The Judas Tree
In a story of wide and fascinating detail A. J. Cronin tells of Dr. David Morey who tries to atone for his desertion of the woman he loved. Beguiled by the prospect of riches he goes on to marry Dottie, a spoiled but beautiful neurotic who brings him almost constant misery, until a chance remark makes him seek retribution in memories of the past and a return to his native Scotland. In the magnificent narrative tradition of "The Citadel," "The Stars Look Down" and Cronin's other classic novels, "The Judas Tree" is a great book by a much-loved author.

The Judas Tree Details

TitleThe Judas Tree
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 1st, 1986
PublisherNew English Library Ltd
ISBN-139780450013935
Rating
GenreFiction, Classics, Drama

The Judas Tree Review

  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    if you are ever in need of being horribly depressed for a period of time, read this punch-you-in-the-heart novel. it's short and well-written, and absolutely painful.
  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    A must read. Have lent to friends. This is a fictional tale where a man keeps meaning to follow his heart but is too ambitious and comfort seeking. The main character is a weakling and fails miserably at having any real backbone or moral compass. Everything we despise about human nature (potentially to some degree within us all).Despite his flaws he still has a few chances throughout the book for something true in life... Enjoyable for alot of reasons.... The journey he takes is interesting and A must read. Have lent to friends. This is a fictional tale where a man keeps meaning to follow his heart but is too ambitious and comfort seeking. The main character is a weakling and fails miserably at having any real backbone or moral compass. Everything we despise about human nature (potentially to some degree within us all).Despite his flaws he still has a few chances throughout the book for something true in life... Enjoyable for alot of reasons.... The journey he takes is interesting and the explanation for the book's title is one of the books easily unnoticed but a profound highlight. The author and his ideas on morality and what matter in life are revealed throughout the book along wit the mechanics of how one easily deviates are laid out in the book.It shows ultimately what appear to be small choices having a lifetime of meaning.The writer's other book - A Pocked Full of Rye, has a main character that faces more difficult situation's and has the moral character that a reader would want. IMO it wasn't nearly as compelling as, but few books are. Although one friend enjoyed it more.
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  • Bettie
    January 1, 1970
    (view spoiler)[Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)]
  • Shane
    January 1, 1970
    The title is a spoiler: a man betrays his heart for shallow worldly satisfactions, to find he can’t live with the shame.Moray, the tragic protagonist, also betrays his calling of medicine; he’s slippery (like his namesake), and we spend most of this gripping novel more or less inside his head. Though a compelling writer, Cronin isn’t always consistent with his chosen point of view. We’re constantly privy to Moray’s thoughts, via close third person, but at times random details of his external app The title is a spoiler: a man betrays his heart for shallow worldly satisfactions, to find he can’t live with the shame.Moray, the tragic protagonist, also betrays his calling of medicine; he’s slippery (like his namesake), and we spend most of this gripping novel more or less inside his head. Though a compelling writer, Cronin isn’t always consistent with his chosen point of view. We’re constantly privy to Moray’s thoughts, via close third person, but at times random details of his external appearance intrude. And the few, sudden switches of perspective – to whichever love interest, the butler etc. – are all the more jarring for their infrequency. A convenience for the sake of conveying the story, it feels oddly like cheating; which is at least apt for the theme.What elevates this morality tale about flawed and seldom likable characters is its uncompromising contrasting of the path of self-indulgence and that of self-negating charity. Ultimately, Moray finds himself torn between the two and, due to a long history of bad habits, doomed – even damned – whichever he chooses.
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  • Rossy Roman
    January 1, 1970
    A painful view into human selfishness and self-comfort. A good read.
  • G
    January 1, 1970
    A.J. Cronin's novels are always a pleasure to read and this book is no exception and gripping till the end.
  • Kay Iscah
    January 1, 1970
    In some ways this is a decent little morality tale for grownups, but I spent the entirety of the read loathing the main character who is the worst kind of villain, the sort that imagines himself and victim and, aside from his wealth, is all too commonly found. The minor characters also come off as rather flat, awful themselves or lacking in the spark that might give them the clear sight to see Moray as he is and pick up on the red flags he drops. While I don't find any obvious faults in the writ In some ways this is a decent little morality tale for grownups, but I spent the entirety of the read loathing the main character who is the worst kind of villain, the sort that imagines himself and victim and, aside from his wealth, is all too commonly found. The minor characters also come off as rather flat, awful themselves or lacking in the spark that might give them the clear sight to see Moray as he is and pick up on the red flags he drops. While I don't find any obvious faults in the writing, it's not particularly clever either. Overall... the mechanics of a solid story are there, but I can't say I enjoyed it.
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  • Oleg Roschin
    January 1, 1970
    From the author of "The Citadel", this is a dark, unsettling story of love and betrayal, full of emotions and leaving the reader stupefied with its shocking ending. Cronin analyzes common human desires, juxtaposing them against the lucid world of faith, which turns the novel into a tense psychological depiction of the eternal battle between good and evil. The beauty of this work is in the way it combines a "chamber" setting, focusing entirely on the main character, with a very "epic" theme, trea From the author of "The Citadel", this is a dark, unsettling story of love and betrayal, full of emotions and leaving the reader stupefied with its shocking ending. Cronin analyzes common human desires, juxtaposing them against the lucid world of faith, which turns the novel into a tense psychological depiction of the eternal battle between good and evil. The beauty of this work is in the way it combines a "chamber" setting, focusing entirely on the main character, with a very "epic" theme, treating such topics as trust, duty, sexuality, career, and the meaning of human life. An outstanding work by one of the greatest novelists of the 20th century.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    What a sick, horrible story! It seems I was right about it reminding me of Anna Karenina, since one of the characters was reading it...for the second time! I had a horrible feeling the whole time I was reading it that the main character was a sicko, selfish, pompous, weak, in body AND mind, to say the least. It turns out, I was right, but I wish I hadn't wasted my time!
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  • Saloni More
    January 1, 1970
    David Moray is a Scottish doctor who let ambition drive him through life resulting in abandonment and betrayal. Good stuff.Read full review here.
  • Merve
    January 1, 1970
    I do not know what to say about the book. I feel like I received a great blow. I'm really suffering. The story hurt me deeply. Cronin is realy very good writer. The citadel novel, another novel of the writer, had affected me intensely to. I definitely recommend it.
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  • Josie Rideg
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best books I've read. Dr. Cronin's narrative is exceptionally good as is his characterization and setting descriptions. His handling of the question of personal redemption is thought provoking and intense. It is hard to come away from this superbly gripping novel unmoved.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    One of the few books I wished I hadn't read. What's left afterwards is total darkness and no point to it.
  • Sinziana Mihalache
    January 1, 1970
    Predictable and misogynistic
  • Mildio
    January 1, 1970
    Somehow disappointed this time with Cronin
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing story; I felt I was reading about Trump in many cases. Beautifully written although the main character was dispicable.
  • Kalin Nikolov
    January 1, 1970
    Idea / Credibility 4.7Characters / Depth 5.0Page-turn / Intrigue 4.6Style / Richness 4.9My rating 4.8
  • Brent
    January 1, 1970
    The story was interesting enough. A doctor makes his fortune by betraying everyone he knows and loves. He does not betray them on purpose, he just lacks the courage and will to see anything to the end. This leads him to always take the easy and comfortable option when faced with a difficult situation. No happy ending here, as indicated by the title.The writing is a little choppy at places. Suffers from the "let me tell you," instead of the "let me show you," your English teacher was always talki The story was interesting enough. A doctor makes his fortune by betraying everyone he knows and loves. He does not betray them on purpose, he just lacks the courage and will to see anything to the end. This leads him to always take the easy and comfortable option when faced with a difficult situation. No happy ending here, as indicated by the title.The writing is a little choppy at places. Suffers from the "let me tell you," instead of the "let me show you," your English teacher was always talking about.
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  • Norma
    January 1, 1970
    A self-absorbed main character goes through life "with the best intentions". However, as the old adage goes "The road to Hell is paved with good intentions". The destructiveness for this fundamentally weak man is sad. His ultimate end is probably deserved but unfortunate that his estate falls into his wife's hands. Good descriptions of Switzerland, Scotland and Vienna.A very literate book.
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  • Dar
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't much like this book. Very self-absorbed main character who appeared on the surface to care very much about people, but actually only cared about himself and what others thought of him. Not a likeable character in any respect. I didn't really warm to any of the characters in the book, for that matter. Also, the writing was dated.
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  • Mitsuyasu
    January 1, 1970
    A. J. Cronin wrote much better novels when he dealt with young people like in "The Citadel"; "Shannon's Way"; "Beyond This Place"; "The Green Years"; "The Song of Six Pence"; "The Hatter's Castle"; and many more. But this one is simply trite to me. The copy I read I bought many a year ago but left it unread for reasons I don't know.
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  • J V Woods
    January 1, 1970
    More of the sameNot one of Cronin's best. His doctor books are very similar. The Citadel was by far the best of the lot. But the Shannon books and this one...well the characters are very similar. Poor upbringing, do well getting qualified and then chuck it all in. Just like the author.
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this contempoary fiction novel written prior to 1965. There was a flowing simplicity of expression, a good and complex plot spanning generations......and a very unusual ending, not neccessarilyhappy.
  • Tryphena
    January 1, 1970
    I first read this book when I was 10, 11 years old I believe. It drew me in immediately, and it even had a hint of comedy in some paragraphs. I loved it, and it quickly became my favorite book. It's a wonderful story and I highly recommend it. :)
  • Naynyinyi
    January 1, 1970
    This is the really great book. It tells about that the doctor work should not be mixed with ego.For a doctor, i think he is concerned with the patient.He does not own his life anymore like Actors or Actress,etc.
  • Orioles2013
    January 1, 1970
    A. Rattling good read. Once you pick up, and A. J. Cronin book, you can't put it down. A consummate storyteller.
  • Kparke
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book, although it's very bleak -- an interesting character study of a man who finally learns to recognize himself for what he is.
  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    Hard to read this book.Recommended by a customer.David Moray is rotten to the women in his life and it comes back at the end of his life and he hangs himself on the tree.
  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    Very well written. Interesting story. Reminds me of some people I've known. I would suspect there is a bit of the main character's weaknesses in all of us.
  • Marti
    January 1, 1970
    Passed on to me by Mom.
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