Where They Bury You
In August 1863, during Kit Carson’s roundup of the Navajo, Santa Fe’s Marshal is found dead in an arroyo near what is now the Hubbel Trading Post. The murder, and the roughly million of today’s dollars in cash and belongings in his saddlebags, is historically factual. Carson’s actual explanation is implausible.Who did kill Carson’s “brave and lamented” Major? The answer is revealed in this tale of a group of con artists operating in 1861-1863 in the New Mexico and Arizona Territories. As a matter of historical fact, millions of today’s dollars were embezzled from the Army, the Church, and the New Mexico Territory during this time. In this fictionalized version, the group includes a Santa Fe poker dealer with a checkered past claiming to fall in love with one of her co- conspirators, and the historically accurate duo of the Marshal of Santa Fe and the aide de camp of the Territories’ Commanding General. It is an epic tale of murder and mystery, of staggering thefts, of love and deceit.Both a Western and a Civil War novel, this murder mystery occurs in and among Cochise’s Chiricahua Apache Wars, the Navajo depredations and wars, Indian Agent Kit Carson’s return from retirement, and the Civil War. The story follows the con artists, some historical, some fictional, during their poker games, scams, love affairs, and bank robberies, right into that arroyo deep in Navajo country.

Where They Bury You Details

TitleWhere They Bury You
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 2nd, 2013
PublisherSunstone Press
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Westerns, Fiction, Mystery

Where They Bury You Review

  • Richard Epstein
    January 1, 1970
    Not at all a bad novel, but I am about to abandon it anyway, deterred by pretty much the worst proofreading I've ever encountered from a commercial press. I survived "horses reigns" for "horses' reins." (Who should be blamed for this sort of thing?) But now this: "The girl immediately jumped up and ran through the line of soldiers screaming epitaphs [!!] at them." Great Googly Moogly!
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  • Hunter Jones
    January 1, 1970
    True Confession: I have seen more Clint Eastwood westerns than Johnny Depp movies; even seeing one of Mr. Eastwood's movies over 100 times. I LOVE this genre. Based on that AND the fact that a First Edition of Lonesome Dove still holds a rose from my prom, yes...it's safe to say I know and enjoy a great Western. However, placing personal feelings aside, Where They Bury You offers an adventure to us as readers. It will take you to a place in the past where survival was the story. If you could get True Confession: I have seen more Clint Eastwood westerns than Johnny Depp movies; even seeing one of Mr. Eastwood's movies over 100 times. I LOVE this genre. Based on that AND the fact that a First Edition of Lonesome Dove still holds a rose from my prom, yes...it's safe to say I know and enjoy a great Western. However, placing personal feelings aside, Where They Bury You offers an adventure to us as readers. It will take you to a place in the past where survival was the story. If you could get a little love and security along the way, even better. The research of this novel--the details, the experiences, the story as told by Kohlhagen, of the shifting social changes of the era--offer a new depth in understanding the struggles of the time. Mr. Kohlhagen's research has absolutely taken me by surprise. A very pleasant surprise.I highly recommend this book to you.
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  • Marissa DeCuir
    January 1, 1970
    This is historical fiction done right - and you can tell the author really did his research. Take a trip back to the old West and see what may have really happened under Kit Carson's reign.
  • PopcornReads
    January 1, 1970
    Book Review & Giveaway: Have you ever read a historical account and felt in your gut that something about it just didn’t sound right? That’s what led Steven W. Kohlhagen to write Where They Bury You. What he read in Kit Carson’s report about August 1863’s events didn’t make sense to him, so he began to do some research. The question he kept asking himself was “Did the Navajo really shoot Santa Fe’s Provost Marshall, Joseph Cummings?” The result is a mystery novel based on historic facts and Book Review & Giveaway: Have you ever read a historical account and felt in your gut that something about it just didn’t sound right? That’s what led Steven W. Kohlhagen to write Where They Bury You. What he read in Kit Carson’s report about August 1863’s events didn’t make sense to him, so he began to do some research. The question he kept asking himself was “Did the Navajo really shoot Santa Fe’s Provost Marshall, Joseph Cummings?” The result is a mystery novel based on historic facts and a very real murder, all set amid the turbulence that made up the very wild but very real West during the Civil War. Sound interesting? Well, even better, we’re hosting a giveaway with the copy of Where They Bury You that we received, so go to http://popcornreads.com/?p=6494 to enter to win it!
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  • Pamela Mclaren
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting tale of the 1863 death of Santa Fe's Provost Marshal, Maj. Joseph Cummings and the finding of what would be about one million in today's dollars that he was carrying at the time. From this historical 'fact,' and with the retelling of the period — the beginning of the Civil War and the ongoing Indian wars — in which it happened, Kohlhagen has developed a creates a credible scenario of Cummings working with four other individuals to embezzle the U.S. Army, the Church and others. Who ki Interesting tale of the 1863 death of Santa Fe's Provost Marshal, Maj. Joseph Cummings and the finding of what would be about one million in today's dollars that he was carrying at the time. From this historical 'fact,' and with the retelling of the period — the beginning of the Civil War and the ongoing Indian wars — in which it happened, Kohlhagen has developed a creates a credible scenario of Cummings working with four other individuals to embezzle the U.S. Army, the Church and others. Who killed the major? And how did he manage to get this much money? While the story is interesting and thought provoking, I found myself conflicted and not sure why. Perhaps its because there is just so much going on — no smooth transitions — so many individuals brought into the story, no back stories explaining the main characters. And there is the major distraction that this story was apparently never properly edited and filled with typos, grammatical errors and loads of excess material that if it had been excised might have been a better read. I wanted this to be a story I could really get into .... I was already interested in learning more. But the author didn't help me or the story in getting to the heart of the times or the story itself. When I was more interested in one of the secondary stories — of Kit Carson, who tried numerous times to retire from being the Indian agent in the territory of Arizona, and the poor treatment of the Native Americans in the hands of the Army — that tells you something about what should have been front and center and wasn't. A good first effort that needed help to make it really shine.
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  • Baglady
    January 1, 1970
    Based on the summary and prologue, I thought I would enjoy this reality-based fiction of the old west - used to love Zane Grey type stories, thought reality would do it one better. But I got lost in the complexity of a series of scams which I did not clearly understand and lost the plot. I enjoyed the characterizations of people and places, and kept reading to learn the fate of some sub-characters.
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  • Tom
    January 1, 1970
    Just not that good.
  • Audra (Unabridged Chick)
    January 1, 1970
    While Westerns and cowboys-and-Indians stories are not genres I'm drawn to, I am interested in the history of the western US in the 19th century. I lived in South Dakota during the filming of more than one cowboys-and-Indians movie (including Dances with Wolves), which provoked conversations about how we view that time and talk about the people, decisions, and events that unfolded. As a result, when I read book set during this era, I want a more nuanced look at the circumstances and people.Happi While Westerns and cowboys-and-Indians stories are not genres I'm drawn to, I am interested in the history of the western US in the 19th century. I lived in South Dakota during the filming of more than one cowboys-and-Indians movie (including Dances with Wolves), which provoked conversations about how we view that time and talk about the people, decisions, and events that unfolded. As a result, when I read book set during this era, I want a more nuanced look at the circumstances and people.Happily, I got that, and more, in this book. I was intrigued by this novel for the historical mystery offered: in 1863, the US Marshal in Santa Fe was killed during a skirmish with the Navajo, with what would be almost a million dollars today on his person. While Kit Carson and the official record says nothing else about this incident or the money, Kohlhagen was curious about the 'real' story. I anticipated a historical thriller with more conspiracy elements, a la Timothy O'Brien's The Lincoln Conspiracy, but this is actually a rather robust and detailed historical novel of Civil War-era New Mexico and Arizona, and the tenuous, complicated relationship between the white Americans, the various Native American tribes, and the Mexicans in the area.I don't think I can succinctly summarize the plot, which seems rather complicated, but in Kohlhagen's hands, unfolds neatly. Covering about two years (1861 through 1863), the novel opens with a oh-god-please-don't-be-so-dumb incident (which is historical) that sets off the violent and tragic turn of events. In Arizona, a green Army officer starts a war with the Apache when he accuses their chief, Cochise, of kidnapping a rancher's child and holds Cochise's family as hostage. While that trouble boils down south, in Santa Fe, a group of gamblers fleeing their pasts (either in California or out East), come together and form a plot to get rich. The tensions in the US over the Lincoln presidency, the succession of states in the south, and the question of slavery touch New Mexico and Arizona as well.Kohlhagen's writing was very approachable, which I appreciated, since I tend to get glazed eye over army and/or battle scenes, and he balances the big conflict (wars) with the smaller one (the con). I found I 'knew' the characters, which was quite a feat given the cast! (It didn't hurt that Kohlhagen includes a list of who's who at the start and separates the two -- thankfully -- so I didn't spend hours googling Lily Smoot, his fictional gambler mastermind.) Kohlhagen manages to avoid the info dump, although now and then there's a rare narrative hiccup that sticks out (when he introduces Kit Carson to the story, for example, he mentions Carson is 'the most famous of the early 19th Century explorers, trappers, scouts, adventurers, and Indian fighters', which is probably true, but feels odd as it doesn't fit the style Kohlhagen used up to that point.). Otherwise, I liked the writing, which was short, immediate, and punchy.A very quick read (it has about 312 pages), this book surprised me in the best way. Great historical details and a breakneck plot, it's a great read. For those who might not be immediately drawn to this era, consider this book as an intro -- lots of drama, mood, ambiance, and a tough female heroine to keep one hooked.
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  • Roxanne Kade
    January 1, 1970
    I have always loved Westerns, and I used to love watching North and South when I was little, so this book was a really exciting read for me. The history of this era has always fascinated me. Kohlhagen's mix of fact and fiction made the story come alive, making me feel like I was right alongside these amazing historical figures who shaped the future on the United States. My knowledge of the Civil War is not vast, and war is always ugly, but my gosh, the thousands of lives lost within a two year s I have always loved Westerns, and I used to love watching North and South when I was little, so this book was a really exciting read for me. The history of this era has always fascinated me. Kohlhagen's mix of fact and fiction made the story come alive, making me feel like I was right alongside these amazing historical figures who shaped the future on the United States. My knowledge of the Civil War is not vast, and war is always ugly, but my gosh, the thousands of lives lost within a two year span was just devastating. It seemed like everyone in that time was out to kill someone, and what made it worse was that a lot of the people involved knew each other personally at one time or another, yet they acted like strangers in the face of war. There were many amazing characters within the pages of this story, and they each had their own battle, or two, to fight, but I never once felt overwhelmed or lost with everything that was going on. I have to say that out of all the characters, Lily was my favorite. She was feisty and knew how to hustle just about everyone around her. She played a great game with those she was in cahoots with, but I also had to admire her loyalty to Damours. She didn't necessarily give a damn about being loyal in a physical sense, but her heart was in the right place, and she was always looking out for him, even when she could have easily kicked him to the curb. Cummings, for me, was the most loathsome character. He gave me a bad vibe off the bat and my dislike for him grew right to the end of the story. He was spineless, deceitful and a little creepy. This book is an action-packed, murder mystery adventure, and at times a little chaotic (and I mean that in a good way). Kohlhagen has masterfully captured history, adding his own twist on factual events, and readers will be totally enthralled.
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  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    Soon after I began "Where They Bury You" I realized that this piece of historical fiction was no masterpiece, but I continued to enjoy it through the conclusion. The characters are interesting if underdeveloped, and the story is all over the place but is going places you want to go anyway and doesn't spend too much time in any one place long enough to get boring. This has that feel of a first novel, although the author has good instincts. That instinct is borne out in his selection of setting, t Soon after I began "Where They Bury You" I realized that this piece of historical fiction was no masterpiece, but I continued to enjoy it through the conclusion. The characters are interesting if underdeveloped, and the story is all over the place but is going places you want to go anyway and doesn't spend too much time in any one place long enough to get boring. This has that feel of a first novel, although the author has good instincts. That instinct is borne out in his selection of setting, the historical killing of a US Marshal carrying a suspicious amount of cash during the clash of warring Indian tribes of the Southwest during the Civil War. Into this setting he drops his characters, motivations, & plot to try to compete with a truth that rivals most fictions. I'll probably be hunting down more non-fiction works on this period now.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    This book grabbed me early on and kept me interested throughout. This is an epic story of New Mexico (and Texas) around the time of the Civil War. There is so much going on with groups of people interacting and fighting; all trying to find a way to survive in the harsh, dryness of the beautiful desert. Sometimes, I had trouble keeping all the factions and leaders straight in my head. The author's knowledge of the period clearly shines through and the story is crafted in such a way that it is nev This book grabbed me early on and kept me interested throughout. This is an epic story of New Mexico (and Texas) around the time of the Civil War. There is so much going on with groups of people interacting and fighting; all trying to find a way to survive in the harsh, dryness of the beautiful desert. Sometimes, I had trouble keeping all the factions and leaders straight in my head. The author's knowledge of the period clearly shines through and the story is crafted in such a way that it is never boring or dry.I enjoyed the book immensely and was glad for the opportunity to dive into the sequel so I could find out more about the characters and the events that shaped the country, the tenacious settlers, and the others struggling to hang on to a disappearing way of life and lawlessness.This book was given to me in exchange for my honest review.Reviewed by Laurie-J
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  • Nae
    January 1, 1970
    This is one heck of a good, good book, and I have no doubt it is going to make one heck of a good movie as well. This author successfully paints a graphic, gritty picture of what it was like in the West at the time the Civil War started. It is a true whirlwind of a story! He peopled with larger than life true western characters, Kit Carson, Cochise, Geronimo, honestly pictures the struggle to relocate understandably reluctant Indians onto reservations; tossed in branches of both Union and Confed This is one heck of a good, good book, and I have no doubt it is going to make one heck of a good movie as well. This author successfully paints a graphic, gritty picture of what it was like in the West at the time the Civil War started. It is a true whirlwind of a story! He peopled with larger than life true western characters, Kit Carson, Cochise, Geronimo, honestly pictures the struggle to relocate understandably reluctant Indians onto reservations; tossed in branches of both Union and Confederate armies (while I knew many Southerners relocated to Texas and other western states after the war, I had absolutely no idea these 2 armies actually fought battles in the West) against what had to be one of the most stunning con games ever seen in the West up until that time ... ohhhh it is a juicy, gutsy, rollicking read :)
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  • Julie Schoerke
    January 1, 1970
    Ii had ben years since I had read or watched a Western and it all came back to me why I love them! The author has done his research and it's a fascinating story based on a real events (or, what ifs). The main character, Kit, was compared to the Amy Adams' character in AMERICAN HUSTLE. Although the stories couldn't be more different - 1860s history vs. 1970s groovy grifting - I appreciate the comparison. If you love adventure and you want a page turner, you'll find it between the cover of Where T Ii had ben years since I had read or watched a Western and it all came back to me why I love them! The author has done his research and it's a fascinating story based on a real events (or, what ifs). The main character, Kit, was compared to the Amy Adams' character in AMERICAN HUSTLE. Although the stories couldn't be more different - 1860s history vs. 1970s groovy grifting - I appreciate the comparison. If you love adventure and you want a page turner, you'll find it between the cover of Where They Bury You.
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  • Nina Chambers
    January 1, 1970
    A great "sequel" to Blood & Thunder, focusing on Civil War history of NM, Santa Fe's Fort Marcy & points north & south, with Kit Carson, Cochise, Mangas Coloradas & other major players of the period. Great historical accuracy.
  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    A story of the Civil War out west. Great historical fiction. Real historical figures, such as Kit Carson, play a huge role in the story. Can definitely recommend.
  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Review pending 30 days wait period from Author's Alliance
  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    Good historical fiction based on events in New Mexico during the American Civil War including Indian wars, a Confederate invasion, and embezzlement on a large scale.
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