Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death (Agamemnon Frost, #1)
Book one of Agamemnon FrostLiverpool, 1891Decorated artilleryman Edgar Mason was forced to find new work when the British Empire replaced its foot soldiers with monstrous machines. Now he waits on the Liverpool elite as a personal servant. He has just one rule: he won’t work for fashion-addled dandies.Agamemnon Frost, however, is far from the foppish man-about-town he appears to be. He’s working to protect the Earth from an alien invasion being planned by a face-changing creature known as Pandarus. And on the night he plans to confront the aliens, he enlists Mason to assist him.For a man to love a man is a serious crime in Victorian England. But when Mason meets Frost, his heart thunders and his blood catches fire. And when Pandarus drags the two men into the torture cellars beneath his house of death to brainwash them, Mason’s new passion may be all that stands between him and insanity.The trilogy continues with Agamemnon Frost and the Hollow Ships.

Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death (Agamemnon Frost, #1) Details

TitleAgamemnon Frost and the House of Death (Agamemnon Frost, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 19th, 2013
PublisherCarina
ISBN-139781426895999
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Steampunk, Romance, M M Romance, Historical, Fantasy, Mystery

Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death (Agamemnon Frost, #1) Review

  • Julio Genao
    January 1, 1970
    i dunno, really.it suffered from a reliance on expository dialogue to advance the plot. mostly, i feel like it could have been longer, unfolding at a more naturally visual pace, and thus obviate the need for one character to explain to another character what has happened, what is happening, or what is about to happen.the arc's too short. by the time my feet are settled in the world, the conclusion's come and gone, and the bits i really cared about have only been teased.it reads like the first se i dunno, really.it suffered from a reliance on expository dialogue to advance the plot. mostly, i feel like it could have been longer, unfolding at a more naturally visual pace, and thus obviate the need for one character to explain to another character what has happened, what is happening, or what is about to happen.the arc's too short. by the time my feet are settled in the world, the conclusion's come and gone, and the bits i really cared about have only been teased.it reads like the first segment of a serial, which is only bad inasmuch as it leaves me unsatisfied with the amount of story i got for my money.i'd definitely read more. there's some good character work with the titular character and the narrator, and the dynamic between them is in an interesting state by the end.kind of a rough start, though :-/
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  • Heather K (dentist in my spare time)
    January 1, 1970
    This is one strange little story.What do you get when you combine steampunk with deranged, global domination-minded aliens? You get this book. I had many WTF moments while reading this story but I just decided that this book would be... a learning experience. I'm not much of a steampunk fan but this quickly moved from steampunk to kind of body-snatching sci-fi. It was odd but strangely pleasant. I DID manage to get into the world (as crazy as it was) in a pretty short amount of time. This book i This is one strange little story.What do you get when you combine steampunk with deranged, global domination-minded aliens? You get this book. I had many WTF moments while reading this story but I just decided that this book would be... a learning experience. I'm not much of a steampunk fan but this quickly moved from steampunk to kind of body-snatching sci-fi. It was odd but strangely pleasant. I DID manage to get into the world (as crazy as it was) in a pretty short amount of time. This book is not really a romance and it doesn't have any sex scenes (I know! Boo, hiss!!) but it seems like this series is going to build on what happened between the two MCs here. I kind of felt like this was an intro and not a full story so I left it feeling a bit unfulfilled. Did I enjoy it? Surprisingly, I did. It certainly kept me guessing as to what was going to happen next. **Copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review**
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  • Macky
    January 1, 1970
    This is a strange one to rate and review as I both enjoyed it but also at times found myself a bit overloaded by what was going on in the story. This is a pretty short novella but it packs a hell of a lot in! I found myself fascinated though by the character of Agamemnon Frost who presents himself as a fop and a dandy but underlying is far from either! And there's no doubt that even though there's very little on page sexual encounters, the relationship he has with poor Morgan ( whose life is li This is a strange one to rate and review as I both enjoyed it but also at times found myself a bit overloaded by what was going on in the story. This is a pretty short novella but it packs a hell of a lot in! I found myself fascinated though by the character of Agamemnon Frost who presents himself as a fop and a dandy but underlying is far from either! And there's no doubt that even though there's very little on page sexual encounters, the relationship he has with poor Morgan ( whose life is literally changed when he gets pulled into the mayhem ) simmers with sexual tension.Morgan himself is an interesting character, bi sexual but instantly drawn to Agamemnon who oozes a strong charisma, he also has hidden depths which I think will be expanded over the series. Things in this story are nothing like they seem and the mix of steam punk, Victoriana, and Martians ( yep, I said Martians ! ) is intriguing enough to make me put my pre orders in for the next two and I can see a possibility of my ratings going up to a five star once I start to get my head around the intricacies of the world building.Definitely quirky and most definitely as different as they come, I think I'm probably going to get hooked! And the prices are unbelievably low. This was under a pound and well worth the money. " Take me to your leader! "
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  • Jennifer Lavoie
    January 1, 1970
    YES. That pretty much sums up this book for me. I can't give a better review than just that one word, but for those that do not know me, I will explain. I love the following categories: m/m historical fiction, steampunk, Sherlock Holmes, science fiction with alien life, and mystery. Throw all those things together and you have one explosive book that defies categorization and makes for sheer awesome. THAT IS THIS BOOK. I didn't put it down. I sat and read it in one sitting, and even when I had t YES. That pretty much sums up this book for me. I can't give a better review than just that one word, but for those that do not know me, I will explain. I love the following categories: m/m historical fiction, steampunk, Sherlock Holmes, science fiction with alien life, and mystery. Throw all those things together and you have one explosive book that defies categorization and makes for sheer awesome. THAT IS THIS BOOK. I didn't put it down. I sat and read it in one sitting, and even when I had to move rooms, I carried it and walked while reading to the other room. This book is just amazing, and I am SO GLAD it's part of a trilogy (at least. Please, PLEASE Kim Knox, DON'T STOP THERE!!!) Agamemnon Frost is a great character. As Mason says, he has many masks, and he wears all of them well. When Mason is hired to be his valet for a night at a party, Mason has no idea what he's gotten himself into. Apparently Martians are trying to turn people into automatons and take over the world or something. That part isn't clear because the humans don't know exactly what they're after, either. Which makes it that much more interesting. I loved Mason, too. When he goes through his transfiguration, it's not 100% the way Frost would have liked it, and there are moments when I think all is in despair. But fear not! Frost is too smart and knows what's going on and reacts accordingly. Not only that, but the two men together have some serious sexual tension building. Though there is no acting on it in this book, that was fine with me. The world and character building was enough. I'm hooked. Move over, Sherlock Holmes. There's a new man in town, and his name is Agamemnon Frost!
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  • MLE
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.An interesting story with a refreshingly different premise. I like the mixture of the Victorian style setting and the aliens. It made for fun reading. The plot is well done, but a bit rough in spots. The characters are interesting, and I liked the hints of what Edgar and Agamemnon are going to come to mean to each other. I loved that Agamemnon was much more than he first appeared to be, and it was nice seeing Edgar I received this book as an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.An interesting story with a refreshingly different premise. I like the mixture of the Victorian style setting and the aliens. It made for fun reading. The plot is well done, but a bit rough in spots. The characters are interesting, and I liked the hints of what Edgar and Agamemnon are going to come to mean to each other. I loved that Agamemnon was much more than he first appeared to be, and it was nice seeing Edgar unbend a bit over the course of the story. I’m looking forward to seeing how the story develops from here. Overall a good start to a fun new series.
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  • ᴥ Irena ᴥ
    January 1, 1970
    I am glad I haven’t read the whole book description before reading this.3.5Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death is one of the weirdest stories I’ve read. It all comes down to my expectations. All I knew is this is a steampunk (romance), nothing more. And I am glad. That description tells almost everything about it. It is written in the third person, but seen through the eyes of Edgar Mason, a decorated soldier. Mason is retired now and he works as a manservant. That’s how he ends up with Agame I am glad I haven’t read the whole book description before reading this.3.5Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death is one of the weirdest stories I’ve read. It all comes down to my expectations. All I knew is this is a steampunk (romance), nothing more. And I am glad. That description tells almost everything about it. It is written in the third person, but seen through the eyes of Edgar Mason, a decorated soldier. Mason is retired now and he works as a manservant. That’s how he ends up with Agamemnon Frost.Mason definitely was not prepared for Frost. He expected a dandy and he hates them. When he meets Frost for the first time, Frost sets ‘his teeth on edge’. Unfortunately (or fortunately), Frost drops his dandy mask and Mason soon realizes that he would be better off with a dandy after all. It is funny how he react to Frost. It goes beyond lust. Even when he thinks of Frost as a complete madman, he can’t help wanting him. (view spoiler)[There is no sex in this story, only a few really hot moments between them. (hide spoiler)]'He was insane. Utterly handsome, but completely insane.' There are a few things that are a bit too convenient and weird near the end of the story. Everything seems too sudden and a lot of it was left unexplained. Maybe in the next book(s) we’ll get more information about the enemy. Right now, this is a great start with just enough of the story to make me want to read more.
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  • Valen
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it!While I wanted more, the promise of the sequels made up for any and all disappointments concerning the books length and lack of romantic storyline. Don't get me wrong, there was LOTS of romance, with LOTS of shockingly great character and world development, but the book was too short for me. I like to commit to long-ish novels, so novellas really aren't my thing, but Knox is so talented that the book's length was not a problem at the end of the day.Mason and Frost are cute and endeari I loved it!While I wanted more, the promise of the sequels made up for any and all disappointments concerning the books length and lack of romantic storyline. Don't get me wrong, there was LOTS of romance, with LOTS of shockingly great character and world development, but the book was too short for me. I like to commit to long-ish novels, so novellas really aren't my thing, but Knox is so talented that the book's length was not a problem at the end of the day.Mason and Frost are cute and endearing and sorta perfect for each other even though they just met. It's like the instachemistry that Sherlock and Watson have in BBC's SHERLOCK with Benedict Cumberbitch--er, Cumberbatch, and where the romantic undertones are only playful jabs in SHERLOCK, in Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death, there are no playful suggestions, just full on hot chemistry and wild on the wind romance - but no the cheesy kind. There are aliens, but it makes it so much more intense! It is not silly or dumb, but just the perfect amount of camp! This world is extremely real and wonderful. While the book does have romance and sexual m/m situations, the sextimes are not story fillers, but are rather simply organic and very - - fun...The action is intense, the aliens are crazy and complex, the characters, even the brief side characters, are 3-D and brilliant. Buy, read and love!!This book is a win!Cannot wait for the sequel.-V
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  • Heather C
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, this was crazy!The cover is what first drew my interest to this story, but when I originally read the blurb for this, I was immediately turned off by the Victorian England-slash-alien invasion concept. Then, something kept pulling me back to it over and over, and when I finally realized it would be a trilogy, I decided to give it a try. It's Liverpool in 1891, and Edgar Mason, a former soldier, has been hired for the night to play manservant to Agamemnon Frost, a well-dressed gentleman *co Okay, this was crazy!The cover is what first drew my interest to this story, but when I originally read the blurb for this, I was immediately turned off by the Victorian England-slash-alien invasion concept. Then, something kept pulling me back to it over and over, and when I finally realized it would be a trilogy, I decided to give it a try. It's Liverpool in 1891, and Edgar Mason, a former soldier, has been hired for the night to play manservant to Agamemnon Frost, a well-dressed gentleman *cough* and guest at Sir Randolph's dinner party. Mason soon realizes that ALL things aren't what they seem and the two men soon find themselves on the run...from Martians! I'm going to separate my review into parts: first half and second half...For the first half, the entire first half, I was so lost and confused I almost gave up. There was a lot of "alien speak" and I couldn't figure out what the other characters were going on and on about. Plus, all the Greek references were lost on me. I couldn't visualize any of the alien contraptions, nor could I picture what the bad guys were doing to the MC. It was like all this was written for a higher level of intelligence and my measly, human brain could not comprehend the complexity of it. Like I said, it was a real struggle for me to continue reading. Then, for the second half, like right AT the 50% mark, something changed, and all of a sudden, it was making sense and I was really interested in what was going to happen. The story was still crazy, but by then, it was a fun crazy in a creative and unique way. I now believe that the beginning was meant to be confusing and hard to follow, since we are getting the story from Mason's third person POV, and not necessarily a poor execution from the author. My favorite part of this story was the sexual tension between Mason and Agamemnon. There's lots of heat there that I really hope will finally reach a climax in the next book. (Yes, I can't wait to read it; I must find out what happens). I am really, really intrigued by Agamemnon and want to know more of his secrets; and I want to know what's really going on in Mason's head. I'm giving this one 3 stars for the fact that it failed to hold my interest for a large part of the story. Don't let the historical aspects scare you if that's not usually your thing, because the feel of the story is more science fiction, alternate universe. Reviewed for The Blog of Sid Love
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  • Ilhem
    January 1, 1970
    “One night’s work. Just one”.It takes only one night’s work as Agamemnon Frost’s valet to topple Mason’s world over and tell this story. “One night”. This is a leitmotiv in his mind as he faces want, fear and death. Indeed, “Agamemnon and the House of Death” is a story of want starting suspiciously at first sight and taking roots with a shaving scene (what is it with shaving scenes?!) - golden eyes and smirking mouth, wet skin and offered throat, sandalwood and vanilla, need to taste and rush of “One night’s work. Just one”.It takes only one night’s work as Agamemnon Frost’s valet to topple Mason’s world over and tell this story. “One night”. This is a leitmotiv in his mind as he faces want, fear and death. Indeed, “Agamemnon and the House of Death” is a story of want starting suspiciously at first sight and taking roots with a shaving scene (what is it with shaving scenes?!) - golden eyes and smirking mouth, wet skin and offered throat, sandalwood and vanilla, need to taste and rush of want.I’m quite taken with their chemistry. Truth be told, it’s what I enjoyed the most in this instalment and Mason’s sexual frustration is my first motivation to go on with the series. I want more of the chemistry, provided that the author gives us more insights into her characters and a development of the shifts in their dynamics. Frost particularly is elusive, which is part of his persona, and I want more of him. That’s my second motivation. Fear and Death. It’s also a gothic spy story with the mandatory villain plotting the world domination, whose main plot device is a little…disconcerting. I didn’t really get into this aspect of the story; a part of my brain never lowered the raised eyebrows even though I liked the action scenes in the end. Perhaps book #2 will run more smoothly now that I’m familiar with Frost’s and Mason’s world.All in all, I’m not 100% won over, but this first book left me with expectations.
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  • Secretly Reading
    January 1, 1970
    This is a lovely introduction to what I hope is a long series. The world building is steampunk combined with medical experimentation and captivated me. The leads of Frost and Mason are well introduced here and set up a compelling relationship I hope to read more about. To be honest, the relationship development is secondary to the plot but I was okay with that as what I got was delicious. I absolutely look forward to the next installment of Frost and Mason's adventures and hope it finds them som This is a lovely introduction to what I hope is a long series. The world building is steampunk combined with medical experimentation and captivated me. The leads of Frost and Mason are well introduced here and set up a compelling relationship I hope to read more about. To be honest, the relationship development is secondary to the plot but I was okay with that as what I got was delicious. I absolutely look forward to the next installment of Frost and Mason's adventures and hope it finds them some private time together!*review copy from publisher*
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  • Erin (PT)
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this book because I'd read a review of the second book of this series that sounded interesting. Unfortunately, the first book was bad enough that I'm not sure I have the patience to see if the second book improves on the imperfections of the first. I had four basic problems with this book. First of all, there's just nothing really remarkable about it, nothing that really sets it apart from any other story. Everything that happens is both fairly cliché and predictable. Even the additi I picked up this book because I'd read a review of the second book of this series that sounded interesting. Unfortunately, the first book was bad enough that I'm not sure I have the patience to see if the second book improves on the imperfections of the first. I had four basic problems with this book. First of all, there's just nothing really remarkable about it, nothing that really sets it apart from any other story. Everything that happens is both fairly cliché and predictable. Even the addition of Martians couldn't really make a blip, except as a way to make the technology even more handwavy than usual. Which raises the second problem: the world building and technology. On the one hand, I am really, deeply willing to buy into an author's made up world and technology. On the other hand, the author has to do their part and make it something I can buy into. For much of the story, I felt like Knox felt like she could substitute made up words for actual world-building and even the made-up words frequently lacked a satisfying context—or context soon enough in the narrative—to really enhance the story. I understand that the POV character, Mason, is coming lately into a situation already in play but that's the whole point of a character like that: it gives you the opportunity to explain things to your reader at the same time that you're explaining them to your newbie character in a way that feels (reasonably) natural and organic. To create that character and then fail to explain almost everything is an unforgivable writing failure. And tremendously frustrating. In other ways, the writing is no great shakes. Knox attempts to emulate the language and style of the gaslight era, but I thought it often lacked a necessary clarity and, more importantly, especially for such an action-heavy story, it lacked a lot of the visual cues necessary to give a good grasp of what's going on and where. And in a few places, it just fell down completely, as when (view spoiler)[Frost reveals that the Martian automata conversion machines cannot identify whether a person is already converted or not. Even if my husband wasn't a mechanical engineer, I fully grasp how stupid a concept that is, and Knox's attempts to woo-woo wave it away by saying that the air pollution keeps the machine working properly doesn't hold water any better. There is no engineer in the universe, I imagine, that would create a machine that converts people into automata and then can't tell whether a person has been converted or not. (hide spoiler)] It makes no logistical sense and, at that point, my willing suspension of disbelief was utterly shattered, to no recovery.As well, because Mason is a stranger to the situation and the characters at hand, it stretches believability past the breaking point that he would trust Frost so quickly and unquestioningly—(view spoiler)[so profoundly that it overcomes his automata programming (hide spoiler)]—or that Frost would be so immediately devoted to him, for no logical reason on either side, in turn. In some sense, it's slightly premature to call it love, but there are definitely all the markers and overtones of instant-love, without any sensible justification for it. In fact, (view spoiler)[given that trusting Frost leads to Mason's DEATH, and rebirth as an automata, (hide spoiler)] Mason has every reason not to trust Frost. (view spoiler)[Which was another thing that bothered me, though it's purely personal: I really dislike it when characters are killed off and then reborn in another form—and this is true of vampire stories, too, but more so with cyborgs, robots, automatons, brains in a jar, pod people, etc.—and it's treated as a) no big deal and b) like the replacement is identical to the original person. Again, I realize it's a personal preference and certainly, Mason is not, post-transformation, in a position to mourn his own death, but the fact is the original and real Agamemnon Frost is dead. Mason is dead. All these other people who have been replaced by so-called automata are dead. And what's left is an imitation. A copy. It isn't the same thing and it's both annoying and less interesting when an author fails to acknowledge that in some way. (hide spoiler)]At the end of the day, I guess it all comes down to one, important thing. I wanted to like this book, but instead, I was bored by it. There were other feelings, too, but none so egregious as the feeling of being bored when I was expecting to be entertained.
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  • ttg
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ 39%I usually love mashups that include m/m, steampunk, adventure, romance, etc, but I got almost halfway through this novella, and it just wasn't working for me.You may dig it though, and it's Carina, so very affordable.
  • Nila
    January 1, 1970
    Steampunk, Victorian setting, alien beings, world domination, lots of copper and sexual tension so thick you can see the vapor. Welcome to my alien world of wonderful reading.Agamemnon Frost, foppish and worthless, has hired the worthy ex-soldier Edgar Mason to attend him as his valet for the evening. Mason needs the money and will work for anyone, but he hates men who have no deeper interest than their clothes. But, as he's ushered into Frost's room Frost begins a subtle seduction that has Maso Steampunk, Victorian setting, alien beings, world domination, lots of copper and sexual tension so thick you can see the vapor. Welcome to my alien world of wonderful reading.Agamemnon Frost, foppish and worthless, has hired the worthy ex-soldier Edgar Mason to attend him as his valet for the evening. Mason needs the money and will work for anyone, but he hates men who have no deeper interest than their clothes. But, as he's ushered into Frost's room Frost begins a subtle seduction that has Mason almost enraptured.The country house party is indeed not what it seems. After demonstrating grace and courage when confronted with hosts and guests who are, face it, not the humans they appear to be, Frost and Mason escape, only to be taken captive again. Poor Mason is taken, strapped down and a machine transforms him totally. He appears as before, but he is now made of alien stuff and is a machine. The story has begun. No one is as they seem, Frost is a vital part of a resistance to the aliens who will conquer the earth. It is not by mistake that Mason is now along for the ride, as Frost places extraordinary faith in him and continues to hold him fast in his sexual aura.So, is Mason being seduced as a further pawn, what are the aliens next move, what does Frost know...?Amazing story! Loved it! Every word was a pleasure. Mystified and lost, I didn't care. Frost and Mason forever! ... The next book, please.I listened to this on audio and it was a perfect pairing of words and voice.
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  • Lisa The Novel Approach
    January 1, 1970
    Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death is a fun and fantastical adventure that I could easily give away far too much of. This installment in the series is a blend of dark danger, insidious enemies, a diabolical master, and imagination galore, the beginning of what I hope will be many more installments to come. Kim Knox has delivered a story that’s a little steampunk, a little sci-fi, a lot of action and some out-of-this-world threats, and then has set the story in Victorian England to make it ju Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death is a fun and fantastical adventure that I could easily give away far too much of. This installment in the series is a blend of dark danger, insidious enemies, a diabolical master, and imagination galore, the beginning of what I hope will be many more installments to come. Kim Knox has delivered a story that’s a little steampunk, a little sci-fi, a lot of action and some out-of-this-world threats, and then has set the story in Victorian England to make it just that much more interesting. This all comes together to create a world I can’t wait to dig a little deeper into, complete with two men I can’t wait to get to know better. Because, let me assure you, there’s absolutely nothing common about either of them.If you love steampunk, sci-fi, fantasy, or all of the above, I’d definitely recommend getting to know Agamemnon and Mason yourself.You can read the rest of this review at The Novel Approach
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Hum. Hovering between 3 and 3.5ish.If you're looking for something original and new, then this is for you. The plot was different than anything I've ever read, in a setting that made it completely unique even if it had some "cliche" aspects (which, to my knowledge, it didn't.)The problem? I was horribly confused for most of it. I had no idea what was going on in some of the most important parts, and maybe I just lack the vivid imagination needed to give this book life in one's head... but dang. Hum. Hovering between 3 and 3.5ish.If you're looking for something original and new, then this is for you. The plot was different than anything I've ever read, in a setting that made it completely unique even if it had some "cliche" aspects (which, to my knowledge, it didn't.)The problem? I was horribly confused for most of it. I had no idea what was going on in some of the most important parts, and maybe I just lack the vivid imagination needed to give this book life in one's head... but dang. I was struggling hardcore.That being said, the style of writing was very nice and eloquent, and I'm intrigued if nothing else.
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  • Serith
    January 1, 1970
    Hmm... don't think this book and I are all that compatible.The language was a little too flowery to sound natural. It suited the historically influenced set, however I think this would have been more enjoyable of a read if it was a little lighter on style. That is just me though (could even just be the particular mood I'm in. May try again someday? Hard to say right now).Also the mix of genres was unique, but a touch too mismatched for me in the end. Just wasn't my thing.Beyond all that, the cov Hmm... don't think this book and I are all that compatible.The language was a little too flowery to sound natural. It suited the historically influenced set, however I think this would have been more enjoyable of a read if it was a little lighter on style. That is just me though (could even just be the particular mood I'm in. May try again someday? Hard to say right now).Also the mix of genres was unique, but a touch too mismatched for me in the end. Just wasn't my thing.Beyond all that, the cover is stunning!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This could totally be an episode of Doctor Who ^_^ except that it wouldn't have played out that way because the Doctor would never have done what Agamemnon did.Oh DUH! Not Doctor Who, Torchwood! That's more fitting for several reasons!---You have to follow through to the end of the 3rd story if you want anything to be resolved with Frost & Mason's relationship. The 2nd story has you frustrated and things are not what one would hope between them and then even in the end I personally didn't fi This could totally be an episode of Doctor Who ^_^ except that it wouldn't have played out that way because the Doctor would never have done what Agamemnon did.Oh DUH! Not Doctor Who, Torchwood! That's more fitting for several reasons!---You have to follow through to the end of the 3rd story if you want anything to be resolved with Frost & Mason's relationship. The 2nd story has you frustrated and things are not what one would hope between them and then even in the end I personally didn't find the conclusion of the subject particularly satisfying. If you're interested in the sci-fi plot, then go for it, if your enjoyment hinges on the romance, you may want to pass on this series.
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  • Pixie Mmgoodbookreviews
    January 1, 1970
    4 HeartsReview written for MM Good Book ReviewsEdgar Mason was forced out of the army when the British Empire replace its foot soldiers with monstrous machines. Now he is working any jobs that he can find as a personal servant to the elite of Liverpool. When he finds himself as the personal servant for Agamemnon Frost he thinks the man is a dandified fop who gets his blood racing, but he soon discovers that not everything is as it seems. Agamemnon Frost has an important task to complete, he hate 4 HeartsReview written for MM Good Book ReviewsEdgar Mason was forced out of the army when the British Empire replace its foot soldiers with monstrous machines. Now he is working any jobs that he can find as a personal servant to the elite of Liverpool. When he finds himself as the personal servant for Agamemnon Frost he thinks the man is a dandified fop who gets his blood racing, but he soon discovers that not everything is as it seems. Agamemnon Frost has an important task to complete, he hates that he has to allow Mason to fall into the well placed trap, but his mission to protect Earth must come first and the attraction he feels toward Mason second. And when they fall into the hands of Pandarus their attraction to each other might be the only thing that keeps them alive.This is a great historical science fiction/steampunk story that has aliens trying to take over the British Empire. Mason is a great character who gets drawn into a war that he never knew existed, a war with alien beings who want Earth. Agamemnon is working with a secret movement to stop the infiltration, but it is far from easy when the very Beings he is fighting have developed the technology the British Empire is using to fight their wars. The men have to work together when they are set on being brainwashed by Pandarus, and they try to bring down Pandarus' homebase. Kim Knox has written a story that combines history and science fiction giving it very steampunk feel and giving us the beginning of a complex relationship. Agamemnon is a man who has to hide behind foppish behavior to keep his real agenda, that of an agent who must stop the aliens. Mason is just a soldier who gets pulled into a secret war because of his birth date. Mason just humors Agamemnon at first until he realizes that the man really isn't nuts, and that he is telling the truth about aliens. Mason has a forbidden longing for Agamemnon and it seems to be reciprocated, but first Mason has to follow Agamemnon's lead if he wants to leave the house alive. This really is a great start to the series, it leads you in but has you grasping for information and Agamemnon is stingy with dishing it out. We are left with an anticipation for the future books and what is going to happen with both Mason and Agamemnon. We don't find out everything we want but we are left with a good idea of what has happened to both men and what they have become, and thankfully their attraction is still fierce. I will recommend this to those who love something a little different, aliens and history mixing, a budding relationship and an ending that leaves you reaching for the next book.
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  • Sophia
    January 1, 1970
    What do you get when you combine Steampunk, Sci-Fi and Suspense? A fun creative work that leaves you chomping at the bit for the next installment. I loved the feeling of being on one of those wild roller-coaster rides as I journeyed along with poor Edgar Mason as he tries to figure out what in the world is going on, deals with his sudden lust for his new master and then trust that the man isn't certifiable when he tells Mason that they are playing a deep game against Martians.Mason was once a so What do you get when you combine Steampunk, Sci-Fi and Suspense? A fun creative work that leaves you chomping at the bit for the next installment. I loved the feeling of being on one of those wild roller-coaster rides as I journeyed along with poor Edgar Mason as he tries to figure out what in the world is going on, deals with his sudden lust for his new master and then trust that the man isn't certifiable when he tells Mason that they are playing a deep game against Martians.Mason was once a soldier in the Royal Artillery serving in Afghanistan and India until the automated soldiers pushed him out of his job. Now he's a valet for a temp agency looking for permanent placement with a military gentleman. His one night placement with dandified and frivolous Agamemnon Frost looks to be a serious pain, but he needs the employment and its just for the night. Um, about that...Valeting for Frost, turns into something else entirely really quick. Mason observes that his temporary master is not what he pretends to be. There is a high level of intelligence behind that playful facade. Frost is a wicked temptation for Mason and Frost knows it even reciprocates it. But duty calls and both respond. Frost knows the score and Mason is left to trust him- with his life.As I said, this one opens simply, but goes mysterious pretty fast. I had a vague idea this was to be a steampunk adventure, but then when the aliens were tossed into the mixed I could only laugh and sit back to enjoy where this inventive piece was taking me. The story is told entirely from Mason's perspective leaving Frost a dark horse who one can never be sure of. The sexual tension crackled between the two, but the mission part of the plot is constantly pulling them apart. This was a shorter piece that left a huge loose end leading to the sequel. I can't wait to get my hands on that one.For those who enjoy the unexpected through an unique blend of genres that include Steampunk, Sci-Fi and M/M Romantic Suspense, do give this new series a try.My thanks to Netgalley for providing the book for review purposes.
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  • Christy B
    January 1, 1970
    Even with reading the summary, I still didn't know what I was getting into, here. Steampunk? Aliens? Victorians? Yes, to all of the above.Surprisingly, it all worked. I'm not much into aliens, but I liked this. The centerpiece of all this is the new relationship between Frost and Mason. Mason is thrown into all this when he becomes valet for a night for Frost, who seems to be a fop, but is more so.Mason didn't know what he walked into when he took this job, but it has changed his life forever. T Even with reading the summary, I still didn't know what I was getting into, here. Steampunk? Aliens? Victorians? Yes, to all of the above.Surprisingly, it all worked. I'm not much into aliens, but I liked this. The centerpiece of all this is the new relationship between Frost and Mason. Mason is thrown into all this when he becomes valet for a night for Frost, who seems to be a fop, but is more so.Mason didn't know what he walked into when he took this job, but it has changed his life forever. This is a short book, so I can't give too much away. However, I will say, that the attraction between Mason and Frost happened immediately, due to the length of the book, but I didn't find it forced.This is the first book in a trilogy, I believe. I will definitely be continuing with it.I was provided a galley of this from NetGalley. This didn't affect my opinions.
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  • Ilona
    January 1, 1970
    Complimentary Review Copy Provided by Author The author describes this book very well when she says "Sherlock Holmes meets The Scarlet Pimpernel with Aliens". It's an interesting mix of Historical, Science Fiction and a kind of m/m Romantic Steampunk story that somehow works VERY well. The Characters are wonderful and the storyline is both a little amusing and very intriguing. I really didn't want to put it down once I had started reading it. I think I am a little disappointed that Kim Knox on Complimentary Review Copy Provided by Author The author describes this book very well when she says "Sherlock Holmes meets The Scarlet Pimpernel with Aliens". It's an interesting mix of Historical, Science Fiction and a kind of m/m Romantic Steampunk story that somehow works VERY well. The Characters are wonderful and the storyline is both a little amusing and very intriguing. I really didn't want to put it down once I had started reading it. I think I am a little disappointed that Kim Knox only intends this to be a trilogy. I think it could run and run if the author continues with the same style and passion as this one.
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  • DL
    January 1, 1970
    I don't even know what to say. I spent a good portion of my reading time confused. I like steampunk. Not so much space aliens. And this book combined the two. Still, I liked Mason. Frost, I have no idea what I feel about him. There are two more books. Perhaps I'll find the answers then.
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  • Dhara
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliant sounding plot, and a good cover made me expect far more than this book delivered. I would’ve put up with the choppy writing and illogical plot of not for one major issue. The fact that British Soldiers stationed in India to help maintain British Colonial rule here are constantly glorified is intolerable to me and makes me feel physically sick. The atrocities and massacres and absolute plunder and butchery that the country suffered at the hands of the Colonisers was no Bravery, it was A brilliant sounding plot, and a good cover made me expect far more than this book delivered. I would’ve put up with the choppy writing and illogical plot of not for one major issue. The fact that British Soldiers stationed in India to help maintain British Colonial rule here are constantly glorified is intolerable to me and makes me feel physically sick. The atrocities and massacres and absolute plunder and butchery that the country suffered at the hands of the Colonisers was no Bravery, it was Exploitation and stealing and there was absolutely no cause for glory in it- only shame. Anyone who helped that cause along was simply a criminal.But I am biased in this respect, and it did completely overshadow everything else about this book to me, so perhaps I judge it more harshly than I should. Either way it is a DNF for me.
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  • Lulu
    January 1, 1970
    Story: 7First MC: 7Second MC: 7Secondary characters: 5Mystery: 5Sexual tension: 4Humor: 3Hotness: 2Product placement: Ridiculousness: 5Annoying: 4Audio: 8 (3hr 33min)To re-read: 7Hmmm this is more of a science fiction alien book than a romance. Weird, the story isn't bad but I found myself zoning out. The writing was a bit dull.I'm reading book 2 because I love historical and bought it before reading book one.
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  • Enid
    January 1, 1970
    This book is strange, dark and very intriguing. I'm equal parts curious and disturbed. Looking forward to the next installment.
  • Shanna
    January 1, 1970
    Okay how could I not read this book gay romance set in the Victorian era with aliens. I mean what's not to love. it wasn't quite as good as I could hoping the book was going to be. I am going to continue to finish the series because I want to know what's going to happen with them but I'm hoping the books do get better.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsOne of the things that I love about independent publishers is the risks they are willing to take with their books. A perfect example of this trend is the wonderfully titled, Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death. Our narrator is Mason, a former foot soldier, who is trying to live in world where his particular military skills are no longer needed. He is forced to look for temporary servant work while attempting to figure out his next step in life. It is one of these seemingly normal job 3.5 StarsOne of the things that I love about independent publishers is the risks they are willing to take with their books. A perfect example of this trend is the wonderfully titled, Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death. Our narrator is Mason, a former foot soldier, who is trying to live in world where his particular military skills are no longer needed. He is forced to look for temporary servant work while attempting to figure out his next step in life. It is one of these seemingly normal jobs that starts Mason on what will end up being the adventure of a lifetime because it involves the enigmatic and slightly odd Agamemnon Frost. I loved Mason as a character and especially as the narrator. He is just a regular guy thrown into this weird drama and is trying the survive the best way he can. While there were definitely moments where Mason was confused and demanding, I thought he handled all the weird situations pretty well. I especially liked his reaction to his attraction to Frost.For his part, I thought Agamemnon Frost was a hell of a character! He appears, at first, to be a foppish gentleman who only cares about his outward appearance and his social calendar. But, like many things in this book, things are much more than they seem with Frost. I liked his special brand of bad boy detective and how he slowly revealed that side of himself to Mason. He really reminded me of Doctor Who with his secretive and often manipulative personality that hides softer side.The physical attraction between Frost and Mason was obvious from their first meeting and was a definite highlight for me. I loved how they both accepted the fact that it existed, but resisted doing anything about it for the time being. Kim Knox showed real skill in her depiction of the chemistry in a single glance or brush of the hand which really grabbed my attention in this book. While nothing physical happened in this installment, I can see some fun stuff in the future for Mason and Frost and can't wait to read it!Besides the two main characters and the chemistry between them, I also really enjoyed the unique concept of Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death. Everything was original and confusing (on purpose) which kept me turning pages on my e-reader. The Pandarus made a great villain and I'm excited to see the fall-out from the events at the end of the book. The only real issue I had with this book was the length. It was only 77 pages and a ton of stuff happened (which was great), but it also felt rushed at times. I spent the middle of the story really confused about what happened to Mason and how Frost was connected, etc. which I think could have been avoided with a few more pages of background information.Despite the page-length, I found this book to be a delightfully original and action-packed science fiction tale that sets up what I'm hoping will be a lengthy series. For more reviews, check out my blog: Feminist Fairy Tale Reviews.
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  • Becky Condit
    January 1, 1970
    Comment on Josie's 5 sweet pea review at http://mrsconditreadsbooks.com/index.... Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death by Kim Knox is a wonderful mix of Victorian steam punk and aliens from Mars. Don't knock it until you've tried it!Edgar Mason spent 10 years as a foot soldier for the British Empire. Now finding himself no longer required, his role on the battlefield replaced by machines, he finds employment where he can, working as a personal servant for The Registry. Mason is hired by Sir Ra Comment on Josie's 5 sweet pea review at http://mrsconditreadsbooks.com/index.... Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death by Kim Knox is a wonderful mix of Victorian steam punk and aliens from Mars. Don't knock it until you've tried it!Edgar Mason spent 10 years as a foot soldier for the British Empire. Now finding himself no longer required, his role on the battlefield replaced by machines, he finds employment where he can, working as a personal servant for The Registry. Mason is hired by Sir Randolph Cadwallander to serve as a valet to the dangerously enigmatic Agamemnon Frost when he visits Sir Randolph to attend a very special Twelfth Night dinner party. Mason finds himself drawn to the man from the moment they first meet but Agamemnon Frost is not what he seems, and neither is Sir Randolph Cadwallander or the rest of the guests. It also turns out that Edgar's presence is by design as well.I loved both Mason and Agamemnon. Mason is confused and irritated his attraction to Agamemnon immediate which leaves him very unsettled, he has no idea why he wants Agamemnon so much he just does.Agamemnon is deliciously seductive with his clipped tones and correct disposition, I kept thinking of a cross between Sherlock Holmes and a bohemian Dr Who as I was reading. The chemistry between both men is immediate, and felt in every page.I found the writing style quite delicious, it's crisp and eloquent; the conversations between both men are cryptic, almost flirtatious right from the first moment. I was hooked from the very first page. I don't want to delve too deeply into the plot except to say this is book 1 of a trilogy and they must be read in order, but it's fabulous, dark, tense, action packed, and very intriguing, I've never read anything like it. The story is set in Victorian England, and it's a recognizable Victorian period, not too outrageously steam punk, until you get into the story and start to encounter monsters from outer space, then it's in a world of its own.I have to mention the title and the cover. The title trips of the tongue beautifully and the cover is gorgeous, so evocative of the story. I can't wait for the saga to continue in the next book, Agamemnon Frost and the Hollow Ships.I've also seen the audiobook on Audible, at a very competitive price, it's released on the same day as the book, something I applaud Carina Press for doing. Whatever your passion, reading, or listening, pick up a copy of Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death by Kim Knox, and hang on for the ride, I guarantee you won't be able to put it down.
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  • pbj
    January 1, 1970
    I want to give Agamemmnon Frost and the House of Death more than just three stars because it tries to break away from the genre rut and boldly go where no MM romance has gone before... but I can't.I love the idea of this book - steampunk, alien invasion, romantic gay thriller. Unfortunately, it just doesn't do any one of these things well enough to feel complete.The beginning of the book is wonderful. Mason, an ex-soldier made obsolete by new-fangled steampunk technology, finds temporary work th I want to give Agamemmnon Frost and the House of Death more than just three stars because it tries to break away from the genre rut and boldly go where no MM romance has gone before... but I can't.I love the idea of this book - steampunk, alien invasion, romantic gay thriller. Unfortunately, it just doesn't do any one of these things well enough to feel complete.The beginning of the book is wonderful. Mason, an ex-soldier made obsolete by new-fangled steampunk technology, finds temporary work through an agency specializing in servants for the upper crust. He longs for a permanent position with a military man - preferably one leaving for a post far away. He is hired for the evening to attend Agamemmnon Frost, a well-dressed social butterfly who recently lost his valet to an aeolipile accident.What's an aeolipile? Well, that's where my problems started with the book.The steampunk aspect of the story is not just window dressing, the machines and their origins are integral to the plot. Mason doesn't know about this secret world and it's through his eyes that we learn all about it. Unfortunately, although I loved the flavor of Kim Knox's writing, I was often confused by what was taking place. All the way through the dinner, I was riveted to the story, but as soon as the action started, I was lost - too many made up words mixed with references to classic literature and ancient Greek. I found myself stopping and starting to ask "Do I know this word? Has this been explained before? Do I know who this character is? Is this another name for someone that I've met?"This may seem like a nitpick, but the irregular use of italics did not help my reading comprehension. Italicizing made up words like Kardax or Koile makes sense, but when you then also italicize Ilarches and Thyreos and Pezos or more randomly wanted, never, idea, we or any other word that somehow demands emphasis, I lose what should be a visual guidepost to aid me as a reader. There's much in the book that feels like an homage to Sherlock Holmes (in a good way), so I happily rode along with it even though I felt like I didn't understand why or what was happening. In the end I enjoyed it although I still feel that the 'transformative' event made no sense at all.
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  • Online Eccentric Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death, first in a series of short novellas, was a very different kind of animal; in this case, a good kind. Aliens, ray guns, sci fi, mystery, spies, thriller, steampunk, and gay main protagonists - what's not to love? And while that many ingredients could make the plot rather overcooked, author Kim Knox somehow manages to pull it off. But be warned - it does stop just as things are starting to get going.The perspective is told from an ordinary Joe - a former sol Agamemnon Frost and the House of Death, first in a series of short novellas, was a very different kind of animal; in this case, a good kind. Aliens, ray guns, sci fi, mystery, spies, thriller, steampunk, and gay main protagonists - what's not to love? And while that many ingredients could make the plot rather overcooked, author Kim Knox somehow manages to pull it off. But be warned - it does stop just as things are starting to get going.The perspective is told from an ordinary Joe - a former soldier named Mason looking for a manservant job in a time when jobs are hard to find (the army having been replaced by machines). He takes a one-night assignment for a gentleman visiting the estate of a nobleman. But as soon as he is told by the enigmatic Agamemnon Frost that the house is full of disguised aliens, the night is going to be full of excitement.The story is told in a very interesting way - Knox does an excellent job of channeling a very real male Victorian character (think the valet in Downton Abbey) in the protagonist. We're only given his point of view, so the unraveling of the sequence of events is given a great languid reveal. We're not sure what Agamemnon's game is more than Mason does. But that single POV was also a bit frustrating because Frost is meant to be enigmatic - but he ends up more as a cypher. Mason has a history of sexual ambiguity (bisexual) but clearly is very attracted to Frost. On the other hand, Frost does nothing except charm, seduce, and play with nearly every character in the story. I kind of wondered what Mason saw in Frost that was so attractive as a result. Frost is very distant and remote - methodical, callous, and single minded. I would have liked to see a touch of reciprocation rather than opportunistic pecks that always seem to be interrupted. I guess it will have to come in later novels.I can say for certain: whatever you think this book is going to be wrong. It was perhaps the most wholly original and creative plot that I have read in years.
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