Pippi in the South Seas
"Any reappearance of the irrepressible Pippi Longstocking is cause for celebration. This installment is no exception." -The New York Times

Pippi in the South Seas Details

TitlePippi in the South Seas
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 18th, 1959
PublisherViking Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780670557110
Rating
GenreChildrens, Fiction, Classics

Pippi in the South Seas Review

  • Manny
    January 1, 1970
    My favourite bit is the song "Sjörövar-Fabbe" - though, as Gulla points out below, this isn't actually in the book, only the movie. It's about Pippi's great-grandfather, Fabbe, who despite being a fearsome pirate has a tendency to become seasick any time the waves get a little rough. Most Swedish three year olds can sing the refreshingly simple chorus: "Oj, oj-oj-oj, oj-oj-oj!" If you're curious, you can hear Drängarna singing it on Youtube.I wondered how difficult it would be to convey to non-S My favourite bit is the song "Sjörövar-Fabbe" - though, as Gulla points out below, this isn't actually in the book, only the movie. It's about Pippi's great-grandfather, Fabbe, who despite being a fearsome pirate has a tendency to become seasick any time the waves get a little rough. Most Swedish three year olds can sing the refreshingly simple chorus: "Oj, oj-oj-oj, oj-oj-oj!" If you're curious, you can hear Drängarna singing it on Youtube.I wondered how difficult it would be to convey to non-Swedish-speakers just what a fine song this is. After a day's thought and experimentation, I have a literal translation, based on the one produced by Google Translate, and a non-literal translation which tries to capture the spirit of the original at the cost of taking great liberties with the text. I feel I have a better understanding of what Nabokov went through when he produced his famous translation of Eugene Onegin: there isn't any satisfactory solution even for a good nursery rhyme, so think how infinitely worse it must be when you're dealing with a book-length literary masterpiece.Anyway, here are the results of my little exercise. I should add that tjohej hadelittan lej doesn't mean anything at all; it's just a piratey chant put in for onomatopoeic effect. I've followed Vivi's suggestion of replacing this with the phonetic English "Joey had a lit an' lay" in the non-literal translation.Original textSjörövar-Fabbe, farfars far,är minsann en sjusärdeles karl,kring alla hav han far och far,tjohej hadelittan lej.Sjörövaryrket passar´n bra;"De är bara att röva och ta,och de", sa Fabbe, "gillar ja",tjohej hadelittan lej.Men då...vad står på?Fabbe blir plötsligt blek och grå!Oj då!Vad står på,oj oj oj oj oj oj oj!(Oj oj oj oj oj oj oj!)Sjörövar-Fabbe, farfars far,är minsann en sjusärdeles karl,men han är sjösjuk alla da´r,tjohej hadelittan lej.Stormen ryter och åskan går,havet brusar och seglena slår,ner i kajutan Fabbe går,tjohej hadelittan lej.Kräks och svär och mår inte bra."Bättre väder det vill jag nog ha,annars", sa Fabbe, "slutar jag",tjohej hadelittan lej.Men då...vad står på?Fabbe blir plötsligt blek och grå!Oj då!Vad står på,oj oj oj oj oj oj oj!"D´ä nåt ingen mänska förstår,varför alltid så illa jag mår,bara båten guppar och går,tjohej hadelittan lej."Sjörövar-Fabbe, farfars far,är minsann en sjusärdeles karl,men han är sjösjuk alla da´r,tjohej hadelittan lej.Literal translationPirate-Fabbe, great-grandfather,is indeed a TERRIFIC manaround all the seas he sails and sails,tjohej hadelittan lej.The pirate profession suits him well;"All you have to do is steal and take,and that" said Fabbe, "I like",tjohej hadelittan lej.But then ...what's going on?Fabbe suddenly becomes pale and gray!Oops!What's the matter,ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh!(Ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh!)Pirate-Fabbe, great-grandfather,is indeed a TERRIFIC manbut he is seasick every day,tjohej hadelittan lej.The storm roars and lightning strikes,the sea growls and the sails flap,down in the cabin goes Fabbe,tjohej hadelittan lej.He vomits and swears and does not feel good."Better weather, that's what I want,otherwise", said Fabbe, "I'm quitting"tjohej hadelittan lej.But then ...what's going on?Fabbe suddenly becomes pale and gray!Oops!What's the matter,ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh!"It's something no human being will understand,why I always feel so bad,just because the boat's bobbing around,tjohej hadelittan lej."Pirate-Fabbe, great-grandfather,is indeed a TERRIFIC manbut he is seasick every day,tjohej hadelittan lej.Free translationOld Pirate Fabbe, grandad's dadToughest guy the family ever hadOut on the ocean he's scary and badJoey had a lit an' lay."Pirate life is perfect for meGrab people's stuff and push 'em in the seaThat," says Fabbe, "'s what I like to see"Joey had a lit an' lay.But... no way!What didya say?Why's Fabbe gone all pale and gray?No way!What didya say?oj oj-oj-oj oj-oj-oj! (Oj oj oj oj oj oj oj!) Old Pirate Fabbe, grandad's dadToughest guy the family ever hadBut he gets seasick and that makes him madJoey had a lit an' lay.The wind comes up, now don't dare laughSoon as the storm's gone a minute and halfHe's in the bathroom, 'cause he's gotta barfJoey an' a lit an' lay.Crawls to his bunk, lies down for a bitYells at the crew who couldn't give a shit"Fix that wind or I'm gonna quit!"Joey had a lit an' lay.No way!What didya say?Why's Fabbe gone all pale and gray?No way!What didya say?oj oj-oj-oj oj-oj-oj! I don't understand, you'll have to explainThree puffs of wind and a little spot of rainHe's in the bathroom, barfing again!Joey had a lit an' lay.Old Pirate Fabbe, grandad's dadToughest guy the family ever hadBut he gets seasick and that makes him madJoey had a lit an' lay.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Reading Pippi is like reading Plato, but better because Socrates didn't have a monkey named Mr. Nilsson. The faux simpleton toys with the stiffs before devastating them with some Five-Point-Palm-Exploding-Heart Technique of logic."Now then," she said finally, "will you tell me how you spell 'seasick'?""I'll be glad to," said Pippi, "S-e-e-s-i-c-k."Miss Rosenblom smiled - a sour smile. "Is that so?" she said. "The dictionary spells it differently.""Then it was very lucky that you wanted to know h Reading Pippi is like reading Plato, but better because Socrates didn't have a monkey named Mr. Nilsson. The faux simpleton toys with the stiffs before devastating them with some Five-Point-Palm-Exploding-Heart Technique of logic."Now then," she said finally, "will you tell me how you spell 'seasick'?""I'll be glad to," said Pippi, "S-e-e-s-i-c-k."Miss Rosenblom smiled - a sour smile. "Is that so?" she said. "The dictionary spells it differently.""Then it was very lucky that you wanted to know how I spell it, said Pippi. "S-e-e-s-i-c-k is the way I have always spelled it and it seems to have worked out just fine."
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  • Ciara
    January 1, 1970
    i re-read all the pippi books every year, usually in the spring. just to keep in touch with my inner child, you know. this is the last of the original pippi books, in which pippi, tommy, & annika board captain longstocking's ship, the hoptoad, & set sail for the south seas cannibal island where he is king. hijinks ensue, such as pippi telling off a shark, protecting the island's pearls from robbers, & promising with tommy & annika to never grow up. i like this book, although i am i re-read all the pippi books every year, usually in the spring. just to keep in touch with my inner child, you know. this is the last of the original pippi books, in which pippi, tommy, & annika board captain longstocking's ship, the hoptoad, & set sail for the south seas cannibal island where he is king. hijinks ensue, such as pippi telling off a shark, protecting the island's pearls from robbers, & promising with tommy & annika to never grow up. i like this book, although i am the first to admit that some of the south seas cannibal islanders stuff is racially suspect. astrid lindgren was a lady who was very ahead of her time when it comes to social issues--she campaigned for animal rights up until the day she died & is famous throughout sweden for her radical political stances. but her books were written in the mid-20th century, when white people throughout the world (lindgren is swedish, obvs) weren't necessarily very racially conscious. so i do feel conflicted about that issue, & prefer the first two pippi books as a result. but still. the last chapter of this book always makes me cry.
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  • Seale Ballenger
    January 1, 1970
    When I was seven years old on my first visit to New York and FAO Schwartz, my parents told me that i could pick out one of whatever I wanted. I got this. BOOK NERD!
  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I had gone with Pippi to the South Seas. It must have been really fun! I was Pippi for Halloween and I think that's what made me want to finish the series. I had already read book 1 and I kept putting off reading the rest. But being Pippi for Halloween inspired me to read the other 2 books. And I'm really glad I did because they're both funny. My favorite part was how Pippi always got away from the bad guys, sometimes by lying and sometimes by telling the truth. This made them confused ab I wish I had gone with Pippi to the South Seas. It must have been really fun! I was Pippi for Halloween and I think that's what made me want to finish the series. I had already read book 1 and I kept putting off reading the rest. But being Pippi for Halloween inspired me to read the other 2 books. And I'm really glad I did because they're both funny. My favorite part was how Pippi always got away from the bad guys, sometimes by lying and sometimes by telling the truth. This made them confused about whether she was telling the truth about one thing or the other. I know it's not good to lie, but she does. Now I want to get Pippi on the Run, the 4th book.
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  • Tamara
    January 1, 1970
    I read this aloud to my daughter, after reading the other two Pippi books. She hangs on every word and when one chapter ends, nearly salivates for the next. Each chapter is a nearly self-contained episode, and works quite well for bedtime stories. Inspired by her heroine, she's tried to sleep "upside down" with her feet on the pillow. Amusingly, my son (a bit older) pretends not to care, but hangs just around the corner whenever one of the books opens, clearly listening to all Pippi's adventures I read this aloud to my daughter, after reading the other two Pippi books. She hangs on every word and when one chapter ends, nearly salivates for the next. Each chapter is a nearly self-contained episode, and works quite well for bedtime stories. Inspired by her heroine, she's tried to sleep "upside down" with her feet on the pillow. Amusingly, my son (a bit older) pretends not to care, but hangs just around the corner whenever one of the books opens, clearly listening to all Pippi's adventures too. (Same with the husband, so I have simply moved the "daughter's" story time to the living room!) My family falls into gales of laughter as Pippi spins her tall tales, and Pippi's simple self-assurance is quite refreshing. That said, I preferred the first Pippi Longstocking book. We all craved more and followed all the way through all three, but this third set of stories shows its age a bit--some inherent racism and colonial attitude, which made me uncomfortable as I read through those passages.
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  • Cherie In the Dooryard
    January 1, 1970
    My kids love Pippi. They love how she does all the things they aren't supposed to do, she's a kind of transgressive fantasy. But she does it all with such a good heart; this little smart-alack is motivated by love, confidence, and a tremendous sense of humor. If you are looking for A++ girl role models that are still funny and fun to read, Pippi is the way to go.
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    Too good. Re-read from my childhood years.
  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the first Pippi book. This had some fun moments and it didn't really draw me in the same way. It is strange Pippi would choose to live separate from her father. Pippi is a strong and fun character. I enjoy that about her. Maybe children would enjoy it more than an adult.
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  • Monique
    January 1, 1970
    This story didn't add much to the world or character of Pippi Longstocking.(view spoiler)[ Pippi, Tommy and Annika travel to her father's island and have a nice time. At the end of the book all three children decide never to grow up, as the things adults concern themselves with are not very important - things like taxes and being superstitious and afraid of things like putting a knife in your mouth. (hide spoiler)]Although it was an enjoyable read hearing how Pippi tackles each situation and how This story didn't add much to the world or character of Pippi Longstocking.(view spoiler)[ Pippi, Tommy and Annika travel to her father's island and have a nice time. At the end of the book all three children decide never to grow up, as the things adults concern themselves with are not very important - things like taxes and being superstitious and afraid of things like putting a knife in your mouth. (hide spoiler)]Although it was an enjoyable read hearing how Pippi tackles each situation and how she philanthropically helps others, it was just an average read. I feel at the end of this book ready to say goodbye to Pippi.
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  • C Wharton
    January 1, 1970
    It was so funny I spat my hot chocolate out when I was reading It. I love Pippi, Mr Nelson and her horse.And on the back of the book it says..."Have you ever given a shark a good telling-off? Pippi has!""Do you know what a squeazle is? Pippi does! "Can you carry your dad on your shoulders? Pippi can!" Pippi can do anything!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I remember loving Pippi as a kid, but rereading the stories now with my 7 year old, I'm not nearly as enamoured with her. My daughter LOVES this book, though. She laughed out loud while reading it, which is very rare for her to do. I think she would give this book at least 4 stars, maybe 5. Maybe sometimes an adult perspective isn't the best one :).
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  • Imas
    January 1, 1970
    Lucuuu...menghibur, cocok kalo lagi suntuk..dan memang itu tujuan aku baca buku ini. Hanya saja, masih ada sisi kelabu dalam cerita Pippi ini, Pippi yang lucu, bengal,nakal dan selalu gembira hanya hidup sendiri di Pondok Serbaneka, kontras dengan segala kegembiraan yang selalu dibawanya.
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  • Selah Pike
    January 1, 1970
    The final Pippi book isn't quite as charming as the first 2, but fun nonetheless.
  • Antje
    January 1, 1970
    Astrid Lindgren hat es geschafft! Nach drei Pippi-Teilen bin ich schließlich von ihr überzeugt wurden, dass ich die rothaarige Göre gern haben muss. Wie es Frau Settergren so schön ihren skeptischen Verwandten erklärt, warum sie ihre Kinder Pippi anvertraut: mag sie sich nicht fein benehmen - doch hat sie ein gutes Herz.Besonders hervorheben, möchte ich das Weihnachtskapitel, in dem sich die Kinder über das gefürchtete Großwerden austauschen. Lindgren ist damit ein würdevoller wie brillanter Abs Astrid Lindgren hat es geschafft! Nach drei Pippi-Teilen bin ich schließlich von ihr überzeugt wurden, dass ich die rothaarige Göre gern haben muss. Wie es Frau Settergren so schön ihren skeptischen Verwandten erklärt, warum sie ihre Kinder Pippi anvertraut: mag sie sich nicht fein benehmen - doch hat sie ein gutes Herz.Besonders hervorheben, möchte ich das Weihnachtskapitel, in dem sich die Kinder über das gefürchtete Großwerden austauschen. Lindgren ist damit ein würdevoller wie brillanter Abschluss ihrer Pippi-Erzählungen gelungen. Besser geht es nicht! Ich liebe gelungene Schlüsse!!!
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    Charming conclusion to the Pippi stories. I’m glad I read them again, after so many years.
  • Carmon Simon
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book as a child and I've thoroughly enjoyed reading it to my 5 year old daughter ❤ I loved this book as a child and I've thoroughly enjoyed reading it to my 5 year old daughter ❤️
  • Gale
    January 1, 1970
    "Irrepressible Nordic Pixie Takes Charge!" This red-headed little rascal has charmed young readers all over the world with her high-spirited antics. Pippi Longstocking—only child of Capitan Longstocking—is a freckle-faced youngster whose flaming braids tick out from her head as if starched! This personable pixie heroine considers herself nearly perfect, as do most of the children she encounters. Self-sufficient, undaunted and unflappable, Pippi amazes all comers with Her outlandish skills: the "Irrepressible Nordic Pixie Takes Charge!" This red-headed little rascal has charmed young readers all over the world with her high-spirited antics. Pippi Longstocking—only child of Capitan Longstocking—is a freckle-faced youngster whose flaming braids tick out from her head as if starched! This personable pixie heroine considers herself nearly perfect, as do most of the children she encounters. Self-sufficient, undaunted and unflappable, Pippi amazes all comers with Her outlandish skills: the ability to “debate” and refine adult logic for instance. And don’t mess with this mini-mite: she possesses prodigious strength-she can easily heft her horse or toss tow grown men around. You see, Pippi is the sole human occupant (and interior decorator) of Villa Villekulla, which boats its own signpost in the town center for curious tourists to easily locate. While the Captain is off ruling his distant island somewhere in the South seas, his spunky daughter entertains as an unconventional hostess in her ramshackle home. Her only residential companions are Mr. Nilsson (a monkey) and of course, the horse (unnamed) who hangs out on the front porch. As a captain’s daughter Pippi is a natural at the helm. Her best friends (more like normal kids with casual parents) are Tommy (why does the boy always get mentioned first?) and Annika next door, who delight in her company and are entranced by her wacky schemes. Pippi amuses them during their be-measled quarentine she later invites them to accompany her on a cruise to the South Seas, to recover their lost color and share her vacation. They have delightful misadventures on the island, of course; the only down side of this prolonged excursion is that they miss Christmas and therefore—no presents! ARGHH! But Pippi undertakes to make up for this tragedy in her own, inimitable fashion upon their return; she proves a loyal friend and a great hostess. This book should appeal to most children who can read it for themselves, as well as to kids who enjoy an active imagination and a world where kids can outsmart adults. Like Peter Pan Pippi urges her friends to eat some magic peas so that they Won’t have to grow up. Even if the peas don’t work for the neighbors, we somehow feel that Pippi will remain the eternal symbol of carefree childhood. (June 20, 2010. I welcome dialogue with teachers.)
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  • Cristina
    January 1, 1970
    Fui totalmente surpreendida por este livrinho maravilhoso, que se revelou uma autêntica delícia de leitura. Não poucas vezes me provocou sorrisos e algumas gargalhadas, chegando também a comover-me.Após a leitura desta magnífica obra de literatura infantil, fiquei sem dúvida uma admiradora desta autora que antes desconhecia. Que grande imaginação, criatividade e originalidade, na criação desta história brilhante e genial, e dos seus personagens. Se fiquei admiradora da autora, o mesmo se passou Fui totalmente surpreendida por este livrinho maravilhoso, que se revelou uma autêntica delícia de leitura. Não poucas vezes me provocou sorrisos e algumas gargalhadas, chegando também a comover-me.Após a leitura desta magnífica obra de literatura infantil, fiquei sem dúvida uma admiradora desta autora que antes desconhecia. Que grande imaginação, criatividade e originalidade, na criação desta história brilhante e genial, e dos seus personagens. Se fiquei admiradora da autora, o mesmo se passou em relação à sua personagem principal, a Pipi.Se os dois amigos da Pipi são adoráveis, a Pipi é-o ainda mais, e ficará para sempre na minha memória. Um cruzamento entre uma menina franzina e uma super heroína, cuja força herculeana só encontra igual na bondade do seu coração. Tem tantas outras características memoráveis, como o seu irónico sentido de humor, a sua inesgotável energia, a sua lealdade para com os amigos, o seu sentido de justiça, e tantos outros. Não vejo como o leitor poderá resistir a ser completamente arrebatado e conquistado por esta singular personagem.Tenho pena de ter iniciado esta minha descoberta pela última história, mas julgo que isso não terá muita influência para as futuras leituras das aventuras de Pipi de Astrid Lindgren, as quais não vejo a hora de ler. É por estes momentos que me motiva a minha "missão" no Linked Books de seguir todos os links, sejam eles quais forem. Sem este blogue, duvido que tivesse lido por iniciativa própria, esta pequena grande obra.Não posso recomendar mais. Apesar de se tratar de literatura infantil, é um livro para todos, e ideal para ser partilhado entre gerações. Não se deixem enganar pela idade deste título, pois esta é uma obra intemporal, que espero que não caía no esquecimento, e que continue a fazer as delícias de miúdos e graúdos durante muitos muitos anos.Para o post completo visite o meu blog em: http://linkedbooks.blogspot.pt/2014/1...
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  • Irene
    January 1, 1970
    In this installment, Pippi, Tommy, and Annika visit Pippi's father on Kurrekurredutt Island in the South Seas. Even though the location has changed, most of the chapters had a bit of that "more of the same" feel. Pippi is as adventurous, optimistic, brave, selfless, and loyal as always. While on the island, Pippi faces down two sea-faring bandits who were up to no good, similar to the way in which she handled two would-be burglars in the first book. One chapter that stands out to me takes place In this installment, Pippi, Tommy, and Annika visit Pippi's father on Kurrekurredutt Island in the South Seas. Even though the location has changed, most of the chapters had a bit of that "more of the same" feel. Pippi is as adventurous, optimistic, brave, selfless, and loyal as always. While on the island, Pippi faces down two sea-faring bandits who were up to no good, similar to the way in which she handled two would-be burglars in the first book. One chapter that stands out to me takes place before the children take their sea voyage. Pippi participates in a bizarre event in which some seemingly random person in town subjects all the school children to a high-stress verbal examination that results in either public praise or public shaming, depending on how well each child answers her questions. In this day and age, it seems like such a terrible situation in which the poor kids are labeled "good" or "stupid", and completely traumatized if the latter. Thankfully, Pippi saves a bunch of children from disgrace with her usual good-hearted sense of justice. I particularly enjoyed the ending, and would really give this book 3 1/2 stars if I could. Pippi, as usual, completely and selflessly devotes her time and energy to making her dear friends Tommy and Annika happy. The last couple pages had a kind of wistfulness to them, as the three children hope to never grow up, and Tommy and Annika take comfort in knowing that Pippi will "always" be at Villa Villekulla.
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  • Danae
    January 1, 1970
    2.5*I prefer the second book to this one, but it was alright. It didn't seem at all familiar to me, so I don't think I ever got around to reading this one even though I own it. It's slightly uncomfortable at times with the way they refer to the natives of the island... And Tommy can be quite the bully to his sister sometimes! Also, there's a girl called Moana. :)
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  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Pippi Longstocking is a little girl who lives by herself in her house, Villa Villekulla. When her father sends a message for Pippi to come join him on his island, her and her friends, Tommy and Annika board the boat and join Pippi's father in the south seas. There, Pippi wrestles with sharks, Catches robbers, and play marbles with pearls. But Tommy and Annika want to be home for Christmas. Will they get back in time?I picked up this book because I read the first two Pippi Longstocking books, and Pippi Longstocking is a little girl who lives by herself in her house, Villa Villekulla. When her father sends a message for Pippi to come join him on his island, her and her friends, Tommy and Annika board the boat and join Pippi's father in the south seas. There, Pippi wrestles with sharks, Catches robbers, and play marbles with pearls. But Tommy and Annika want to be home for Christmas. Will they get back in time?I picked up this book because I read the first two Pippi Longstocking books, and I liked them a lot. Pippi, Tommy, Annika, and all the children on the island kept me entertained the whole time I was reading the book.I would recommend this book to Emma. I think she would find Pippi's adventures very funny and interesting.
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  • Ann Moody
    January 1, 1970
    We read a "non-cannibal" translation by Gerry Bothmer. Another reviewer noted some potentially offensive language in a different translation. When we read the prior books in the series, I was not crazy about Pippi's dad being referred to as a "cannibal king" either. This version used either the terms "South Sea Islanders" or "Kurrekurredutts" to refer to the inhabitants of the island of the same name. Likewise, the native children she befriends were portrayed in a respectful manner, speaking in We read a "non-cannibal" translation by Gerry Bothmer. Another reviewer noted some potentially offensive language in a different translation. When we read the prior books in the series, I was not crazy about Pippi's dad being referred to as a "cannibal king" either. This version used either the terms "South Sea Islanders" or "Kurrekurredutts" to refer to the inhabitants of the island of the same name. Likewise, the native children she befriends were portrayed in a respectful manner, speaking in only slightly broken English for effect. Not that my kiddo would really notice either way. She, like Tommy and Annika, adores Pippi and closed out the trilogy very satisfied to have had so much fun with this very special, spunky, charmer.
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  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    Pippi doesn't grow up, as much as she grows more generous and insightful into her acts of kindness. Her mischief becomes more and more benevolent, less and less naughty.In this installment, Pippi visits the island where her father is king. She takes Tommy and Annika so that they can recover from an illness. While they are there, she protects the native children from robbers, reigns in humility, and otherwise enjoys life in the South Seas. She tells Tommy and Annika that she may never return to V Pippi doesn't grow up, as much as she grows more generous and insightful into her acts of kindness. Her mischief becomes more and more benevolent, less and less naughty.In this installment, Pippi visits the island where her father is king. She takes Tommy and Annika so that they can recover from an illness. While they are there, she protects the native children from robbers, reigns in humility, and otherwise enjoys life in the South Seas. She tells Tommy and Annika that she may never return to Villa Villekula, but she does so for their sake--and tops it off with a special surprise, just for them.
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  • Yasmin
    January 1, 1970
    Does it even count as read if I could only handle seventeen pages? (15 from the beginning, and then two of the last chapter--then I realized that I don't care how it ends.The Prose = AwfulPippi = ANNOYINGPippi's Friends = It seems as if this is how readers are supposed to insert themselves into the story, because Annika and Tommy are so freaking bland that I had to look their names up again a minute after reading a portion of the book--it's like Bella Swan for kiddies. Except instead of "all gir Does it even count as read if I could only handle seventeen pages? (15 from the beginning, and then two of the last chapter--then I realized that I don't care how it ends.The Prose = AwfulPippi = ANNOYINGPippi's Friends = It seems as if this is how readers are supposed to insert themselves into the story, because Annika and Tommy are so freaking bland that I had to look their names up again a minute after reading a portion of the book--it's like Bella Swan for kiddies. Except instead of "all girls want a beautiful vampire lover" it's "all little kids want a weird pig-tailed biffle?"Anne-Marie, why? (And I think Pippi Longstocking weirded me out as a first-grader, too.)
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    What a delightful story! Our entire family has enjoyed reading this one about a sassy little spark of a girl and her antics. My husband and I take turns reading books to our sons at night, and this has been the first book in memory where we both join on the other parents' night because we don't want to miss a chapter. That said, I have to admit that I find myself doing a little clever censoring as I read this book to my 5- and almost-3- year-olds. There are isolated spots in the story that are r What a delightful story! Our entire family has enjoyed reading this one about a sassy little spark of a girl and her antics. My husband and I take turns reading books to our sons at night, and this has been the first book in memory where we both join on the other parents' night because we don't want to miss a chapter. That said, I have to admit that I find myself doing a little clever censoring as I read this book to my 5- and almost-3- year-olds. There are isolated spots in the story that are racist, or characters who are sexist or violent, and I just don't feel like turning an otherwise enjoyable storytime into a 'teachable moment'.
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  • Mell
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure this book's portrayal of indigenous island peoples would stand up to an adult re-read (and my social activist standards) but I loved this book when I was young.My aunt gave me this book as a kid. We are both red heads, and I remember her telling a story about how she dressed as Pippi for Halloween. She used pipe cleaners inside her braids to make them stand up like Pippi's. I also remember watching the movies on TV on the weekends. They must have been made in Scandinavia, because th I'm not sure this book's portrayal of indigenous island peoples would stand up to an adult re-read (and my social activist standards) but I loved this book when I was young.My aunt gave me this book as a kid. We are both red heads, and I remember her telling a story about how she dressed as Pippi for Halloween. She used pipe cleaners inside her braids to make them stand up like Pippi's. I also remember watching the movies on TV on the weekends. They must have been made in Scandinavia, because the words/voices didn't match the actors' mouths.
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  • Mladen Trpčevski
    January 1, 1970
    What I like most about this work is that it offers children from non-Scandinavian countries a view of a world without war, where children's perspective wins the battle against violent adults. It would have been a great alternative read to my generation in Serbia, since we went through all possible forms of violence (several wars included). I don't believe it will ever find its rightful place within mandatory school literature, since our authorities prefer violent nationalist trash, but one can a What I like most about this work is that it offers children from non-Scandinavian countries a view of a world without war, where children's perspective wins the battle against violent adults. It would have been a great alternative read to my generation in Serbia, since we went through all possible forms of violence (several wars included). I don't believe it will ever find its rightful place within mandatory school literature, since our authorities prefer violent nationalist trash, but one can at least spread the word and hope that children would find Lindgren's works in libraries.
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  • Anne-Marie
    January 1, 1970
    In this book, Pippi visits the island where her father, a cannibal king, rules. Her friends Tommy and Annika come with her and the three have fun together with the natives, having games such as seeing who can spit the farthest. Pippi climbs in a barrel and has Tommy push her off a cliff down a waterfall in it; of course, she isn't hurt, because she is the strongest human being alive. At the end, SPOILER, she and her friends all take a pill that will keep you young forever (kind of reminds me of In this book, Pippi visits the island where her father, a cannibal king, rules. Her friends Tommy and Annika come with her and the three have fun together with the natives, having games such as seeing who can spit the farthest. Pippi climbs in a barrel and has Tommy push her off a cliff down a waterfall in it; of course, she isn't hurt, because she is the strongest human being alive. At the end, SPOILER, she and her friends all take a pill that will keep you young forever (kind of reminds me of Peter Pan).
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  • Summer
    January 1, 1970
    Another Pippi Longstocking book that I read in English because the Swedish is so weirdly expensive over here. This is pretty good, though unfortunately not so much as the previous two books - the unfortunate racism, while pretty benign for the time, is a little uncomfortable to read now. Still, I love this raucous, lively, strong superhero of a girl who doesn't take nonsense from anyone, who dearly loves her friends and family, and who has not only a horse, but a monkey with the hilarious name o Another Pippi Longstocking book that I read in English because the Swedish is so weirdly expensive over here. This is pretty good, though unfortunately not so much as the previous two books - the unfortunate racism, while pretty benign for the time, is a little uncomfortable to read now. Still, I love this raucous, lively, strong superhero of a girl who doesn't take nonsense from anyone, who dearly loves her friends and family, and who has not only a horse, but a monkey with the hilarious name of Mr. Nilsson (the horse is still unnamed).
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