Morningside Fall (Legends of the Duskwalker, #2)
The lone gunman Three is gone, and Wren is the new governor of the devastated settlement of Morningside, but there is turmoil in the city. When his life is put in danger, Wren is forced to flee Morningside until he and his retinue can determine who can be trusted.They arrive at the border outpost, Ninestory, only to find it has been infested with Weir in greater numbers than anyone has ever seen. These lost, dangerous creatures are harbouring a terrible secret – one that will have consequences not just for Wren and his comrades, but for the future of what remains of the world.

Morningside Fall (Legends of the Duskwalker, #2) Details

TitleMorningside Fall (Legends of the Duskwalker, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 29th, 2014
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN-139780857663658
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fantasy, Dystopia, Fiction, Apocalyptic, Post Apocalyptic

Morningside Fall (Legends of the Duskwalker, #2) Review

  • Dan Schwent
    January 1, 1970
    Wren's term as Governor of Morningside is short-lived when it becomes apparent he's been targeted by people within the Council. With his mother and a group of trusted allies, he flees the city. But who is working against him and why are the Weir massing in greater numbers?I got this from Angry Robot via Netgalley.The Weir threat escalates in the second entry in the Duskwalker series. Wren is struggling to grow into his role as boy governor of Morningside and the influx of people into Morningside Wren's term as Governor of Morningside is short-lived when it becomes apparent he's been targeted by people within the Council. With his mother and a group of trusted allies, he flees the city. But who is working against him and why are the Weir massing in greater numbers?I got this from Angry Robot via Netgalley.The Weir threat escalates in the second entry in the Duskwalker series. Wren is struggling to grow into his role as boy governor of Morningside and the influx of people into Morningside, both the dwellers outside the walls and the Awakened, the former Weir, are making the rest of the population uneasy. Sound pretty good? Well...Okay, here's the deal. I loved Three, the first book in this series. However, I didn't love this book. I felt like it very much suffers from "Second book in the Trilogy" syndrome. There's a lot of setup toward bigger things down the road but mostly there's a lot of running through the wastelands shooting at Weir. There is no new character to take Three's lead role so we get a lot of interchangeable warrior types acting as Wren's bodyguards and with no lynchpin character driving things forward, my attention waned quite a bit. If it weren't for the last 20% of the book, I probably would have given it a 2.The last 20% made up for a lot of my distaste for the rest of the book. A lot of stuff happens. Wren figures out how to stop the Weir, the mastermind is revealed, and a battle of monstrous proportions happens. The revelation of who the blindfolded man was was very satisfying. The third book is going to be an asskicker of Muhammed Ali proportions.Morningside Fall is worth a read but I don't think it holds up very well when compared to Three. I do plan on sticking with the series, though. Three out of five stars.
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  • Tabitha
    January 1, 1970
    Just a moment while I wipe the blood from my eyes Morningside Fall is the sequel to the absolutely amazing post apocalyptic book, Three. It was strong, edgy and had a kick ass, no holds barred, main character with a soft spot. Not only did Three not go in the direction that I expected, it blew me away with how immersed I became in the world and the main character named Three. The ending was shocking and fantastic so much so that I raved and raved about it and maybe I even amped myself up a bit Just a moment while I wipe the blood from my eyes Morningside Fall is the sequel to the absolutely amazing post apocalyptic book, Three. It was strong, edgy and had a kick ass, no holds barred, main character with a soft spot. Not only did Three not go in the direction that I expected, it blew me away with how immersed I became in the world and the main character named Three. The ending was shocking and fantastic so much so that I raved and raved about it and maybe I even amped myself up a bit much for the second book.With that, moving onto Morningside Fall I had specific expectations and a direction in which I thought things were going to go. Let's say I was wrong. *smacks the whammy on herself* That teaches me to hypothesize and start throwing down cement in my thoughts where it doesn't belong. I shouldn't get ahead of myself. That was totally my own fault, bad naughty reader thinking you know what's best. But what pray tell were my wild fantasies? Holding out for a Hero I thought perhaps we would have a big time lapse into the future and see the characters somewhat more aged. Ok who am I kidding - I thought I would get to see WREN, more aged, specifically as an adult in all his kick ass glory, with his oddball powers strengthened and him just being the new lead man. Man being the key word there. Well within the first chapter you learn this isn't to be the case (so hey that's not a spoiler, so don't start moaning). Alas, Wren is still a kid and I didn't have that hero I was hoping for. Into the wastelands they wander The author's writing style was still as top notch as ever. The characters are setting back out into the waste, and what isn't fun about seeing people struggle against whatever odds a post apocalyptic world and nasty baddies can throw at them? I still found the world and Weir utterly fascinating but there was a smidge of punch lacking in this one that made the first one a complete win win with me. Strange things are happening with the Weir - small signs of change that we saw towards the end of Three are now really come out to play. They aren't acting the way everyone have always expected, but then hey Cass should have been somewhat of a clue about that too right? Ultimately it was that my momentum and interest didn't peak until 2/3rds of the way into it and I think if that would have happened say 100 pages into the book it would have kicked things up a notch for me on the enjoyment scale. The innocence of a child... While I like Wren as a character I didn't enjoy spending as much time with him in this book as I did the first book. Why? Because in the first book there was Three and he was to me the main focus. Where as here Wren is more of the main focus and I just couldn't seem to wrap my interest around him. He's an innocent and he's a child, a young child, and when it boils down to it I don't usually want to read about a child. I read young adult fiction quite frequently. So of course I enjoy it but having the focus be on a kid as much as it was I didn't find myself as gripped to the book as I was the previous one. In a similar but completely different fashion there was a disconnect between myself and his mother Cass. She was always an interesting character in the first novel but I never attached to her personally, for reason that they she was a junkie, and so then going into Morningside Fall she was already at a disadvantage with me, even though she wasn't really the same person anymore. Luckily there are some other characters that are introduced that spice things up.Overall, Morningside Fall was still a really good read and I would definitely recommend it to those that enjoyed Three but with a cautionary note that you'll be getting a very different vibe with this one. I believe this is going to be a trilogy and that might have partly to do with my reaction. I find that I tend to have trouble with second books in a trilogy for some reason. But hey, I still definitely look forward to what comes next.
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  • Bob Milne
    January 1, 1970
    With Morningside Fall, Jay Posey's Legends of the Dustwalker saga is beginning to remind me of Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn Saga. Both series started off strong, with first novels that really impressed me with their imagination and their storytelling, and which guaranteed I would keep on reading. Unfortunately [minor spolier here], the second volume in both series suffers from the absence of the protagonist who made the first book so compelling.That absence made this a frustrating reading experi With Morningside Fall, Jay Posey's Legends of the Dustwalker saga is beginning to remind me of Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn Saga. Both series started off strong, with first novels that really impressed me with their imagination and their storytelling, and which guaranteed I would keep on reading. Unfortunately [minor spolier here], the second volume in both series suffers from the absence of the protagonist who made the first book so compelling.That absence made this a frustrating reading experience for me. The world building was taken to the next level, the threat of the Weir was far better explored, and we finally get something of a primary antagonist in the final portions of the book. In addition, the writing was just as solid as it was in the first book, contributing to an enhancement of the overall atmosphere. There really was a lot to enjoy and appreciate here, but Wren is no Three, and that's a very big 'but' indeed.I didn't like Wren much in the first book, and I didn't come to like him any better here. He's too innocent, too precocious, and too vulnerable. I wasn't necessarily looking for him to stand up and become a hero, but I was hoping he would serve some purpose other than to be the typical kid who needs to be rescued. He just rubs me the wrong way, leaving me exasperated and anxious to move on to the next scene that doesn't center on him. As for his mother, I really liked the darkness and the edge of Cass in the first book, but at lot of that seems blunted here. Sadly, it seems as if she's just not as interesting without Three there to challenge her on a personal and intellectual level.It's not a bad read, and the last 100 or so pages are worth sticking it out for, but it was a long, slow, difficult read getting to that point. I found myself skimming in places, and getting tired of all the walk-on auditions to replace Three as Wren's guardian. Morningside Fall definitely suffers from middle-book syndrome, adding to the issue of trying to replace a protagonist, but it ends with enough promise to make a third book a likely-to-read, if not quite a must-read.Originally reviewed at Beauty in Ruins
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  • Luke Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    While far too many readers were expecting a second helping of the incredible first book of the Dustwalker series, Three, Jay Posey wrote Morningside Fall, and in doing so, greatly expanded the depth of the saga which hopefully never stops. I loved Jay's use of the spec ops team and the gratifying revelations of the book's saga plot expansion reminded me in many ways of one of the best movies ever made, The Empire Strikes back, in the classic operatic psychological second act fall, no pun intende While far too many readers were expecting a second helping of the incredible first book of the Dustwalker series, Three, Jay Posey wrote Morningside Fall, and in doing so, greatly expanded the depth of the saga which hopefully never stops. I loved Jay's use of the spec ops team and the gratifying revelations of the book's saga plot expansion reminded me in many ways of one of the best movies ever made, The Empire Strikes back, in the classic operatic psychological second act fall, no pun intended. I refuse to give any spoilers away, and am as eager as any for the third book. Thanks again, Jay! Post-apocalyptic stories will never be the same.
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  • Rebecca McNutt
    January 1, 1970
    Holy cow, this series is very intense at this point! A lot changes since Three.
  • Rolo
    January 1, 1970
    It’s getting hard to find science fiction books that aren’t dystopian. Because of that, they’re all starting to blend together. This book series manages to stand out by showing a world in the aftermath of a combined robot/zombie apocalypse.I was excited to get an ARC off NetGalley and from the good people at Angry Robot. I really enjoyed Three, the first book in the Legends of the Duskwalker series. I loved the futuristic biotech, the fast paced story, and the special-forces like action. The sto It’s getting hard to find science fiction books that aren’t dystopian. Because of that, they’re all starting to blend together. This book series manages to stand out by showing a world in the aftermath of a combined robot/zombie apocalypse.I was excited to get an ARC off NetGalley and from the good people at Angry Robot. I really enjoyed Three, the first book in the Legends of the Duskwalker series. I loved the futuristic biotech, the fast paced story, and the special-forces like action. The story manages to stay high action by giving the bare minimum of back story.Autor, Jay Posey, brings all that back in Morningside Fall. But instead of being as engaging as the first book, this one was exceptionally average. What went wrong?The last book is named Three, after one of the main characters. He was a mysterious action hero and a dynamic character. He starts out as a bounty hunter that cares for no one. For reasons he doesn’t fully understand, he risks his life to save a couple of strangers, Cass and Wren. He’s a strong character, mysterious, and full of human contradiction. He’s the main reason I liked the book. But he dies in the end of the first book.A story is only as strong as their characters. Morningside Fall doesn’t measure up to Three because of the lack of a strong character to replace Three. Or because of too many Three-like characters.Cass and Wren have one goal, self-preservation. While that’s a strong goal for dealing with external conflict, it doesn’t do much for internal character drama. Their only purpose is being damsels in distress. While they are given some extra motivations in the Morningside Fall, it’s not enough to make up for the loss of Three.A team of guards try to fill that hole. They’re fun to read about. They’re all highly trained special-ops types. They become Cass and Wren’s sworn protectors after Wren becomes governor of Morningside. But that’s all we know about them. There’s no character drama. Because there’s so many of them, we don’t get to know any of the individual team members enough to really care about them.They’re like chess pieces. We learn enough about each one to see how they move and how they’re different from each other, but not enough to care about any of them as people. What’s at stake for them? Why’d they take the job? What does failure mean to them personally? I don’t know.Another big issue is the lack of a clear villain. The beginning of the book is all politics. It’s Cass, Wren, and a political council. Some of the council members are kind of bad, but they’re no villains. The Weir make great bad guys, and they’ve grown as a threat since the last book, but they’re not a major issue until later in the book.Morningside Fall has potential, but without strong characters to anchor the story, character drama gets lost in the large scope of the story. Cass and Wren aren’t strong enough characters to fill the hero role, at least not until the end of the book. The team of guards could have filled the role, but there are too many of them. None of team members are developed enough to stand out from the crowd. Same goes for the villain role. Throughout the book, pretty much everyone is a villain. We don’t have a solid villain until near the end.Because of this, I feel like the story didn’t really get started until two-thirds of the way through. This book reads like an introduction for the next book. That said, the book ends with a solid hero and a solid villain in place. So I have high hopes for the next book.
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  • Jasper
    January 1, 1970
    originally posted at: http://thebookplank.blogspot.com/2014...Around this time last year I read another one of my favourite debuts. Three from Jay Posey. AND WOW!! Yes it really was that good. I am still fired up by it. My god I can still slap myself when I think that Three escaped my attention, luckily I was notified by Angry Robot about the release, was send an ARC and totally lost myself in the world that Jay Posey created in Three. It had a very raw feeling and the lone gunman Three readily originally posted at: http://thebookplank.blogspot.com/2014...Around this time last year I read another one of my favourite debuts. Three from Jay Posey. AND WOW!! Yes it really was that good. I am still fired up by it. My god I can still slap myself when I think that Three escaped my attention, luckily I was notified by Angry Robot about the release, was send an ARC and totally lost myself in the world that Jay Posey created in Three. It had a very raw feeling and the lone gunman Three readily pulled the story forward. Three was one of those protagonists that only raised more questions and didn't answer any, however nearing the ending Three parted ways with Wren and Morningside. When Angry Robot mentioned they send out a review copy I put my tent next to the postbox, I needed this book. Badly. But the big question does remain, can Jay Posey live up to his stellar debut Three? You will find out below... I don't know whether I should say that you should be warned when you pick up Morningside Fall, but just a note upfront: the tone of Morningside Fall is different that Three. A lot of other readers let it owe to the fact that Three if out of the picture, and they feel they lack strong characterization. Well to be honest, I find that the characterization is just as strong but since the whole point of view has been changed it just took some getting used to. Though it is a direct sequel and leave the thoughts that you want to have Three in the picture again. My advice focus on the current characters and the amazingly rich and yet again creative story that Jay Posey manages to put down.Ok, first off, the prologue to Morningside Fall. This was really, really great, directly in the action-packed lines of what I have come to learn from it predecessor Three. It shows some of the troubles that might start to run rampant later on in the book. Jay Posey keeps a lot of things unclear but near the end of the prologue he does drop one name. That of Painter. If this is an "episode" he goes through regularly it could proof more that troublesome... With this prologue Jay Posey had put the mood just right for the continuation of Three. After the prologue the story of Morningside Fall focuses on the young boy Wren instead of the lone gunman Three, Three left Wren behind in the settlement of Morningside at the end of book one. Wren showed that he has an amazing gift, being able to "awaken" the Weir. It's by these powers that he has been held in awe by most of the inhabitants of Morningside. However it does soon come to show that not everyone is in favor of Wren being the new governor of Morningside. The situation becomes so dire for Wren that he has to face off assassins and starts to fear for his own life and that of his mother Cass. After all the lingering threats that Wren had to fight, the council, his mother and Wren himself find that the best solution is to flee Morningside, but whether this is a temporary solution or permanent they don't know yet, but it is the safest so far. Now that Wren, his friends and his mother have left Morningside behind they find themselves yet again in the midst of the destroyed wastelands, they were relative safe behind the walls of Morningside, but out in the open, with hardly any protection, you will start to fear when the Weir start to cry out at night... They still roam the wastelands in many, many numbers... I mentioned that I loved the aspect of the Weir in Three, these are a bit like zombie creatures, only a bit though! As you soon come to learn that the Weir are changing... certain assumptions were made about them in the first book, but be sure to abandon a few a long the way, it seems that they are evolving into more powerful beings. This is what Wren and his cohorts find out when they roam the wastelands yet again and proves to be a troublesome happening. Earlier "remedies" to fight of the Weir don't seem to be that effective anymore, a new solution has to be found...Now there is one thing that Jay Posey adds to the storyline. Have you seen the guy on the cover? When I read Three, I directly knew it had to be the character Three. In the case of Morningside Fall, you have a blindfolded man, with some wicked blades strapped to his belt. I went through several secondary characters but just couldn't place him. He does look awesome doesn't he? So who could this one be? Luckily soon after the introduction to the story of Wren there is a short change in perspective where you focus on this man, he is powerful and a one to be feared of but there isn't a mention of WHO he is... Jay Posey keeps the identity of this man obscure for a long, long time. Each time his chapters were over I was looking forward to the next, I don't know how to describe the feeling I got of of him, I think it was the mysterious vibe and he was pretty awesome with his knives though. Anyway later we luckily learn that he is an old acquaintance, but who, I won't spill either. I liked the addition of the blindfolded man to the story and later with the follow-up of the events of Wren and end of the books does again hold a lot of promise. As for the characters of Morningside Fall, above I mentioned that the focus is on Wren and the inhabitants of Morningside and that Three is completely out of the picture. So for Wren character, not a lot of time has passed between the Three and where the story picks up in Morningside Fall. He is still a young boy. During his travels with Three you really saw him shine when he had those pads on his back, and for me it seems that he has grown tremendously by the guidance that Three gave him. For his age, Wren knows a lot, he is a clever and resourceful boy, he might have a bit of naivety in him but don't we all? However he is still faced with impossible situations, situations where he has to choose between whats will work for the good and for the bad. In the settlement of Morningside, he was a bit static but later when he ventures with his mother and friends on the wastelands he starts to develop more and more, really something that I wanted to read about. If I like back on the whole transition of Wren's character, from the start in Three down to the last page in Morningside Fall I can only but smile and say yes. Compared to Three there are much more secondary characters that make an appearance; many of the friends that Wren has made in Morningside amongst others his friend Painter (does that name ring any bells?), his mother Cass and many of the guards that come along during Wren flight from Morningside. Even though there is a strong focus on Wren's development, these side characters weren't just plain cut-outs, Jay Posey makes them all be unique and interesting, with just a few guiding sentences to introduce them and build on that for the remainder of the story, neatly nestles them into the storyline. The ending of Morningside Fall is again one that provides a lot of speculation of the direction where the hopefully third book will go. So far in the series we have seen a lot of the destroyed wastelands and places that were, lived the high times with Wren and Three but also their low times. But with the appearance of the blindfolded man and the journey their are about to embark on, could there still be a possible light at the end of this dark, dark tunnel? I am still living on a high when it comes down to these first two books in The Legends of the Duskwalker series. I have to say that I did expect a different kind of book for being the sequel to Three. But when I reflect on the whole story in Morningside Fall and combine this with all that has happened in Three I have to admit that I couldn't have wished for a better sequel. It has a lot of the cool idea's of the first book, but instead of being the introduction, Jay Posey further explains and builds upon these idea's. The focus isn't necessarily contained on one single person like the first book by Jay Posey broadens the whole scope of his post apocalytic story, involving many more different factors like human emotions, that can run pretty high when there is hardly anything left in the world that Jay Posey has build. Switching the focus on Wren instead of leaving it a Three might be difficult for some to accept, Wren is just as great a character as Three but on many different levels. Wren is a very smart boy but has that naivety that makes him easily relatable to, I am very eager to find out how Wren and the blindfolded man will manage in the third book. A great sequel to Three and Jay Posey clearly shows that he has one creative mind, bring on more of his stories!
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  • Cathy Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsIn a post Three world, young Wren is now the governor of Morningside after the death of his father, Underdown. His mother, Cass, acts as his advisor, protector and companion. Although Wren has special abilities, and is sometimes able to ‘awaken’ Weir, including Cass and his friend Painter, he’s not equipped to deal with Morningside’s politics. It becomes clear not everyone in the Council is in favour of Wren’s governorship and his life is in danger. Following a failed murder attempt the 4.5 starsIn a post Three world, young Wren is now the governor of Morningside after the death of his father, Underdown. His mother, Cass, acts as his advisor, protector and companion. Although Wren has special abilities, and is sometimes able to ‘awaken’ Weir, including Cass and his friend Painter, he’s not equipped to deal with Morningside’s politics. It becomes clear not everyone in the Council is in favour of Wren’s governorship and his life is in danger. Following a failed murder attempt the situation escalates and Cass, Painter and Wren are forced to escape the city, along with Wren’s team of elite bodyguards, even though it means travelling the bleak wastelands between refuges and leaving themselves open to attacks by Weir.Reaching the outpost Ninestory, they encounter Weir in huge numbers. An enormity never before witnessed. Posing an even deadlier threat, appearing quite different and much more menacing, their presence places everyone in jeopardy. More so than is apparent initially. The little group battle against impossible odds, with help from an unexpected quarter.After the surprising and shock ending of the first book I did wonder how the second would fare without the compelling and mysterious central character that was Three. The pace is slightly slower to begin with and there’s no main focus on one particular hero. The writing however, along with the post apocalyptic world and Weir are just as compelling. Wren is central to the story, a child who in some ways is older than his years, but nevertheless acts mainly as a boy of his age would. He has benefitted from all he learned from Three and his character does develop quite a lot towards the end of the book. The secondary characters, most especially Wren’s contingent of elite bodyguards, helped in some way to fill the void left by Three. Those passages featuring Gamble, Sky, Swoop and Wick are terrific, their interactions, dialogue and personalities, even though there’s no back story as such for them, are interesting and distinctive.The story opens with a short but excellent prologue. Painter is quite a tragic character who invites sympathy but his personality takes a very unexpected turn towards the end, when he decides to leave and strike out on his own. The mysterious Blindfold Man of the cover image (who I initially thought was a grown up Wren) is intriguing and very powerful, not someone to be taken lightly. He appears at the beginning of the story and then again more substantially in the last few chapters. His identity is left unknown for the longest time and is a surprise when revealed. For me, the story didn’t have quite the same impact as Three, but having said that, I did enjoy it a lot and look forward to the third book, which actually could go in any direction given the ending. I’m enjoying Jay Posey’s writing style and Luke Daniels’ performance, as always, is just so good and brings out the atmosphere and emotion of the story, as well as giving the characters distinct voices and personalities.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I reread my review from Three, and I felt this book hit all the same notes. Fast-paced, very little exposition about the world, good characters that have unique points of view from each other, interesting setting and tech. Ironically, the new hot trend he adopted this book was what happens when a zombie comes back to human, which I've recently seen 3-4 books and a couple tv shows with similar themes. Pretty much if you liked the pacing, action, and characters in Three, you're going to like this I reread my review from Three, and I felt this book hit all the same notes. Fast-paced, very little exposition about the world, good characters that have unique points of view from each other, interesting setting and tech. Ironically, the new hot trend he adopted this book was what happens when a zombie comes back to human, which I've recently seen 3-4 books and a couple tv shows with similar themes. Pretty much if you liked the pacing, action, and characters in Three, you're going to like this one too. I miss Three, but I like the new characters they introduced. I feel the internal monologues get a bit redundant (Cass in particular felt more one note to me), I wish there was a bit more nuance between the good characters are super good and evil characters are super evil, and I think the book could have gone further into what Cass and Painter are. But in general very entertaining, holds up the strengths of the first book. Again leaves the door open for future books and I will enjoy snatching up the next one. Note: I received a free copy from the publisher, thanks AR!
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  • Kdawg91
    January 1, 1970
    This is actually a 3 and a half, but I am rounding up due to my love for the first of this series.I really like this world and I like where the story goes, it mainly in my opinion suffers from being the middle book a bit. You know how it goes, series starts with a bang, then the middle part comes along, fills in the holes from the start, then hopefully the finish gives you what you need.I dug it, I am offically a fan, and look forward to the next in the series, Do yourself a solid, go get both b This is actually a 3 and a half, but I am rounding up due to my love for the first of this series.I really like this world and I like where the story goes, it mainly in my opinion suffers from being the middle book a bit. You know how it goes, series starts with a bang, then the middle part comes along, fills in the holes from the start, then hopefully the finish gives you what you need.I dug it, I am offically a fan, and look forward to the next in the series, Do yourself a solid, go get both books if you haven't read Three already and read them back to back, You will come back and thank me, probably.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    When judging Jay Posey's Morningside Fall, I used the tried and true "sadness gauge" to decide how much I liked the book. The standard? When I find a series I love, such as Wesley Chu's Tao, Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive or Lev Grossman's The Magicians, I tend to feel a genuine sadness when I finish a volume and I know it will be a long wait until the next one arrives (I would include G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, but if I was down in the dumps waiting for each installment of When judging Jay Posey's Morningside Fall, I used the tried and true "sadness gauge" to decide how much I liked the book. The standard? When I find a series I love, such as Wesley Chu's Tao, Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive or Lev Grossman's The Magicians, I tend to feel a genuine sadness when I finish a volume and I know it will be a long wait until the next one arrives (I would include G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, but if I was down in the dumps waiting for each installment of THAT series I think I would be on suicide watch pending the 5-6 year delay.)I finished Morningside Fall (book #2 in The Duskwalker Cycle) late last night; it certainly passed the test. OK; I'll admit that no tears were shed, but I definitely felt as if there was much more life in the world that Posey constructed for the series. He still has my interest, for sure.If you haven't read book one, Three then you probably should stop reading this review. Superfluous "Spoiler Alert" necessary? Fine, consider the word given.In Three, the protagonist was clearly the bad ass bounty hunter that the book was named after. Most of the book is from his perspective and he is the guy you are rooting for. The book chronicles Three's journey to help a mother and her young child to safety. That child, Wren is revealed to be a prodigy of sorts. He is able to manipulate the networks that all the residents have hard wired into their brains in this post-apocalyptic world. He also appears to have some power over the ever present "Weir", Zombie mutant type creatures that maraud the night and ravage all they come into contact with. Wren's mother, Cass is a dystopian "helicopter mom"; understandably so as her first son (Wren's psychopathic but gifted half brother Asher) spent the entire first book hunting them in an attempt to kill them. Three is finally able to escort the group to Morningside, a walled city that appears to eke out an almost normal existence despite the hardships that are the realities of life in the world. After a final battle scene, Wren seemingly destroys Asher and Three is killed saving Cass and Wren. I would think that most readers would ask the same questions I did, namely "What now, Jay?"Morningside Fall picks up in the aftermath of Three. Wren is now the Governor of Morningside and Cass is by his side constantly. Wren appears to be the Governor as a figurehead; his power over the Weir and the manner in which he destroyed Asher seemed to cement him as the De Facto head of the government. However, there are factions in Morningside that don't agree with Wren and a plot unfolds from an attempt of Wren's life. This is the running plot line through the novel; Wren's fight to stay alive and do all he can for the citizens of Morningside despite his treatment by some and prejudices against "The Awakened", Weir that Wren was able to bring back from the ether and give back a semblance of their lives. Cass, seemingly killed at the end of Three is also an Awakened.The second book is no less fast moving than the first; but it is different. The physical confrontations handled so capably by Three are no more; instead Wren is escorted and protected by the Governor's Guard. The Guard is an elite team of tactical operators tasked with protecting Wren and Cass; Posey clearly has done ample research in the field of tactical operations (likely due to his work on the Ghost Recon and Rainbow Six video game franchises) as his operator's talk the talk and walk the walk. The scenes involving the Guard are detailed and eminently believable. He is an author that loves the details; he could write a book on a group moving through a city if he wanted to, and it would fascinate me thanks to his detailed descriptions and authentic action sequences.Throw in a mysterious "blindfolded man", a ton of Weir fights and an underlying mystery and I was sold immediately. Posey manages to kill off his main character and yet still soldier on down the road with the series. Fans of Three will definitely want to read Morningside Fall. If you disregarded my advice at the beginning of this review and hung in despite missing the first volume, go get it NOW.4 Stars (I had to dock him one star. Why? He killed Three! The guy was a legit badass!) Does he do lunch with G.R.R. Martin or something? Can we expect a Nedd Stark / Three ghost team up novel? Seriously, who does that??
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  • Nichole ~Bookaholic~
    January 1, 1970
    Morningside Fall: Legends of the Duskwalker 3.5 Stars• Written by: Jay Posey • Narrated by: Luke Daniels • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins • Series: Legends of the Duskwalker, Book 2 • Unabridged Audiobook • Release Date:02-24-15 • Publisher: Audible Studios• Reviewed for Audiobook ReviewerI am OCD about reading books in order….so I picked up to listen to first before starting this Morningside Fall, and I’m still reeling a bit from it, Three was an awesome listen……This second installment….not sure Morningside Fall: Legends of the Duskwalker 3.5 Stars• Written by: Jay Posey • Narrated by: Luke Daniels • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins • Series: Legends of the Duskwalker, Book 2 • Unabridged Audiobook • Release Date:02-24-15 • Publisher: Audible Studios• Reviewed for Audiobook ReviewerI am OCD about reading books in order….so I picked up to listen to first before starting this Morningside Fall, and I’m still reeling a bit from it, Three was an awesome listen……This second installment….not sure if it because I started it right after the first book and the loss of Three is still so fresh in my mind…but story wise this book was just not as good as the first one. While I really liked Wren in the first book, in this one he was just okay….maybe it is the whole second book syndrome that so many series have……The story seemed to drag quite a bit but did pick up towards the last couple of hours. The story was not bad, just not as good as the first….the characters of Morningside Falls are really what bring this book together and keep you reading/listening…..the world building is great and we find out more about the threat of the Weir….there is not much more I can say without getting spoilery. I’m taking a short break from this so I don’t burn out and will then be jumping into the third book.As always, Luke Daniels did an amazing job on the narration….he is one of my favorite narrators and the reason I wanted to try this series…..so narration on this is a solid 5 stars.So go and listen….while not as great as the first book, it is still good and the narration is fabulous... Audiobook provided by Author/Publisher via Audiobookreviewer.com for an honest review
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  • Robert Defrank
    January 1, 1970
    Disappointment is an unwelcome but increasingly familiar guest. It’s shown up a lot in my life as a reader. Slight spoilers.While the first few chapters were all right and some interesting elements were introduced, the story quickly began to feel padded. The very first time I recognized truly superfluous scene I felt my spirits sink.Without getting too far into spoiler territory, the plot does not so much move the characters forward as tread water, then set them back to square one. Much like Dan Disappointment is an unwelcome but increasingly familiar guest. It’s shown up a lot in my life as a reader. Slight spoilers.While the first few chapters were all right and some interesting elements were introduced, the story quickly began to feel padded. The very first time I recognized truly superfluous scene I felt my spirits sink.Without getting too far into spoiler territory, the plot does not so much move the characters forward as tread water, then set them back to square one. Much like Danys’ story in Dance with Dragons, the characters start out in a strong position, with the chance to make something worthwhile out of the ruined world, only to see it all fall apart due to venial greed, and the tale ends with little to hope for in this world, or to fight to save, and the struggles and sacrifices of the first book come to nothing.Other issues: the ‘awakened’ characters did not have the alien quality I would have expected, and the revelations were disappointing.I still recommend the first book, and it can be read as a stand-alone, and I’ll be checking out the next volume, but this one is skip-able.
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  • Caleb
    January 1, 1970
    Three is no more and wren is the new governor of morning side but when a forgotten evil arises again is found by our hero's they will have to face them with the full frontal force they have this book is very slow after have read Three i would still recommend it to people that have read hunger games or other survival books
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  • James Cox
    January 1, 1970
    This was interesting.
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    Three is dead. Wren is now the Governor of Morningside, having watched his father be killed by Asher, and then, having removed Asher. Asher determined that the previous Governor had a trick he was using, a special machine, that he could control the Weir with, call them, and then send them away. However, Asher, with his enhanced abilities worked out that he could do other things to them as well, having greater control. And it was with this control, that he exerted his will over Cass, who had been Three is dead. Wren is now the Governor of Morningside, having watched his father be killed by Asher, and then, having removed Asher. Asher determined that the previous Governor had a trick he was using, a special machine, that he could control the Weir with, call them, and then send them away. However, Asher, with his enhanced abilities worked out that he could do other things to them as well, having greater control. And it was with this control, that he exerted his will over Cass, who had been turned into a Weir, and used her to kill Three.It was an interesting move by Posey, as Three is bound to be a favourite character in the first book, and killing him could be a reason for a lot of people to stop reading the series. However, if you do, you are going to miss out on an utterly brilliant sequel. The other clever part about killing Three is that it means that anybody is fair game. So often in these books, the main characters become immortal, unable to die, escaping near impossible situations, but with this series, the death of such a pivotal character signified that was not going to be the case. There is also the concern of whether the story would be strong enough to survive without Three’s character, and again, Posey shows some incredible writing skill, by not only remembering his fallen hero, honouring him, but moving on and allowing the newly awakened Cass, Wren who has come into his new abilities, as well as the addition of Gamble and her crack unit to not so much fill the void, but to take up the mantle of where Three’s character was. As with the first book, the writing is beautifully structured, flowing so easily that you can glide through the pages with ease, but be lost in this incredibly crafted story with such an in-depth world that it is obvious that Posey has poured hours into developing a finely crafted backdrop from which to tell his tale.Whilst Wren has discovered the ability to awaken the Weir, bringing back the minds of those that once belonged to the body, making them almost human again, he is still only a child. As such, those around him do not see him as a leader, and they see his mother, a newly awakened Weir, as a danger. Gamble and her team are just brilliant, the tactics, technical skill, manoeuvres that are discussed and used in this book show that Posey has done a lot of research on how a small unit of Special Forces troops operates in close combat operations. This attention to detail is what makes this book such a standout to other books of its genre, these little bits of detail that are so well done. Wren soon learns the hard way about being Governor and Politics, and must make some difficult decisions for the future of Morningside, especially when he realises the danger that is coming.This book is just as good as the original. I can’t say it is better, because Three was just an exceptional character, but it is getting close, especially for a sequel. There is a lot of fascinating intrigue, and things you don’t expect, all leading to what is going to be a spectacular final book. This is a must read series.
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  • Brandi Knepper
    January 1, 1970
    I find it painfully frustrating that Posey introduces a horde of characters with no real explanation or back story. It's hard to become attached to characters you barely know anything about. However, I somehow managed to do just that. The storyline, again, lacks development, though Posey's imagery is spectacular. He has a beautiful writing style that is so completely descriptive yet devoid of any real explanation. I so desperately want to know the wants, desires, and innermost thoughts of the ch I find it painfully frustrating that Posey introduces a horde of characters with no real explanation or back story. It's hard to become attached to characters you barely know anything about. However, I somehow managed to do just that. The storyline, again, lacks development, though Posey's imagery is spectacular. He has a beautiful writing style that is so completely descriptive yet devoid of any real explanation. I so desperately want to know the wants, desires, and innermost thoughts of the characters, and less about the exact shade of grey that concrete wall is. I have to admit I was much less angry at the end of book 2 than I was at book 1. The story progresses overall, but at a very slow rate. Wren thankfully cries less, and I still love to hate the ever-obnoxious Cass. There were diminutive twists and turns which kept me flipping pages long past bedtime. Overall, I enjoy the read but the story leaves much to be desired.
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  • Charlie F
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a pretty good sequel to the first (Three) but it didn’t have the same kind of atmosphere as the first. It kind of lacked what the first had, it didn’t have a clear plot or explain what was happening. Throughout the story they keep having little cutscenes to a man who where’s a blind fold who is later on completely disregarded till the last three chapters for no resone. Also this book lacks so many details that the first had not giving the characters a solid foundation. You learn wh This book was a pretty good sequel to the first (Three) but it didn’t have the same kind of atmosphere as the first. It kind of lacked what the first had, it didn’t have a clear plot or explain what was happening. Throughout the story they keep having little cutscenes to a man who where’s a blind fold who is later on completely disregarded till the last three chapters for no resone. Also this book lacks so many details that the first had not giving the characters a solid foundation. You learn what they look like by just thinking them up they have the most plain descriptions and It’s hard to tell who is talking. But it did get better as it went on but still lacked basic details and kind of jumped forward pretty fast making it hard to keep up with.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 4.0 of 5 **WARNING -- POTENTIAL SPOILERS AHEAD (FOR BOTH THIS AND THE PREVIOUS BOOK IN THE SERIES THREE** I raved, not too long ago, about Three , the first book of the Legends of the Dustwalker series by Jay Posey and I was both excited and fearfully nervous about starting this second book.  After all, Three was so good, it would be impossible to follow it up with something equally fantastic or even better, right?  Right?Well.. This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 4.0 of 5 **WARNING -- POTENTIAL SPOILERS AHEAD (FOR BOTH THIS AND THE PREVIOUS BOOK IN THE SERIES THREE** I raved, not too long ago, about Three , the first book of the Legends of the Dustwalker series by Jay Posey and I was both excited and fearfully nervous about starting this second book.  After all, Three was so good, it would be impossible to follow it up with something equally fantastic or even better, right?  Right?Well...yeah.So Morningside Fall didn't quite live up to all that Three offered, but it was still an incredible read that had me hooked as soon as I began.  You don't have to read Three first ... I think that Morningside Fall covers all that is needed to know to understand the current batch of characters, though I do think the reader might get a better grasp on why the characters act as they do if Three is read first.A quick summation:The child, Wren, is the Governor of Morningside.  His mother, Cass, is his constant companion and advisor.  A board of officials are mostly respectful to Wren, but it becomes quickly clear that Wren is nothing more than a figurehead to them, despite his having shown the potential for incredible power.  But this is a book of politics, power, and war, and typically a child will come out on the short end in such a struggle.  But as is usually the case, there are always those few who will serve, follow, and protect the leader no matter what is age might be.This book takes a turn from what we had in Three, but the turn is a natural progression of the story.  This will seem like a bit of a departure, but I am reminded of the movie Alien.  If you are over 40, you might remember when Alien came out.  It was awesome.  It was like nothing else at the time.  And then they came out with a sequel, Aliens.  There was no way it could live up to the first movie, right?  The sequel had soldiers, with massive weaponry, as opposed to the first movie's rag-tag crew and solitary heroine.  So it was clearly a different movie, with a couple of the same characters and settings.  And it worked.  Here, we have something very similar.  Instead of the small party working their way across a landscape riddled with dangers, we have some of the same characters in most of the same setting, with armed guards.  And it works.  Mostly.It feels like there's a lot of set-up here.  Once in the (relative) comfort of Morningside there isn't a lot of physical action.  The physical action of Three (and 'the three') against the odds in the first book really moved the pace along.  Here we spend more time with political backstabbing and the introduction of a few new characters.  Author Posey does introduce a character, a blindfolded man, who would rival Three for pure action.  After reading the first chapter with this new character I thought: 'Yes!  Posey definitely knows how to write an action sequence!'  I think I was holding my breath during the entire chapter!  It is these scenes that keep us going, and we can sense the simmering unrest in Morningside, and this is what keeps us turning pages, waiting for climax.We do learn just a little more about the Weir (a strange, electrified zombie) and they take on even more of a dominant role here.  And, as we see with the Weir, it seems, in science fiction, you can't count anyone down, even if they die, so it isn't unrealistic to expect a few familiar faces.I mentioned, in my review of Three, a connection to a Christian theme, and I see that continuing here, but I'll wait for the final book before remarking more on this.My biggest issue with this second installment in the Legends of the Dustwalker series is ... (if you've been reading my reviews you can probably fill in the blank before I do!) ... that it isn't a complete book in itself.  Whereas in Three you could read to the end and feel satisfied that you had a complete book, with an ending to the story, Morningside Fall ends with a big question mark.  There are too many unanswered questions to feel like a satisfying conclusion to the story at hand.  There is clearly another book to come.  Instead of a beginning, a middle, and an end there is a beginning, a middle, and an open door.  And while Posey sets up the blindfolded character tremendously, he could easily be written out of the book without disrupting the current story.  I can only assume (and hope) he plays a much bigger role in volume three.But even with these criticisms in mind, Jay Posey still writes one heck of a darn good yarn!  I'm sold on this Legends of the Dustwalker series and will eagerly read the third book when it comes out.  I'll also read anything Posey puts on paper.  For me, the highest compliment I can think of for a writer is that I would buy his/her book in hardcover as soon as it's released.  There are only four writers for whom that currently holds true for me.  Now five.Looking for a good book?  Jay Posey's follow-up to Three, Morningside Fall, continues the high adventure in a dystopian world and is a fantastic read.  It is a part of a series and a book that should be on your read list!
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  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    I did not expect to like this book as much as I enjoyed the first, and my reason for that is (spoiler alert if you haven't read Three!!) the main character died at the end of the first book. So I didn't see how I could possibly enjoy this one in the same way. And I was partially right; this book IS different. However, it's just as intense, just as gripping, just as incredible. Three is obviously missing from the story, but new characters are introduced who are their own special kind of complex. I did not expect to like this book as much as I enjoyed the first, and my reason for that is (spoiler alert if you haven't read Three!!) the main character died at the end of the first book. So I didn't see how I could possibly enjoy this one in the same way. And I was partially right; this book IS different. However, it's just as intense, just as gripping, just as incredible. Three is obviously missing from the story, but new characters are introduced who are their own special kind of complex. Definitely a worthy sequel.
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  • R.J. Blain
    January 1, 1970
    Morningside Fall by Jay Posey is a a novel that slips between a variety of different genres. For the sake of simplicity, I’m defining this novel as a Science-Fantasy Western.Morningside Fall is the second novel in the Legends of the Duskwalker series.About the BookThe lone gunman Three is gone. Wren is the new governor of the devastated settlement of Morningside, but there is turmoil in the city. When his life is put in danger, Wren is forced to flee Morningside until he and his retinue can dete Morningside Fall by Jay Posey is a a novel that slips between a variety of different genres. For the sake of simplicity, I’m defining this novel as a Science-Fantasy Western.Morningside Fall is the second novel in the Legends of the Duskwalker series.About the BookThe lone gunman Three is gone. Wren is the new governor of the devastated settlement of Morningside, but there is turmoil in the city. When his life is put in danger, Wren is forced to flee Morningside until he and his retinue can determine who can be trusted. They arrive at a border outpost to find it has been infested with Weir in greater numbers than anyone has ever seen. These lost, dangerous creatures are harbouring a terrible secret – one that will have consequences not just for Wren and his comrades, but for the future of what remains of the world.New threats need new heroes…The Short ReviewI really liked this book. It has a lot to offer, and I think it’ll appeal to a very wide audience. It has the action and adventure I associate with a good western-themed novel, and it also has some really interesting science fiction and fantasy elements. I found the front end of the book to be a little slow, but once it takes off, it’s a real nail-biter.This is a 4 to a 4-1/2* novel, in my opinion. Almost ranked up there among my favorites, but not quite.The Long ReviewBefore I begin the actual review, I want to make a note for potential readers: Read book one, Three, first. If you’ve already read Three, you might want to consider re-reading it before diving into Morningside Fall. I know some readers will happily dive into the middle of a series and figure things out as they go, but this novel has a good number of references to Three.This isn’t a bad thing. Jay Posey doesn’t spend a great deal of time covering old ground. I like this about the novel, because I get frustrated when there is too much exposition regarding what happened in a previous novel. Some readers might find this disconcerting, however.I’m going to start with the one thing I viewed as a flaw in this book before I wax eloquent about all of the things I really enjoyed about this novel.I found the start of this novel a little slow for my liking. It took me a couple of chapters before I really got sucked into the story.Part of this is my fault.Wren is a young boy–younger than ten years old. He’s in the unfortunate position of being Governor of Morningside. This dichotomy of age, role, and maturity level threw me for a loop. Sometimes, Wren is exceedingly mature and wise for his age. It strained my suspension of disbelief quite a bit. Then there are the moments where Wren acts exactly like I expect a child of his age to behave. This also exists in Three, though I found it was to a lesser extent.I don’t usually read a lot of books where one of the heroes of the novel is so young–especially as a POV character. But, Posey does a really good job balancing these bursts of wisdom and maturity with Wren’s behavior as a child. Wren has circumstances, and a lot of them.He’s a good character.It just took me longer than I like to get behind him and get used to how he is portrayed in Morningside Fall.With the exception of my personal issues with Wren, the characters in Morningside Fall are what really make this novel stand out. They’re different. They’re unusual. They are interesting. Posey’s portrayal of all of the secondary characters is what really brought this book together.When combined with the plot, featuring problems created by the characters and problems from outside influences, it’s a really powerful combination. After the first quarter or so of the book, it becomes a real nail-biter. It took me several sittings to finish the book, and the closer to the end I got, the grumpier I got about having to go to bed. I ended up losing a lot of sleep one night to finish because I couldn’t go to sleep wondering what would happen next.I like when a book does that to me.What really drew me to this book was the mix of elements. It’s post-apocalyptic. It’s a western in styling. It’s science fiction–sometimes rather hard science fiction. It’s a bit of a fantasy, too. The blend of fantastical elements with the science fiction ones, which are in turn harnessed to the western post-apocalyptic setting is a matter of brilliance on Posey’s part. The setting is a character, and by the time the novel ended, I felt like I had walked through the desolation right along with Wren and the other characters.In closing, I want to mention one more thing: I specifically avoided spoilers telling what this story is about, instead relying on the book blurb from the novel for the introduction. This is the type of story where I feel spoiling the events–even the little things–will really take away from the reading of the book. Little things matter in this novel, and the impact of a single conversation or a small event is often huge.This is definitely a book I’ll re-read again. I recommend it for anyone who enjoys a young hero, an action adventure, science fiction, post-apocalyptic, and soft fantasy. I think because this novel so seamlessly melds these elements together, it’s a great introduction series for those wanting to try a hybrid novel out.Morningside Fall defies genre in all of the right ways. This book isn’t quite one of my absolute favorite novels out there, but it’s close — 4 to 4-1/2 * close.Recommended.Note: I received this novel as an ARC from Angry Robot Books in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't like this book as well as the first one; I really had liked Three, and his absence in this book really made a difference. Wren and Cass annoyed me, she was a bit over the top smothering, and Wren seemed a bit like a weenie. Going into the book I had been thinking Wren would be older and total kickass. The mysterious blindfolded man was what kept me going. I am hoping the third book will be as good as the first book.
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  • Den L
    January 1, 1970
    Action packed, lots of fighting and running and fighting. Good light reading. Reminds me of a lot of seinen manga (graphic novel).Unfortunately, found the story itself predictable and the central protagonists at times irritatingly naive. I suppose it makes them human. Sorry mama bear and precocious child protagonist. The secondary characters (the bodyguards) were much more likeable.
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  • Trista Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    The ending is the only thing that saved this book from a 2 star. If you’re going to read it, do yourself a favor and skip to chapter 20. The rest is useless and completely boring. A 500 page books took me longer to read than a 1500.
  • Kimmi Afro Puffs
    January 1, 1970
    A big string of actions scenes with a short story's worth of actual plot. Doesn't live up to expectations set by "Three" which was amazing.
  • Bennie
    January 1, 1970
    Pacing and plot issues. A disappointment after the excellent first novel in the series Three.
  • Krazykiwi
    January 1, 1970
    This is the follow-up to the book Three, which was by far one of my best reads of last year, and this one is taking it's spot as my favourite read for this year. In Three, the child Wren and his drug addicted dying mother Cass are on the run, and find themselves under the wing of the titular Three, a lone gunman who guides them to (relative) safety in Morningside Falls - but at terrible cost.In Morningside Fall, Wren is now the titular governor of the city of Morningside but not everyone is happ This is the follow-up to the book Three, which was by far one of my best reads of last year, and this one is taking it's spot as my favourite read for this year. In Three, the child Wren and his drug addicted dying mother Cass are on the run, and find themselves under the wing of the titular Three, a lone gunman who guides them to (relative) safety in Morningside Falls - but at terrible cost.In Morningside Fall, Wren is now the titular governor of the city of Morningside but not everyone is happy about it. Between a city council that expected him to be malleable and play the figurehead, his having allowed the rabble that had been living outside the city walls to come inside to safety, and his uncanny ability to awaken some of the weir, there's a lot of unhappy people around and some of them have the ability to make life very difficult for Wren and his beloved mother Cass.I was a little apprehensive that without Three around, and with the antagonist Asher apparently defeated and Cass and Wren starting out in a relatively comfortable position, I wouldn't enjoy this book as much, but I was wrong. Wren is in a completely untenable position, a literal child who despite wisdom well beyond his years in a lot of ways, often doesn't understand the politics and motives of those around him as they try to manipulate him. So he is on the run again, this time with a whole team, trying to get back to one of the few places he ever felt truly happy. And everyone knows you can't go home again, so I don't need to tell you how that turns out.There's all the things I liked from the first book - the sparse but incredibly evocative, almost visceral descriptions, the loveable but deeply flawed, even tragic characters. The way everyone is beaten down, exhausted by their ordeals - nobody here is running for 20 kilometres but still up and ready to party right after. People who are hurt, are hurt, they even die, they feel pain.There's still no explanation how the world got the way it is, and I like it better for that. We don't need to know, the characters don't know either, and can't answer. Nobody, not even the weir or the awakened know what the weir really are, so how can we the reader? I can see that not sitting well with some readers, but for me, it's as it should be. I'm sure if Wren ever figures it out, we'll find out right along with him. But mostly, it's just so flat out well-written, I could turn around and read both books start to finish again just to savour them. The new characters do a fine job standing in for Three, but it's a testament to him that it takes a half dozen of them to achieve what he did alone, and in the end, they still can't quite. The repeat characters remain true to themselves as written in the first book (a pet peeve of mine when they don't!).Cass is still an interesting character - despite her enormous abilities, she is mostly passive, and when she stands up for herself (or finally goes into action in a fight) everyone is surprised, including Cass herself--but not Wren. As for Wren, while a little fey and full of surprises and as yet untapped power, he could have easily been a miniature Marty Stu, but he's not. Posey manages to write a child who despite being possibly the saviour of the world has a child's reactions to things: He believes what adults tell him, he understands when adults are just being polite to him--but not why, he trusts, he has overwhelming faith in his mother and that "doing the right thing" and being good will fix everything. You can feel his frustration with his small physical size, they way he's upset over something as small as tripping over and grazing his chin. And he's afraid--still enough a child to want to sleep in his mamma's room after the things that go bump in the night turn out to be carrying a knife.Once again, the ending has everyone in fairly dire circumstances, and there are characters we're probably not going to see again, albeit not as gut-wrenchingly as the first book. And the set-up for the next book is clear.One final comment: I still can't help see these books as typical westerns. I compared Three to the classic plot elements of the western that Will Wright wrote about. If Three was Shane, the epitome of the classic western plot, this is the transitional western: High Noon. Wren's special status and abilities sets him apart, but keep him alienated and rejected by the society he so dearly wants to help. (I could also argue, it follows some of the narrative structure of the vengeance western plot, but I suspect that one is going to be even clearer in book 3. I predict Stagecoach--let's see if I'm right. And I can't wait.)ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • He110Ne0
    January 1, 1970
    **SPOILER FREE REVIEW**In this incredible sequel to THREE, author Jay Posey continues the story of Wren who is quite possibly the most unlikely hero I've read about in a long time.If you read my review for THREE you would know I mentioned that this is not sci-fi that takes time to detail the intricacies of a post-apocalyptic world and its technology. This is a dystopian future for certain. One that has been reduced to rubble, leaving humanity fending for survival in weathered enclaves walled off **SPOILER FREE REVIEW**In this incredible sequel to THREE, author Jay Posey continues the story of Wren who is quite possibly the most unlikely hero I've read about in a long time.If you read my review for THREE you would know I mentioned that this is not sci-fi that takes time to detail the intricacies of a post-apocalyptic world and its technology. This is a dystopian future for certain. One that has been reduced to rubble, leaving humanity fending for survival in weathered enclaves walled off from the zombie-like mechanical/biological hybrid hunter/gatherer monsters known as the Weir. We do not know where they came from, we don't know what happened to Earth. THREE provided some hints but it seems that whatever it was is a distant past that no one left alive has time to remember. The constant threat of extinction runs heavy on each sentence of this story and with it comes a mixture of a Western novel, where settlers face every challenge possible in a quest for survival against nature, mankind, and themselves. I've seen this book get a lot of criticism for its lack of exposition on the details of the world, and I guess in the world of sci-fi that can be a deal breaker. However, I believe there are many ways to approach a genre, and if you want to call it anything "sci-fi lite" would be the best terminology. Much like in my first review, if this is what turns you off about the novel, it's a shame because the story it has to tell continues to be utterly fascinating. Posey is not afraid to be brutal to his cast of characters and no one and nowhere is safe from the touch of loss, dread, and uncertainty. Wren is thrust into the center of attention as Governor of Morningside with his mother Cass as his bodyguard, but at only 8 years old the child is made a figurehead by a Council that is very quickly revealed to be corrupt. Their inevitable exile leads to revelations about a change in the nature of the Weir which roam the Earth that has the potential to end what is left of mankind once and for all. Wren is the key to the survival of the species if he can only figure out how he, himself, works. The writing style of this book is amazing. Posey conveys emotion and intense action in equal measure without any unnecessary fat. Written in omniscient 3rd person, it shifts between many people's POVs and the bond you make to the identity of each character, even passing ones, is made clear in knowing exactly whose voice you're reading. It is a testament to Posey's writing ability that each voice and personality comes through so clearly, especially in the chaos that ensues in this book. Wren particularly, as an eight year old boy, is enough to break your heart and at the same time make you want to support him to the very end. He's an excellently written child character who never becomes annoying or whiny. His growth from THREE is very clear and consistent and he grows even further in this book. The bond between him and his mother, Cass, is also beautifully written in its strength. If you worry about having forgotten any of the details from THREE, the book does a very fluid job of introducing a new set of characters in Wren's personal security team that act as the reader's eyes and ears to remind them of the order of events. Fear not, there are not copy and pasted descriptions or anything that feels redundant, in case you are reading these back back to back. It is a cleverly worked in plot device to make sure you are keeping up with the fast pace of the events and placing tabs on who is who. I would recommend reading THREE first (as I would recommend reading books in order in any series) but I was pleased to see how I didn't have to reach for the first book again to refresh my memory. The writing did it for me. There are precious few sci-fi books I can say that about when I take a break from a series. The ending of this book is less of a cliffhanger, and more of a knife edge pressed against your throat. There is a crescendo to this plot that is waiting just over a terrible horizon. Honestly, the only way I could bring myself to close the book was knowing, as confirmed by the author himself in a Twitter dialogue, that he is even now writing the third novel. This book and its predecessor have become 2 of my favorite books I've read this year. I will recommend them to everyone I know and I hope that anyone who reads this review will give it a chance as well. This is a literary ride you don't want to miss and there's plenty of time to catch up before the finale.
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  • Captain Doomsday
    January 1, 1970
    Please note that this review is a modified version from my blog After The Last Day.The PremiseIts a year or so after the events of the first novel and young Wren has managed to inherit the role of governor of Morningside from his father. He's made some controversial decisions already in his short tenure and hasn't made many people happy with his new-found ability to return some of the Weir back to their old human selves.Soon enough circumstances conspire to send Wren and his mother Cass on the r Please note that this review is a modified version from my blog After The Last Day.The PremiseIts a year or so after the events of the first novel and young Wren has managed to inherit the role of governor of Morningside from his father. He's made some controversial decisions already in his short tenure and hasn't made many people happy with his new-found ability to return some of the Weir back to their old human selves.Soon enough circumstances conspire to send Wren and his mother Cass on the run with a handful of bodyguards, but with the Weir changing their behaviour, nowhere seems safe to run to.What’s so great about it?Just about everything. Morningside Fall is a welcome return to the post-apocalyptic world that was itself a character in the previous title, Three. Here, as with its predecessor, we still don't have the details of how this world came to be. But we don't need them, and its what this series leaves out that really makes it so readable. The lack of overt backstory to almost all of the characters that grace these pages is refreshing and makes for an interesting read.Morningside Fall is everything a sequel should be. The continuity between this entry in the series and Three isn't explained; it's backstory now. Morningside Fall expands the story, adds to the original seamlessly, and escalates the events in the first book. It's execution reminds me of the Alien franchise; the first film was a taut horror thriller, set on one ship. The second film, Aliens, expands that story, sets it on a planet, and dumps a platoon of marines on it. That's what a sequel should be and that's what Morningside Fall delivers.The ending, on reflection, is handled brilliantly and manages to close the story while leaving so much open, just like The Empire Strikes Back. And yes I apologise for all the movie analogies in this recommendation. Much of the author's style lends easy comparison to cinema; tight writing with minimal wastage of words, absorbing action sequences that flow in an easily readable way, and an atmosphere that draws you in and keeps those pages turning. What’s not great about it?The beginning is a little slow until the third chapter, and difficult to get into. It's only momentary. The ending comes too fast and could easily have gone for another hundred pages.Shifting the focus of the novel to Wren's point of view does, of necessity slow the narrative a little, again at the start. But the exploration of his character here is well done and his growth well-realised.Some of the plotting that sets Wren and Cass on the run seems a bit contrived and flimsy, as does the idea of an 8 year old being Governor of a city, but the results of that plotting bear very interesting fruit.Recommended by Captain DoomsdayMorningside Fall and its predecessor Three are very futuristic explorations of the Apocalypse. We don't know what has come before, and we don't know for sure what set the End of the World in motion. But that's what makes them fun, and Morningside Fall in particular lets you discover its futuristic concepts without dishing it out to the reader on a plate. Its an absorbing, entertaining, and very readable exploration of the future fall of mankind.Add to that an atmosphere that screws in the tension tightly and a writing style that keeps pages turning and you've got not only a worthy sequel to Three but an effort worth a Captain Doomsday recommendation in its own right.Morningside Fall is the second volume in the Legends Of The Duskwalker series. If you haven't yet read the first volume, Three, please check out Captain Doomsday's recommendation.
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  • Lynn Williams
    January 1, 1970
    Probably 3.5 Ratinghttp://lynnsbooks.wordpress.com/2014/...Morningside was my weekend read and the follow up to last year's Three which I really enjoyed. If you haven't read Three then beware of potential spoilers.Morningside continues more or less where Three left off. Wren is the new Governor of Morningside and with his mum and his Council struggles to make the right sort of decisions for the inhabitants. Unfortunately, the Council are not quite as straightforward as they may seem and followin Probably 3.5 Ratinghttp://lynnsbooks.wordpress.com/2014/...Morningside was my weekend read and the follow up to last year's Three which I really enjoyed. If you haven't read Three then beware of potential spoilers.Morningside continues more or less where Three left off. Wren is the new Governor of Morningside and with his mum and his Council struggles to make the right sort of decisions for the inhabitants. Unfortunately, the Council are not quite as straightforward as they may seem and following a failed attack on Wren's life Cass has to take action into her own hands. Without wanting to give away the plot Cass and Wren end up back on the wrong side of the walls facing all sorts of life and death situations and finally coming to the realisation that petty politics and bids for authority are the least of everyone's worries.Without wanting to be too negative I didn't enjoy Morningside as much as I did three which is a shame, but not totally unexpected. Part of me thinks second book syndrome had popped up it's ugly head. Three was really quite unique and so anything that follows won't have the same impact because the world is now familiar. And, yet, I don't think that's the case for me with this book. My main issue with this story lies in the fact that Wren and Cass are not really substitutes for Three - they just don't hold the attention in quite the same way. Three was such a good character to read about that you definitely feel his loss when reading Morningside. Plus, to be fair to the author I did have issues with Cass in the first book and they continued to a degree in this one - which I think is more to do with me probably than anything to do with the story. I just, for some reason, find it difficult to like Cass. It's a bit unwarranted and unjustified to be honest. In the first book I found her a little bit irritating and to be frank my feelings towards her haven't really changed. Why, I just really can't put my finger on it. The other thing is the whole idea of a city being run by an eight year old. Okay, it could happen. However, in the world that Posey has created here with the constant walking on a knife edge fear of death at any given time type of situation - I'm really not quite sure that would cut it. I simply think that Wren comes across too young, he's insecure and unsure of himself although he grows in confidence as the book progresses.On the positive side - which I realise I've probably come across as quite critical above The book does find it's feet again - it just takes a little time. We travel back to some familiar territory - where in a number of situations - things have unfortunately deteriorated! We also have a mystery character who seems to slowly be making his way back to Morningside and we have the slow reveal of another mmm, 'baddie' - both these are played in such a way that it leaves a mystery as to who is the good or bad guy in the situation.On the whole a good read. Yes, I didn't enjoy it as much as the first but I'm still interested in finding out how all this ends and the ending of this leaves a perfect set up for the next instalment.I received a copy of this through the publishers courtesy of Netgalley. The above is my own opinion.
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