The Public Library
A gorgeous visual celebration of America's public libraries including 150 photos, plus essays by Bill Moyers, Ann Patchett, Anne Lamott, Amy Tan, Barbara Kingsolver, and many more.Many of us have vivid recollections of childhood visits to a public library: the unmistakable musty scent, the excitement of checking out a stack of newly discovered books. Today, the more than 17,000 libraries in America also function as de facto community centers offering free access to the internet, job-hunting assistance, or a warm place to take shelter. And yet, across the country, cities large and small are closing public libraries or curtailing their hours of operation. Over the last eighteen years, photographer Robert Dawson has crisscrossed the country documenting hundreds of these endangered institutions. The Public Library presents a wide selection of Dawson's photographs— from the majestic reading room at the New York Public Library to Allensworth, California's one-room Tulare County Free Library built by former slaves. Accompanying Dawson's revealing photographs are essays, letters, and poetry by some of America's most celebrated writers. A foreword by Bill Moyers and an afterword by Ann Patchett bookend this important survey of a treasured American institution.

The Public Library Details

TitleThe Public Library
Author
ReleaseApr 8th, 2014
PublisherPrinceton Architectural Press
ISBN-139781616892173
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Art, Photography, Writing, Books About Books, History, Essays, Architecture, Adult, Art and Photography, Science, Library Science

The Public Library Review

  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book I love this book I love this book! Also, just a fun fact: I checked out The Public Library from my public library, creating a small tear in the time-space continuum and leading to a fun conversation with my mom. ("What a beautiful book! Who gave it to you?" "It's a library book." "I can see that. Who gave it to you?" tee hee) The Public Library is not only filled with beautiful photos of libraries all over our nation, but all filled with essays by such literary greats as Isaac A I love this book I love this book I love this book! Also, just a fun fact: I checked out The Public Library from my public library, creating a small tear in the time-space continuum and leading to a fun conversation with my mom. ("What a beautiful book! Who gave it to you?" "It's a library book." "I can see that. Who gave it to you?" tee hee) The Public Library is not only filled with beautiful photos of libraries all over our nation, but all filled with essays by such literary greats as Isaac Asimov, Anne Lamott, Amy Tan, and more, about how the public library has impacted them. Finally, in the captions I found many, many fun facts about lots of libraries.The author, Robert Dawson, worked on this photographic essay for eighteen years . Turns out there's a bajillion libraries in America, and it can take a little bit to get around to photographing a good selection of them. ("Bajillion" may be a slight exaggeration. It's actually closer to 16, 415. I got that number from the American Library Association's website, which I trust to be really close to the mark.) There are big libraries and there are tiny libraries. There are incredibly affluent libraries and there are incredibly poor libraries. There are libraries in their own building; there are libraries that share space with post offices. There are libraries of books and libraries of seeds and libraries of tools. In short: a library can be nearly any place where people can come together to share ideas and knowledge and materials. The Public Library is a gorgeous book to spend time with. Robert Dawson mentions his camera a few times in the books as being a large format camera? I'm not a photographer and don't know exactly what that means, but I can tell you that it leads to crystal-clear images with loads of details.Of course there were photographs of the big, beautiful libraries: New York and Salt Lake City and Los Angeles and Seattle. (In fact, I've heard so much about the Salt Lake City Library that I now want to go there just to visit! Too bad it's thousands of miles away from me, and the hubby says that a single library isn't quite enough reason to plan an entire vacation out west.) But there's also the stories of survival librarianship. There's a photo of a tiny little building on an Indian reservation; the only tiny library for hundreds of miles; the only library for a reservation with a population of 3,300+ people; the home of the only internet-connected computer for 3,300+ people. And it's being threatened with closure. There's also a library in Mississippi with a sign on the door informing the patrons that there would be no internet available that day; the librarian had turned off all the lights and the computers in attempt to curb rising temperatures, as the library's air conditioner was broken (and had been for over a year). In Mississippi! I want to give some kind of Congressional medal to my colleagues in those trenches.Finally, the essays: these eloquent essays by well-known authors intersperse the chapters, expounding on their love of libraries and their support for continuation of library sources. They are penned by Amy Tan, Isaac Asimov, Dr. Seuss, E.B. White, Barbara Kingsolver, Luis Herrara, Anne Lamott, and Ann Patchett, among others. They're only 2-3 pages each, but they speak volumes. I can't recommend this book enough, and am adding to my "wish list" to own myself someday.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Rural Nevada (I live in Carson City, part of the rural NV consortium) well-represented... because ordinary successful libraries don't interest Dawson. He focused on the under-funded, the tiny, the closed... and I came away from this book so depressed. Then I went online and plugged in a bunch of random small towns and found a bunch of happy libraries.Yes, do pay attention. Do make sure that you do your bit to save your local library. But don't cry wolf just because the library in a boomtown that Rural Nevada (I live in Carson City, part of the rural NV consortium) well-represented... because ordinary successful libraries don't interest Dawson. He focused on the under-funded, the tiny, the closed... and I came away from this book so depressed. Then I went online and plugged in a bunch of random small towns and found a bunch of happy libraries.Yes, do pay attention. Do make sure that you do your bit to save your local library. But don't cry wolf just because the library in a boomtown that went bust is closed - if there are no patrons, there need not be a library! (Jeffrey City Wyoming).I didn't find the pictures all that meaningful, either. Again, Dawson went out of his way to make the struggling libraries look bleak, and the city libraries look like they're filled with obsolete art treasures and homeless patrons but never mind ordinary people choosing books.I'm sorry, but it's pretty sad when a book like this fails in preaching to the converted.I am glad to see the note Isaac Asimov sent in response to a grand-opening request:"Dear Boys and Girls,Congratulations on the new library, because it isn't just a library. It is a space ship that will take you to the farthest reaches of the Universe, a time machine that will take you to the far past and the far future, a teacher that knows more than any human being, a friend that will amuse you and console you... and most of all, a gateway to a better and happier and more useful life."
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  • TK421
    January 1, 1970
    In the end, libraries serve one purpose: the promise for a better life for all.
  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful buildings, amazing locations, and a sad state of affairs for those out in the country and out of the way places.I loved the opening by Bill Moyers and the story of the driver in Nevada, but the one that really struck home with me was the story by Barbara Kingsolver. I admire all of the librians who go to work every day and fight to keep their doors open, no matter what the conditions they face.An 18 year project brought beautifully to conclusion and into our waiting hands.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful book!!! I would enjoy visiting some of these libraries, to the oldest and to the state of art!
  • Mike French
    January 1, 1970
    A photographic essay showing libraries across the USA.This shows pictures and a blurb from one room libraries in the middle of nowhere to the reading room at New York City Public Library. Also features reflections from authors and celebrities of their early experiences of going to libraries.My only disappointment was no pictures of exterior of New York Public Library. Having been brought up in small towns in Illinois,Iowa and Missouri,my parents moved to New York City area. I will never forget m A photographic essay showing libraries across the USA.This shows pictures and a blurb from one room libraries in the middle of nowhere to the reading room at New York City Public Library. Also features reflections from authors and celebrities of their early experiences of going to libraries.My only disappointment was no pictures of exterior of New York Public Library. Having been brought up in small towns in Illinois,Iowa and Missouri,my parents moved to New York City area. I will never forget my first trip to New York City Public Library. I was in total awe of this huge building with the two lions guarding the entrance!
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    The library means something different to every individual. For me, its hallowed ground, its where my mom shared her love of reading and I always feel close to her when I walk into a library. When I move to a new town, its the first place I seek out. Robert Dawson's photo essay about libraries points out what libraries mean to us as a nation. Its a source of freedom for most of us and in some cases a refuge. A lot of the time its the only place where someone has access to the internet or a child The library means something different to every individual. For me, its hallowed ground, its where my mom shared her love of reading and I always feel close to her when I walk into a library. When I move to a new town, its the first place I seek out. Robert Dawson's photo essay about libraries points out what libraries mean to us as a nation. Its a source of freedom for most of us and in some cases a refuge. A lot of the time its the only place where someone has access to the internet or a child has access to books. My favorite essay was about a bookmobile that traveled the remote areas of Northeastern Nevada where he makes 29 stops every 2 weeks. The driver/librarian felt it was his mission to get books into people's hands. Some of the libraries photographed are closed and abandoned and some look more like art museums. The main message I came away with is that we need to do better about supporting our libraries and preserving their place in our society.
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  • Kendra Stejskal
    January 1, 1970
    Libraries and the gift of books and education have always been important to me. I grew up going to libraries and it was one of the few places in the community I looked forward to going to every week. I felt safe and loved there and the librarians made me feel special. I even made my own personal book collection into a "library" as a child and rented titles out to my family and friends. Appropriately, I now work in a library, and still feel strongly about the importance of libraries in the commun Libraries and the gift of books and education have always been important to me. I grew up going to libraries and it was one of the few places in the community I looked forward to going to every week. I felt safe and loved there and the librarians made me feel special. I even made my own personal book collection into a "library" as a child and rented titles out to my family and friends. Appropriately, I now work in a library, and still feel strongly about the importance of libraries in the community. Robert Dawson has taken some incredible photographs that show the wide range and importance of libraries in our country. The essays from different authors complete these photos in a special way and show the necessity of having this institution everywhere, and what it means to different people. A must read.
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  • Megan (ReadingRover)
    January 1, 1970
    Great look at the public libraries across America!
  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    “I remember the sense of awe I felt as a teenage when I realized I could roam among the shelves, take down any book I wanted, examine it at my leisure at one of the library tables, and if it struck my fancy, bring it home.” – Robert Dawson The Public Library: A Photographic EssayAbsolutely! Public libraries, from my childhood to present, have been a godsend: my happy place – solace grace – reading, dreaming, thinking place. Naturally then, I thoroughly enjoyed this beautiful book honoring these “I remember the sense of awe I felt as a teenage when I realized I could roam among the shelves, take down any book I wanted, examine it at my leisure at one of the library tables, and if it struck my fancy, bring it home.” – Robert Dawson The Public Library: A Photographic EssayAbsolutely! Public libraries, from my childhood to present, have been a godsend: my happy place – solace grace – reading, dreaming, thinking place. Naturally then, I thoroughly enjoyed this beautiful book honoring these public gathering places of enrichment. Dawson’s passion for libraries, literature, authors, architecture, peoples, cultures, and photography runs deep and is beautifully and thoughtfully presented throughout. Dawson’s journey capturing photographs across America makes for entertaining reading. But this is more than just a coffee table book with fabulous photos. This is a call of awakening; it’s a historical accounting, a portrait of educational importance, a culture awareness montage, and it’s an alertness to political agendas, told through Dawson and essays from nine other contributors; from bestselling authors Amy Tan and Ann Patchett to librarians and other library/biblio enthusiasts."In an age of greed and selfishness, the public library stands as an enduring monument to the values of cooperation and sharing. In an age where global corporations stride the earth, the public library remains firmly rooted in the local community." - David Morris, “We may never have full equality in our legal system, our schools, or our health care, but in our libraries there is parity: all are welcome, all books are free, and if you can wait awhile, all books are available.” - Robert DawsonAlso included are wonderful quotes from various artists, authors, and public office bibliophiles. “I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns it on, I go to the library and read a good book.” – Groucho Marx“My real education, the superstructure, the details, the true architecture, I got out of the public library.” – Isaac Asimov“The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man.” T.S. EliotDawson sums up the importance of libraries being available to all, for all times, quite perfectly: “If you love your library, use your library, support libraries in your words and deeds. If you are fortunate enough to be able to buy your books, and you have your own computer . . . then don’t forget about the members of your community who are like you but perhaps lack your resources – the ones who love to read, who long to learn, who need a place to go and sit and think. Make sure in your good fortune you remember to support their quest for a better life. That’s what a library promises us, after all: a better life. And that’s what libraries have delivered.” Five Top Pick Superb Stars: photographically, educationally, conversationally, and entertainingly.
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  • Natalie Pietro
    January 1, 1970
    The best thing that came out of this book was discovering there are three unique libraries in the United States that offers something rare.1)Richmond Grows Seed Lending Library, Richmond Public Library, Richmond, CA. You can check out healthy seeds, to plant and use, and return new seeds from the resulting plants at the end of the season. 2)Tool-Lending Library, Berkeley Public Library, Berkeley, CA. Opened to Berkeley residents and homeowners this library houses over twenty-five hundred tools t The best thing that came out of this book was discovering there are three unique libraries in the United States that offers something rare.1)Richmond Grows Seed Lending Library, Richmond Public Library, Richmond, CA. You can check out healthy seeds, to plant and use, and return new seeds from the resulting plants at the end of the season. 2)Tool-Lending Library, Berkeley Public Library, Berkeley, CA. Opened to Berkeley residents and homeowners this library houses over twenty-five hundred tools to borrow at the residents needs. 3)West Wendover Branch Library, West Wendover, NV. Only library in the United States to offer a Rifle-training class. Closing their doors to allow members to safely practice outside towards the rugged mountains. Oh and how could I forget about lovely Elsie Eiler. At 77 years old this wonderful woman is the soul occupant of Monowi, NE. Acting as the mayor and running the only business in town, Elsie decided to donate her late husbands books to the world and opened Rudy's Library. Housing over 5000 books, magazines, and newspapers, some dating back to 1940s, patrons can check out items by signing a notebook. So after reading this book I think a road trip is in order. Quite a few fascinating libraries I would love to check out. So who's coming along.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Confirms my belief that the public library is one thing (the only thing?) that the United States can be unashamedly proud of. Old news to me, but always endangered. Lovely pictures of libraries big and small, and a call to action to keep them open. Fantastically funny essay by Barbara Kingsolver, inspiring letter by E.B. White, and don't miss the one by the bookmobile driver in rural Nevada. And this, from the afterword by Ann Patchett: So know this--if you love your library, use your library. S Confirms my belief that the public library is one thing (the only thing?) that the United States can be unashamedly proud of. Old news to me, but always endangered. Lovely pictures of libraries big and small, and a call to action to keep them open. Fantastically funny essay by Barbara Kingsolver, inspiring letter by E.B. White, and don't miss the one by the bookmobile driver in rural Nevada. And this, from the afterword by Ann Patchett: So know this--if you love your library, use your library. Support libraries in your words and deeds. If you are fortunate enough to be able to buy your books, and you have your own computer with which to conduct research, and you're not in search of a story hour for your children, then don't forget about the members of your community who are like you but perhaps lack your resources--the ones who love to read, who long to learn, who need a place to go and sit and think. Make sure that in your good fortune you remember to support their quest for a better life. That's what a library promises us, after all: a better life. And that's what libraries have delivered. Amen.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    If I was giving a rating for what this book was *trying* to do - show the wide range of conditions and circumstances (social, economic, physical, etc) facing America's public libraries- it would be worth 5 stars. As it was, I felt the book fell short of that aim. It's seems as though the author chose to focus on libraries that were either already closed in poverty stricken urban and/or rural areas (several libraries in Detroit were featured, as were libraries on Native American Reservations) or If I was giving a rating for what this book was *trying* to do - show the wide range of conditions and circumstances (social, economic, physical, etc) facing America's public libraries- it would be worth 5 stars. As it was, I felt the book fell short of that aim. It's seems as though the author chose to focus on libraries that were either already closed in poverty stricken urban and/or rural areas (several libraries in Detroit were featured, as were libraries on Native American Reservations) or libraries that had gorgeous, soaring architecture or artwork. Given the length of the project (almost 20 years in the making) it would have been nice to see at least one library from each state, or perhaps a longer piece on the fate of libraries in Louisiana after Katrina, rather than just one picture and a small blurb on literally the last page of the book. With the exceptions of a few of the essays submitted by authors, the book felt very flat.
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  • Amanda [Novel Addiction]
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful and inspirational. I loved seeing the photos of libraries new and old, and reading the stories of easily recognizable names, talking about what the library means to them. Gorgeous. Definitely recommended to anyone and everyone.
  • Sandy Lenahan
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful book! Every library and library lover should have a copy of this photographic love letter to libraries. I loved Amy Tan's essay she wrote when she was 8 and the bookmobile (that's where I got my first library card!).
  • Noninuna
    January 1, 1970
    As the title obviously suggests, this book is mostly pictures of libraries around America with one essay per chapter, written by various kind of people; from popular authors to political activist to librarians to journalist to Robert Dawson's own son, who helped his dad to complete this project. Seeing the photos, all kind of emotions came to me. Sometimes, I was in awe looking at the beautiful structure of the libraries. Sometimes sad when looking at abandoned/closed libraries and glad seeing s As the title obviously suggests, this book is mostly pictures of libraries around America with one essay per chapter, written by various kind of people; from popular authors to political activist to librarians to journalist to Robert Dawson's own son, who helped his dad to complete this project. Seeing the photos, all kind of emotions came to me. Sometimes, I was in awe looking at the beautiful structure of the libraries. Sometimes sad when looking at abandoned/closed libraries and glad seeing some libraries are still crowded with their patrons. It also, more or less, opened my eyes. A library could be much more than a center for books, information, or reading. Once, I was a snob who looks down on my local library because from my past experience, their collection consists of small local published books and mostly classics. After years of buying and hoarding books, my space for books became less and less (and my mom actually asked me to stop buying books), I tried to look for an alternative. Earlier this year, I tried browsing the library and to my surprise, their collections got bigger and better. With various activities for young patrons every week, either at the main library or at their branches. Looking at my young fellow library users, I'm thinking of donating a few of my books to the library. It's better than the books sitting on my shelf gathering dust. And now, I think I've become someone who has strong feelings of ownership towards the institution.
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  • Branwen *of House Targaryen*
    January 1, 1970
    I cried multiple times while reading this. Absolutely beautiful.
  • Lenore
    January 1, 1970
    Very cool to see all the different libraries. Nice way to spend a few hours leafing through a book.
  • Patti's Book Nook
    January 1, 1970
    "In small towns the public library may be the only noncommercial and nonreligious space where people can gather to meet neighbors and sustain the ties that create a sense of community." (Pg 83). The library's ability to create diverse collections is astounding. For example, "The Queens library has the largest circulation of any in the United States. The borough has one of the largest immigrant populations in the US....and is one of the most ethnically diverse places on earth. The librarians spea "In small towns the public library may be the only noncommercial and nonreligious space where people can gather to meet neighbors and sustain the ties that create a sense of community." (Pg 83). The library's ability to create diverse collections is astounding. For example, "The Queens library has the largest circulation of any in the United States. The borough has one of the largest immigrant populations in the US....and is one of the most ethnically diverse places on earth. The librarians speak Russian, Hindi, Chinese, Korean, Gujarati, and Spanish. If the New York Public Library, the Queens Library, and the Brooklyn Public Library were considered one institution, it would be the largest public library in the world in terms of both collection size and circulation." (page 68). These facts made my happy juices flow! Imagine the much-needed learning and understanding this cultivates. It puts into perspective the importance of funding these incredible places.The anecdotes from Ann Patchett and and Barbara Kingsolver were my favorites, as I've enjoyed their novels immensely. My favorite Patchett lines: "We may never have full equality in our legal system, our schools, or our healthcare, but in our libraries there is parity: all are welcome, all books are free, and, if you can wait a little while, all books are available." I will end this review (I suppose more of a synopsis of my favorite quotes) with Patchett's simple and perfect advice: "So know this- if you love your library, use your library." This is worth your time, plus it's gorgeous.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't impressed by this photographic essay about public libraries both because while the pictures were nice, they weren't spectacular and the essays weren't particularly evocative or beautifully written. I wasn't moved as I was expected to be with pictures of destitution, wealth, grandeur, beauty, poverty, or anything really. There were pieces that were interesting in his journey of about fifteen years worth of taking pictures, including one that was about a public librarian in Troy who wrote I wasn't impressed by this photographic essay about public libraries both because while the pictures were nice, they weren't spectacular and the essays weren't particularly evocative or beautifully written. I wasn't moved as I was expected to be with pictures of destitution, wealth, grandeur, beauty, poverty, or anything really. There were pieces that were interesting in his journey of about fifteen years worth of taking pictures, including one that was about a public librarian in Troy who wrote to famous people to ask them why they loved libraries and to send letters back to their local children. The letters she received were lovely including Dr. Seuss's wonderfully Seussical one, but that was because there was a local connection.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeously photographed libraries and insightful essays make for a simultaneously beautiful and haunting collection. This is definitely (and defiantly?) a positive ode to the public library. It can be overdone at times, however it accomplishes one (giant) feat: it demonstrates the need for public libraries. There were small communities, large urban areas, and isolated towns included. It's a statement on the human need for social connection and libraries often provide this singular purpose. Pictu Gorgeously photographed libraries and insightful essays make for a simultaneously beautiful and haunting collection. This is definitely (and defiantly?) a positive ode to the public library. It can be overdone at times, however it accomplishes one (giant) feat: it demonstrates the need for public libraries. There were small communities, large urban areas, and isolated towns included. It's a statement on the human need for social connection and libraries often provide this singular purpose. Pictures often speak louder than words, and that sentiment holds true here.
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    beautiful small coffee table book beautiful libraries small and large within. ¡viva la Bibliotheca!
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Public libraries: fighting the good fight since 1833. A wonderfully varied collection of libraries across the nation (including Louisville's own Western Library).
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    This quote from Ann Patchett says it all: “So know this—if you love your library, use your library. Support libraries in your words and deeds. If you are fortunate enough to be able to buy your books and you have your own computer with which to conduct research, and you’re not in search of a story hour for your children, then don’t forget about the members of your community who are like you but perhaps lack your resources—the ones who love to read, who long to learn, who need a place to go and s This quote from Ann Patchett says it all: “So know this—if you love your library, use your library. Support libraries in your words and deeds. If you are fortunate enough to be able to buy your books and you have your own computer with which to conduct research, and you’re not in search of a story hour for your children, then don’t forget about the members of your community who are like you but perhaps lack your resources—the ones who love to read, who long to learn, who need a place to go and sit and think. Make sure that in your good fortune you remember to support their quest for a better life. That’s what a library promises us, after all: a better life. And that’s what libraries have delivered.”
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  • Tyler Jones
    January 1, 1970
    As Ann Patchett remarks in the afterword, a library to her is primarily about the books. And so it is for me. All these pictures of the exteriors of libraries just left me wanting to see the insides. Correct that - made me want to be in the insides, looking through the stacks.The pictures are wonderful, and show that a library could be a tumble-down shack or a marble palace. The accompanying essays, many by literary heavyweights, put the pictures into a wider cultural scope. The book focuses on As Ann Patchett remarks in the afterword, a library to her is primarily about the books. And so it is for me. All these pictures of the exteriors of libraries just left me wanting to see the insides. Correct that - made me want to be in the insides, looking through the stacks.The pictures are wonderful, and show that a library could be a tumble-down shack or a marble palace. The accompanying essays, many by literary heavyweights, put the pictures into a wider cultural scope. The book focuses on the role, history and future of the library within the United States, which has set my mind to wondering to what degree libraries in the rest of the world are faring. But I suppose that is a different book.
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  • Eli Claire
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful, powerful collection of essays and photographs of American public libraries, from the bookmobile that distributes books to residents in rural Nevada to the award-winning Central Library in Seattle. It amazes and inspires me to read about how hard people have fought to keep their libraries open, and the different ways libraries have adapted to their communities - opening in old strip malls, gas stations, prisons, and schools. Makes me prouder than ever to be going to school to become A beautiful, powerful collection of essays and photographs of American public libraries, from the bookmobile that distributes books to residents in rural Nevada to the award-winning Central Library in Seattle. It amazes and inspires me to read about how hard people have fought to keep their libraries open, and the different ways libraries have adapted to their communities - opening in old strip malls, gas stations, prisons, and schools. Makes me prouder than ever to be going to school to become a professional librarian.
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  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating book offering a view into the scope and diversity of public libraries across the United States. I paused frequently to look up more information and images as I went through the book. I could have spent days reading about each one!
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful. I loved the photos, their vast array of contrast, from the most grand architecture to abandoned and boarded up, modern to historical, and those libraries that have found a home in odd places - a former gas station, a former drive through bank. The essays from well known writers were a treat. Above all, I loved the history and information included with the photos.Well done.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I especially enjoyed the afterward written by Ann Patchett.
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