Suicide Risk, Vol. 1
Even when there are only villains, being a hero makes you a...Eisner Award-nominated writer Mike Carey (UNWRITTEN, X-MEN: LEGACY) brings his first original ongoing series to BOOM! Studios! Heroes are dying, and cops are dying twofold. Humanity is underpowered in the face of their onslaught, and people are suffering untold casualties trying to stem the flow. After barely surviving a super-powered bank heist gone horribly wrong, beat cop Leo Winters vowed to try and find a way to stop them. Following a lead, he discovered two lowlifes who seemed to be able to grant a person powers...for the right price. Thing is: you don't get to choose which power. It's seemingly random, a crap-shoot, a risk. Will Leo decide to take that risk? And why is it that even the heroes in this world eventually break&? Eisner Award nominated writer and novelist Mike Carey (UNWRITTEN, X-MEN: LEGACY) and rising star Elena Casagrande (HULK, HACK/SLASH) deliver a smart, mind-bending deconstruction of the superhero genre that will have you questioning your definition of a hero. This volume, featuring a cover by Tommy Lee Edwards (TURF, MARVEL 1985), collects the first four issues of the critically-acclaimed series.

Suicide Risk, Vol. 1 Details

TitleSuicide Risk, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 22nd, 2013
PublisherBOOM! Studios
ISBN-139781608863327
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Mystery, Crime, Graphic Novels Comics

Suicide Risk, Vol. 1 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Is the title a warning that the reader might just give up all hope somewhere in the book and decide to end it all for good?Leo is that most interesting of character archetypes, an ordinary cop, who lives in a world where the supervillains massively outnumber the superheroes, for some reason. During a bank robbery, his partner’s arm is cut off and several colleagues lose their lives. Though incensed, how could an ordinary cop take on supervillains with their powers? Luckily for Leo he finds a way Is the title a warning that the reader might just give up all hope somewhere in the book and decide to end it all for good?Leo is that most interesting of character archetypes, an ordinary cop, who lives in a world where the supervillains massively outnumber the superheroes, for some reason. During a bank robbery, his partner’s arm is cut off and several colleagues lose their lives. Though incensed, how could an ordinary cop take on supervillains with their powers? Luckily for Leo he finds a way to somehow become a superhero himself. Now, the hunt is on to take the fight to the bad guys and make them pay - by boring them to death! Suicide Risk was the most garbled, confusing comic I’ve read in quite some time. I have nothing but questions over the bizarre storytelling choices of Mike Carey. For instance, why are there so many more supervillains than superheroes? Why do so many “turn” evil? It’s never explained. Not that you really care – these characters, superhero or villain, are laughable at best. The supervillains go by: Grudge War, Dr Maybe, Diva, Voiceover, The Alchemist and Memento Mori. The worst names you’ve ever seen in a comic? Hold on! The one superhero who shows up has the stupidest name of them all: Extended Remix! I re-read that page multiple times to make sure that was his name and not some weird line, but no, it is! Extended Remix?! Is that why superheroes become supervillains - so they can have a slightly less embarrassing name? But then, Dr Maybe… no. I guess Mike Carey’s just a crap writer. These tools barely qualify as ciphers, you learn so little about them. And if they’re so capable at dealing with every threat thrown their way from police to superheroes and everything else, why do they stop at robbing banks – why aren’t they running the world or something from some tropical island fortresses? Instead they live in flats! Sure, “nice” flats, but still – not even a house? That’s the end of their “story” by the way: the supervillains rob a bank, kill some police, then do nothing while Leo gets superpowers and hunts them down. They’re basically just props.How does an ordinary guy get powers to become an Electro clone? He finds a random number by chance, dials it, somehow convinces the two goons who show up with a magic wand to tap him on the head and faster than you can say Hey Presto! he’s floating in the air and shooting lightning bolts. But he can’t use his powers too much because he can’t control them yet and he might die – he’s a Suicide Risk. Excuse me while I try to stop my eyes from rolling out of my head.Up to this point I was bored senseless with the clumsy plotting, non-characters, and below-average, totally uninteresting script. But here’s where the series took a fatal nosedive which made sure I wouldn’t continue past this first volume. A goddess who’s some kind of ancient superhero says that she and Leo lived a past life together as gods and he’s just forgotten?! Then she demands he murder his family before they can be together?!?! And she’s a good guy or something!?!?!?!? WHaAaAaAaatTt?!?!?!There are other scenes that didn’t make sense to me before this, uh, “big reveal”. Like when the actual detectives assigned to investigate the supervillains go to visit The Alchemist, knowing his superpower is to alter peoples’ brain chemistry and that he’ll probably make them like him and totally forget to question him properly – which he does – and yet they make no attempt otherwise to offset this. How. Dumb. Are. They. Also a dog is killed which is something I hate seeing.But Suicide Risk Volume 1 was the definition of sloppy. The story is just all over the place and fails to have any aspect of its nonsense make sense by itself let alone mesh with another. The result is pure bafflement and tedium. Part of it felt like Gotham Central (the supervillains vs ordinary cops), and part of it felt like Incognito (the divisions within the supervillain world), both of which are coincidentally Ed Brubaker comics that I didn’t care for. But Suicide Risk tries to emulate the two and comes up short. Not that either series is that good, but a crap facsimile of the two mashed together? What codswallop – I hated this stupid comic! Oh and the “story” ends in the middle of an action sequence - great timing, idiots! The characters are in a location that’s falling down around them, they say something redundant like “quick, we’ve gotta get out of here!” and then it ends. It couldn’t be less satisfying. I mean, how annoying is that, when everything just
    more
  •  Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't like this as much as I expected. I like the idea of normal people getting powers and becoming superheroes and villains, but the storyline just got weirder and less coherent as it went along. I love the concept of super-powered individuals, and it was interesting how Carey taps into the dark side of that. Similar to what Brandon Sanderson did with Steelheart and Mark Waid with Irredeemable, Vol. 1. It's a scary thought when people have super powers and they are mentally unstable or just I didn't like this as much as I expected. I like the idea of normal people getting powers and becoming superheroes and villains, but the storyline just got weirder and less coherent as it went along. I love the concept of super-powered individuals, and it was interesting how Carey taps into the dark side of that. Similar to what Brandon Sanderson did with Steelheart and Mark Waid with Irredeemable, Vol. 1. It's a scary thought when people have super powers and they are mentally unstable or just plain evil. The damage they can do is incalculable. So I could understand the lead character's motivations on that score, but over time, the story just made less and less sense, and it took a right turn that I didn't like towards the end. The artwork was pretty good, but I didn't find much to enthrall me about the story overall. I'm not sure if I will continue reading this series.This is a preliminary review. I may add more later.
    more
  • Lono
    January 1, 1970
    Suicide Risk is an interesting mix of Brian Bendis's Powers and Ed Brubaker’s Incognito set in Mark Millar’s MillarWorld universe. I don’t think that makes this book as original an idea as some of the other reviewers on Goodreads seem to think it is. However, this does make Suicide Risk a reasonably satisfying cocktail consisting of a few of my favorite comic series and themes. Mark Carey establishes the groundwork for his new series in this collection of Suicide Risk issues 1 through 4. It foll Suicide Risk is an interesting mix of Brian Bendis's Powers and Ed Brubaker’s Incognito set in Mark Millar’s MillarWorld universe. I don’t think that makes this book as original an idea as some of the other reviewers on Goodreads seem to think it is. However, this does make Suicide Risk a reasonably satisfying cocktail consisting of a few of my favorite comic series and themes. Mark Carey establishes the groundwork for his new series in this collection of Suicide Risk issues 1 through 4. It follows a “normal” cop, Leo Winters, as he looks to get payback from a bunch of super-powered villains that done him wrong. This takes him down an unexpected road that leads deeper into where these supervillains came from and forces him to take a look into his own clouded past. Not wanting to give too much away, I’ll leave it at that. Carey is taking his time laying the foundation for his world in this collection and it took me a couple issues to really buy in. This one certainly picks up towards the end and concludes with a cliff-hanger, so I’m definitely curious to see where Carey is going with this series. Elena Casagrande is completely new to me and she does a good job. Her art suits the series well and I liked it more as the book went on.Suicide Risk is probably a safe bet for Powers or Incognito fans. The series is fairly fast paced with enough action to keep it humming along nicely. Now that Carey has completed the required underpinning, I’m pretty confident I’m going to dig Suicide Risk Vol. 2 even more than the first one. Get this review and more at:
    more
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    This book should not have been this good. It contained a number of things we've seen before (in Irredeemable, The Boys, Powers and Gotham Central) that should have felt copycat and tired. Plus Carey has been doing his thing with Unwritten for such a long stretch, and hasn't done a big capes book in long memory - he should've been shitty at this.Instead this feels like something he's been working on for a long stretch - a fully-formed world that makes a helluva lot more sense than anything should This book should not have been this good. It contained a number of things we've seen before (in Irredeemable, The Boys, Powers and Gotham Central) that should have felt copycat and tired. Plus Carey has been doing his thing with Unwritten for such a long stretch, and hasn't done a big capes book in long memory - he should've been shitty at this.Instead this feels like something he's been working on for a long stretch - a fully-formed world that makes a helluva lot more sense than anything should in book one.The characters have an inner life, and a solid confidence, that are not typical for a new universe formed from whole cloth. As much as I love much of Mark Waid's capes work, his Irredeemable strikes me now (years after reading some of it) as something that started out stiff and painful, getting better (and then worse) with age. (But maybe I'm thinking of all that TV I watch that never feels natural until half a season in.)I'm absolutely intrigued by the supernatural and mythological elements in this story, and I can't wait to burn through the next two volumes I have here (even though it means I might have a hard time coughing up a decent review for them - hard to speed-read *and* have enough presence of mind to remember anything funny, weird or otherwise notable enough to distinguish my thoughts from everyone else who's loving these books - so sad, what a tough problem to have you whiner).Makes me wonder where I'd be in life if I hadn't stopped reading The Unwritten when is first caught up on it. I'd probably be some sex magic master or a be ruling an empire from space. Those are probably OK reasons to go re-read Unwritten vols 1-4 and keep moving. Or I could just keep carving that ass groove in the couch. There's the ambition I was forgetting.
    more
  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    What started off as a decent idea quickly went into....something. This is a world where superheroes are not really happening, instead super villains taking over. Tons of evil bastards going around killing and hurting people. The normal police force isn't capable of stopping them and that's bring our newest hero to the front, Suicide Risk man! After watching his partner get hurt he decides to join the fight with his own superhero powers he gains illegally. Then it becomes a revenge tale and then. What started off as a decent idea quickly went into....something. This is a world where superheroes are not really happening, instead super villains taking over. Tons of evil bastards going around killing and hurting people. The normal police force isn't capable of stopping them and that's bring our newest hero to the front, Suicide Risk man! After watching his partner get hurt he decides to join the fight with his own superhero powers he gains illegally. Then it becomes a revenge tale and then...something? Good: I liked the start. The idea of the world is pretty cool too and leaves it in dire situations. Bad: The art is pretty bad. Like it starts off okay but the fight scenes are super bland. I also thought the dialog was okay at best. It lacked punch, maybe it being rated M would have worked more. I can't get over the last issue and how off the walls it is and how dumb the story becomes. The pacing is pretty awful too. Overall Suicide Risk is a failed attempt for me. This is my first Mike Carey story but I know he can do better than this. I can't give this over a 2.
    more
  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Until this afternoon I'd never even heard of 'Suicide Risk', but on my LCS guy's recommendation, I picked this up. I really liked it (hence the 4 stars, duh) and I breezed through it in one sitting - okay that's not really an accomplishment, as it collects only the first 4 issues of the series. It's over too soon! Short & sweet, but oh what a ride. Mike Carey's new series has a lot of potential, and I can't wait to see where this is going. Bring on Suicide Risk Vol. 2, post haste!
    more
  • Celine
    January 1, 1970
    Summary: Super powers exist, but everyone who gains them turn evil. Cop Leon Winters becomes obsessed with stopping the villains.What I liked:- The art is shiny, dynamic and well-rounded- There is a lot of action, and even though I wasn't invested, it was quite easy to read- I really liked the concept, even though the concept has been used before. A battle between good and evil within a person always gets the blood pumpingWhat I didn't like:- Suicide Risk didn't bring anything new to the table. Summary: Super powers exist, but everyone who gains them turn evil. Cop Leon Winters becomes obsessed with stopping the villains.What I liked:- The art is shiny, dynamic and well-rounded- There is a lot of action, and even though I wasn't invested, it was quite easy to read- I really liked the concept, even though the concept has been used before. A battle between good and evil within a person always gets the blood pumpingWhat I didn't like:- Suicide Risk didn't bring anything new to the table. Honestly, this was as bland as could be- All the characters were paper-thin. The motivations where only half established, themes were never carried through- It also doesn't help that all the characters are copy-pasted archetypes. The cop who sees his partner get hurt, who neglects his family and gets himself in too deep? Gee, I have never seen that before- It tries to establish some pathos for the main character by including family scenes, but the family dynamics seemed stilted and too idealised- Near the end, the story completely goes off the deep end by adding weird shit that doesn't fit in the worldVerdict: Least inspired Boom! Studios production I have read so far. Would only recommend this for when you have to pass some time at the dentist's
    more
  • Vderevlean
    January 1, 1970
    Un univers cu supereroi, similar cumva cu ce face Brandon Sanderson în Steelheart. Avem o mulțime de eroi negativi și foarte puțini pozitivi, plus poliția care e depășită de acest conflict. Personajul principal e un polițist ai cărui colegi sunt răniți sau uciși într-o confruntare cu supereroii. Căutând răzbunarea, devine la rândul lui supererou și totul se complică pentru că puterea vine la pachet cu victime nevinovate și cu un trecut pe care nu-l recunoaște decât în vise. Se cam tulbură povest Un univers cu supereroi, similar cumva cu ce face Brandon Sanderson în Steelheart. Avem o mulțime de eroi negativi și foarte puțini pozitivi, plus poliția care e depășită de acest conflict. Personajul principal e un polițist ai cărui colegi sunt răniți sau uciși într-o confruntare cu supereroii. Căutând răzbunarea, devine la rândul lui supererou și totul se complică pentru că puterea vine la pachet cu victime nevinovate și cu un trecut pe care nu-l recunoaște decât în vise. Se cam tulbură povestea pe final, dar cum sunt doar primele 4 numere, probabil e vreo logică în toată schema narativă.Mi-ar fi plăcut să avem un personaj central rămas la stadiu de simplu polițist. Chiar aș fi vrut să văd o bandă povestită din perspectiva asta. Nici așa nu e rău. Probabil voi mai cumpăra și volumul 2.
    more
  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    I had no idea what this graphic novel was about when I picked it up. I did a library search for Mike Carey, looking for the second installment of Crossing Midnight. This came up instead. When I picked it up and discovered it was about superheroes (well, okay, supervillains), I was skeptical. I’ve seen the genre done well (most notably with V. E. Schwab’s Vicious). But, mostly, I see a lot of people trying to write the next Superman or Batman, and just get turned off by how rapidly the story fall I had no idea what this graphic novel was about when I picked it up. I did a library search for Mike Carey, looking for the second installment of Crossing Midnight. This came up instead. When I picked it up and discovered it was about superheroes (well, okay, supervillains), I was skeptical. I’ve seen the genre done well (most notably with V. E. Schwab’s Vicious). But, mostly, I see a lot of people trying to write the next Superman or Batman, and just get turned off by how rapidly the story falls into clichés.I went into Suicide Risk thinking I’d not make it past the second issue. I finished the volume about an hour later with a new must-read for my monthly comic pull list. Carey has done something unique here, and created a world where you aren’t born with powers or given a super-nifty and probably traumatic origin story. Superpowers are a drug, bought on the street from a couple of common pushers who seem to have almost no real knowledge of the origin of their “product.” Leo is a San Diego cop who tracks down a dealer following a supervillain standoff that leaves several cops dead and his partner severely wounded. Gifted with powers to control the earth’s primal forces, his powers come with a hefty price in the form of a “recoil” that occurs every time he uses it. He also temporarily forgets about his wife and kids, and starts having visions of a floating castle and a mysterious and powerful woman named Aisa. There is also the name of a fallen destroyer, Requiem, which Leo mysteriously inherits.Carey is one of my favorite storytellers, both in comic and novel forms. The opening volume of Suicide Risk is a small one, but serves to whet the appetite and leave you wanting to read more. I think I’ll be heading down to my comic shop tomorrow after work, in hopes that they have the second volume. It’s been a while since I’ve read through a graphic novel in one sitting, and longer still since I have been so eager to see how the story continues.
    more
  • Rob McMonigal
    January 1, 1970
    A cop gets frustrated by the damage being done by superpowered individuals, so he tries to get powers himself. It unlocks a life he never knew, sending him on a collision course with all he knew in this series.Mike Carey is very good at making characters live in a world where there's a ton of grey, and that's no exception here. His main character wants to do the right thing, but it all very quickly is going to fall apart. Props for keeping so many things obscured here but still fun to read and m A cop gets frustrated by the damage being done by superpowered individuals, so he tries to get powers himself. It unlocks a life he never knew, sending him on a collision course with all he knew in this series.Mike Carey is very good at making characters live in a world where there's a ton of grey, and that's no exception here. His main character wants to do the right thing, but it all very quickly is going to fall apart. Props for keeping so many things obscured here but still fun to read and making me want to learn more.Elena Casagrande is the primary artist on this series, and she does a good job setting up the nature of the world and making the super-powered folks feel fresh and not just "Here's your stand-in for X" that we often see in series like this. Some of the detail work is left undone, but that's an artistic choice and not the failing of the creator.Overall, this is a good entry (so far) in the genre of hero deconstruction, and fans of those kind of stories (or Carey) should check it out.
    more
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    Great art, strong plotting and character--also one central relationship is between a man and his daughter, which is sort of rare in this genre, I think. There are some typical setup elements here--a man gets superpowers to get revenge, and things aren't what they seem--but as usual Carey elevates these themes to great heights, all the while giving us a fun ride. I think this is my fave thing he's done since Lucifer.
    more
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    [This review is for the entire series, comprised of 6 volumes] I had never heard about this when it came out; Patrick at the comic shop said they pitched it as a cop drama so as not to give away the major plot twist that happens in the second or third issue and forever takes it away from cop drama territory into meta-superhero drama in the vein of Watchmen, Irredeemable, Welcome to Tranquility, and the like. Carey also effectively weaves in world-building (without overcomplicating it like Morris [This review is for the entire series, comprised of 6 volumes] I had never heard about this when it came out; Patrick at the comic shop said they pitched it as a cop drama so as not to give away the major plot twist that happens in the second or third issue and forever takes it away from cop drama territory into meta-superhero drama in the vein of Watchmen, Irredeemable, Welcome to Tranquility, and the like. Carey also effectively weaves in world-building (without overcomplicating it like Morrison, Ellis, and Hickman) and interrelationship conflict. It's so much to attempt, and like few others have, he pulls it off. He covers a lot of familiar territory--multiple dimensions, fascist governments, apocalypses, and more...and just as the story seems like it's going to slip into cliche, Carey takes it in a different direction. He is also remarkably good at maintaining a consistent internal logic and natural exposition. I will note that the ending seems a little abrupt and a little too clean, but sometimes a story this packed with, well, story can be hard to end in any kind of satisfying way. I don't hold it against Carey, who is now on my list of writers to keep an eye out for.P.S. It also has a strong female central character, who emerges later in the story...another way Carey upends the norm for this sort of thing.
    more
  • Vittorio Rainone
    January 1, 1970
    Non che sia da buttar via, ma SR è una piccola (o forse non piccola) delusione. Da un Mike Carey che ti sforna splendidi episodi di Unwritten sarebbe lecito aspettarsi qualcosa in più. E invece tutte le speranze di trovare un "Powers" da prospettiva diversa e disegnato meglio si scontrano contro una struttura che, lungi dal richiamare Powers, ricorda invece qualche storia di supereroi alla Warren Ellis, di quelle che ha iniziato a sfornare in quantità, con umani che diventano superumani, che ass Non che sia da buttar via, ma SR è una piccola (o forse non piccola) delusione. Da un Mike Carey che ti sforna splendidi episodi di Unwritten sarebbe lecito aspettarsi qualcosa in più. E invece tutte le speranze di trovare un "Powers" da prospettiva diversa e disegnato meglio si scontrano contro una struttura che, lungi dal richiamare Powers, ricorda invece qualche storia di supereroi alla Warren Ellis, di quelle che ha iniziato a sfornare in quantità, con umani che diventano superumani, che assumono poteri al di là della comprensione del superumano medio. E una narrazione troppo veloce, che si libera delle didascalie, il che ci può stare, ma non dosa le vignette, rendendo la lettura a tratti forsennata. Certo, ripeto, non è tutto da buttar via, e forse c'è qualche possibilità che cresca. Staremo a vedere. La storia: un poliziotto si trova a combattere un gruppo di individui potenziati che uccidono la quasi totalità della sua squadra e polverizzano un braccio al suo partner. E' questa (?) la molla che fa scattare la sua sete di vendetta: dopo aver incontrato una improbabile coppia di spacciatori di poteri e aver ricevuto da loro una super abilità (quasi senza volerla. ma perchè??) si mette in caccia dei criminali e li ammazza tutti in (troppo) poco tempo. Amen. PS: i disegni della Casagrande oscillano fra il convincente e il raffazzonato.
    more
  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    This is a rare thing, a Mike Carey story that I really really did not like.Partly because we've seen it all before so many times now. Powers, irredeemable, the boys. But also it just... has one particularly giant and annoying plot hole.
  • c,
    January 1, 1970
    interesting but idk if its interesting enough to continue yetRep: mlm side characters, Indian American side characters
  • Claire Benham
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this! Reminded me of Brandon Sanderson' s Steelheart series. I'm not sure how I bought it for only 6 bucks. I feel it was worth more. So, score! :D
  • Matt Erwin
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't really get it. Feels like large chunks of narrative are missing.
  • Ondřej Halíř
    January 1, 1970
    Zajímavá premisa, která ale v závěru poměrně vyšumí do prázdna, spolu i s dějeme který je lehce matoucí k závěru.
  • Carla A
    January 1, 1970
    I like but we shall see where it goes.
  • Fantifica
    January 1, 1970
    Reseña de Lorenzo Martínez · Nota: 7 · Reseña en FantíficaSi los supervillanos de Mike Carey, gente aburrida de sus vidas cotidianas que ha comprado sus poderes en el mercado negro, se hubieran cargado a todos mis compañeros y dejado a mi mejor amigo con un brazo inservible, yo también querría vengarme de ellos. Leo Winters es policía y ha sufrido todo eso, razón por la cual su única meta ahora mismo es alcanzar a toda esa gentuza con poderes y hacerles pagar sus crímenes.El guionista de Lucifer Reseña de Lorenzo Martínez · Nota: 7 · Reseña en FantíficaSi los supervillanos de Mike Carey, gente aburrida de sus vidas cotidianas que ha comprado sus poderes en el mercado negro, se hubieran cargado a todos mis compañeros y dejado a mi mejor amigo con un brazo inservible, yo también querría vengarme de ellos. Leo Winters es policía y ha sufrido todo eso, razón por la cual su única meta ahora mismo es alcanzar a toda esa gentuza con poderes y hacerles pagar sus crímenes.El guionista de Lucifer y The Unwritten plantea en esta serie de superhéroes un interrogante que podría ser común a todas las historias del género publicadas desde entonces: ¿el superhéroe o supervillano es así de nacimiento o se va formando a sí mismo? En principio podríamos pensar lo primero, dado que debe haber algo en el ADN del sujeto que permita esa transformación, pero el autor introduce aquí un cambio que le da ese punto de interés a Riesgo suicida: ¿y si los poderes pudieran comprarse en el mercado negro? Y lo que es más importante: ¿de dónde provienen dichos poderes?El apartado gráfico de Elena Casagrande me ha parecido bastante corriente y con poco que destacar, pero cumple bastante bien con su cometido y resulta dinámico y efectivo. Ojo, no se trata en absoluto de un dibujo malo (tampoco el color de Andrew Elder), y es justo lo que esperamos de una serie de estas características, aunque creo que hablaríamos de Riesgo suicida de otra manera si su parte artística estuviera un punto por encima de la media.El primer recopilatorio con los cuatro primeros números de la serie original de BOOM! Studios plantea un relato de crecimiento personal, en el que Leo Winters se enfrenta a la cruda realidad en un mundo donde los supervillanos son reales, y donde en determinado punto de la narración el héroe tiene que aceptar algún tipo de cambio. El esquema básico de toda la vida, pero al contrario de otras series de temática superheroica que pretenden ser el no va más, Riesgo suicida genera interés por ver lo que pasará en los siguientes números. Número con los que quizá ya podamos decir que estamos ante una serie, no ya renovadora al cien por cien, sino por lo menos que quiere dar algún cambio al panorama superheroico del momento. Está por ver. La serie fue nominada en la categoría mejor serie nueva en los premios Harvey 2014 y tendréis por aquí la reseña del segundo volumen lo más pronto posible.
    more
  • Fahim Ahmed
    January 1, 1970
    No idea what the f**k is going on, but I still dug it! In a time where storytellers always try their best to hold the audience's hand, it becomes difficult to begin reading a story where the author doesn't. My first exposure to Mike Carey's writing was when I read the first volume of The Unwritten (I should really get back to that series). Carey also did something similar there in how the story just starts. Details and explanations come in bits and pieces and it's up to the reader to connect all No idea what the f**k is going on, but I still dug it! In a time where storytellers always try their best to hold the audience's hand, it becomes difficult to begin reading a story where the author doesn't. My first exposure to Mike Carey's writing was when I read the first volume of The Unwritten (I should really get back to that series). Carey also did something similar there in how the story just starts. Details and explanations come in bits and pieces and it's up to the reader to connect all the dots and put everything together. Suicide Risk is very much in the same vein, it goes from humans vs supers, to this sort of grim revenge tale, and to... well I don't really what, especially at the end. There's just so much I don't understand and don't know, but I do have the bare bones a story here. Leo has a second chance and wherever he ends up, I'm pretty damn sure it's gonna be great journey getting there.My only gripe is that I really don't have a clue of what's going on in terms of the grand scale of the story. I guess I've just become used to understanding the direction of a story by the time I get to the end of the first arc, not the case here. I guess in conclusion Suicide Risk's lack of exposition is a hard pill to swallow, also the fact that the reader really has to take a leap of faith when it comes to continuing the story. Because like I said at the start, at the end of this first volume, I really have no idea what the f**k is going on.
    more
  • Hunter Lambright
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this series back when I was getting physical comics, but the rate and which I was getting to this in the monumental stack of comics I was trying to read each month left the story feeling disjointed and incomplete. It's safe to say that this is a much better read sequentially and that Carey and company have set up a long-form narrative that is really a 25-issue story rather than a series of six volumes that feature a complete story. And that, I think, is where this volume falter I started reading this series back when I was getting physical comics, but the rate and which I was getting to this in the monumental stack of comics I was trying to read each month left the story feeling disjointed and incomplete. It's safe to say that this is a much better read sequentially and that Carey and company have set up a long-form narrative that is really a 25-issue story rather than a series of six volumes that feature a complete story. And that, I think, is where this volume falters slightly. As a volume, it's clearly a part one. As an individual package, the story is still missing something. I have faith that the whole 25-issue run will feel much more complete, but I was confused that this was the choice for breaking off the ending. Boom! Studios seems to think 4-issue trade paperbacks are the best way to go, but it was a decision that knocked a star off the review for me. Had I been reading these trades as they came out, I'd have been extremely frustrated waiting for the next one since this one didn't have a complete chapter in and of itself. Still, Carey has set up a fairly unique superpowered world here. At the very least, I'm intrigued enough to pick up the next volume right now.
    more
  • Miguel
    January 1, 1970
    The first volume of Suicide Risk is an engrossing first step into a world where the familiar trope of the superhero has been turned on its head. Instead of gaining powers through cosmic chance, it appears to police officer Leo Winters that random people are purchasing super powers off the street. Though the world of Suicide Risk gives the reader the immediate impression of the mundane bending toward dystopian, and of a story about the corruptive nature of power and the flaws of human morality, a The first volume of Suicide Risk is an engrossing first step into a world where the familiar trope of the superhero has been turned on its head. Instead of gaining powers through cosmic chance, it appears to police officer Leo Winters that random people are purchasing super powers off the street. Though the world of Suicide Risk gives the reader the immediate impression of the mundane bending toward dystopian, and of a story about the corruptive nature of power and the flaws of human morality, a far more fantastical narrative begins to emerge as Leo embarks on a quest for answers and to avenge his wounded partner.Instead of the overarching question of the narrative being one of human nature and morality, it seems to be more one of perception and reality. Leo's whole life begins to be called into question, as he must reconcile it with unfamiliar memories he experiences. This premise is extremely engaging and appears at first blush to be unique. Engaging characters are paired with great design and brought to life with fantastic art work. Suicide Risk is highly recommended.
    more
  • La Espada en la Tinta
    January 1, 1970
    Cuando lo primero que ves en un cómic como Riesgo suicida es el nombre de Mike Carey (The Unwritten, Lucifer, entre otros) y una portada en la que se muestra lo que parece ser un agente especial de policía y unos seres voladores al fondo –uno de ellos incluso con alas de ángel–, sabes que lo que vas a encontrar entre las páginas que sujetas no va a ser algo del montón. Es cierto, hay un dicho que dice "nunca hay que juzgar un libro por su portada", pero creo que es algo que en realidad no es apl Cuando lo primero que ves en un cómic como Riesgo suicida es el nombre de Mike Carey (The Unwritten, Lucifer, entre otros) y una portada en la que se muestra lo que parece ser un agente especial de policía y unos seres voladores al fondo –uno de ellos incluso con alas de ángel–, sabes que lo que vas a encontrar entre las páginas que sujetas no va a ser algo del montón. Es cierto, hay un dicho que dice "nunca hay que juzgar un libro por su portada", pero creo que es algo que en realidad no es aplicable a los cómics y curiosamente, en pocas ocasiones me he equivocado.A lo largo de la historia de Riesgo suicida hemos podido ver cómo en grandes momentos de estrés, ansiedad o de tensión social, distintos escritores han tratado el tema de los vigilantes y los superhéroes como una forma de expresar su descontento con...Sigue leyendo: http://www.laespadaenlatinta.com/2014/09/riesgo-suicida-mike-carey-resena.html
    more
  • Skjaldmær Freyja
    January 1, 1970
    Questo primo volume non è un ottimo inizio serie,è buono anche se a fine lettura ti lascia con la sensazione di non averci capito niente.Quindi,alla domanda ''com'è?ti è piaciuto?'' rispondo ''meh''. Non saprei,la trama è certamente curiosa ed è ben evidente che promette buoni sviluppi nei numeri successivi(almeno è ciò che ci si augura),tuttavia devo ammettere che se non mi avessero prestato questo volume e due successivi con la garanzia che andando avanti con gli stessi avrei cominciato a capi Questo primo volume non è un ottimo inizio serie,è buono anche se a fine lettura ti lascia con la sensazione di non averci capito niente.Quindi,alla domanda ''com'è?ti è piaciuto?'' rispondo ''meh''. Non saprei,la trama è certamente curiosa ed è ben evidente che promette buoni sviluppi nei numeri successivi(almeno è ciò che ci si augura),tuttavia devo ammettere che se non mi avessero prestato questo volume e due successivi con la garanzia che andando avanti con gli stessi avrei cominciato a capire fino ad aver chiara la situazione,non credo avrei continuato. Inoltre suppongo che se non avessero tradotto determinati nomi,questi sarebbero risultati meno patetici..ma questa è una nota estremamente soggettiva.In sostanza: Suicide Risk 1 potrebbe deludervi ma il secondo volume(che ho appena finito con piacere) è molto bello,la trama è più chiara e i nodi della trama cominciano a sciogliersi.
    more
  • Anchorpete
    January 1, 1970
    Now this is one of the reasons to be into comic books. I am always saying how Mike Carey is one of the most underrated writers in comics. This book shows how fantastic his potential ideas can be. How about a world where getting super powers almost guarantees that you will become a villain? That doesn't sound super original, but the reasoning why the super powered people become villains is. The thing is, I can't explain what it is, because the power source has a mysterious mythology connected to Now this is one of the reasons to be into comic books. I am always saying how Mike Carey is one of the most underrated writers in comics. This book shows how fantastic his potential ideas can be. How about a world where getting super powers almost guarantees that you will become a villain? That doesn't sound super original, but the reasoning why the super powered people become villains is. The thing is, I can't explain what it is, because the power source has a mysterious mythology connected to it, involving a two-faced God, and ancient memories, that hasn't been fully revealed to us yet. It reminds me of Lost or Morning Glories. Mixing those stories with a violent super hero revenge story? Sounds like it was written just for me!
    more
  • Geoff Sebesta
    January 1, 1970
    I swear Mike Carey would be one of my favorite authors if I could remember his name. One of the great advantages of writing is that you get to make up your own name, why doesn't he use something a bit more memorable? "Mike Carey" sounds like somebody who you went to high school with, not somebody who spins thrilling tales for a living.Anyway, yet another in the endless attempt to revitalize super heroes. A game try, one of the better recently. It starts as a standard "guy gets super powers" but I swear Mike Carey would be one of my favorite authors if I could remember his name. One of the great advantages of writing is that you get to make up your own name, why doesn't he use something a bit more memorable? "Mike Carey" sounds like somebody who you went to high school with, not somebody who spins thrilling tales for a living.Anyway, yet another in the endless attempt to revitalize super heroes. A game try, one of the better recently. It starts as a standard "guy gets super powers" but it has more teeth than most, and it develops into an interesting story about a father and his daughter. I'm enjoying it. I read it and I'll keep reading it.
    more
  • Cale
    January 1, 1970
    Mike Carey's take on super heroes is a very different approach - focusing on collateral damage and the response of a police officer who decides to get revenge on a band of villains, it goes pretty dark, focusing on repercussions and the ethics of revenge. And the way that powers are distributed in this world is very different as well, which has unique ramifications. Carey makes distinctive characters, and the world feels well-crafted. The climax isn't very visceral, with Leo using wits instead o Mike Carey's take on super heroes is a very different approach - focusing on collateral damage and the response of a police officer who decides to get revenge on a band of villains, it goes pretty dark, focusing on repercussions and the ethics of revenge. And the way that powers are distributed in this world is very different as well, which has unique ramifications. Carey makes distinctive characters, and the world feels well-crafted. The climax isn't very visceral, with Leo using wits instead of brawn, which is a surprising but effective solution here.
    more
  • Jaimie
    January 1, 1970
    This series had a lot of potential, but it somehow fell quite short. Normally when I pick up a graphic novel I sit down and end up reading it in one sitting, but I actually stalled about halfway through this one - and had very little inclination to pick it back up again. You would think that the concept of artificially caused superpowers would be a great starting point for the series, but instead it makes it seem like the protagonist (a cop out for revenge) is just dealing with a slightly height This series had a lot of potential, but it somehow fell quite short. Normally when I pick up a graphic novel I sit down and end up reading it in one sitting, but I actually stalled about halfway through this one - and had very little inclination to pick it back up again. You would think that the concept of artificially caused superpowers would be a great starting point for the series, but instead it makes it seem like the protagonist (a cop out for revenge) is just dealing with a slightly heightened drug problem...
    more
  • Nathalia
    January 1, 1970
    Officer Leo is dealing with the aftermath of some serious super-villain damage. In the midst of his leave he decides to go undercover to "buy" superpowers on the blackmarket and target the villains who caused all the destruction and almost killed his partner. However once he has acquired his powers things start to get tricky and he begins to have memories from another life. I'll read anything Carey (The Unwritten) writes and this story did not disappoint.
    more
Write a review