Bo at Iditarod Creek
Ever since five-year-old Bo can remember, she and her papas have lived in the little Alaskan mining town of Ballard Creek. Now the family must move upriver to Iditarod Creek for work at a new mine, and Bo is losing the only home she’s ever known. Initially homesick, she soon realizes that there is warmth and friendship to be found everywhere . . . and what’s more, her new town may hold an unexpected addition to her already unconventional family.

Bo at Iditarod Creek Details

TitleBo at Iditarod Creek
Author
ReleaseDec 9th, 2014
PublisherHenry Holt and Co. (BYR)
ISBN-139780805093520
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Childrens, Middle Grade, Fiction, Juvenile

Bo at Iditarod Creek Review

  • Adele
    January 1, 1970
    It makes me very sad to be writing this review. This book started well with interesting, well-rounded characters doing interesting things and treating each other with love. If anything, I was enjoying this sequel even more than Bo at Ballard Creek. Then Bo's family arrived at Iditarod Creek with its noisy dredge and ugly tailing piles everywhere and the entire book took a horrible turn. It started when they moved into their new house and declared that Jack would be sleeping "in the closet". Seri It makes me very sad to be writing this review. This book started well with interesting, well-rounded characters doing interesting things and treating each other with love. If anything, I was enjoying this sequel even more than Bo at Ballard Creek. Then Bo's family arrived at Iditarod Creek with its noisy dredge and ugly tailing piles everywhere and the entire book took a horrible turn. It started when they moved into their new house and declared that Jack would be sleeping "in the closet". Seriously? This can't be a coincidence right? This is clearly a reaction to either criticisms from a narrow-minded editor or general backlash to the first book or both, right? Either way, I was appalled to read Bo saying Jack and Arvid weren't partners before getting her, that they just "partnered up on the spot". I don't remember if the first book stated explicitly that they were partners before, but it was definitely implied. In any case, saying Jack and Arvid became partners solely for the purpose of raising a baby girl doesn't make them straight, it just makes them stupid. Then there was the whole section where a little boy uses the word "n*****" and Jack, a black man, says this is sometimes a mean word but sometimes it's just a word. The author attempts to justify this scene in an afterword in the back, but I don't buy it. Then they bring in a nasty woman just to say bad things about the good-time girls and be mean to Bo. And several chapters seem to be inserted to give the author an opportunity to pontificate on problems in education. The book goes so far astray from being in Bo's voice and from Bo's point of view that at the end she is reduced to eavesdropping behind doors on scenes she is not a part of. Which really makes no sense because there are some scenes from Graf's point of view that Bo isn't part of at all.Very, very disappointing. :-(
    more
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    In this sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek, Bo, her new brother Graf, and her papas Jack and Arvid must move from their small town of Ballard Creek to Iditarod Creek, where the men have jobs in a mining operation in about 1930. The trip is long, and involves passing a ghost town and a boat with a gramophone on it! Once they arrive, the family sets up shop in a house in a town where mining sometimes dictates that houses be moved, giving the whole place a haphazard air. Bo has to explain her story to a In this sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek, Bo, her new brother Graf, and her papas Jack and Arvid must move from their small town of Ballard Creek to Iditarod Creek, where the men have jobs in a mining operation in about 1930. The trip is long, and involves passing a ghost town and a boat with a gramophone on it! Once they arrive, the family sets up shop in a house in a town where mining sometimes dictates that houses be moved, giving the whole place a haphazard air. Bo has to explain her story to all of the new people that she meets, such as the Japanese gentlemen who run the town laundry, and the few children who are in town. She meets another boy, Renzo, whose father works at another mine, as well as Nita and her daughter, Paulie. Eventually, Bo has to be signed up for school, and the papas get an opportunity to leave the mine business and live on land that is not ruined by the mining industry, leaving room open for another sequel. Strengths: Like the first book, this is a charming story about community and family, rich with details about life in the Alaskan wilderness. There are all kinds of diversity, from Jack, who is African-American, to various native Alaskans, to Renzo, who is Italian. The E ARC didn't show the LeUyen Pham illustrations, which I am sure are delightful. Weaknesses: The first book is a hard, hard sell at my school, and since Bo is about 6, this would be better suited for younger readers. However, there is a lengthy discussion of why "nigger" is a bad word, several mentions of women who are "bitches", and occasional mentions of women being "good time girls", all of which seems like not a good match for the target demographic. I found the use of the term "Dago Charlie" especially offensive; growing up in a largely Italian community, I was always told that this was an offensive term, but there was no mention that this was an ethnic slur.
    more
  • Autumn
    January 1, 1970
    If you had asked me 10 years ago if there would ever be a kids' book about two gold-mining bears who adopt a bunch of kids that is also extremely cool about native Alaskans, people who can't read and why you shouldn't say the n-word (but you might hear it around), I would have been like I DOUBT IT. But, here it is!
    more
  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    Just as sweet and enjoyable as the first. I love how these books are full of interesting information about living in Alaska at this time but also full of heart and fun. These books deal with a lot of serious issues in a very easy-to-handle package and with so much love and community support. I think this is some truly great historical fiction!
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Didn't like this quite as much at the first, but 6yo and I enjoyed it. She really got attached to the characters. We are definitely hoping there's a third (fourth, fifth) book. I love the settings and the characters. We've both learned a lot about the particular time and place.I had to do a little editing, as it's not meant for 6yos. If you want more specifics, ask me.
    more
  • Connie Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this historical fiction about a non-traditional family. Gold rush camps and mining towns in Alaska. This author knows Alaska - The Year of Miss Agnes is one of my favorite stories.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy the closeness and understanding this blended family shows to their entire community. Repeated uses of racial slurs, while true to the time period, may require some discussion.
  • Sarah Sammis
    January 1, 1970
    More anecdotal than plot oriented but still delightful.http://pussreboots.com/blog/2018/comm...
  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book in a series of two books so far, but I hope many more to come! This time Bo, her two papas and her new brother Graf ( well, new to her!) leave Ballard because there is no more gold to mine. They get in a boat and spend a long, long time getting to the mining camp at Iditarod Creek where they have many new adventures. The end of the book seems like another new beginning to me, so hopefully that means the author has another book in the series coming out soon.
    more
  • Kirsten Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    Connections: Alaska, gold rush, mining, familiesSequel to Bo at Ballard Creek
  • Mary Evers
    January 1, 1970
    One of the cutest books I've read in a long time! I wish the author would write more of Bo's story!
  • Katie Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom.Bo is back! In her second adventure, she and newly adopted younger brother Graf set off with their papas (gold prospecting partners) for their new home at Iditarod Creek. Unlike Ballard Creek, this new town is heavily populated, but has few children. Houses are moved from place to place as necessary to facilitate access to gold, and there are loud dredge machines that make frightening noises. Though Bo misses her old friends, she makes the be This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom.Bo is back! In her second adventure, she and newly adopted younger brother Graf set off with their papas (gold prospecting partners) for their new home at Iditarod Creek. Unlike Ballard Creek, this new town is heavily populated, but has few children. Houses are moved from place to place as necessary to facilitate access to gold, and there are loud dredge machines that make frightening noises. Though Bo misses her old friends, she makes the best of her new experience by getting to know all the interesting people around her, including a mysteriously sad boy who might be in trouble.This book is fascinating. It includes information about gold prospecting, Eskimo culture, relations between people from different racial and cultural backgrounds, and the nature of adoption in this specific time and place. There is lots of discussion about language - off-color words to describe others, differences in language even among people from the same culture, even what to call a couch (or divan, or sofa). Interesting details reveal what it was like to get an education at home, and how adults could grow up without ever learning how to read and write, only to be taught later by their own children. Words seems to be the main focus of the story, and the message about their power comes through loud and strong.Unfortunately, some of the language itself makes it hard to know who will - or should - read this book. Certainly the first story about Bo would make a fine read-aloud for even a preschooler, but this second book uses racial slurs in confusing contexts (sometimes as insults, sometimes as nicknames) and it throws around the "b word" in a playful way without ever really explaining what it means or why it might not be okay for Bo - or other kids her age -to say it. I fully believe that these details are accurate for the time period and the nearly childless male dominated environment Bo and Graf are living in, but I would still hesitate to read these words out loud to my child. If I were looking for a way to have a specific conversation about sensitive language, this book might help me do that, but if a mom picked up this book unwittingly based on her child's love for the first one, she might find herself faced with some uncomfortable discussions she was not prepared for.Also possibly troubling to younger audiences would be the abuse of Renzo, the boy who Bo's family befriends and helps. There aren't many details, and they are mostly filtered through Bo's optimistic and innocent point of view, but the thought of a young boy nearly freezing to death in a piano box could be troubling for very little kids.I liked this book very much, but I feel like my book talk of it for a parent would be more of a warning label than a promotion of the book, because it is so deceptively mature in content.
    more
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    It's 1930. Bo, her part-Indian new brother Graf, and her two papas, Swedish Arvid and African-American Jack, need to leave Bo's beloved Alaskan town of Ballard Creek because the gold mine is closed. They make a long, long journey by river to the papas' new jobs at Iditarod Creek. The town is nothing like Ballard Creek; all the houses sit on the gravel tailings from the everlastingly loud dredges, and there is no green and no animals anywhere. What they do find is a town full of diverse and mostl It's 1930. Bo, her part-Indian new brother Graf, and her two papas, Swedish Arvid and African-American Jack, need to leave Bo's beloved Alaskan town of Ballard Creek because the gold mine is closed. They make a long, long journey by river to the papas' new jobs at Iditarod Creek. The town is nothing like Ballard Creek; all the houses sit on the gravel tailings from the everlastingly loud dredges, and there is no green and no animals anywhere. What they do find is a town full of diverse and mostly kind people whom Bo soon befriends just as she befriends everyone. She, Graf, and their new friends Will and Buddy roam the town and learn all they can, and Bo even starts school by mail. They enjoy a raucous fourth of July, and a few sad times, especially when they hear about a boy named Renzo who seems to have a very difficult life. Is there any way they can help him?I so adored the first book, and really liked this one as well. The descriptions are fantastic, and you can really see the town and its people (okay, the illustrations help!). It's such a different world from that which most kids encounter in books and in daily life, and paints a great picture of the diversity of gold mining towns at the time. Although this is a children's book, the author doesn't shy away from difficult topics, such as the casual use of the "n" word in relation to Jack (which will probably cause many libraries to ban this book), and the abuse of Renzo. What did disappoint me a bit was that she did not maintain the ambiguity of the papas' relationship--it's pretty clear that they're just besties, nothing more. While there's nothing wrong with that, I just feel sorry for the little kids with two papas or two mamas who read this book and realize that yet again, their reality is not represented in 99.99% of childrens' books. Still, definitely worth a read for kids who like episodic historical fiction that tell them about different lives, and which are full of loving people (the few mean ones don't get much air time, though they are certainly present). I hope a third book is in the offing!
    more
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Following up on her delightful Bo at Ballard Creek, which won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, the author continues to tell the story of a blended Alaskan Family. The previous book left off as Jack and Arvid, two strapping miners with hearts of gold, leave Ballard Creek after the mine plays out. They take Bo and Graf, their adopted children, with them, of course. The trip takes quite a long time, and they contend with mosquitoes and boredom as well as having the chance to take a lo Following up on her delightful Bo at Ballard Creek, which won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, the author continues to tell the story of a blended Alaskan Family. The previous book left off as Jack and Arvid, two strapping miners with hearts of gold, leave Ballard Creek after the mine plays out. They take Bo and Graf, their adopted children, with them, of course. The trip takes quite a long time, and they contend with mosquitoes and boredom as well as having the chance to take a look at what must have been the largest ghost town in Alaska. Once the family reaches Iditarod Creek, Bo finds very few children with whom to play, and the ravages of the dredge whose noise fills the air, disturbs their senses and makes all of Bo's family long for the tundra and quietness. Because gold lies beneath some of the houses, residents have grown accustomed to having to have their houses relocated. As in the first book, the author describes the quick friendships that spring up among the townsfolk as well as delicious meals and community celebrations. She also addresses some of the racism and prejudices of the times, but throughout the book, it's clear that Bo and Graf have landed with the right family. One of the most entertaining parts of the story involved the children's education, a mail order program that specified exactly what the teacher should say and do, and included the Dick and Jane readers from which many of us learned to read. Needless to say, Bo is not impressed. I enjoyed this one from start to finish, and as the family heads off to a new home in Mammoth Creek with one more addition, I wondered about the next chapter in their lives. I hope the author will provide readers with a follow-up. The characters are charming and are fully aware of what really matters in life.
    more
  • Lorie
    January 1, 1970
    Bo is back! This welcome sequel to the 2014 Scott O’Dell award winner for historical fiction Bo at Ballard Creek begins where the previous novel ended as Bo and her family must move to Iditarod Creek after the mine at Ballard closes. Their travels take them down two big rivers and then up two on a boat to a remote area of Alaska. There her fathers will work for a dredge mine that breaks up rock for the gold inside. One dredge can do the work of hundreds of men, but it leaves behind a mountain of Bo is back! This welcome sequel to the 2014 Scott O’Dell award winner for historical fiction Bo at Ballard Creek begins where the previous novel ended as Bo and her family must move to Iditarod Creek after the mine at Ballard closes. Their travels take them down two big rivers and then up two on a boat to a remote area of Alaska. There her fathers will work for a dredge mine that breaks up rock for the gold inside. One dredge can do the work of hundreds of men, but it leaves behind a mountain of gravel, destroying any natural landscape. The loudness of the dredge, the unnatural landscape, and the remoteness of the new home makes for a hard life, but Bo and her family once again are embraced by the community and there they find new friends, another new brother for the family and a promise of an even better home by the end.Kirkpatrick Hill’s beautifully written story embraces the historical reality of post gold rush life in Alaska and shows us that life was hard, but rewarding for those who could embrace the beautiful country that they chose to love. Bo’s family is formed from one part necessity and two parts love. The charming illustrations by LeUyen Pham bring to life characters, scenery and the action of the story. Bo’s struggles like her missing friends and finding learning to read hard will make her relatable to modern kids. This middle grade fiction title will appeal to children from 8 to 80. I would recommend this book for purchase by any public or school library.This book was provided by the publisher for professional review by SWON Libraries.
    more
  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    I really did enjoy the first book in the series. And I wanted to love this one just as much. But it was more of an almost book for me. I still love Bo as a narrator. She still has a very unique voice to her. And the illustrations by LeUyen Pham are oh-so-wonderful which is probably why I like Bo so much. In this second book in the series, Bo and her new brother, Graf, go with their fathers Jack Jackson and Arvid Ivorsen to a new community: Iditarod Creek. They go where there's work, to keep it s I really did enjoy the first book in the series. And I wanted to love this one just as much. But it was more of an almost book for me. I still love Bo as a narrator. She still has a very unique voice to her. And the illustrations by LeUyen Pham are oh-so-wonderful which is probably why I like Bo so much. In this second book in the series, Bo and her new brother, Graf, go with their fathers Jack Jackson and Arvid Ivorsen to a new community: Iditarod Creek. They go where there's work, to keep it simple. So there are new characters to meet, new opportunities and situations. In fact, there might even be a THIRD child added to the family. The setting is unique, especially for a children's book. Historical fiction set in Alaska in 1929 and 1930. The world Bo is growing up in is probably a strange one to most readers. Bo is a six (or seven) year old girl growing up without many girls her own age, and without many ladies around in general. It's not exactly a "proper" or "traditional" upbringing. But what Bo has in abundance is LOVE and understanding. Both Jack and Arvid take time to talk with Bo, to love her, to teach her. One word of warning this book has racial slurs, matter-of-fact, this is the way it was language. So if you're reading this aloud to young(er) children, you should know what's coming.
    more
  • Jennybeast
    January 1, 1970
    Loving the continuing adventures of Bo and her family. One more thing that I really enjoy about these books is the way children are treasured by the community. They aren't taken for granted by the majority of the adults that surround them -- another thing that I think must be unique to places and times where children are scarce. The one thing I find controversial is the use of racial slurs -- I appreciate that the author addresses them directly in this book, and applies them widely to a variety Loving the continuing adventures of Bo and her family. One more thing that I really enjoy about these books is the way children are treasured by the community. They aren't taken for granted by the majority of the adults that surround them -- another thing that I think must be unique to places and times where children are scarce. The one thing I find controversial is the use of racial slurs -- I appreciate that the author addresses them directly in this book, and applies them widely to a variety of characters -- which may sound like a weird thing to say, but it's an aspect of our history that is true to the time, and an opportunity to confront hurtful language with child readers today. I think we get more of talking about it than pretending it never happened, and in 1930's Alaska, you can be sure that racially/culturally charged language was present. I also appreciated the author's note on the term Eskimo. I also find the world of mining to be relatively horrifying, but I'm glad to learn more about it, and to hear the range of viewpoints that Hill presents. There's a lot to learn here, and the presentation is excellent.
    more
  • Salsabrarian
    January 1, 1970
    As with "Bo at Ballard Creek," this is a sweetly cheerful child's-eye view of life with two loving papas in a hard-scrabble mining town. Bo and her adopted little brother Graf spend their days exploring the town meeting the miners, storekeepers, hotel managers, etc., and hanging out with new friends Will and Buddy. The author's note at the back addresses the use of the "N" word in one of the chapters. The note is somewhat unsatisfying and would benefit from more context and explanation. She does As with "Bo at Ballard Creek," this is a sweetly cheerful child's-eye view of life with two loving papas in a hard-scrabble mining town. Bo and her adopted little brother Graf spend their days exploring the town meeting the miners, storekeepers, hotel managers, etc., and hanging out with new friends Will and Buddy. The author's note at the back addresses the use of the "N" word in one of the chapters. The note is somewhat unsatisfying and would benefit from more context and explanation. She does not address the use of dago, polack and canuck that are also in the book. The book doesn't directly address the impact of mining on the environment but through Bo's eyes, the thoughtful young reader may figure it out: no more trees or plants at Iditarod Creek, piles of tailings everywhere, houses moved at will to dig more gold, and the constant noise of the dredgers. Share together with young readers but be prepared to have contextual discussions about the narrative for a more complete understanding of that time period.
    more
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Like "Bo at Ballard Creek," this second book featuring spunky little Bo is full of humor and warmth. At it's heart, it is a book about family, community and accepting people as they are. The book starts off with the family making its way along the river to Iditarod Creek so that they can work at a new mining operation. While there is talk of the mining operation itself, the story really is centered around Bo and her two fathers, Arvid and Jack - and her little adopted brother, Graf. The family i Like "Bo at Ballard Creek," this second book featuring spunky little Bo is full of humor and warmth. At it's heart, it is a book about family, community and accepting people as they are. The book starts off with the family making its way along the river to Iditarod Creek so that they can work at a new mining operation. While there is talk of the mining operation itself, the story really is centered around Bo and her two fathers, Arvid and Jack - and her little adopted brother, Graf. The family is the heart of this story - a family that is not typical, but is nonetheless loving. Again, as with "Bo at Ballard Creek," the story is quiet and gentle. It moves along slowly at the pace of life - reminiscent of the Little House on the Prairie books or "The Year of Billy Miller." And while there isn't a lot of action and adventure, there is still a good story.
    more
  • Devin
    January 1, 1970
    Bo at Iditarod Creek is the sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek. It continues the story of Bo and her somewhat unusual family of two dads and "just adopted" Graf as they move their home to Iditarod Creek. The noisy dredging machines are always running in this barren mining land with no trees and endless gravel, but the community, like Ballard Creek, is filled with lovable characters that teach Bo and Graf unforgettable life lessons, many of which include basic human kindness for people and animals. Th Bo at Iditarod Creek is the sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek. It continues the story of Bo and her somewhat unusual family of two dads and "just adopted" Graf as they move their home to Iditarod Creek. The noisy dredging machines are always running in this barren mining land with no trees and endless gravel, but the community, like Ballard Creek, is filled with lovable characters that teach Bo and Graf unforgettable life lessons, many of which include basic human kindness for people and animals. The book is historically and geographically accurate as well. While there is a small mention of child abuse, this would be a great read aloud for 1st-3rd graders liking historical fiction and a good independent reading book for 3rd-5th graders.
    more
  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this book more, because I loved The Year of Miss Agnes. It is well written, and the characters are likeable, but there just isn't much conflict to draw us in. It's a nice slice of Alaskan gold mining life in the 1930's, but nothing really happens beyond the day-to-day. No one is mean (except Miz Eller, who is mentioned and with whom Bo has one momentary uncomfortable encounter, but we never see her again), no major struggles to overcome, no inner turmoil--Bo leads a charm I really wanted to like this book more, because I loved The Year of Miss Agnes. It is well written, and the characters are likeable, but there just isn't much conflict to draw us in. It's a nice slice of Alaskan gold mining life in the 1930's, but nothing really happens beyond the day-to-day. No one is mean (except Miz Eller, who is mentioned and with whom Bo has one momentary uncomfortable encounter, but we never see her again), no major struggles to overcome, no inner turmoil--Bo leads a charmed life. Even the fact that she has "two papas and no mama" doesn't create any societal disturbance. Everyone takes everything in stride. It's a great way to approach life, but it doesn't make for riveting fiction, unfortunately.
    more
  • Sharon Lawler
    January 1, 1970
    Set during1929-1930 in the Alaskan mining town of Iditarod Creek, the book is filled with wonderful descriptions of the environment, rivers, plant and animal life through the seasons. Will appeal to a grade 3-5 interest level, but has a the plot which focuses on serious family issues such as adoption, two dads/no mom, education, child abuse and neglect. All are presented in an age appropriate way, realistic, without being overly graphic, and with adults stepping into the children's lives as lovi Set during1929-1930 in the Alaskan mining town of Iditarod Creek, the book is filled with wonderful descriptions of the environment, rivers, plant and animal life through the seasons. Will appeal to a grade 3-5 interest level, but has a the plot which focuses on serious family issues such as adoption, two dads/no mom, education, child abuse and neglect. All are presented in an age appropriate way, realistic, without being overly graphic, and with adults stepping into the children's lives as loving role models. This is a continuation of the author's 2013, Bo at Ballard Creek, which won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction.
    more
  • Yapha
    January 1, 1970
    In this sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek, Bo, Graf, and their two Papas have left Ballard Creek since the gold dried up. They are on their way to a dredge mine at Iditarod Creek. Once there, Bo and Graf find that there are only a few other children it town. Nonetheless, they manage to have grand adventures. My main problem is wondering who this book is written for, with a kindergarten age main character, but issues such as the use of a the N-word as well as child abuse. I understand that it is true In this sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek, Bo, Graf, and their two Papas have left Ballard Creek since the gold dried up. They are on their way to a dredge mine at Iditarod Creek. Once there, Bo and Graf find that there are only a few other children it town. Nonetheless, they manage to have grand adventures. My main problem is wondering who this book is written for, with a kindergarten age main character, but issues such as the use of a the N-word as well as child abuse. I understand that it is true to life at the time, but it will require much discussion between children and adults. Not as strong as the original, which must be read first.
    more
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    I did not realize this was a sequel, but did not feel as if I had dropped into the middle of a story. I enjoyed the child's-eye view of Alaska in the 1930's. The author rationalized her use of the n-word, which did not bother me at all as I understood it was within the setting. What bothered me more was the swearing! Granted, there would be talk like that in a mining camp, but in a children's book???
    more
  • Virginia Walter
    January 1, 1970
    When the gold runs out at Ballard Creek, Bo's two papas take her and Graf to Iditarod Creek. It's still a rough-and-tumble mining town, but different from the home they knew. The details of everyday life in 1930 Alaska are fascinating, and the characters warm my heart. I was not surprised when the papas-- Arvid and Jack -- take in a third abandoned child whose Indian mother died and whose Italian father has left him without a word. More, please.
    more
  • Jenn Estepp
    January 1, 1970
    I love these books about Bo and her non-traditional family and I think the first one - despite the Scott O'Dell award - is really underrated. I liked this one just as much, if not more and find the details of life in early twentieth century Alaska absolutely fascinating. For families who have shied away from the Little House books because of problematic issues, I think these are terrific alternatives. So much humor and heart.
    more
  • Emily Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    I love these books and I love Bo! This should be an instant classic. Laura Ingalls Wilder meets the Alaskan Frontier! I think these books are an easy read and very interesting. Students from Upper Elementary to Middle school should enjoy this story. I love the two papas. I also enjoy reading about what life would be like in the gold fields of Alaska.
    more
  • Kienie
    January 1, 1970
    Bo has two father's and two brothers. And a last name that's a combination of her dads' names. Here we encounter child abuse, death, moving to new places, and people with disabilities. Organized religion, racism, the great depression and classism are encountered, but not dwelled upon. Mostly it's a story of love, acceptance, generosity, and hard work.
    more
  • Sheila Welch
    January 1, 1970
    This is an unusual story; in several ways. I really liked it as an adult reader but am not sure if young readers would be quite so receptive. The author has lived the life she describes so well, and the authenticity drew me into her story of this unconventional family.
    more
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this second installment of this series by Kirkpatrick Hill. Bo has a new brother and the entire family moves to Iditarod Creek where they encounter a whole new set of adventures. Gentle stories from a rugged time period of US history.
Write a review