Book Crush
From picture books to chapter books, YA fiction and nonfiction, Nancy Pearl has developed more thematic lists of books to enjoy. The Book Lust audience is committed to reading, and here is a smart and entertaining tool for picking the best books for kids. Divided into three sections--Easy Books, Middle-Grade Readers, and Young Adult--Nancy Pearl makes wonderful reading connections by theme, setting, voice, and ideas. For horse lovers, she reminds us of the mainstays in the category (Black Beauty, Misty of Chincoteague, etc.) but then in a creative twist connects Mr. Revere and I to the list. In a list called Chapter One, she answers the proverbial question: which chapters books are the most compelling for kids who are now ready to move beyond picture books. And who says picture books aren't deep? Recommended Folk Tales sort out many of life's dilemmas and issues of good and bad; a selection of picture books on Death and Dying introduces this topic with sensitivity; and You've Got a Friend offers up books for early readers that show the complexities and the pleasures of relating to others. Parents, teachers, and librarians are often puzzled by the unending choices for reading material for young people. It starts when the kids are toddler and doesn't end until high-school graduation. What's good, what's trash, what's going to hold their interest? Nancy Pearl, America's favorite librarian, points the way in Book Crush.

Book Crush Details

TitleBook Crush
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 6th, 2007
PublisherSasquatch Books
ISBN-139781570615009
Rating
GenreWriting, Books About Books, Nonfiction, Reference, Education, Teaching, Childrens, Parenting, Science, Library Science, Adult, Young Adult, Teen

Book Crush Review

  • Malbadeen
    January 1, 1970
    Not a huge fan of book list books. Thought it was mostly okay, some weird organizational things - but, really how the hell does one organize the thousands of books one wants to recommend? Disagreed with some agreed with othersAND THEN!I saw it, a book/author I hate so much I was repelled by the thought that Pearl could even consider this book as worth mentioning and I felt that I could no longer trust a word she said. Maybe I don't even like the books we shared a taste before because I can not f Not a huge fan of book list books. Thought it was mostly okay, some weird organizational things - but, really how the hell does one organize the thousands of books one wants to recommend? Disagreed with some agreed with othersAND THEN!I saw it, a book/author I hate so much I was repelled by the thought that Pearl could even consider this book as worth mentioning and I felt that I could no longer trust a word she said. Maybe I don't even like the books we shared a taste before because I can not fathom that we could share a taste in one thing and be so off in this other area.Is it fair? no.reasonable? no.am I going to be calm and rationale after the shock as worn off? no.I'm going to allow myself this one tiny hatred in my life and if casting aside Nancy Pearls opinion is part of the aftermath of that choice - so be it, she's got a big enough fan base, I'm sure I wont be missed.
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  • Shellie (Layers of Thought)
    January 1, 1970
    Original series review posted at Layers of Thought.If you love books and lists, and are an eclectic reader, you will adore this series. Each recommends books which are organized into themes, with great little descriptions; all are softbound, small and easy to read.Books reviewed:Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason ~ by Nancy PearlMore Book Lust: Reading Recommendations for Every Mood, Moment, and ReasonBook Crush: For Kids and Teens Thoughts: Nancy Pearl, librarian Original series review posted at Layers of Thought.If you love books and lists, and are an eclectic reader, you will adore this series. Each recommends books which are organized into themes, with great little descriptions; all are softbound, small and easy to read.Books reviewed:Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason ~ by Nancy PearlMore Book Lust: Reading Recommendations for Every Mood, Moment, and ReasonBook Crush: For Kids and Teens Thoughts: Nancy Pearl, librarian extraordinaire, has created this series of books (with the fourth to be released in a few days - its one for travelers) which contain organized collections of book recommendations, labeled under catchy little categories. Inside the categories are enticing snippets of the books in a very readable format.The books are small and easy to handle with a soft cover. With her “lust” of reading, Pearl shares with the reader the books she loves and those which she knows about, creating more desire and adding to your ever expanding book list. I spent hours perusing these books, enjoying her fun and interesting recommendations.Better yet, Nancy has a variety of philosophies which she labels “Pearlisms”. One is the “rule of fifty” which I have used recently when an abandoning a book (Pride and Prejudice – sorry Jane). What I love is that she gives you permission to stop reading a book when you are not enjoying it. It’s a free “get out of guilt card”. Here is her rule:If you’re fifty years of age or younger, give a book fifty pages before you decide to commit to reading it or give it up. If you’re over fifty, which is when time gets even shorter, subtract your age from 100—the result is the number of pages you should read before making your decision to stay with it or quit. Since that number gets smaller and smaller as we get older and older, our big reward is that when we turn 100, we can judge a book by its cover!I loved these little books and will be purchasing every one for my personal collection. 4 stars for Book Lust and Book Crush, and 4.5 stars for More Book Lust – since it has so many books I had never heard of. Highly recommend resources for teachers, librarians, and book lovers within every genre.
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  • A
    January 1, 1970
    I was curious to read Nancy Pearl's book, since she is supposedly "America's favorite librarian". While there is no single reader's advisory book or source that will fit every need, this one seems like a very useful one for parents and librarians who want to pick out or recommend books for young people. Although each book in this pocket-sized volume is not summarized in detail, the book is organized into age group and then by subject. Pearl has chosen snazzy titles for her subject groupings, and I was curious to read Nancy Pearl's book, since she is supposedly "America's favorite librarian". While there is no single reader's advisory book or source that will fit every need, this one seems like a very useful one for parents and librarians who want to pick out or recommend books for young people. Although each book in this pocket-sized volume is not summarized in detail, the book is organized into age group and then by subject. Pearl has chosen snazzy titles for her subject groupings, and included books for children with a wide variety of subject preferences. I particularly liked that she considered emotional readiness in her choice of whether to group books in a certain age group. Her chatty style make the book entertaining, and inspires confidence that she is familiar with the books she writes about. It is a bit difficult to sort through Pearl's subject groupings because of their titles; for example, I wouldn't have known that "Tam Lin" stories are about women who save their lovers from danger. Yet Pearl's subject headings are more interesting than many, so the book itself makes enjoyable reading. The short book descriptions make this book easier to use in a hurry than others that include long summaries. On the other hand, the descriptions don't give the reader any kind of summary--we must simply take Pearl's word for it that the book is a worthwhile read in a particular category. I would recommend that libraries have several copies, one for the reference desk, and others for parents and teens to borrow. A School Library Journal review (6/1/07) questioned many of Pearl's choices for inclusion and exclusion, and said that the book would generate many arguments among youth services professionals. The reviewer complained that certain sequels had been omitted and not others, and that some of the books that Pearl recommended are out of print, which would place heavy demands on interlibrary loan services. It acknowledged, however, that the book could help new readers "get the juices flowing". A Booklist reviewer (10/1/07)shared my feeling that libraries should have multiple copies. The reviewer enjoyed Pearl's writing style, and did not take issue with the selections.
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  • Karren
    January 1, 1970
    I love the structure of this book of recommended reading for children / youth. First of all, it's organized very simply into 3 sections: youngest readers, middle-grader readers, and teen readers. Having researched book recommendations online, it is incredibly hard to find a good list when children / youth have such a wide range of reading levels and interests (for instance, try finding a book for a 7th grade boy who reads at a 3rd grade level. Not as easy as you'd think when you're trying to eng I love the structure of this book of recommended reading for children / youth. First of all, it's organized very simply into 3 sections: youngest readers, middle-grader readers, and teen readers. Having researched book recommendations online, it is incredibly hard to find a good list when children / youth have such a wide range of reading levels and interests (for instance, try finding a book for a 7th grade boy who reads at a 3rd grade level. Not as easy as you'd think when you're trying to engage him in reading and want to build his confidence as a reader).Within these respective groups, author Nancy Pearl organizes her recommendations by interest. I found this extremely helpful. For example, if you have a reader who is interested in animals, you have, in the children's section, recommendations for different kinds of animals such as cats, pigs, and ducks (e.g. Make Way for Ducklings) and then for middle-school readers, there are recommendations for horse and dog books (e.g. Black Beauty). So regardless of the child's reading level, you can find a book according to his or her interest.The last section, for teens, I found the least helpful. I've decided that it's simply because I'm biased and went directly from middle-school reading to adult reading, with some exceptions (I blame my English teachers). I thought some of her recommendations were insightful, but I doubt I will ever use this part of the book.I think I may buy this, however, just for the first two sections. Or, even to just make notes about additional books I find and want to remember which were not identified in this book (e.g. Blueberries for Sal, The Ordinary Princess).
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    It seems odd that I had never read this before-every librarian knows who Nancy Pearl is. I guess I don't typically read readers advisory book just because I never run out of anything to read. But really-I was missing out. Because Nancy Pearl is a true kindred spirit when it comes to books. Sure there were lots of books she recommended that I agreed with. But. But. She highly recommended the 4 most cherished books of my childhood/teen years that are not the world's most popular books: Gone Away L It seems odd that I had never read this before-every librarian knows who Nancy Pearl is. I guess I don't typically read readers advisory book just because I never run out of anything to read. But really-I was missing out. Because Nancy Pearl is a true kindred spirit when it comes to books. Sure there were lots of books she recommended that I agreed with. But. But. She highly recommended the 4 most cherished books of my childhood/teen years that are not the world's most popular books: Gone Away Lake, The Saturdays (and sequels), And Both Were Young, and Mr and Mrs Bo Jo Jones. And yes, she did also recommend all my runner up favorites.I loved the structure of this: recommending titles based on moods or very specific interests, rather than just general genre. I admire that (like any excellent librarian) she offered a mix of contemporary, classic, popular, and lesser known titles. And, because this book is from 2007, all the YA books were ones that I had read and recommended when I was a teen librarian, so it was fun to see those titles again.
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    First and foremost, Book Crush For Kids and Teens-Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment and Interest is a reference book, not a book with a plot or a story, and it should be read as such. I believe this book absolutely belongs on the shelf of any one who has an interest in children's lit and YA. Read the rest of my review here
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  • Inhabiting Books
    January 1, 1970
    I love Nancy Pearl's Book Crush series. This book alone has brought many books into my life that I might never have found, like Eloise Jarvis McGraw's Greensleeves, and Paul Fleischman's The Borning Room.
  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    This is probably meant to be a reference book rather than read cover to cover, as I did, though it took months. Reading it that way was a bit tedious, as some books have a line or two of description, but others are just titles. This allows the inclusion of more books, but requires the reader to do their own research. All book titles are in bold, making it easy to skim, and there’s an index that includes titles and authors.Nancy Pearl is librarian and lifelong booklover, evident in this series of This is probably meant to be a reference book rather than read cover to cover, as I did, though it took months. Reading it that way was a bit tedious, as some books have a line or two of description, but others are just titles. This allows the inclusion of more books, but requires the reader to do their own research. All book titles are in bold, making it easy to skim, and there’s an index that includes titles and authors.Nancy Pearl is librarian and lifelong booklover, evident in this series of books full of book recommendations. Book Crush focuses on books for younger readers, dividing it into three parts: picture books for young children, middle grade/juvenile, and young adult. The parts are then broken down into brief, themed sections. The only challenge with the themed sections is they’re a bit random and the titles don’t always make the theme evident, though most do. So as a reference, it’s not as easily accessible as it could be if it was more organized and structured.I think if I had read this soon after it was published, I would have rated it higher. But as it’s now over 10 years old, many of the books were older titles I was already familiar with, and many recent books were, naturally, omitted. Pearl also includes a number of vintage titles, including some obscure books that are out of print and hard to find. The books are mostly fiction, but there is some nonfiction included, notably a section in middle grade broken down by Dewey decimal numbers. I enjoyed the children’s picture book section the most, as it was easy to request those that interested me from the library on-line, and read a lot of them quickly. I think picture books are also not as easily dated as books for middle grade and teen readers, and there were a number included that I remembered from my childhood.The middle-grade section wasn’t as strong for me as the children’s picture book section. A lot were older books that I’m not sure modern kids would relate to, and popular classics I was already familiar with. It also seemed more focused on books for boys; I didn’t find any books that sounded like a good fit for my niece, which was disappointing. I also wasn’t inspired to add many to my “to read” list, though this was partly influenced by the fact that they take longer to read and my reading time is finite. I had a similar issue with the young adult section. Here, Pearl includes some books shelved in the adult section that are a good fit for teens, like Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper and Mercedes Lackey’s Valdemar series. The YA and juvenile novels included that I have read are generally ones that I agree are worth recommending, notably Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies series, and L.A. Meyer’s Bloody Jack novels. Overall, this book may be worth skimming through for teachers, librarians, and parents of voracious young readers. But I think for most book lovers, an updated edition would be needed to make it really worthwhile.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really useful reading experience, as part of my job is reader’s advisory. Since this was published the year I graduated high school (2007) it’s a bit out of date and missing a lot. It’s also organized by arbitrary sections in alphabetical order, so if I was looking for funny books, I’d have to find the sections “Just for Fun” or “LOL”, which takes a bit longer to figure out what section I need for that genre. Besides that, I think this will come in handy when a parent or teen asks for This was a really useful reading experience, as part of my job is reader’s advisory. Since this was published the year I graduated high school (2007) it’s a bit out of date and missing a lot. It’s also organized by arbitrary sections in alphabetical order, so if I was looking for funny books, I’d have to find the sections “Just for Fun” or “LOL”, which takes a bit longer to figure out what section I need for that genre. Besides that, I think this will come in handy when a parent or teen asks for a certain kind of book and my mind comes up blank.
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  • Evelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Not exactly the most thrilling read, but definitely a great list of what to read. It's exactly what the title promised. And some of the more avid readers will enjoy seeing some of their favorites mentioned. I'm definitely going to check out Nancy Pearl's other books like this one which include Book Lust and More Book Lust .
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  • Chrisanne
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps my review of this one, and lack of my reviews of the other two, proves that children's lit is where my heart really lies. :DOf course, I didn't like all the recommendations and I vehemently disagreed with several suggestions. But I rarely agree with anyone 100%.
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  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a reread.
  • Sharon Buxton
    January 1, 1970
    A. nonfiction, children's books, reviews. Multiple possibilities for youngsters' reading
  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    Had lots of books in it I enjoyed as a youth that I was unable to remember the titles/author of. Now I can find them again, and build up my stockpile of books I have wished to own.
  • Amanda Daugherty
    January 1, 1970
    Pearl, N. (2010). Book crush: For kids and teens: Recommended reading for every mood, moment, and interest. Seattle, WA: Sasquatch Books. Citation created by: Amanda DaughertyType of reference: BibliographyCall number: 011.625Cost: $16.95Description: This book is a bibliography of over 1,000 books that are recommended for children and teenagers. Content/Scope: This book contains a list of titles broken down by age group and then by interest. Accuracy/Authority: This book is a newer version publi Pearl, N. (2010). Book crush: For kids and teens: Recommended reading for every mood, moment, and interest. Seattle, WA: Sasquatch Books. Citation created by: Amanda DaughertyType of reference: BibliographyCall number: 011.625Cost: $16.95Description: This book is a bibliography of over 1,000 books that are recommended for children and teenagers. Content/Scope: This book contains a list of titles broken down by age group and then by interest. Accuracy/Authority: This book is a newer version published in 2010, so the information should still be accurate. This bibliography is written by Nancy Pearl who is considered to be “America’s Favorite Librarian;” however, she better known for her knowledge in adult readers. Arrangement/Presentation: The book is divided into three age groups: easy, middle-grade, and young adults. It is further subdivided into 118 categories where a brief synopsis is given for each title. The book also contains an index.Timeliness/Permanence: The book was published in 2010, so the information is timely. It would be advisable to update a library collection with newer versions of this book. Rationale for Selection: I felt that this book would be a good addition to the library since it allows students to select books based on their interests and feelings. This might guide them into selecting a book that they would enjoy reading. Professional Review: Edwards, C. A. (2007). Book crush: For kids and teens- recommended reading for every mood, moment, and interest. School Library Journal, 53(6), 184. Relation to Similar Works: Gillespie, J. T. (1991). Best books for junior high readers. New Providence, N.J: R.R. Bowker.This is another bibliography of books geared specifically to students in middle school.
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  • Bonnie Blevins
    January 1, 1970
    Pearl, N. (2007). Book crush: For kids and teens: recommended reading for every mood, moment, and interest. Seattle, WA: Sasquatch Books. Citation by: Bonnie BlevinsType of Reference: BibliographyCall Number: Ref 028.5Content/Scope: A bibliography covering picture books, chapter books, young adult books, and nonfiction books. This bibliography recommends books from over 100 categories for kids and teens and contains bibliographical references and index.Accuracy/Authority/Bias: The author, Nancy Pearl, N. (2007). Book crush: For kids and teens: recommended reading for every mood, moment, and interest. Seattle, WA: Sasquatch Books. Citation by: Bonnie BlevinsType of Reference: BibliographyCall Number: Ref 028.5Content/Scope: A bibliography covering picture books, chapter books, young adult books, and nonfiction books. This bibliography recommends books from over 100 categories for kids and teens and contains bibliographical references and index.Accuracy/Authority/Bias: The author, Nancy Pearl, is a former librarian and bookseller. She has won awards such as: Library Journal, Fiction Reviewer of the Year and Library Journal, Librarian of the Year.Arrangement/Presentation: This bibliography is divided into three sections; easy, middle-grade, and young adult. Each section is then divided into essays which are arranged alphabetically.Relation to other works: The other bibliography in the library contains addresses to popular and important people or organizations. This book will add to the collectionAccessibility/Diversity: This book covers material for a broad range of children so it may be used by teachers or students since the school has students P-6. The index in the back allows a search by title or author. Cost: $16.95Professional Review: Edwards, C. A. (2007). Book crush: For kids and teens-recommended reading for every mood, moment, and interest. School Library Journal, 53(6), 184.
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  • Ellie Dynek
    January 1, 1970
    What I most appreciate about reading this book is that I've already read a lot of the books that she recommends for young readers, so I feel very accomplished now :)
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a sucker for booklists, and this one is great. Does Nancy Pearl really read all of these books she recommends??? If only I had the time to keep up with her! There aren't enough hours in the day! In this installment of her collection, she focuses on books for kids and teens. The book is divided up by age, beginning with the "Earliest Readers," a category that includes babies and toddlers as well as young elementary school children. She continues with the interesting, and sometimes humorous, c I'm a sucker for booklists, and this one is great. Does Nancy Pearl really read all of these books she recommends??? If only I had the time to keep up with her! There aren't enough hours in the day! In this installment of her collection, she focuses on books for kids and teens. The book is divided up by age, beginning with the "Earliest Readers," a category that includes babies and toddlers as well as young elementary school children. She continues with the interesting, and sometimes humorous, categorization that she uses in the other Book Lust books. Does your child love dogs? Well you're in luck, because there is a section on dogs! Did a loved one just pass away? Well, there's a section on "Death & Dying" too. What I like about Book Crush, is that while it does include the most popular children books, such as "Goodnight Moon" and "Cat in the Hat," it also provides many more suggestions (thousands of them!), most new to me. I borrowed this book from the library to see if I liked it, and now it's in my Amazon shopping cart. :)
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I was unsure about the format of this book; most reference books of this sort have lists of books to choose from. I found, though, that the set-up was easy to work with and had enough of a teaser for most of the books to get the gist of what they were about. While most of the categories that the books were broken down into were very easy to navigate and could be skipped entirely if you knew it was a topic that did not interest your child, there were a few that didn't mesh as well and the books w I was unsure about the format of this book; most reference books of this sort have lists of books to choose from. I found, though, that the set-up was easy to work with and had enough of a teaser for most of the books to get the gist of what they were about. While most of the categories that the books were broken down into were very easy to navigate and could be skipped entirely if you knew it was a topic that did not interest your child, there were a few that didn't mesh as well and the books within could have been better filed. For instance, the categories where the only thing the books had in common were that the titles were single words.I disagreed on a few of the books that Nancy Pearl thought were fantastic reads, but I am looking forward to sharing many of the titles with not only my children, but with some of their friends. Book Crush is a book that I will be recommending to others!
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  • Linda Lipko
    January 1, 1970
    Nancy Pearl is also the author of Book Lust and More Book Lust. In this edition she writes recommendations regarding children and teen books.Packed full of suggestions, I added many to my already bulging impossible to finish tbr list.While one might think this would be a dry list of recommendations, rather, it is written with a style that kept me reading and very interested.Like me, Nancy had a not so happy childhood. Like me, Nancy Pearl spent her childhood in libraries. And, like me, she was v Nancy Pearl is also the author of Book Lust and More Book Lust. In this edition she writes recommendations regarding children and teen books.Packed full of suggestions, I added many to my already bulging impossible to finish tbr list.While one might think this would be a dry list of recommendations, rather, it is written with a style that kept me reading and very interested.Like me, Nancy had a not so happy childhood. Like me, Nancy Pearl spent her childhood in libraries. And, like me, she was very fortunate to have wonderful mentors in librarians who knew her, made excellent suggestions and developed her intelligence through kind outreach.Avoid this book if you do not want additional piles of books to read. Add this book if you delight in witty banter and excellent suggestions with explanations of why the books are recommended.
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  • Kokeshi
    January 1, 1970
    This is an exceptionally well thought out book with superb reading lists directed at youth, but I think that the lists could be used by adults as well. Parents can appreciate the first section of the book entitled Part 1: Youngest Readers, which is full of brilliant suggestions for little ones. Part 2: Middle-Grade Readers Ages 8-12 is a terrific mix of classic and modern literature that will turn any child into a life long reader (this is a great section for books to give as gifts to kids as we This is an exceptionally well thought out book with superb reading lists directed at youth, but I think that the lists could be used by adults as well. Parents can appreciate the first section of the book entitled Part 1: Youngest Readers, which is full of brilliant suggestions for little ones. Part 2: Middle-Grade Readers Ages 8-12 is a terrific mix of classic and modern literature that will turn any child into a life long reader (this is a great section for books to give as gifts to kids as well!). Part III: Teen Readers is full of mature reads that teenagers will love. This section could easily be read by adults also as the suggestions are well worth our time. Many of the works listed are probably on adult reading lists already anyway.This is definitely Nancy Pearl's best collection of books to read. I can't imagine what she will come up with next!
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  • Lisa Vegan
    January 1, 1970
    Unfortunately not comprehensive or always on the mark. For instance, A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle is mentioned as a good book for discussion in one section, but under The Middle Grade Readers ages 8-12, when Madeleine L'Engle is mentioned, her only book listed is Meet The Austins, a book I loved, but A Wrinkle In Time should have been put in that section also or instead of Meet The Austins. A Wrinkle In Time was my favorite book when I was 10 & up and loved it when I was was first Unfortunately not comprehensive or always on the mark. For instance, A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle is mentioned as a good book for discussion in one section, but under The Middle Grade Readers ages 8-12, when Madeleine L'Engle is mentioned, her only book listed is Meet The Austins, a book I loved, but A Wrinkle In Time should have been put in that section also or instead of Meet The Austins. A Wrinkle In Time was my favorite book when I was 10 & up and loved it when I was was first introduced to it by my 4th grade teacher reading it to the class when I was 9.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the way this book was set up in three sections for young children, middle-grade readers, and teens. Each division discussed books related by a theme or mood. There was a nice mix of old and new books. I saw many I'd like to check out from the library. I think the book could be improved if the recommended books stood out more, rather than just include the title in bold print, with a description, and the theme or topic discussed in essay form. I would prefer to see an introduction to the t I liked the way this book was set up in three sections for young children, middle-grade readers, and teens. Each division discussed books related by a theme or mood. There was a nice mix of old and new books. I saw many I'd like to check out from the library. I think the book could be improved if the recommended books stood out more, rather than just include the title in bold print, with a description, and the theme or topic discussed in essay form. I would prefer to see an introduction to the theme, then book covers and a description of the book.I also would have liked more recommendations and themes in the teen section. It seemed the middle-grade readers received more attention. Overall, parents, kids and teachers could benefit from perusing Book Crush.
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    I like Nancy Pearl's recommendations - she certainly knows her stuff, and when I'm familiar with the book, I generally agree with her. I had a lot of fun finding all the titles that I had read as a child (or as a member of the kids' section). My only issue with the book was the omission of several of my favorites (most of which are recent, and it's entirely possible that they weren't available before she published Book Crush). Specifically, Jaclyn Moriarty, Cynthia Lord's Rules, Lauren Child, 17 I like Nancy Pearl's recommendations - she certainly knows her stuff, and when I'm familiar with the book, I generally agree with her. I had a lot of fun finding all the titles that I had read as a child (or as a member of the kids' section). My only issue with the book was the omission of several of my favorites (most of which are recent, and it's entirely possible that they weren't available before she published Book Crush). Specifically, Jaclyn Moriarty, Cynthia Lord's Rules, Lauren Child, 17 Things I'm Not Allowed To Do Anymore, and John, Paul, George, and Ben. Hopefully, she'll get them next time around.
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  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    I admit that I skimmed the first part of this book since it was geared towards picture books. However, I really enjoyed the second two parts of the book. Her book recommendations are fantastic and I particularly enjoyed when she mentiones if they would be good as read-alouds.My only complaint, and it's a small one, is the format. I would have preferred a list of the books with small descriptions and age ranges for each one as opposed to the way she has several books rolled into one paragraph. Th I admit that I skimmed the first part of this book since it was geared towards picture books. However, I really enjoyed the second two parts of the book. Her book recommendations are fantastic and I particularly enjoyed when she mentiones if they would be good as read-alouds.My only complaint, and it's a small one, is the format. I would have preferred a list of the books with small descriptions and age ranges for each one as opposed to the way she has several books rolled into one paragraph. This is only because I like to highlight books my girls have read and it makes it much easier to do if they are in list form. Like I said; it's a silly thing and my only complaint.
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  • Cornelia
    January 1, 1970
    From the author of Book Lust, this readers 19 advisory book recommends books by topic to kids 0 to age 18, segmented into youngest readers (0-7), middle grade readers (8-12) and teen readers (13-18); topics range from Adventures Ahoy to Real People You Ought to Know and so many more (my favorite section is titled Dewey Love Nonfiction? Dewey Ever!). The creative and fun topics recommend books for readers to explore all their curiosity and options. It 19s obvious disadvantage is that it was publi From the author of Book Lust, this readers 19 advisory book recommends books by topic to kids 0 to age 18, segmented into youngest readers (0-7), middle grade readers (8-12) and teen readers (13-18); topics range from Adventures Ahoy to Real People You Ought to Know and so many more (my favorite section is titled Dewey Love Nonfiction? Dewey Ever!). The creative and fun topics recommend books for readers to explore all their curiosity and options. It 19s obvious disadvantage is that it was published in 2007, so it 19s missing some of the more recent publications, but it is so user friendly that it makes for it. This is a great place for children to start searches within known interests.
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  • Christine H
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book, but I warn you of the consequences--putting an exorbitant number of books onto your to-read list! My book is so full of page-markers that the book itself could be a page-marker in my library. I was glad to have found a compilation of great books that was created by someone who had actually read them! I only wish there had been more descriptions of some of the novels mentioned as a way of further enticing me to read them. I am glad, though, about the organization of the I really liked this book, but I warn you of the consequences--putting an exorbitant number of books onto your to-read list! My book is so full of page-markers that the book itself could be a page-marker in my library. I was glad to have found a compilation of great books that was created by someone who had actually read them! I only wish there had been more descriptions of some of the novels mentioned as a way of further enticing me to read them. I am glad, though, about the organization of the books. It will definitely help me choose the genre and/or subject area according to the whim of the moment.
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  • AnnaBnana
    January 1, 1970
    This is a super reference resource--full of booklists for kids and teens. I did wish there was more about mood appeal as that's the reader's advisory thing I'm struggling with a bit. I thought it was organized a lot more by topic/interest than by mood, which was disappointing given the title (although there are some mood triggers--e.g. "Cry me a river"). Even with my disappointment over the mood thing though, Nancy Pearl is always great--super funny with booklists like "Sink your teeth into thes This is a super reference resource--full of booklists for kids and teens. I did wish there was more about mood appeal as that's the reader's advisory thing I'm struggling with a bit. I thought it was organized a lot more by topic/interest than by mood, which was disappointing given the title (although there are some mood triggers--e.g. "Cry me a river"). Even with my disappointment over the mood thing though, Nancy Pearl is always great--super funny with booklists like "Sink your teeth into these" and "Smells like teen nostalgia."
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Nancy Pearl is my hero. How do I get to be her and publish fun books like this and have my own action figure? Maybe I should email her and find out. I skimmed some of this but for the most part, her suggestions seemed right on (and of course, made me want to read more!). The only thing I didn't love was at the end of some sections she would include a paragraph with further suggestions and she offered only titles without even a small phrase summary. I like to see summaries in these types of books Nancy Pearl is my hero. How do I get to be her and publish fun books like this and have my own action figure? Maybe I should email her and find out. I skimmed some of this but for the most part, her suggestions seemed right on (and of course, made me want to read more!). The only thing I didn't love was at the end of some sections she would include a paragraph with further suggestions and she offered only titles without even a small phrase summary. I like to see summaries in these types of books so I don't have to go to another source to find out just what it's all about.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Everything that I didn't like about Book Lust worked here, mostly because while I'm not necessarily willing to commit to 500 pages of an adult novel based on a few sentences, I am willing to do it for picture books or teen lit. I wrote down lots of titles to check out while reading this.
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