add this series to my annual reading. Laura Lippman has assembled some outstanding stories here, many by authors I've enjoyed for years (James Lee Burke, Annie Proulx) and other "new to me" writers such as Megan Abbott, Laura van den Berg and Matthew Neill Null.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I always like this series, but this year seemed particularly strong, perhaps because most of the stories were real mysteries as opposed to noir things (w/no offense to my noirish friends). My favorite story, 'Pleasant Grove' by Scott Loring Sanders, still haunts me.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    A great selection of stories.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    It seems problematic to rate a book in the "Best of" series. But, I'd recommend this for the stories by Roxanne Gay, Laura Van Der Berg, Jodi Angel, and Megan Abbott.
  • Roger
    January 1, 1970
    Some stories were OK, some were less so.
  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    A bit of a mixed bag. Some of the stories were very good, but about half of them I couldn't wait to speed through. None of them were "mysteries" as I normally think of the genre.
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