A Man Called Ove
A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn't walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove's mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents' association to their very foundations.

A Man Called Ove Details

TitleA Man Called Ove
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 15th, 2014
PublisherAtria Books
ISBN-139781476738017
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Humor, Audiobook

A Man Called Ove Review

  • Lynda
    January 1, 1970
    "Death is a strange thing. People live their whole lives as if it does not exist, and yet it's often one of the greatest motivations for living. Some of us, in time, become so conscious of it that we live harder, more obstinately, with more fury. Some need its constant presence to even be aware of its antithesis. Others become so preoccupied with it that they go into the waiting room long before it has announced its arrival. We fear it, yet most of us fear more than anything that it may take som "Death is a strange thing. People live their whole lives as if it does not exist, and yet it's often one of the greatest motivations for living. Some of us, in time, become so conscious of it that we live harder, more obstinately, with more fury. Some need its constant presence to even be aware of its antithesis. Others become so preoccupied with it that they go into the waiting room long before it has announced its arrival. We fear it, yet most of us fear more than anything that it may take someone other than ourselves."― Fredrik Backman, A Man Called Ove"For the greatest fear of death is always that it will pass us by. And leave us there alone."― Fredrik Backman, A Man Called OveI'm sitting here this afternoon, alone. Alone and contemplating. Contemplating life. Contemplating time. Contemplating age. Just contemplating...I do so with tear streaked cheeks. I've just finished crying. I've just parted with a man I've never met, yet a man I feel I know so well. A man I disliked in the beginning, yet a man I loved at the end. A man who spent his life contemplating. A Man Called Ove. Ove (pronounced 'Oo-veh') is a cantankerous, taciturn, inflexible man. He's a veritable stick in the mudslide of human advancement, futilely rebelling against it. He thinks himself surrounded by idiots, with people always disappointing him. Over the years he has been conned, ripped off and harrassed, mainly by bureaucrats ("the men in the white shirts"), whom he despises. He is a man who lives life fairly and squarely but finds himself beset by injustice and bad luck. Ove has certainly had his fair share of sadness. At 59, he's lost his job as well as the love of his life, his wife Sonja. He misses Sonja so much that sometimes he can't bear existing in his own body. "Loving someone is like moving into a house. At first you fall in love with all the new things, amazed every morning that all this belongs to you, as if fearing that someone would suddenly come rushing in through the door to explain that a terrible mistake had been made, you weren't actually supposed to live in a wonderful place like this. Then over the years the walls become weathered, the wood splinters here and there, and you start to love that house not so much because of all its perfections, but rather for its imperpections. You get to know all the nooks and crannies. How to avoid getting the key caught in the lock when it's cold outside. Which of the floorboards flex slightly when one steps on them or exactly how to open the wardrobe doors without them creaking. These are the little secrets that make it your home." “People said Ove saw the world in black and white. But she was color. All the color he had.” ― Fredrik Backman, A Man Called OveLife has got to the point where Ove's had enough. He is fed up. So fed up that he simply wants to end it all. He wants out of this world.A Man Called Ove essentially calls out the dangers of living in a society that focuses more on thought than action, and highlights the risk of imprisoning oneself in grief. There is a sombreness to this novel (afterall, it's from Sweden! :-) ), but there is also optimism and lots of laugh out loud humor. “Ove glares out of the window. The poser is jogging. Not that Ove is provoked by jogging. Not at all. Ove couldn’t give a damn about people jogging. What he can’t understand is why they have to make such a big thing of it. With those smug smiles on their faces, as if they were out there curing pulmonary emphysema. Either they walk fast or they run slowly, that’s what joggers do. It’s a forty-year-old man’s way of telling the world that he can’t do anything right. Is it really necessary to dress up as a fourteen-year-old Romanian gymnast in order to be able to do it? Or the Olympic tobogganing team? Just because one shuffles aimlessly around the block for three quarters of an hour?” I simply adored this book. Backman's writing is clean and simple, at times deceptively so, with its gentle, episodic and occasionally repetitive structure. The story is laced with loneliness, with life's numerous disappointments and the great grey weight of the real; the last chapters deliver some unexpectedly savage emotional blows. But this is tempered with a sense of quiet celebration.A note of hope threads through the writing, building slowly, and the small details as much as the grand narrative delight and move: the moments of connection, the reawakening of a man frozen by grief, the ability of people to touch one another's lives.This is a MUST READ. It will resonate with everyone.
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  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    Update: I had planned to leave this post as it is, but after seeing the continued kind responses, I thought it best to inform you that my grandad passed away just before Christmas. Thank you to everyone who commented about this review and about him, but it seemed wrong to not let you know. It's always hard to lose someone who has been such a huge part of your life from day one, but please know that he died a happy old man, peacefully, surrounded by his family. And isn't that the best any of us c Update: I had planned to leave this post as it is, but after seeing the continued kind responses, I thought it best to inform you that my grandad passed away just before Christmas. Thank you to everyone who commented about this review and about him, but it seemed wrong to not let you know. It's always hard to lose someone who has been such a huge part of your life from day one, but please know that he died a happy old man, peacefully, surrounded by his family. And isn't that the best any of us can ever hope for?~ Emily ♥ .......................................................................I'm going to share something with you.My grandad is the very definition of curmudgeonly. He's an eighty year old man who likes to complain about anything and everything: youth today, UK politics, my dad, the weather, technology... you name it. He calls me and my siblings up most days to tell stories punctuated with rants and numerous "bloody hell"s. I'm not worried about him seeing this post because he doesn't trust computers and hasn't even grasped the concept of the internet. Most new technology is referred to as "those bloody things", except for FaceTime, which he has recently taken a liking to. He makes use of it by popping up on my iPhone multiple times a day to deliver a bout of doom and gloom in which I see nothing on the screen but his chin. All my friends are a little afraid of him and are never quite sure when he's joking. He is nothing short of a grumpy old man. Except, in truth, that's only half of it.The other day I opened the mailbox to find an envelope which contained this picture of me and him from my graduation:And with it came this note:Thing is, behind whatever my grandad may seem on the outside, he is a loving man who lost his wife - my grandmother - several years ago. He bugs us constantly with his moaning about life because he's lonely and because he misses us. He has a heart and he has a sense of humour, even if most people don't really get it. And it was in Ove, the protagonist of this novel, that I recognized pieces of my grandad. “People said he was bitter. Maybe they were right. He’d never reflected much on it. People also called him antisocial. Ove assumed this meant he wasn’t overly keen on people. And in this instance he could totally agree with them. More often than not people were out of their minds.” I loved Ove. Parts of this novel punched me right in my emotions. I think I would have been okay if this novel was merely a sad, moving tale about a man who has to get on with his life after his wife died. I could have shaken off the emotional manipulation - as I did with The Fault in Our Stars - and not shed a tear. But this story is so much more than a tearjerker.Ove shouldn't be a character we love; he's so miserly and grumpy and skeptical of everything... but he's also hilarious. He charms us with his completely uncharming ways. Because, though I don't share his worldview, what he says actually makes sense and sometimes it's really funny. Take this: “Ove glares out of the window. The poser is jogging. Not that Ove is provoked by jogging. Not at all. Ove couldn’t give a damn about people jogging. What he can’t understand is why they have to make such a big thing of it. With those smug smiles on their faces, as if they were out there curing pulmonary emphysema. Either they walk fast or they run slowly, that’s what joggers do. It’s a forty-year-old man’s way of telling the world that he can’t do anything right. Is it really necessary to dress up as a fourteen-year-old Romanian gymnast in order to be able to do it? Or the Olympic tobogganing team? Just because one shuffles aimlessly around the block for three quarters of an hour?” Plus, there's a wonderful cat who our lovable protagonist grudgingly befriends, which just improves this book even more. I think perhaps the saddest part of this book is not found in the most obvious place. Ove's loss of his wife touched me, but I was even more affected by the underlying tale of old age and how many old people can be left feeling lonely and out of place towards the end of their lives. How difficult it must be to live alone in a world that becomes more foreign to you every day, with its new gadgets and trends that you don't understand or care to entertain. It was moving and thought-provoking.I'm going to call my grandad now.Blog | Leafmarks | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr
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  • David V.
    January 1, 1970
    Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 5-8-14. Finished 5-11-14. First let me explain what happened to me while reading this book aloud to my wife as she was preparing dinner. I'm 70; she's almost 70. I'd read the first page, laughed out loud and decided she'd like to hear it read. I read, we laughed and nodded knowingly, then I got to the end of chapter 4 and completely lost it---I couldn't continue through those last few sentences. My wife said I should quit since she knows that I cry Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 5-8-14. Finished 5-11-14. First let me explain what happened to me while reading this book aloud to my wife as she was preparing dinner. I'm 70; she's almost 70. I'd read the first page, laughed out loud and decided she'd like to hear it read. I read, we laughed and nodded knowingly, then I got to the end of chapter 4 and completely lost it---I couldn't continue through those last few sentences. My wife said I should quit since she knows that I cry at supermarket openings! Now how many books have you read that can cause that kind of a physical and emotional response?! On the other hand, this book is hilarious, insightful, touching and just plain awesome. It seems pretty simple at first but there is more depth to this book than any I've read in forever. As I got near the end, I thought that there really should be a sequel, then the plot changed-----definitely no sequel. But I'm thankful I had the opportunity to read this. You will too.
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  • Nicholas Sparks
    January 1, 1970
    This novel, set in Sweden, tells the story of Ove, who can best be described as a curmudgeon. The story takes place after the death of his wife, and shows how healing can occur with the unlikeliest of people, in the unlikeliest of ways.
  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tale that makes you appreciate life!I vote *OVE* as 'character-of-the-year'! The author has created the most memorable character to be found in a novel --in years. *OVE*, is an unassuming man. He likes routines, and rules. He's an honest man. Doesn't smile and give compliments -- but he's a man of integrity. To watch OVE grow - heal the loss of his wife -and allow his neighbors to love him (and love them back) -- is is a treasure. This book has great humor & great heart!Its a perso This is a tale that makes you appreciate life!I vote *OVE* as 'character-of-the-year'! The author has created the most memorable character to be found in a novel --in years. *OVE*, is an unassuming man. He likes routines, and rules. He's an honest man. Doesn't smile and give compliments -- but he's a man of integrity. To watch OVE grow - heal the loss of his wife -and allow his neighbors to love him (and love them back) -- is is a treasure. This book has great humor & great heart!Its a personal gift for 'all' readers! DON'T MISS THIS GEM!
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    Argh! It’s hard not to start this review with a bunch of expletives, because this book pissed me off royally! Shit! See, I can’t even hold it in. The cat and the fat were the straws that broke the camel’s back.Let’s start with Ove not liking the cat. Not liking the cat is one thing. For some reason bitching about a cat is supposed to be funny, but to me it’s annoying. Ove kicking the cat a couple of times cranked my wincing up a notch. But there was a way worse cat crime: Ove was going to leave Argh! It’s hard not to start this review with a bunch of expletives, because this book pissed me off royally! Shit! See, I can’t even hold it in. The cat and the fat were the straws that broke the camel’s back.Let’s start with Ove not liking the cat. Not liking the cat is one thing. For some reason bitching about a cat is supposed to be funny, but to me it’s annoying. Ove kicking the cat a couple of times cranked my wincing up a notch. But there was a way worse cat crime: Ove was going to leave the cat to die in a snow bank! The neighbor saw the cat and saved it, while Ove looked on with annoyance. So Ove isn’t just grumpy, he’s heartless--seriously mean. And then miraculously, yet still predictably, Ove comes to like the cat and suddenly they’re best friends. At least the story’s predictability saved me from fretting incessantly about the cat.Cat problem number 2: The author, Backman, is completely absolutely totally clueless when it comes to cats. Cats are known for not being adaptable. Yet here is a stray cat; i.e., probably unsocialized and skittish and scared of people, who immediately and happily jumps into Ove’s car and accompanies him on all his errands. I mean the cat actually goes into stores with him! What??? I’ve met maybe one cat that doesn’t hate riding in a car. You usually can’t even coax a cat into the car, but if you do succeed, the second the car starts moving the cat freaks out. And it’s highly unlikely that the cat would follow its new person into a store, full of strange people, sounds, smells, and objects; it’s just ludicrous. When the cat walked into McDonald’s with Ove, that was the last straw. And never mind that restaurants don’t even allow pets (including Sweden). The writer should have made the animal a dog instead of a cat, or should have talked to a cat person before writing the book.The next huge bitch I have is the way the author talks about the big guy, Jimmy. Ove makes a disparaging comment about the guy letting himself get fat. So at first, I thought, okay, so Ove doesn’t like fat people; he doesn’t like anyone, so that’s not surprising. But I quickly see it’s the author who has a problem. When the author first introduces Jimmy, he’s referred to a “quarter-tonner” who, the author says, probably tests bacon for a living! The author mentions something about Jimmy’s weight every single time Jimmy enters a scene. For instance, the author says something like “the overweight man gets into the car.” That’s like saying every time a non-overweight person gets into a car, “the height-weight proportionate man gets into the car.” Not only is it obnoxious that the author points out Jimmy’s weight every chance he gets, but isn’t it bad writing to repeat, time after time, the same feature of a particular character? He’s overweight, we get it. The author’s prejudices and insensitivities are shining through, and they aren’t pretty: Jimmy either has food hanging out of his mouth, or has food spilled on his clothes, or he’s looking for food. I hate to tell the author, but most overweight people are not slovenly and they often don’t even eat in public. His prejudice against overweight people was prominent and infuriating.But I’m not done. Let’s talk about Ove’s transformation. First, why in the hell would an upbeat woman fall in love with the jerk? Talk about an unlikable character! And why would any neighbor put up with his shit? Not believable, sorry. Second, how would his personality change over just a couple of months? People don’t transform that fast, if at all. But most important, I want to know why someone who is grumpy and mean becomes a super star when he simply turns into a civil human being. Why is he being rewarded, praised, adored, and esteemed because he finally becomes civil? Why does he get extra credit for acting civil, like everyone else is doing all along?Okay, there are a couple of fine things about the book. Ove is so well drawn, I believed every nasty word he uttered. Also, the language is good, and the story moves along seamlessly.But there are many structural and logistical problems. One time the same paragraph appears three times within 20 pages. Another time, a character disappears from a scene. This all points to a careless editor and writer. Debut book or no debut book, it shouldn’t be this sloppy.I wish I had better news. Those who aren’t bothered by cat and fat insensitivities might find Ove to be interesting and funny, and the book entertaining. I didn’t. The majority of reviews are positive. It just hit me all wrong.
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  • Jesse (JesseTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a nice story! It's about the transformations we go through in life and how different events within our life affect, shape us, and make us who we are today.
  • Megan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Since I have been reading more and more, I have realized that it is not always beneficial to give each book a 5 star rating just because you got to the end of it. This book, I mean THIS BOOK deserves a 5 star rating. If I could give it more than I would, but alas I cannot. :(So, here's the review. Greif is a strange thing, I have heard many people say. I have lost people in my life, but not in the way that Ove has in this book. Ove mother dies when he is young, leaving Ove and his father. His fa Since I have been reading more and more, I have realized that it is not always beneficial to give each book a 5 star rating just because you got to the end of it. This book, I mean THIS BOOK deserves a 5 star rating. If I could give it more than I would, but alas I cannot. :(So, here's the review. Greif is a strange thing, I have heard many people say. I have lost people in my life, but not in the way that Ove has in this book. Ove mother dies when he is young, leaving Ove and his father. His father taught Ove how to be a man in so many ways. He was taught that a Saab was the best car to purchase, which Ove goes above and beyond to stay loyal to that car company. His father taught him how to work and cook and love. Then, Ove looses his father when he is 16. This leaves Ove in a bad place, he literally becomes a hermit in a way and doesn't talk or bother with people anymore. He takes over his father's job. Then there were some issues with that, but Ove was honest and trusting and he came out on top of that issue!Ove then meets Sonja when he is on a bus. Buses have a lot to do with this story come to think of it. Ove finds his wife and the love of his life on that bus that day. He also looses a lot on a bus on a different day - but you'll have to read the book to find that part out ;). Ove and Sonja moved into a row home together and shortly after Sonja passes away. This leaves Ove with nothing and he doesn't know what to do with himself. He lived his life to please her and now she is gone. Here's the thing about grief, people deal with it in all kinds of ways. Ove was dealing with it in the worst way you could, until his new neighbors moved in. This is where the book gets going really, and I don't want to say too much because I think it is really important that if you want to read this book that you get the entire story how it was intended by the Author. Moral of my little review, Ove was a mean, grumpy, miserable man until those neighbors moved in and that brought Ove out of his shell. He was needed by people again and he felt wanted. He became a family with everyone in the neighborhood all because of that little family who lived across the street.Some things to remember when you are reading this book:1.) Buses2.) Pink Flowers3.) Saab's4.) Rules - Ove was NOT a rule breaker5.) Love6.) Hands - an odd one, but true!7.) White ShirtsThis is the end of my review. I loved this book and I feel like I will reread this one many times when I feel alone or upset or just want to read a damn good book!If you have any questions or want to know more about it than I have told you, please private message me.Enjoy reading this wonderful book! :)
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  • PirateSteve
    January 1, 1970
    Ove - gruff, insensitive, antisocial - Ove 6 months in widower finds nothing remains to live for. The writing/English translation of Ove's story is top-notch. The story-line itself plays very well with this character study.The story moves forward, then comes a little back story, we move forward again and this pace continues through out the book at finely tuned measurements. But that's not why 5 stars. My 5 stars comes because every time the story moved forward, someone touched on my emotions. An Ove - gruff, insensitive, antisocial - Ove 6 months in widower finds nothing remains to live for. The writing/English translation of Ove's story is top-notch. The story-line itself plays very well with this character study.The story moves forward, then comes a little back story, we move forward again and this pace continues through out the book at finely tuned measurements. But that's not why 5 stars. My 5 stars comes because every time the story moved forward, someone touched on my emotions. And every time I read another piece of back story, Ove or his wife(Sonja) pulled on my emotions. So halfway into the book and there is a slight feeling of attachment starting to take hold. And by the end of the book there was solid emotional investment ... it's worth it. excerpts are spoiler(ish)(view spoiler)[page 11 narration "Won't it be nice to slow down a bit?" they said to Ove yesterday at work. While explaining that there was a lack of employment prospects and so they were "retiring the older generation." A third of a century in the same workplace, and that's how they refer to Ove. Suddenly he's a bloody "generation." "Ove glares out of the window. The poser is jogging. Not that Ove is provoked by jogging. Not at all. Ove couldn't give a damn about people jogging. What he can't understand is why they have to make such a big thing of it. With those smug smiles on their faces, as if they were out there curing pulmonary emphysema. Is it really necessary to dress up as a fourteen-year-old Romanian gymnast in order to be able to do it?" page 18/19 narration '"Holy Christ. A lower-arm amputee with cataracts could have backed this trailer more accurately than you." Ove mutters as he gets into the car."' "'Reverse radar and parking sensors and cameras and crap like that. A man who needs all that to back up with a trailer shouldn't be bloody doing it in the first place."' "The lanky One nods cheerfully at him. "Thanks for the help," he calls out, as if Ove hadn't just spent the last ten minutes insulting him." page 36 narration "Ove knew very well that her friends couldn't understand why she married him. He couldn't really blame them." "People said he was bitter. maybe they were right. He'd never reflected much on it. People also called him antisocial. Ove assumed this meant he wasn't overly keen on people. And in this instance he could totally agree with them. More often than not people were out of their minds." "Ove wasn't one to engage in small talk." page 37 narration"He was a man of black and white." "And she was color. All the color he had." page 51-52 Ove's skinny neighbor lady he has nicknamed Weed. She has a dog named Prince and Ove is protecting a stray cat. "Don't you hiss at Prince!" wails Weed, picking up another stone from Ove's flower bed and hurling it at the cat.""She picks up another stone and prepares to throw it. Ove takes two quick steps forward and stands so close behind her that she can most likely feel his breath.""'That disgusting thing scratched Prince!" she manages to say, her eyes wild with fury.""I'll kill that piece of shit! ... It's probably full of disgusting diseases and rabies and all sorts of things!" "Ove looks at the cat. Looks at the Weed. Nods." "'And so are you, most likely. But we don't throw stones at you because of it." page 108-109 narration "He never understood why she chose him. She loved only abstract things like music and book and strange words. Ove was a man entirely filled with tangible things. He liked screwdrivers and oil filters. He went through life with his hands firmly shoved into his pockets. She danced." "You don't fool me, darling," she said ... "You're dancing on the inside, Ove, when no one's watching. And I'll always love you for that. Weather you like it or not." page 125 Ove, neighbor Parvaneh and her two daughters, and two security guards "Ove hit the clauwn!" the three-year-old shrieks delightedly.""Parvaneh stares at him, agape, and can't even think of anything to say.' "He was no good at magic anyway," the seven-year-old groans.""Why ... hold on ... what ...what clown?""The clauwn Beppo," the toddler explains, nodding wisely." "Stupid magic," says Ove." "Ove HIT the clauwn, Mum," the three-year-old titters as if this was the best thing that ever happened in her whole life.""We're here to visit my husband. He's had an accident. I'm bringing in the children now to say hello to him,"she explains to the guards.""That's fine." One of the security guards nods." "But this one stays here," Confirms the other security guard and points at Ove." page 131 narration "Ove had never been asked how he lived before he met her(his wife). But if anyone had asked him. he would have answered that he didn't." page 151 Ove with wife, Sonja "Shakespeare,' said Sonja." "Is that any good?" Ove wondered." "It's fantastic,' Sonja nodded, smiling." "I've never read anything with him," mumbled Ove ..." "By him," Sonja corrected, and lovingly put her hand on his. In their almost four decades together Sonja taught hundreds of pupils with learning difficulties to read Shakespeare's collected works. In the same period she never managed to make Ove read a single Shakespeare play. But as soon as they moved into their row house he spent every evening for weeks on end in the toolshed. And when he was done, the most beautiful bookcases she had ever seen were in their living room." "You have to keep them somewhere," he muttered." "And she crept into his arms and said that she loved him. And he nodded." page 153 narration "The ones she liked, such as The Old Man and the Sea, she'd read so many times that she'd lost count." page 262 narration "... when the doctors gave her the diagnosis four years ago. She found it easier to forgive than Ove did. Forgive God and the universe and everything. Ove got angry instead. Maybe because he felt someone had to be angry on her behalf, when everything that was evil seemed to assail the only person he'd ever met who didn't deserve it." (hide spoiler)]
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  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    January 1, 1970
    Ein Mann namens Ove = A Man Called Ove, Fredrik BackmanA Man Called Ove (original title in Swedish: En man som heter Ove) is a 2012 novel by Fredrik Backman, a Swedish columnist, blogger and writer. It was published in English in 2013. The English version reached the New York Times Best Seller list 18 months after it was published and stayed on the list for 42 weeks.عنوانها: مردی به نام اوه؛ مردی به نام اووه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و هشتم ماه اکتبر سال 2016 میلادیعنوا Ein Mann namens Ove = A Man Called Ove, Fredrik BackmanA Man Called Ove (original title in Swedish: En man som heter Ove) is a 2012 novel by Fredrik Backman, a Swedish columnist, blogger and writer. It was published in English in 2013. The English version reached the New York Times Best Seller list 18 months after it was published and stayed on the list for 42 weeks.عنوانها: مردی به نام اوه؛ مردی به نام اووه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و هشتم ماه اکتبر سال 2016 میلادیعنوان: مردی به نام اوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: حسین تهرانی؛ تهران، نشر چشمه، 1395؛ در 361 ص؛ شابک: 9786002296979؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان سوئدی - سده 21 معنوان: مردی به نام اُوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: فرناز تیمورازف؛ تهران، نشر نون، 1395؛ در 392 ص؛ شابک: 9786007141779؛ عنوان: مردی به نام اووه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: محمد عباس آبادی؛ تهران، کتابسرای تندیس، 1395؛ در 374 ص؛ شابک: 9786001822124؛ عنوان: مردی به نام اوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: مهسا دوستدار؛ ویراستار: بابک حقایق؛ تهران، آوای چکامه؛ 1396؛ در 387 ص؛ شابک: 9786008173380؛عنوان: مردی به نام اوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: جهانپور ملکی الموتی؛ تهران، سپهر ادب، 1396؛ در 296 ص؛ شابک: 9786009852871؛عنوان: مردی به نام اوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: اسدالله حقانی؛ ویراستار: نسیم احمدی خلیلی؛ تهران، انتشارات آتیسا، 1396؛ در 440 ص؛ شابک: 9786008399957؛ عنوان: مردی به نام اوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: فرشته افسری؛ ویراستار: هوشنگ بازگیر؛ تهران، آسو، 1396؛ در 397 ص؛ شابک: 9786008755166؛مترجم: آیدین پورضیائی؛ ویراستار: بهمن رضایی؛ تهران، راه معاصر، 1396؛ در 360 ص؛ شابک: 9786006585499؛عنوان: مردی به نام اوه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: جواد شاهدی؛ قم، نظاره، 1397؛ در 384 ص؛ شابک: 9786008870609؛عنوان: مردی به نام اووه؛ نویسنده: فردریک بکمن؛ مترجم: سعید گوهری راد؛ ویراستار: علی احمدی؛ تهران، نکوراد، 1396؛ در 356 ص؛ شابک: 9786006443256؛بکمن در رمان: «مردی به نام اوه»؛ بینشی انتقادی به اجتماع دارند، و احساساتی همچو: عشق و نفرت را، به زیبایی به تصویر می‌کشند، جامعه را در لفاف طنز زیر سؤال می‌برند، و انزوا و ریشه‌ های مشکلات بشر مدرن را، می‌کاوند. نثر کتاب، ساده و روان است و خواندنش لذت‌بخش، مفاهیم ژرفی در بر دارد که از دیدگان تیزبین و ذهن‌های منتقد، هرگزی پنهان نمی‌ماند. روزنامه ی «اشپیگل» درباره ی این رمان نوشته است: «کسی که از این رمان خوشش نیاید، بهتر است هیچ کتابی نخواند»؛ ا. شربیانی
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  • Mio
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this book expecting some easy entertainment, you know, a few giggles here and there. I did not expect to spend almost half an hour crying my eyes out after finishing it - and yet, that's exactly what I did. Ove is a grumpy old man. He wants things to be "right" and doesn't think twice about the fact that he isn't always perceived as fair - and that always keeping to the truth can actually make people stay away from you. This book is a journey. For Ove, for Ove's surroundings and for the I bought this book expecting some easy entertainment, you know, a few giggles here and there. I did not expect to spend almost half an hour crying my eyes out after finishing it - and yet, that's exactly what I did. Ove is a grumpy old man. He wants things to be "right" and doesn't think twice about the fact that he isn't always perceived as fair - and that always keeping to the truth can actually make people stay away from you. This book is a journey. For Ove, for Ove's surroundings and for the reader. It is a magnificent tale about true love, Saab and the fact that what you see isn't always what you get.
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  • Candace
    January 1, 1970
    This definitely isn't my usual type of book, but I'm glad I read it. Every once in a while, you have to change things up a little. 'A Man Called Ove' was a great choice for me.Ove is a wonderful character. He is opinionated, cantankerous and utterly set in his ways. He is a man that has been left behind in many ways, unwilling to adapt and unable to understand the thought process that drives "modern man" in this technological era.When his new neighbor's failed attempts to back a trailer up draws This definitely isn't my usual type of book, but I'm glad I read it. Every once in a while, you have to change things up a little. 'A Man Called Ove' was a great choice for me.Ove is a wonderful character. He is opinionated, cantankerous and utterly set in his ways. He is a man that has been left behind in many ways, unwilling to adapt and unable to understand the thought process that drives "modern man" in this technological era.When his new neighbor's failed attempts to back a trailer up draws his attention, it is only the first of many humorous interactions to come. Despite his unpleasant disposition and perpetual crankiness, Ove seems to constantly be coming to the rescue of his newest neighbors. He comes off as "hard" at first, but it quickly becomes clear that he is a softie.A series of comical and heart-warming events play out, which kept me laughing and smiling. Little by little, we are provided glimpses of Ove's past, experiencing the love he has for his deceased wife and the events that shaped him into the man he became. Slowly but surely, I fell in love with this gruff old man.Determined to end his life and join his wife, fate combined with his his infallible values and sense of civic duty to repeatedly postpone his suicide. There's always something that he has to take care of before he can draw his last breath. Time after time, his plans are thwarted.Overall, I thought this was a fantastic story. Everybody needs an Ove in their life!
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    When I began reading A Man Called Ove, I thought what a clever tale of an angry old man. The kind that believes rules and regulations are of utmost importance, that see the world filled with stupid people, and is always right. The way the author describes him and his actions are hilarious, as I have known a few Oves myself. They have their principles! The only person Ove had and loved dearly, was his wife, Sonja. She has just passed away, and all Ove wants to do is kill himself, but those pesky When I began reading A Man Called Ove, I thought what a clever tale of an angry old man. The kind that believes rules and regulations are of utmost importance, that see the world filled with stupid people, and is always right. The way the author describes him and his actions are hilarious, as I have known a few Oves myself. They have their principles! The only person Ove had and loved dearly, was his wife, Sonja. She has just passed away, and all Ove wants to do is kill himself, but those pesky neighbors keep getting in his way!I was enjoying all the fun until about the 40% mark, then I started getting angry myself. It is always others who make Ove begrudgingly do the right thing. It was always his wife who made all the excuses for him as a basically non-functioning adult.There were two items in particular that I really didn't like. The first was his cat, a stray, whom if not for his neighbors he would have let die. The second is a neighbor called Jimmy. Jimmy is overweight, and the constant references to food hanging out of his mouth, and stains on his shirt were just plain rude.I pressed on even though it was getting tough to read. There was one paragraph near the ending about getting older that touched my heart, but other than that, it was just more of the same. The author, Fredrik Backman, is a blogger, and this is his first novel. He is a good writer, and I can see how blogs of Ove would be fun, but as a whole book it just didn't work for me...but, I am in the minority!
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent heartwarming and humorous book. Basically, a series of short stories about a man called Ove that all combine together into an awesome all-encompassing storyline.Ove is a grumpy old man who has a cynical approach to everything. But, how he got this way, combined with the relationships he "accidentally" develops lead to a lot of unexpected twists and turns.One of the things I loved about this book is that seemingly serious situations end up hilarious, while scenes that seem to This is an excellent heartwarming and humorous book. Basically, a series of short stories about a man called Ove that all combine together into an awesome all-encompassing storyline.Ove is a grumpy old man who has a cynical approach to everything. But, how he got this way, combined with the relationships he "accidentally" develops lead to a lot of unexpected twists and turns.One of the things I loved about this book is that seemingly serious situations end up hilarious, while scenes that seem to be completely for comic relief can really pull on your heart strings. I went from laughter to tears on the turn of a dime while I listened to this book.Also, If you like interesting characters, this is the book for you. Every character is fascinating in their own right. I will miss them all! Can't say for sure, but I think most people will enjoy those book.
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  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed. I cried. If you want a contemporary that will warm you up inside this is the one you should read.It also gave me some strong vibes of the movie Gran Torino!4 or 5 stars I'm not sure yet!
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Why This Book I run a monthly poll on the ThisIsMyTruthNow blog via my Book Bucket List. Followers get to choose from a list of the twelve books I own and want to read in the near future. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman was selected as the book I should read in March 2018. I added it to the list because I really enjoyed his novel, Beartown, and thought this was the next logical step. A good friend of mine was interested in reading the novel, too, so we made this a buddy read. I'm so excit Why This Book I run a monthly poll on the ThisIsMyTruthNow blog via my Book Bucket List. Followers get to choose from a list of the twelve books I own and want to read in the near future. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman was selected as the book I should read in March 2018. I added it to the list because I really enjoyed his novel, Beartown, and thought this was the next logical step. A good friend of mine was interested in reading the novel, too, so we made this a buddy read. I'm so excited to discuss the book as if it's our own book club. Approach & Style I was going to order the book online, but I found it sitting on the shelf in my apartment building's library room; how lucky am i? The paperback is 337 pages long and broken into ~40 chapters (not  numbered). Each has a title which explains what might happen in the chapter, and they mostly alternate between what is happening today in Ove's life in comparison to something connected that occurred in the past. It took me 4 hours to read over a three-day weekend getaway to New Hampshire, but I forced myself to stop at 110 pages each day so it would last longer. It could easily be read in one sitting as it's that good! The novel's perspective is focused on Ove, and it is told in third-person omniscient POV. It was published in 2014 but as a Swedish novel, then brilliantly translated into English. Plot, Characters & Setting Ove is a 59-year old man who is cantankerous, ornery, difficult, mean and everything else that comes along with the type of men you'd see in the movie "Grumpy Old Men." It opens with a bit about an iPad that is basically someone we all know (or are -- I see my own future in a good 20+ years). But he of course has a heart somewhere, and we spend the entirety of the book seeing little pieces of it as we watch his journey to try to complete a final goal. We meet several of his neighbors and former friends, a few citizens of his community, and some strangers who all have an impact on Ove's life, but are also touched by the time they spend with Ove.It's difficult to summarize more about the book without giving away big pieces of the plot, but it is a story that will make you cry and laugh at the same time on several occasions. Imagine a man you would not want to meet in person slowly tugging at your heart strings because you see and understand all he's been through that's turned him into the person we read about today. When you learn what his actual goal is, you'll be shocked and struggle to accept that you want to support him in it. And when the things he's always wanted but could never quite have suddenly start appearing in his life, you'll know you can't help but love the grumpy old man. Key Thoughts Fredrik Backman is hands-down one of my favorite character-building authors. Ove has so many levels to him you will lose count trying to guess what he might do in any given situation. His first reaction will almost always annoy you. His second will irritate you beyond belief... could he really have lost all humanity? But by the third or fourth time he encounters a situation, you see the tides turning. That's where Backman excels. No matter how harsh he makes someone, the character teeters on the edge until they fall sweepingly into your arms as someone you now love and root for.Despite reading the reviews and guessing enough of the high-level plot from the descriptions, I was not prepared for all the emotions in this book. The story captures different aspects of life and tries to make sense of them in reverse order. We aren't reading Ove's past in any logical format or order. It's bits and pieces, re-told at appropriate points in his current life. In the opening scenes, he's yelling at an iPad sales clerk... and we think he's just an irate older man who can't 'get with the times.' But when you learn everything that led up to it, you'll find so many new connections. The order of the chapters is brilliant. You know people dislike one another, but not why. You find out way after you think you will, and it makes total sense. An author who can keep that going for 300+ pages is phenomenal.I kept thinking 'What if Ove meets the main character from The Five People You Meet in Heaven?' Would they get along? They're basically the same person, but completely different. From the plot to the story, the dialogue to the narrative, this book will capture your attention, enthrall your senses, tease you, torture you, and in the end, make you wish there were more. I can't recommend it enough! You'll even laugh out loud so often, people will look at you quite funny. Summary I am so thrilled with my second Fredrik Backman book that I plan to read all of his remaining works this summer. I have a copy of Beartown 2 which I will read next month, but then it will be My Grandmother Asked Me To Tell You She's Sorry and Britt-Marie Was Here. There are others, but those are up next on the spring and summer reading lists. I don't think I could be disappointed as I am addicted to his writing style and storytelling abilities. He's definitely in my top 10 favorite authors thus far in my reading lifetime.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    OMGOSH, what a wonderful novel! I now have my first super-favorite of 2015!This is a story of the deep and everlasting love of a contrary 59 year old man who struggles each and every day to cope with the pain and loss of the only person who ever understood him, and the never-ending guilt of not preventing a horrible tragedy.It is also a comical and entertaining account of A Man Called Ove and his peculiar ways....an honest man with strict principles who abhors "the men in white shirts" that have OMGOSH, what a wonderful novel! I now have my first super-favorite of 2015!This is a story of the deep and everlasting love of a contrary 59 year old man who struggles each and every day to cope with the pain and loss of the only person who ever understood him, and the never-ending guilt of not preventing a horrible tragedy.It is also a comical and entertaining account of A Man Called Ove and his peculiar ways....an honest man with strict principles who abhors "the men in white shirts" that have done him wrong, a man who fights for what's right, a man who will no longer be cheated out of a kroner, a man who eventually becomes(view spoiler)[ a hero and loved by all. (hide spoiler)]Ove's crazy antics with his neighbors and numerous outlandish conversations....(my favorites were with the vagrant cat)....are laugh-out-loud hilarious, and OMG his vocabulary....."selective obesity" ???....will not forget that one!This feel good story will break your heart, (so keep the tissues handy) make you smile, and wish you had a friend like Ove. Do Not Pass This One By!
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    I MUST ALERT YOU THIS CONTAINS SPOILERS BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE STUPID AND CAN'T SEE THAT I CLICKED THE SPOILER BUTTON. DON'T READ REVIEW IF YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE SPOILERS.I am an utterly blubbering fool right now. I loved this book and I adored Ove and all the other characters. The end took me by surprise and I really wasn't expecting Ove to die at the end and it was so sad. This was such an amazing book! I loved this book so much. I wish I could give it 10 stars and I hope that one day Hollywood co I MUST ALERT YOU THIS CONTAINS SPOILERS BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE STUPID AND CAN'T SEE THAT I CLICKED THE SPOILER BUTTON. DON'T READ REVIEW IF YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE SPOILERS.I am an utterly blubbering fool right now. I loved this book and I adored Ove and all the other characters. The end took me by surprise and I really wasn't expecting Ove to die at the end and it was so sad. This was such an amazing book! I loved this book so much. I wish I could give it 10 stars and I hope that one day Hollywood could recreate this into a movie that emulates how special Ove really was. You won't be sorry you read this, you'll laugh and cry and it is so worth it!
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  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
    January 1, 1970
    I've always had a thing for grumpy old men. Not in a pervy way you nut job! I've always favored them in real life because probably I'm one of those people who tolerate little bullshit and they fit that for me.Plus most of them really don't like people. Ove is my kind of people. He comes across as a pretty big curmudgeon. All he wants to do is commit suicide. People won't leave him alone long enough to do it. He misses his outgoing wife and doesn't think he has much to live for. Then the neighbo I've always had a thing for grumpy old men. Not in a pervy way you nut job! I've always favored them in real life because probably I'm one of those people who tolerate little bullshit and they fit that for me.Plus most of them really don't like people. Ove is my kind of people. He comes across as a pretty big curmudgeon. All he wants to do is commit suicide. People won't leave him alone long enough to do it. He misses his outgoing wife and doesn't think he has much to live for. Then the neighbors move in down the street. The lanky dad backs over Ove's garden because the idiot can't back a trailer, Mom is pregnant and bossy, and two kids.They won't leave Ove alone. They even saddle him with an aggravation cat.I can't seem to figure out how to do the best words when I really love a book. Just picture the hallelujah light over my head when it finally happens. Be sure and duck after that though because that lightning bolt might hit you in the ass.Go read this book and love it. It'll make your old Grinch heart grow.(If I can handle it, you guys can.)
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  • Snotchocheez
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 starsI've read all my GR friends' wildly divergent reviews of Fredrik Backman's debut novel A Man Called Ove and can find something to agree with in each of them. Nods to those who enjoyed the comedy of errors. Nods to the ailurophiles who despised Ove's treatment of the cat. Nods to those who couldn't get enough of Ove's archetypal curmudgeonly character. Nods to those who found Ove's transformation from hating the world to being a reluctant hero an unlikely and transparently feel-good-y a 2.5 starsI've read all my GR friends' wildly divergent reviews of Fredrik Backman's debut novel A Man Called Ove and can find something to agree with in each of them. Nods to those who enjoyed the comedy of errors. Nods to the ailurophiles who despised Ove's treatment of the cat. Nods to those who couldn't get enough of Ove's archetypal curmudgeonly character. Nods to those who found Ove's transformation from hating the world to being a reluctant hero an unlikely and transparently feel-good-y affair.My assessment: cute but repetitive, not nearly as funny as it needs to be, rendered trite by its obvious similarity to other, better comedic works, slathered with life-lesson goop, and adorned with a way-too-predictable wreath of lingonberries and happy happy joy joy.Or maybe I'm just as curmudgeonly as Ove, so never mind me.
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  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Ove is a surly man who keeps to himself. He cares about rules, routine, and being left alone to go about his business. His quiet life is upended by chatty new neighbors who flatten his mailbox, drive over his flowerbed, and insert themselves into his house and his life with careless disregard for his needs. Though Ove prefers to be free of their nuisance interruptions, they’re the first of many whose lives Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Ove is a surly man who keeps to himself. He cares about rules, routine, and being left alone to go about his business. His quiet life is upended by chatty new neighbors who flatten his mailbox, drive over his flowerbed, and insert themselves into his house and his life with careless disregard for his needs. Though Ove prefers to be free of their nuisance interruptions, they’re the first of many whose lives enmesh with his. If Ove’s not careful, he may find himself caring about someone other than himself. Backman has created a highly memorable protagonist. Ove is a pragmatic man who “checks the status of all things,” who believes in principles, who understands things he can “see and touch,” who has no friends and doesn’t need them, who likes mathematics, and who shoves his hands in his pockets “in that particular way of a middle-aged man who expects the worthless world outside to disappoint him. He’s a delightful old man who’s irascible, morose, and unintentionally funny. “That disgusting thing scratched Prince!” she manages to say, her eyes wild with fury. Ove peers down at [her dog]. It growls at him. Then he looks at the cat, sitting humiliated and bleeding but with its head defiantly raised, outside his house. “It’s bleeding. So it seems to have ended in a draw,” says Ove. “Like hell. I’ll kill that piece of shit!” “No you wont,” says Ove coldly. His insane neighbor begins to look threatening. “It’s probably full of disgusting diseases and rabies and all sorts of things!” Ove looks at the cat. Looks at [her]. Nods. “And so are you, most likely. But we don’t throw stones at you because of it.” However, beneath Ove’s toughened exterior is a story of heartbreak, disappointment, and tragedy. Never before has a character been kicked down – and then kicked while he’s down – so many times in one story. Ove is convinced his life holds little value but, as he inadvertently collects strays – in the form of a ragged cat and a cast of diverse neighbors – he sees the first glimmers of purpose. His woeful story transforms into a triumphant exploration of the way one person can change the life of countless others. A Man Called Ove is a stupendous read that brings forth laughter and tears in equal measure.
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    I'm probably going to be crying about this book forever.There are so many things to love in this book. It's a story about an old crotchety man unwillingly being thrust into friendships that change his life, as well as a bit about his past too. There's really nothing I didn't love about this book. It had me laughing one minute and tearing up the next, and by the end I was bawling.I also listened to the audiobook which was SO GOOOOD.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman is a 2014 Atria publication. After I read ‘Britt-Marie Was Here’ and really enjoyed it, my Goodreads friends strongly recommended this book, and were positive I would love it. I vowed to fit the book in as quickly as possible, and was thankful my library had a copy and the wait list wasn’t monstrous. I have no idea where to begin! This an amazing story, with the most interesting characters, humorous and emotional situations. The writing is unusual, with presen A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman is a 2014 Atria publication. After I read ‘Britt-Marie Was Here’ and really enjoyed it, my Goodreads friends strongly recommended this book, and were positive I would love it. I vowed to fit the book in as quickly as possible, and was thankful my library had a copy and the wait list wasn’t monstrous. I have no idea where to begin! This an amazing story, with the most interesting characters, humorous and emotional situations. The writing is unusual, with present tense mingled with past tense. Ove appears, in the beginning, as though he is a cranky old man, maybe a little anal, but there is also a loneliness surrounding him, and a sense of despair. As the story progresses, we learn about Ove’s background, his marriage, and how he got to this point where he attempts to end his life, but is always inadvertently prevented from succeeding. Ove may have been reserved, but his life has meant more, and his influence has reached further, than he ever thought. Every person has a history. We see people on the surface, without knowing anything about them, and make judgements. I did that with Ove in the beginning, but by the end of the book, my opinion of him and respect for him had grown immeasurably. I loved the various secondary characters, including the cat and of course the Saab!! But, the relationship between Sonja and Ove is the most poignant and effective part of the novel. “Ove had never been asked how he lived before he met her. But if anyone had asked him, he would have answered that he didn’t.”Although Ove is dragged out of his shell kicking and screaming, he finally begins to live again, in the most eccentric, but enchanting way! This book lived up to any and all of my expectations and then some!! 4.5 stars
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  • Mischenko
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best books I've read. Many emotions here. We'll written. *((Wow!))* I could read it all over again!
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Alright. This book pissed me off. It took far too much time to get some traction. I lost my buddy along the way and was tempted to join her, if not for some rave reviews. So, I persevered. And then I was no longer pissed off at Backman or Ove. I rather got a little sentimental even, by the end of it.Ove is a grumpy old man (he's only 59 but you would think he was ancient). He's an introvert who has lost his wife which translates to he has lost his life. His mission is to commit suicide to be rec Alright. This book pissed me off. It took far too much time to get some traction. I lost my buddy along the way and was tempted to join her, if not for some rave reviews. So, I persevered. And then I was no longer pissed off at Backman or Ove. I rather got a little sentimental even, by the end of it.Ove is a grumpy old man (he's only 59 but you would think he was ancient). He's an introvert who has lost his wife which translates to he has lost his life. His mission is to commit suicide to be reconciled with her. Except his mission is interrupted -several times- by others in need. And as a stand up guy, as frustrating and annoying as these outsiders are, they bring back a renewal of hope and a feeling of being needed which brings this miserable man back from the brink of darkness.Backman has created some quirky characters with a sense of community and forgiveness. This was charming but, MAN, could you have picked up the pace, Backman? This debut novel was a sentimental starter with Britt-Marie Was Here as a sputter; And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer, Backman gets better and better with Beartown being by far, his bestest.Ove, you got a small piece of me by the end, but I, like you, can be pigheaded and am only giving you a 3.5⭐️
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  • Algernon
    January 1, 1970
    A man named Ove knocked on my door and asked if I have space on my shelves for a stray book about an angry, bitter, contrarian, (view spoiler)[ suicidal (hide spoiler)] old man. I hesitated for a second, thinking I don't need to get more depressed than I already am, but then I took another look at his wooden clogs, his out-of-fashion clothes and frowning brow, and decided: "What the heck! I'll give it a try! I'll read a couple of chapters and see how I feel about it." Ove is fifty-nine.He drives A man named Ove knocked on my door and asked if I have space on my shelves for a stray book about an angry, bitter, contrarian, (view spoiler)[ suicidal (hide spoiler)] old man. I hesitated for a second, thinking I don't need to get more depressed than I already am, but then I took another look at his wooden clogs, his out-of-fashion clothes and frowning brow, and decided: "What the heck! I'll give it a try! I'll read a couple of chapters and see how I feel about it." Ove is fifty-nine.He drives a Saab. He's the kind of man who points at people he doesn't like the look of, as if they were burglars and his forefinger a policeman's flashlight. Ove is the genuine "Get off my damn lawn!" article, lashing out at all the young yuppies and self-employed slackers that are moving into his neighborhood, ignoring his clearly marked interdiction signs and regulations. He stomps his feet and he fumes and he rages at a whole world gone to pot.[ Misanthropy is the general hatred, distrust or contempt of the human species or human nature. A misanthrope or misanthropist is someone who holds such views or feelings. ] [from wikipedia]A man called Ove might have reasons to behave the way he does. The world has not treated him kindly in his almost six decades of living. He'd been a grumpy old man since he started elementary school, they insisted. , but Ove has had to deal with hardship, injustice and mistrust for just as long. Society, through its institutions, has done nothing to improve his philosophy of life. On the contrary, it has repeatedly rallied against him in every way possible. (view spoiler)[ Orphaned at an early age, Ove abandons school to start working in a rail depot. Later he rebuilds a house with his own hands, only to have it burned to ground in a suspect arson attack while the firemen and neighbours enjoy the show. He falls in love, and his wife gets crippled for life by a drunken driver, miscarrying their child. She dies years later of an incurrable disease, and a few months after he buries her Ove is let go from his job. So I say: Ove has no reason at all to smile and be accomodating (hide spoiler)]The novel alternates between the present day clashes a man called Ove has with his pesky neighbors and flashbacks of his past experiences, first as a lonely young man with a talent for manual labor (A job well done is a reward in its own right, as his father used to say.), and later as the surprised husband of a lively young woman. People said he was bitter. Maybe they were right . He'd never reflected much on it. People called him antisocial. Ove assumed this meant he wasn't overly keen on people. And in this instance he could totally agree with them. More often than not people were out of their minds. [...]People said Ove saw the world in black and white. But she was color. All the color he had. Her name is Sonja and she is everything that Ove is not : outgoing, laughing at the smallest provocation, dedicated to her work as a teacher helping others to enjoy literature. Why would she shackle herself to a frowning bear like Ove? He never understood why she chose him. She loved abstract things like music and books and strange words. Ove was a man entirely filled with tangible things. He liked screwdrivers and oil filters. He went through life with his hands firmly shoved into his pockets. She danced. (view spoiler)[ But to Sonja, Ove was never dour and awkward and sharp-edged. To her, he was the slightly disheveled pink flowers at their first dinner. He was his father's slightly too tight-fitting brown suit across his broad, sad shoulders. He believed so strongly in things: justice and fair play and hard work and a world where right just had to be right. Not so one could get a medal or a diploma or a slap on the back for it, but just because that was how it was supposed to be. Not many men of his kind were made any more, Sonja had understood. So she was holding on to this one. (hide spoiler)]The story of their life together unfolds in reluctant confessions from Ove, details that emerge slowly and painfully from his tight fisted grip. He's a doer, not a talker, but most of all he is holding on to these memories as the most precious possession he ever had, his magnetic north and his only reason for staying alive. Ove had never been asked how he lived before he met her. But if anyone had asked him, he would have answered that he didn't. In one of these memories of his past, Ove tells us how he built a house with his own hands, learning the trade by apprenticing himself to a construction company. In my favorite metaphor from the book (not an original one, but who cares when Backman is so eloquent) , Sonja explains their love in building terms anybody could relate to: Loving someone is like moving into a house. At first you fall in love with all the new things, amazed every morning that all this belongs to you, as if fearing that someone would suddenly come rushing in through the door to explain that a terrible mistake had been made, you weren't actually supposed to live in a wonderful place like this. Then over the years the walls become weathered, the wood splinters here and there, and you start to love the house not so much because of all its perfection, bur rather for its imperfections. You get to know all the nooks and crannies. How to avoid getting the key caught in the lock when it's cold outside. Which of the floorboards flex slightly when one steps on them or exactly how to open the wardrobe doors without them creaking. These are the little secrets that make it your house. Compared to this polychromatic past with Sonja, the present day apears to Ove only in shades of darker and darker grey. Without his wife's sunny counterweight, his disposition grows more bitter and contrarian by the hour. Could those pesky neighbors tame the ogre and convince him that life is worth living?I am not going to give an answer here for fear of spoilers, but I can't help noticing that at some point of the novel I felt like I have wondered off into the set for one of those classic Frank Capra movies where Jimmy Stewart is convinced that his life is a mess and then the whole town rallies to demonstrate the opposite. Some exigent readers might be turned off by the sentimentality and the artificiality of these developments (I myself thought that he was laying the sugar on pretty thick in places), pointing out that in real life people are selfish and cruel and indifferent to the woes of their next door neighbors, but I will counter their argument with a quote from another of my favorite authors: “People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it. Better yet, build it. Predicting the future is much too easy, anyway. You look at the people around you, the street you stand on, the visible air you breathe, and predict more of the same. To hell with more. I want better.” According to Ray Bradbury (and John Lennon) the role of art is not simply to reflect reality, but to point the way to a better state of existence. In order to bring any change about we must first imagine what kind of world we would like to live in, and then we have to realise that it is up to each of us to make it happen through the small choices we make day by day. Fredrik Backman may have written only a fairytale, a feelgood tragicomedy, but I know that for the time spent in the company of this man Ove I left my critical faculties by the door and imagined myself moving to his neighborhood in order to find some peace of mind and some friends I could rely on. People can say whatever they like about you, Ove. But you're the strangest superhero I ever heard about. - - - -The story is finished. I turn the last page, gaze once more at the cover and then at my overburdened shelves. What should I do with you, Ove? Send you back to the street like the stray cat that sits at your heels? Or maybe slip you in next to that big tome on Guernsey, so you can have some conversations about the way these modern kids know nothing about life with a man called Ebenezer? Yeah! I think the last one will work best.
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    This might be a funny/sweet novel about a curmudgeonly old man, who knows that any thinking person would do things properly but unfortunately the world is full of idiots who do everything incorrectly and need someone like Ove to keep things in line. I'm not really sure. Instead, it was a novel filled with with sucker punches right to my gut. I might be giving four stars to the Swedish equivalent of Mitch Albom, but fuck it.
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  • Raeleen Lemay
    January 1, 1970
    I'm kicking myself for not picking this book up sooner.I absolutely adored this book, and the only reason I've docked a star is because the writing style got on my nerves a bit (way too many similes, to the point of it being distracting), but everything else was AMAZING. I thought I would dislike reading about a grumpy old man, but I didn't! Ove was hilarious, sympathetic, and I never wanted to put the book down because I wanted to know how his story would play out. All in all, this is a great h I'm kicking myself for not picking this book up sooner.I absolutely adored this book, and the only reason I've docked a star is because the writing style got on my nerves a bit (way too many similes, to the point of it being distracting), but everything else was AMAZING. I thought I would dislike reading about a grumpy old man, but I didn't! Ove was hilarious, sympathetic, and I never wanted to put the book down because I wanted to know how his story would play out. All in all, this is a great happy-sad book, and I highly recommend it!
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  • Luffy
    January 1, 1970
    What a great book! So down to earth, so wacky, so funny, and so maudlin. The end was unexpected and it's worth reading the entire book by itself. The book is less than 350 pages long and it reads like a page turner.Ove is a militaristic sort of guy. He is so since quite a long time, but is it only a trait on the surface? Underneath that hard exterior is a sad and lonely guy. The author, Fredrik Backman's treatment of Ove's arc is brilliant. Ove, like most memorable characters, has an arc, where What a great book! So down to earth, so wacky, so funny, and so maudlin. The end was unexpected and it's worth reading the entire book by itself. The book is less than 350 pages long and it reads like a page turner.Ove is a militaristic sort of guy. He is so since quite a long time, but is it only a trait on the surface? Underneath that hard exterior is a sad and lonely guy. The author, Fredrik Backman's treatment of Ove's arc is brilliant. Ove, like most memorable characters, has an arc, where he changes (for the better?)I was transported into the book while reading it. I also am fearful since I almost missed reading A Man Called Ove. This story is like a coming of age tale, except that the old guy is 59 years old. Very good authors are springing like daffodils from nowhere these days. Am I living in a golden age for books? I don't know... I don't know.
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  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    At first you think Ove is just an aging, cranky, overly fastidious man who complains about everything and everyone, but by the end of the book you will wish that you could be more like Ove . Ove is 59, and his wife of 40 years has recently died. He is now being forced to retire, and he has given up on life.As the story of his past unfolds through flashbacks, you realize how much sadness he has had in his life and you begin to see glimpses of his kindness. We see the loving relationship Ove had w At first you think Ove is just an aging, cranky, overly fastidious man who complains about everything and everyone, but by the end of the book you will wish that you could be more like Ove . Ove is 59, and his wife of 40 years has recently died. He is now being forced to retire, and he has given up on life.As the story of his past unfolds through flashbacks, you realize how much sadness he has had in his life and you begin to see glimpses of his kindness. We see the loving relationship Ove had with his father , especially after his mother dies. The way his father imparts right and wrong and rules to Iive by is especially touching . He is raised to be and does becomes a decent, good man. He’s an honest, unassuming man, who falls in love with a beautiful, smart woman, who falls in love with him. Now he is a very sad, lonely man and what he intends to do will break your heart.Enter into the story the quirky neighbors, the stray injured cat, the best friend that Ove no longer speaks to, and you can't help but laugh even though there is Ove's sadness. His plans are interrupted every day by one quirky neighbor or another but especially by the family next door . Ove continues to show kindness to the people around him in spite of what appears to be a mean temperament and these people come to love him and you suspect he cares about them, too.It's predictable and sometimes a bit melodramatic but it will make you laugh and cry and you'll be glad that you met Ove.Thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books
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