The Lion and the Bird
One autumn day, a lion finds a wounded bird in his garden. With the departure of the bird's flock, the lion decides that it's up to him to care for the bird. He does and the two become fast friends. Nevertheless, the bird departs with his flock the following spring. What will become of Lion and what will become of their friendship?Marianne Dubuc received her degree in graphic design from the University of Quebec, Montreal. She has created many different kinds of books for readers of all ages. She is an internationally acclaimed illustrator whose work has been published by major publishers in fifteen countries.

The Lion and the Bird Details

TitleThe Lion and the Bird
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 6th, 2014
PublisherEnchanted Lion Books
ISBN-139781592701513
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Animals

The Lion and the Bird Review

  • Kathryn Berla
    January 1, 1970
    It took me two minutes to read it and another two minutes to stop crying. Then I read it to my husband who had the exact same reaction. We're such saps.
  • Erinn Batykefer
    January 1, 1970
    I teared up while reading this-- "Sometimes life is like that." A delicate and joyful exploration of friendship and the limits of human connections. How we must love people on their own terms, and let them go when they need to go. Because maybe then they will come back.
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  • Karen Bromley
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful book. Such a tender story of caring, kindness, and love. The pace of the story is peaceful and warm like a hug. So much to ponder on each page - even if it was a white page blanketed with snow, my daughter and I would linger for a moment and chat about what the characters might be feeling. Love that my daughter will not think a friendship between a lion and a bird is an unlikely one.
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  • Sanja_Sanjalica
    January 1, 1970
    Pure love and beauty...so simple, yet so warm and endearing..a book to hug...
  • Lizzie
    January 1, 1970
    Utter bliss to discover. I read this whilst in a room full of people, but this book instantly transported me to a safe space, on my own, in a cosy corner with a blanket, a warm mug and this wonderful read. A tender tale of unlikely friendships, the ebb and flow of instincts, loneliness, kindness, hope, holding close and letting go. The feel, the look, the colours and content of this book reach right into your soul and down to your toes. Its gentle nature of touching on so many topics and emotion Utter bliss to discover. I read this whilst in a room full of people, but this book instantly transported me to a safe space, on my own, in a cosy corner with a blanket, a warm mug and this wonderful read. A tender tale of unlikely friendships, the ebb and flow of instincts, loneliness, kindness, hope, holding close and letting go. The feel, the look, the colours and content of this book reach right into your soul and down to your toes. Its gentle nature of touching on so many topics and emotions allows its reader to really drink everything in and enjoy, question and hope just as the characters do. A wonderful book for exploring seasons, friendships, emotions, acts of kindness, migration patterns, differences and understanding with any age. Beautiful, touching and calm-inducing. Thank you, Marianne Dubuc!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    When a big-hearted lion finds a wounded bird on the ground, he patches the little creature up and offers his home as a place to stay during the colder months. The little bird can't fly, and the other birds migrate. A series of illustrations show how time passes and the two become fast friends. Eventually, though, the bird heals, and is strong enough to migrate when the time comes. The lion is sad and lonely but understands that this is the way of life. When fall arrives once again, though, his b When a big-hearted lion finds a wounded bird on the ground, he patches the little creature up and offers his home as a place to stay during the colder months. The little bird can't fly, and the other birds migrate. A series of illustrations show how time passes and the two become fast friends. Eventually, though, the bird heals, and is strong enough to migrate when the time comes. The lion is sad and lonely but understands that this is the way of life. When fall arrives once again, though, his bird friend returns with plans to spend the winter together. This one tugs gently at the heart with its characters and messages about friendship.
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  • Elizabeth A
    January 1, 1970
    This delightful picture book is a quiet meditation on life and friendship. The pacing is lovely, and would work well as a curl up and read aloud story with a little one.
  • Angie
    January 1, 1970
    Simple and dear illustrations. Sparse, yet deep narrative. I think I will buy this one for my collection.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    10 STARS!
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Just a beautiful, beautiful book, both in the art and the words. It did my heart good.
  • Ellie Labbett
    January 1, 1970
    A highly emotive story about the joy and sorrow of finding friendship and letting go of something held so dear. When a little bird is injured and falls away from the migrating flock, Lion openly welcomes the lost fledgling into his home, where a beautiful companionship is born. The winter months pass by with ease and spring surfaces; it is here that Bird’s family return and Lion has to swallow his heart by allowing his friend to leave.To me, Dubuc’s work is utter perfection. There is such a soot A highly emotive story about the joy and sorrow of finding friendship and letting go of something held so dear. When a little bird is injured and falls away from the migrating flock, Lion openly welcomes the lost fledgling into his home, where a beautiful companionship is born. The winter months pass by with ease and spring surfaces; it is here that Bird’s family return and Lion has to swallow his heart by allowing his friend to leave.To me, Dubuc’s work is utter perfection. There is such a soothing warmth embedded within the scenes featuring the bonding between Lion and Bird- perhaps even more so in the quiet moments of being and living from day to day. What is done so well is the space Dubuc leaves for the aching loneliness and sad understanding after the departure of Bird. Really, she says so very little in words, and that is more than enough. The Lion and the Bird is deeply moving, and such a stunning depiction of friendship continuing to flower regardless of passing time and absence.
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  • Sophie Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    The small amount of written text is perfect for a deeper, personal story to develop. Following the growth of a loving friendship, deep loneliness and developing hope it is great at depicting this emotion through illustration alone. I love the joy depicted through simple everyday life, a really good example of how you can find happiness and fulfilment in small things.
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  • L.S.
    January 1, 1970
    A great illustration book, with a sweet- sour story about a lion and a bird. Winter days are definitely better spent in two.
  • Laura (Book Scrounger)
    January 1, 1970
    A simply told, beautifully illustrated story that, while joyful at the end, leaves space for sadness. Read my full review here:https://www.theproblemsite.com/book-s...
  • AgnesO
    January 1, 1970
    The Lion and the Bird by Marianne Dubuc is a beautifully rendered picture book translated from French. I found this title among other outstanding international books on USBBY. It is autumn. Lion discovers a wounded bird while working in his garden. He decides to care for the fragile bird as the flock has already departed for the winter. Over the course of the winter, Lion and the bird grow close. Readers can relate to their companionship. Nonetheless, the bird rejoins the flock of birds the foll The Lion and the Bird by Marianne Dubuc is a beautifully rendered picture book translated from French. I found this title among other outstanding international books on USBBY. It is autumn. Lion discovers a wounded bird while working in his garden. He decides to care for the fragile bird as the flock has already departed for the winter. Over the course of the winter, Lion and the bird grow close. Readers can relate to their companionship. Nonetheless, the bird rejoins the flock of birds the following spring. Lion continues a solitary life, but after a moment of loneliness and suspense, autumn returns with a wonderful surprise…The Lion and the Bird cleverly communicates lessons on compassion, loyalty, friendship, patience, as well as the changing of the seasons. The pastel illustrations allow the reader to ponder the themes presented in this gentle and touching story. The book’s artistic quality evokes the feelings of the characters. This picture book, told mostly in images, explores a range of emotions familiar to readers of all ages; however, I would implement it in primary grades. The book can certainly inspire conversations about human emotions and the value of true friendship accentuated by the author.I also read The Lion and the Bird in a digital format. However, I preferred reading the original book illustrations with their gentle lines and colors.
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  • Rory Wise
    January 1, 1970
    Loved how this challenges perceptions of men, instead presenting this male lion as caring and dependent on others
  • Mădă
    January 1, 1970
    Recenzie : http://cititoriferoce.weebly.com/magi...
  • Angelina
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful, quiet story about frienship that unfolds slowly and makes you appreciate its beauty. Great illustrations, too! Would love to read it to my daughter in a couple of years.
  • Bistra Ivanova
    January 1, 1970
    Много хайп по тази книга, но всичко си е струвало. Абсолютно разкошна история за приятелството и истинската любов! Тоолкова са сладки героите, така нежно са нарисувани, сърцето ми се разтапя, като я чета. Има нещо от доброто старо време, когато на света е нямало поквара, егоизъм, злина. Всичко тук е чисто, детско и красиво! <3
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  • Jeremy
    January 1, 1970
    Good. 3.5 stars. Mentioned here and here.
  • Jackie Ostrowicki
    January 1, 1970
    There are a few children's picture books that follow this plotline--animal finds hurt bird, the bird winters with the animal, the bird heals, the bird then flies away. Btu thus one has minimal language (some pages have none; with the feelings expressed through the lovely illustrations.) Brain Pickings calls it "An ode to life’s moments between the words." The review goes on to say, "Once in a long while, a children’s book comes by that is so gorgeous in sight and spirit, so timelessly and ageles There are a few children's picture books that follow this plotline--animal finds hurt bird, the bird winters with the animal, the bird heals, the bird then flies away. Btu thus one has minimal language (some pages have none; with the feelings expressed through the lovely illustrations.) Brain Pickings calls it "An ode to life’s moments between the words." The review goes on to say, "Once in a long while, a children’s book comes by that is so gorgeous in sight and spirit, so timelessly and agelessly enchanting, that it takes my breath away." (https://www.brainpickings.org/2014/05...)The illustrator, Marianne Dubuc, is a French Canadian and also a graphic designer, and has put out other books, such as "Mr. Postmouse", This one is illustrated in a warm, tender way that captures both the feelings of childhood and loneliness. She plays with the illustrations, using scale and blank space to create a visual narrative that is, at times, stronger than the words that are used. "scenes fade into opacity as time passes, Lion shrinks as Bird flies away, and three blank pages punctuate the story as brilliantly placed pauses that capture the wistfulness of waiting and longing. What emerges is an entrancing sing-song rhythm of storytelling and of emotion." (Brain Pickings).One of the best phrases is after the bird flies away, and Lion walks back to his house. He understands his friend so well that when a flock of birds pass overhead, Lion looks at his friend and says: "Yes. I know." A vignette of pages show the bird leaving, as Lion shrinks away behind him. As Lion walks alone to his house (you can literally see the slump in his shoulders, the sadness in his body), the narrative says: "And so it goes. Sometimes life is like that."We then see Lion alone, in all the same vignettes he used to share with Bird. His loneliness is palpable, and he lies awake at night. He loved and he lost. But, he keeps company with his garden and with nature, and time goes by. Autumn returns--the season when he first found his friend. Might the bird return? Lion sees a flock of birds overhead and wonders, looking wistfully at the sky. But they pass, and Lion bows his head, eyes closed. Two pages of white follows, extending his feeling of emptiness. And then....a single note. Bird is back. He has decided to winter with his friend. The last scene is Lion's house, cozy as Autumn arches towards snow. This book is incredibly lovely. You will find yourself lingering over it, and thinking....and feeling.
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  • Maggie Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    The Lion and the BirdBy Marianne DubucMarianne Dubuc is a French-Canadian graphic designer, who has written and illustrated many books for children, among them is the award winning , Le Lion et l'oiseau, or The Lion and the Bird. This picture book about friendship and kindness has won the United States Board on Books for Young People (USBBY) Outstanding International Books award in 2015. I was fortunate to find this book on the USBBY website: http://www.usbby.org/list_oibl.htmlThe beautiful and The Lion and the BirdBy Marianne DubucMarianne Dubuc is a French-Canadian graphic designer, who has written and illustrated many books for children, among them is the award winning , Le Lion et l'oiseau, or The Lion and the Bird. This picture book about friendship and kindness has won the United States Board on Books for Young People (USBBY) Outstanding International Books award in 2015. I was fortunate to find this book on the USBBY website: http://www.usbby.org/list_oibl.htmlThe beautiful and serene pictures in the book, as well as the message of friendship it communicates would appeal to students in grades K-2. The book begins with the protagonist, a handsomely portrayed lion doing yard work. The pictures of birds flying south and leaves on the ground help the reader set the scene as a warm, fall day. All of a sudden, Lion notices a bird lying on the ground with a hurt wing. Lion bandages the bird’s wings, and the two characters watch as the little bird’s flock flies away. Lion decides to open his home to the bird so that it can recuperate. The two characters form a friendship. In the springtime, the little bird rejoins his flock and leaves behind Lion. Lion’s life becomes solitary again. When fall comes around, to the reader’s surprise, the bird returns to spend another winter with Lion.The author’s choice to use personification in this book allows all readers to relate to the story and learn the lesson of helping others. The simple, yet powerful, story of Lion and the bird is told in a very sequential manner. Teachers can engage young readers in identifying the story elements and retelling the events. Also, young readers can relate to the themes in the book, which include changing seasons and human emotions. This book would be a great resource to use during a social-emotional lesson or in a friendship themed reading unit. The text, in combination with the pictures, invoke the feelings of happiness, sadness, loneliness, love, and loyalty that can be explored by young readers.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    The award winning book, Le lion et l'oiseau or The Lion and the Bird, is written and illustrated by Marrianne Dubuc, who is a Canadian-French graphic designer who has written and illustrated many children’s books. I found this book on the United States Board of Books for Young People (USBBY) website. It is a wonderful story about loneliness and friendship. It begins with Lion finding a wounded bird and taking him in to care for him while his flock flies away for the winter. The two characters st The award winning book, Le lion et l'oiseau or The Lion and the Bird, is written and illustrated by Marrianne Dubuc, who is a Canadian-French graphic designer who has written and illustrated many children’s books. I found this book on the United States Board of Books for Young People (USBBY) website. It is a wonderful story about loneliness and friendship. It begins with Lion finding a wounded bird and taking him in to care for him while his flock flies away for the winter. The two characters start a friendship and when spring comes again, the little bird goes back to rejoin the other birds. Lion becomes lonely again. One day as winter is approaching once again, Lion hears a familiar sound. It is the little bird joining Lion for another winter together filled with friendship. Marrianne Dubuc does a wonderful job with the beautiful illustrations in this simple, nearly wordless, picture book of emotions. The illustrations truly show the emotions that the characters go through in the book and as a reader we know what is going on. For example, in the scene where the bird flies away, Lion becomes smaller and smaller depicting his sadness and loss of his friend. I can see teachers using this in grades K-2 to show and discuss the power of friendship and helping one another. I can also see it being used to incorporate discussions of seasons as the book goes through all the seasons as shown clearly in the pictures.
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  • Juli19
    January 1, 1970
    This is a touching story of a lion who lived alone in his house. Every day he would get up, get dressed and then go to work on his garden. He did the same thing every single day until one day during fall he found a wounded bird on his garden. The bird flock flew away and when the lion saw that he decided to take care of the bird. The lion took the bird to his house, he bandage it and feed it. Time went by and they became good friends, they ate together and went to work on the garden together. Wi This is a touching story of a lion who lived alone in his house. Every day he would get up, get dressed and then go to work on his garden. He did the same thing every single day until one day during fall he found a wounded bird on his garden. The bird flock flew away and when the lion saw that he decided to take care of the bird. The lion took the bird to his house, he bandage it and feed it. Time went by and they became good friends, they ate together and went to work on the garden together. Winter came but it did not feel too cold for the lion with a friend in the house. Winter was over and during spring the bird reunited with its flock. Lion is on his own again, spring and summer passes away and the lion does not see his friend back. However, on the fall the lion hears a beautiful sound, he looks up and sees his friend again. The bird is back to spend a warm winter with his friend. This is a lovely story that will teach children about patience, and friendship. I enjoyed listening to this story. I am sure children will have fun going through the book and making up the story since the book has more illustrations than wording. This is a good book to read to children between the ages of 5-8 years old.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    This is a delightful picture book written by the Canadian author, Marianne Dubuc. The book has a simple story line that will capture young minds with its warm characters. The lion becomes friends with the bird when it becomes injured. The bird ends up staying with the lion for the winter and a friendship is developed. The story parallels the seasons and eventually springtime arrives and the bird must fly back north. The Lion loses his friend for the summer, but as friendships come and go, so do This is a delightful picture book written by the Canadian author, Marianne Dubuc. The book has a simple story line that will capture young minds with its warm characters. The lion becomes friends with the bird when it becomes injured. The bird ends up staying with the lion for the winter and a friendship is developed. The story parallels the seasons and eventually springtime arrives and the bird must fly back north. The Lion loses his friend for the summer, but as friendships come and go, so do the seasons and fall returns with the return of a friend. This book’s instructional levels would be kindergarten through 3rd grade. The book covers the theme of friendships and how they can last over time. This book would be a nice book to study character feelings with the younger students. There are many pages without words and the pages with words do not have many at all. It would be an excellent book to use for young readers to learn how to infer from prior knowledge and picture clues. This book leaves the reader feeling warm and cozy with thoughts of good friends.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    http://www.booksinprint.com.leo.lib.u...I appreciated that the Booklist review celebrated the simplicity and clarity of this book. While one could potentially get through The Lion and the Bird very quickly (there are few words), its depth comes from looking through the images and reflecting on what's happening with each character. I especially agree with the reviewer's idea that this book is "one to savor."
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  • Atsupui Dogbla
    January 1, 1970
    This book describes how powerful companionship is, especially when people can help each other in difficulty, but also children should keep in mind that there will be a time when they should split for different needs. Overall, it's important to get together and assist or support each other, and it's also imperative to be alone to accomplish some tasks; let everything goes when its time comes.
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  • Stephani
    January 1, 1970
    Lion helps Bird, who is injured. Bird ends up having to stay with Lion through the winter, and when Spring comes, Bird leaves to join the other birds. Will Bird return in the winter? I may have cried a bit reading this.
  • Michael Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    I think that Dubuc must have some kind of friend in the paper industry that she needs to prop up. This book is way too long for what it is. Why a lion? Living in a house? Is there any kind of rationale? I guess maybe she just liked to draw a lion.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    A quiet, contemplative book. The wordless spreads really give you moments to pause and sit with this sweet friendship story. My absolute favorite spread is "Lion's garden grows" which illustrates the passage of time through a tomato plant.
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