Mortal Arts (Lady Darby Mystery, #2)
Scotland, 1830. Lady Kiera Darby is no stranger to intrigue—in fact, it seems to follow wherever she goes. After her foray into murder investigation, Kiera must journey to Edinburgh with her family so that her pregnant sister can be close to proper medical care. But the city is full of many things Kiera isn’t quite ready to face: the society ladies keen on judging her, her fellow investigator—and romantic entanglement—Sebastian Gage, and ultimately, another deadly mystery.Kiera’s old friend Michael Dalmay is about to be married, but the arrival of his older brother—and Kiera’s childhood art tutor—William, has thrown everything into chaos. For ten years Will has been missing, committed to an insane asylum by his own father. Kiera is sympathetic to her mentor’s plight, especially when rumors swirl about a local girl gone missing. Now Kiera must once again employ her knowledge of the macabre and join forces with Gage in order to prove the innocence of a beloved family friend—and save the marriage of another…

Mortal Arts (Lady Darby Mystery, #2) Details

TitleMortal Arts (Lady Darby Mystery, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2013
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139780425253786
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery, Romance, Fiction

Mortal Arts (Lady Darby Mystery, #2) Review

  • Andrea Seaver
    January 1, 1970
    Well. What to say. Let's start with the good. Lady Kiera Darby is a heroine with an interesting backstory. She views the world in which she inhabits with a bit of an outsiders eye, and since the novel is written first person, hers is the only viewpoint we have. The setting (rambling family manse in Scotland) is interesting for the time period. No London high society setting, very different. The storyline/mystery: very high promise. What depravities might Kiera's tortured past art instructor be Well. What to say. Let's start with the good. Lady Kiera Darby is a heroine with an interesting backstory. She views the world in which she inhabits with a bit of an outsiders eye, and since the novel is written first person, hers is the only viewpoint we have. The setting (rambling family manse in Scotland) is interesting for the time period. No London high society setting, very different. The storyline/mystery: very high promise. What depravities might Kiera's tortured past art instructor be capable of? Who is hiding what and from whom as to his acts? Long suffering love interest with the enigmatic (or tries to be) Sebastian Gage. Now, the reality. For all that the setting is the 1830's, the time period is not something that you are steeped in, no immersion. The language does not ring through as period correct. Kiera at one point exclaims, "there you go!" in response to a reason for motive. It read as something my daughter would say today. It could be anytime, anywhere, excepting the tossed in mentions on what may be "proper" or against "propriety" and the ad nauseum descriptions of Lady Darby's clothing. William could have been traumatized in any war, so vague is the feeling of time set. Again, while the mystery had plenty of moments of "oohh, so this is going to be good" it fizzled shortly in when you knew who was behind the murder mystery and had a good guess as to why. Now, this I can overlook. I cannot overlook the heroines propensity of hugging herself, Kiera is always "wrapping her arms about herself", her tendency to melodramatics, the manufactured "obstacle" that she and Gage must overcome.Their developing "relationship" for lack of a better word, is trying to be enigmatic and on the heartbreaking side, two lovers held apart by circumstance. But the courtship of the two is all tepid looks and strange confidences, followed by cold silence and distance. Frustrating. And not in a good, shiver of expectation up your spine kind of way. More along the lines of what, exactly is keeping these two apart? There is no societal barrier, other than Kiera's infamy, and as Gage reeks of trade, it would be Kiera to "lose face" in society, if she had any at all. The fact that she feels ostracized, or different, are brought to us only in her words. Never in the actions or words from another, unless blatantly obvious, a reminder of how loathed or mistrusted our heroine is supposed to be considered. There is little subtlety to the characters, again their feelings must be explained step by step by Kiera's analyzing of their words and facial expressions. The author could spin this in a much more likeable manner for me if I felt as though I just entered a pre-Victorian atmosphere, the characters had snappy, colorful dialog that allowed me to draw conclusions as to their actions and feelings, instead of in long descriptive paragraphs of the narrators "thoughts". This way of coming at the story works better with a third person narrative. I simply do not need to be inundated by the color of Kiera's "Prussian blue gown" when she is teetering on the precipice of a decrepit Scottish castle about to engage the enemy in a windy climax. Bad form indeed.
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  • Rane
    January 1, 1970
    Once again Lady Kiera Darby is thrown into another inquiry this time dealing with her old friend and art teacher William Darby. William was thrown into an insane asylum by his evil father. The situation become even more dire when a local girl is killed and eyes turn to the still healing and troubled William. With the aid of Sebastian Gage, Kiera set out to fight for the innocence of her beloved friend and find the turn killer. As sequels go, this just blew the first book away. The story never Once again Lady Kiera Darby is thrown into another inquiry this time dealing with her old friend and art teacher William Darby. William was thrown into an insane asylum by his evil father. The situation become even more dire when a local girl is killed and eyes turn to the still healing and troubled William. With the aid of Sebastian Gage, Kiera set out to fight for the innocence of her beloved friend and find the turn killer. As sequels go, this just blew the first book away. The story never slowed nor hinder which was my biggest complaint in LD #1. This was also a tad darker as it dealt with mental illnesses in a time where it was never understood as the individual was thrown into an asylum without a backward glance. I felt poor Kiera was dealt even heavier personal blows this time around. She still has a dark cloud hovering over her from her disaster of a first marriage. With William she feels like he holds a part of her childhood with his kindness he showed a lonely young girl when she needed a friend to turn to. Add to that is her confusion over her feelings with Gage who still is a mystery to her yet is showing another side to himself with his actions. Their developing relationship still intrigues me greatly that it leaves me wondering what path it'll take. The mystery was not about the who. You knew who was behind it all, but the how and the why is the the driving force. The ending didn't have a truly HEA feel to it, but it did have one truly fitting. I can't get enough of this series or Anna Lee Huber writing that I quickly picked up Lady Darby #3!
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  • Sandi *~The Pirate Wench~*
    January 1, 1970
    Setting: Scotland 1830Summary: In the second book by Anna Lee Huber, Lady Kiera Darby accompanies her pregnant sister Alanna to Edinburgh for a much needed medical care for her. And although Kiera would never admit it, she is excited to be in the same city that she know's investigator Sebastian Gage is in as well. While there, she plans to attend the wedding of an old family friend. But when a local girl goes missing and the groom's brother becomes a suspect, Kiera once again must use her Setting: Scotland 1830Summary: In the second book by Anna Lee Huber, Lady Kiera Darby accompanies her pregnant sister Alanna to Edinburgh for a much needed medical care for her. And although Kiera would never admit it, she is excited to be in the same city that she know's investigator Sebastian Gage is in as well. While there, she plans to attend the wedding of an old family friend. But when a local girl goes missing and the groom's brother becomes a suspect, Kiera once again must use her medical knowledge to help Sebastian to solve the crime. If you have read the first book, Kiera's next tale will draw you once again. The setting in this one is described in great detail, bringing 18th Century Scotland to life. The characters once again are true to the time period,yet their emotional qualities allow the reader to identify with them. Again the mystery is well plotted, with many unique twists and turns that stem from Lady Darby's unconventional role in life. And of course the working relationship between Lady Darby and Sebastian Gage continues to become increasingly personal. And without giving anything away I found the ending in this one much better and with another "carrot-dangling" what will happen from here?And will the next book unravel our hero Sebastian's secrets? Off to pick up book three!
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  • Misfit
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsSince most of us don't read the author's notes until the book is done, I found some info that I would have loved to have known at the start. Would have helped with the imagery of the two houses. The Dalmay House in Mortal arts was based on Dalmeny House, and the crumbling abandoned castle was based on Barnbougle Castle. There's also a short video taken of the old castle here on Youtube.Now for the review. You'll have to mosey on over to Booklikes and read it here.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Very creepy, with a master of an insane asylum gone rogue and a man who suffers from severe PTSD in the same area when a young lady disappears. It's a mostly clean mystery, with some mild period curses and some innuendo, along with moderate violence. I'll definitely be moving along to the third book in the series to see what else Kiera and Gage will be solving.
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  • Veronique
    January 1, 1970
    After reading The Anatomist's Wife, I couldn’t wait to rejoin Kiera and see what happened next to her. Naturally, another mystery presents itself to be uncovered, involving her childhood art tutor, who had been missing for nearly ten years.I must admit I didn’t expect this but I appreciated Huber’s choice of dealing with mental illness (PTSD from war experience) in a time when it was totally misunderstood, and the horrors of quite a few contemporary insane asylum. The resulting narrative is After reading The Anatomist's Wife, I couldn’t wait to rejoin Kiera and see what happened next to her. Naturally, another mystery presents itself to be uncovered, involving her childhood art tutor, who had been missing for nearly ten years.I must admit I didn’t expect this but I appreciated Huber’s choice of dealing with mental illness (PTSD from war experience) in a time when it was totally misunderstood, and the horrors of quite a few contemporary insane asylum. The resulting narrative is pretty dark but also compelling. Once more, Kiera’s knowledge, past experiences, and especially her way of perceiving events and people is called to help save more than one person. And what of Gage? Well, he is of course present, doing his usual ambivalent ‘dance routine' around Kiera, but really dealing with his own demons. For someone who comes across often quite badly, behaving in the entitled way men of standing did then, the author does hint at hidden depths.And yes, I can’t help starting book 3 right now :O)
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Mortal Arts is Anna Lee Huber’s second in the Lady Darby Historical Mystery series published by Berkley Prime Crime, September 2013If you have not read the first in this new series, The Anatomist’s Wife, run out and get a copy, download a copy, whatever you have to do, and then get ready for Mortal Arts. Find a quiet place, get a glass of wine or fresh brewed coffee or tea, and let the Victorian atmosphere and careful narration take you away to another time and share with you the sounds and Mortal Arts is Anna Lee Huber’s second in the Lady Darby Historical Mystery series published by Berkley Prime Crime, September 2013If you have not read the first in this new series, The Anatomist’s Wife, run out and get a copy, download a copy, whatever you have to do, and then get ready for Mortal Arts. Find a quiet place, get a glass of wine or fresh brewed coffee or tea, and let the Victorian atmosphere and careful narration take you away to another time and share with you the sounds and scents that will overtake you in this beautifully written tale. Lady Kiera Darby, our protagonist, is a strong woman, so likeable, so smart, and so very much her own person. While there are several themes at play, Ms. Huber’s neatly constructed plot never wavers from its linear progression. The central mystery is cushioned in family betrayal, PTSD issues, and the treatment of the mentally ill.There are moments of descriptive brilliance here, and the gentle touches to surrounding characters enhance your visit to Lady Darby’s world. In one scene, Lady Darby and Gage enter a crude stone building occupied by Mrs. McCray. When she brings out her finest tea china, that simple act provides insight into this peripheral villager. And in another, Lady Darby erupts into a defensive tirade and shocks the guests in the room. As each react to the outburst, we get a clearer view behind the proper façades. This story has an added romantic element that is necessary to the growth of Lady Darby but does not overshadow the core that is the mystery. I enjoyed the slow build of the relationship between Lady Darby and Gage. He does confuse me a bit. But he also confuses Lady Darby. Will we learn more about his motives in book three? By the end of the tale, Lady Darby has certainly evolved and several of those bricks in her emotional wall have crumbled.I truly enjoyed every page, every sentence. I'm already in line for book three as this author delivers a carefully constructed, comfortably enveloping story with brutal lies to uncover and shocking secrets to reveal. But don’t get too caught up in soft brocade, feathery breezes or the breathtaking Scottish landscape. There is, after all, a murder to solve.
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  • Jen (The Starry-Eyed Revue)
    January 1, 1970
    This is definitely a series that I'll be sticking out, if only in hopes of seeing Kiera and Gage make it to the altar one day. :D I love their banter and how protective Gage is and how Kiera still won't let that stop her from solving the mystery at hand. She's plucky and courageous and one day, I'm sure she'll get that gun she's been meaning to purchase. ;) Lord knows she's gonna need it if she keeps on her current path. I do wish there was more of an on-going mystery and not just a new case This is definitely a series that I'll be sticking out, if only in hopes of seeing Kiera and Gage make it to the altar one day. :D I love their banter and how protective Gage is and how Kiera still won't let that stop her from solving the mystery at hand. She's plucky and courageous and one day, I'm sure she'll get that gun she's been meaning to purchase. ;) Lord knows she's gonna need it if she keeps on her current path. I do wish there was more of an on-going mystery and not just a new case with each book, especially as the cases thus far have been a tad predictable, but even so, I still find these books suspenseful and captivating.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This was a heartbreaking mystery (which, again, wasn’t very mysterious) featuring a strong h and a well developed cast of secondary characters. The suspense was good and the development of the relationship between the MCs continued to draw me in. There was no sex in this book (yay!) and no OP drama at all. The thing I probably appreciated the most about this book was that the h didn’t chase the H. She didn’t apologize for anything that wasn’t her fault and she wasn’t a doormat. I’m 3.5 stars. This was a heartbreaking mystery (which, again, wasn’t very mysterious) featuring a strong h and a well developed cast of secondary characters. The suspense was good and the development of the relationship between the MCs continued to draw me in. There was no sex in this book (yay!) and no OP drama at all. The thing I probably appreciated the most about this book was that the h didn’t chase the H. She didn’t apologize for anything that wasn’t her fault and she wasn’t a doormat. I’m looking forward to what’s to come in this series.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Kiera and Gage are once again involved in solving another mystery, but this one is far more personal to Kiera, giving us a great chance to learn more about her beyond her past with her brute of an anatomist husband. It says a lot for how sympathetic an heroine Kiera is that the enormous pain she experienced due to the events in The Mortal Arts soured my mood as much as hers. Although I liked her healthy, loving relationships with her sister and brother-in-law, it was even better seeing her stand Kiera and Gage are once again involved in solving another mystery, but this one is far more personal to Kiera, giving us a great chance to learn more about her beyond her past with her brute of an anatomist husband. It says a lot for how sympathetic an heroine Kiera is that the enormous pain she experienced due to the events in The Mortal Arts soured my mood as much as hers. Although I liked her healthy, loving relationships with her sister and brother-in-law, it was even better seeing her stand on her own feet as an individual again - having her own social life and making decisions without the protective hovering of her family.The mystery in this book, while actually more compelling than the first because the broken, erratic and mysterious individual at its center had such a deep bond with Kiera, had less logical progression. Part of this was because of Kiera’s very attachment to Will Dalmay – she admitted herself later on that she could not really be impartial in the investigation. His deteriorated mental condition also made him as much of a victim as a suspect, and thus Kiera spent a large part of the story tip-toeing around Will the way one would a frightened animal, rather than actually… investigating. But even less convincing was the sudden appearance of an (view spoiler)[almost comic book-style evil doctor villain, one who has been conducting horrendous experiments in an asylum of darkness and has set his sights on a new victim (hide spoiler)]. That just isn’t a fair murder mystery, is it? It’s all so unsatisfyingly pat, though it made for excellent suspense-building.On the other hand, I was glad to have my concerns regarding whether Kiera and Gage’s tumultuous romance would be dragged on by misunderstandings and feelings left unsaid proven false. If anything, their fiery arguments made Gage feel far more real to me as a character than he did in the first book, where he was almost always the master of himself. Thanks to Kiera, he’s humbler, more open about his own personal demons and increasingly gentle. I liked him much better for it.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    An unconventional female heroine, paired with an enigmatic and charming male lead; whispers of a brewing attraction between them; set in 1830 on the rocky coast of the Firth of Forth in Scotland; a mystery involving betrayal and a creepy lunatic asylum and the disappearance of two young girls-- this historical mystery has everything a reader of my tastes could want, and indeed, I was prepared to devour it with singular enjoyment. The trouble is, it fell short on all of these elements. The An unconventional female heroine, paired with an enigmatic and charming male lead; whispers of a brewing attraction between them; set in 1830 on the rocky coast of the Firth of Forth in Scotland; a mystery involving betrayal and a creepy lunatic asylum and the disappearance of two young girls-- this historical mystery has everything a reader of my tastes could want, and indeed, I was prepared to devour it with singular enjoyment. The trouble is, it fell short on all of these elements. The heroine repeatedly tells us she is unusual and ostracized and even became a target of the villain because of her supposed oddities-- but she's actually not particularly odd or unusual or even in truth very interesting. We see nothing in her behavior to support her descriptions of herself so the words fall flat. Second, the romance between her and Gage is stagnant and unnecessarily thwarted. The obstacles between them are unnamed, unclear, and contrived. The result is not delectable sexual tension but simple irritation. Third, the promising geographical and historical setting is marred by inconsistent and uncomfortably written Scottish accents and even more so by jarring bursts of anachronistic dialogue. The characters live in 19th century UK but frequently speak in 21st century (American) idioms and colloquialisms. Finally, the mystery itself was without suspense and should have been solved by our 'brilliant sleuths' about 150 pages earlier. Some of their oversights and deductive failures were simply inexcusable. I found myself shouting at them to figure it out -- never a pleasant experience when reading a mystery. I'll probably give the third book in the series a try, but if it doesn't show significant improvement it will probably be my last investment of time in Ms. Huber's work.
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  • The Lit Bitch
    January 1, 1970
    After rapidly finishing the first Lady Darby book, I knew that I would need the next one. I didn’t care that the book cost $14.00 on my Kindle and I had tons of other books I could read….I had to know what happened to Gage and Kiera next!This book was much different than the first one and I think I liked it even more than the first book! I loved all the Gothic elements that this one had. The first book lacked some of my favorite elements but this one did NOT disappoint!Crumbling castle on the After rapidly finishing the first Lady Darby book, I knew that I would need the next one. I didn’t care that the book cost $14.00 on my Kindle and I had tons of other books I could read….I had to know what happened to Gage and Kiera next!This book was much different than the first one and I think I liked it even more than the first book! I loved all the Gothic elements that this one had. The first book lacked some of my favorite elements but this one did NOT disappoint!Crumbling castle on the coast, a madman locked in the attic, an asylum looming ominously off the North Sea coast, a family fallen from grace, a howling ghost dog legend, family secrets, and murder most foul? YES! All things that I love in a Gothic novel, plus you add the budding affection between Kiera and Gage and you easily have a five star rating from me!I loved how prominent the madness element was in this novel. I thought it added a layer of uncertainty that would keep readers on edge. Because of the uncertainty surrounding Will, I found myself second guessing everything we were being told. Was Kiera just bias or was she wrong? I loved the not knowing if we could trust one of the major characters.The chemistry between Gage and Kiera is also really heating up. I love how mysterious Gage is and how we don’t really know too much about him in the first book besides that he is ‘charming’ and now in this book we start learning a ton more about him. He’s like an onion….peeling a layer back one at a time and I am literally LOVING IT! Watching the growing affection between Kiera and him is just so exciting. I especially love that the author is dragging it out over the course of the books rather than rush to ‘put a ring on it’ in like the first book.One thing that I struggled a little bit with was Kiera’s devotion to Will. I felt like her defense of him was more than the acquaintance warranted. He was her drawing tutor for a few short months, and I felt like Gage had reason to believe there was a romantic interest and frankly I felt like she was holding back as well. I gathered that she was infatuated with him, but I just felt like her devotion to him and her defense and her feelings at the end of the book just didn’t jive with me. The reason for her devotion was because he had faith in her art and herself as well as her abilities, which I suppose was a good enough reason, but still I felt like it wasn’t enough. But in the end I simply didn’t care. I was too wrapped up in the mystery and the darker content and the heating up romance to put much thought into it.There was plenty to love in this latest installment and I loved loved loved the Gothic feel of this novel. I immediately downloaded the third book in this series as soon as I finished this book…..even if it was another $14.00, it was $14.00 well spent if you ask me!See my full review here
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Mortal Arts4 StarsLady Kiera Darby travels with her sister and brother-in-law to Edinburgh, but is detoured to Dalmay by an urgent missive from Phillip’s aunt. It seems that Michael Dalmay, an old family friend, is soon to be wed to Phillip’s cousin. Unfortunately, the return of Michael’s older brother and the disappearance of a local girl put a pall on the wedding plans, and Kiera is forced to join forces once again with the enigmatic Sebastian Gage to uncover the truth. An enjoyable sequel Mortal Arts4 StarsLady Kiera Darby travels with her sister and brother-in-law to Edinburgh, but is detoured to Dalmay by an urgent missive from Phillip’s aunt. It seems that Michael Dalmay, an old family friend, is soon to be wed to Phillip’s cousin. Unfortunately, the return of Michael’s older brother and the disappearance of a local girl put a pall on the wedding plans, and Kiera is forced to join forces once again with the enigmatic Sebastian Gage to uncover the truth. An enjoyable sequel with engaging characters although the mystery is far too obvious. Similar to Charles Todd’s A Duty to the Dead, Huber provides an accurate and heart-wrenching portrayal of battle fatigue albeit during a much earlier time period (Napoleonic War vs. WWI). Huber’s insight into the human mind as it struggles with the devastating aftermath of war and her descriptions of the terrible atrocities suffered by those afflicted with mental illness and confined to asylums in the 19th century adds a darker tone to the story and makes it impossible for the reader not to sympathize with William Dalmay’s suffering. The mystery takes time to get going and although the eventual explanation is exceedingly disturbing it is also very predictable. The culprit is glaringly obvious from the start as is the motivation, and all that remains is following along as Kiera and Gage investigate and figure out the hows and the whys of it all. Gage and Kiera’s relationship (one cannot quite call it a romance at this time) develops at a steady pace as more of Kiera’s past is revealed including her feelings of isolation as a young teen and the time she spent under her nefarious husband’s oppressive thumb. More details of Gage’s background are also provided and they go a long way toward explaining his actions in the previous book. Nevertheless, there are still many unanswered questions and it will be interesting to learn the answers. Heather Wilds' narration is alright. Her accents are very good, but her pacing is off. She reads quite fast and there are times when the sentences seem to run together, i.e., she doesn't pause would she should at the end of a paragraph or a section of dialogue. All in all, a well written and disturbing mystery with a touch of romance. Recommended for fans of Deanna Raybourn’s Lady Julia series.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I'd enjoyed Book 1 in this series SO much (despite some nitpicks) that I immediately bought Book 2; with this one, Book 2, I had no nitpicks at all. I just loved it! This is such a binge-worthy series. The mystery was much stronger in this volume, and I really, really love the way the relationships are developing through the books - not only Kiera's relationship with her romantic interest, but also with her family members and old friends and in the way she's learning to re-enter larger society I'd enjoyed Book 1 in this series SO much (despite some nitpicks) that I immediately bought Book 2; with this one, Book 2, I had no nitpicks at all. I just loved it! This is such a binge-worthy series. The mystery was much stronger in this volume, and I really, really love the way the relationships are developing through the books - not only Kiera's relationship with her romantic interest, but also with her family members and old friends and in the way she's learning to re-enter larger society after the scandals of her past. I grabbed Book 3 right away, and if only I had an unlimited book budget, I'd be buying all 6 books in the series-so-far this month!Also, I really appreciate the sensitive way that Anna Lee Huber writes about the murders in these books. Even when they are quite gruesome, there is never any sense of voyeurism in their descriptions (which is something that bothers me in a lot of mysteries) - we see them only through the appalled and deeply compassionate gaze of Kiera, who will NEVER take any pleasure in the awfulness. (This may sound like an obvious point, but actually, I had to take a long break from reading mysteries or suspense novels for a while because SO MANY of them - including many written by women - left me feeling really gross from the way they'd gone into SO MUCH vivid and explicit detail in describing the horrific and often sexualized violence of those murders. Having read so many of those kinds of murder/discovery scenes in the past, I REALLY appreciate the very different way that violence is handled in these books.)
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  • Allison (The Allure of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    The mystery and suspense weaved into the plot of Mortal Arts is far superior to the first book of the series, in my opinion. You guys, it is impossible not to become emotionally involved in the story. William, who has been locked away, is a former soldier suffering from PTSD in a time before it was recognized or understood. The combination of watching him suffer as well as seeing everyone around him at a total loss as to how to help? Heart wrenching, seriously. PTSD is still so misunderstood The mystery and suspense weaved into the plot of Mortal Arts is far superior to the first book of the series, in my opinion. You guys, it is impossible not to become emotionally involved in the story. William, who has been locked away, is a former soldier suffering from PTSD in a time before it was recognized or understood. The combination of watching him suffer as well as seeing everyone around him at a total loss as to how to help? Heart wrenching, seriously. PTSD is still so misunderstood even today when it is possible to seek treatment – it must have been unbearable in 1830.Basically, if you’re a (intensely rabid) fan of Tasha Alexander and/or Deanna Raybourn like I am, you absolutely have to give Lady Darby a spin! Then we can join forces and demand the next installment by any means necessary…Check out my full review on the blog!
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  • Heather Gilbert
    January 1, 1970
    At this point, I am fairly confident to say I'm going to like every book in this series. Although this one is setup differently from a traditional mystery (ie: we don't have a body at the beginning), Huber once again makes me feel invested in the characters and the setting right from the get-go. This novel delves into PTSD in a time when it wasn't recognized as such, and I couldn't put the book down until I knew what had happened.I truly admire Huber's smooth writing style. Both novels I've read At this point, I am fairly confident to say I'm going to like every book in this series. Although this one is setup differently from a traditional mystery (ie: we don't have a body at the beginning), Huber once again makes me feel invested in the characters and the setting right from the get-go. This novel delves into PTSD in a time when it wasn't recognized as such, and I couldn't put the book down until I knew what had happened.I truly admire Huber's smooth writing style. Both novels I've read so far in this series are cozy reads I want to curl up with and savor, yet they are so intriguing with their insight into human nature, I can't stop until I reach The End. Looking forward to reading the next in series.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Abandoned on page 47, after several weeks where I was not able to sustain interest in the story. Might come back to the series later... but probably not.
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Lady Kiera Darby is enroute to Edinburgh with her sister's family when they are sidetracked at the behest of a family friend. Michael Dalmay is about to be married, but when his fiancée's family learns that Michael's older brother William - Lady Darby's beloved childhood painting tutor - has been released from a nine-year stint in a mental institution, they no longer approve of the marriage. Lady Darby having believed that William was dead is both overjoyed to see him and shocked by his frail Lady Kiera Darby is enroute to Edinburgh with her sister's family when they are sidetracked at the behest of a family friend. Michael Dalmay is about to be married, but when his fiancée's family learns that Michael's older brother William - Lady Darby's beloved childhood painting tutor - has been released from a nine-year stint in a mental institution, they no longer approve of the marriage. Lady Darby having believed that William was dead is both overjoyed to see him and shocked by his frail mental health. William suffers episodes, during which he draws shockingly violent images in a trance-like state. Kiera feels responsibility towards her old friend and wants to help him in any way she can. Matters are never simple for Lady Darby, however, and when a local girl goes missing, suspicion falls on William. Kiera is determined to prove that William had nothing to do with the girl's disappearance, and she grudgingly teams up with Gage to solve the mystery.This is the second installment in the Lady Darby series, and I recommend that you read them in order. Lady Darby's character evolves over the course of the two books, and I enjoyed learning more of her backstory here. The mystery wasn't altogether too mysterious, but the topic of mental health, especially PTSD, as viewed in the 1800s was something I hadn't read about before, so points to the author for tackling a difficult subject and doing it well. It was clever how the author orchestrated Gage's return to co-sleuth, and the chemistry between the two characters is steadily rising, but once again, the romance (happily!) does not overpower the main story line. Two complaints: the dialogue, though believable in terms of what the characters say isn't always believable in how they say it. A little modernized, if you will. And, the author has a small but annoying tic during which she over describes clothing during key points in the action (e.g., "I slipped the letter and its reply into the pocket sewn into the side of my pale green dinner dress trimmed with white lace and crossed the room to rejoin the others," and "I shivered in my thin, vermilion satin evening gown and tightened my ivory shawl around my shoulders"). Overall, minor complaints for a series that I am otherwise enjoying and a satisfying end to my reading in 2013!
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  • Nidofito
    January 1, 1970
    Reread rating: 3/5There were a couple of obvious irregularities that Kiera chose not to investigate, which was out of character for her, especially the time when they appeared. Original rating: 4/5Awesome sequel to The Anatomist's Wife. I finished it in one sitting! The plot is tighter, more complicated with greater consequences and an incredible setting. Keira's character development is a welcome to read as she becomes more confidant. But most of all, I appreciate the author keeping the romance Reread rating: 3/5There were a couple of obvious irregularities that Kiera chose not to investigate, which was out of character for her, especially the time when they appeared. Original rating: 4/5Awesome sequel to The Anatomist's Wife. I finished it in one sitting! The plot is tighter, more complicated with greater consequences and an incredible setting. Keira's character development is a welcome to read as she becomes more confidant. But most of all, I appreciate the author keeping the romance light and in the background so it doesn't distract from the story.EDIT: Now that I've some time to think about the book, I realized what's missing in the book. Kiera hardly ever has to use her knowledge of human anatomy in the book. And while I appreciate the fact that she's coming out of her shell, her personality shown in the prequel as the withdrawn, 'tortured' and misunderstood is diminishing. Her character as the scorned lady of gentle birth being thrown into situations with bloody and gruesome deaths is what attracted me to read the prequel. And it's something I saw less in here. I had a feeling throughout the book that she's becoming a lot like other female protagonists in historical light murder mysteries. I hope the next book is a lot more darker. Also, I hope the author doesn't continue to add details of clothing at unnecessary points of the story that only serve as a distraction. Do I really need to know the material and color of Gage's jacket and how it compliments his eyes as he puts a letter in his pocket? I don't think so.EDIT # 2: I guess the feeling of this book being 'cleaner' than its predecessor can be justified with the fact that this murder mystery used Kiera's talent for art as a source whereas the previous used her knowledge of human anatomy. Curious to see what the author comes up for the next book.
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  • Elliot A
    January 1, 1970
    Stopping at 119 pages. I don't think I'm in the mood for this story at the present moment. Speaking purely from my own point of view; I found the protagonist has changed from the first instalment to this one. She seems more subdued and centred too much on her own plights, which are still the same as in the first book. I was looking forward to a murder mystery set in Scotland during the 1800's, but instead it felt like recycled internal conflicts and social commentary. Again, this is how I felt Stopping at 119 pages. I don't think I'm in the mood for this story at the present moment. Speaking purely from my own point of view; I found the protagonist has changed from the first instalment to this one. She seems more subdued and centred too much on her own plights, which are still the same as in the first book. I was looking forward to a murder mystery set in Scotland during the 1800's, but instead it felt like recycled internal conflicts and social commentary. Again, this is how I felt while trying to read this story and given my own struggles at the moment dealing with an traumatic experience, so this may not be the best choice right now. I will try again at a different time.
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  • Lupinus Texensis
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book by a wonderful writer, with an absolute pile of shit where the end should be.Mentally ill people are not plot points. MENTALLY ILL PEOPLE AREN'T PLOT POINTS.Mentally ill people are people, and therefore characters with agency and purpose.Killing off Will is such a cop out, that I can't even. Yay, now everyone gets to move on and Michael can get married and be a baron and nobody has to deal with anything uncomfortable, like damaged war heroes. Everyone at Dalmay house can This is a great book by a wonderful writer, with an absolute pile of shit where the end should be.Mentally ill people are not plot points. MENTALLY ILL PEOPLE AREN'T PLOT POINTS.Mentally ill people are people, and therefore characters with agency and purpose.Killing off Will is such a cop out, that I can't even. Yay, now everyone gets to move on and Michael can get married and be a baron and nobody has to deal with anything uncomfortable, like damaged war heroes. Everyone at Dalmay house can move on and la-dee-da.Do you smell that? That is a steaming pile of what comes out the back end of a cow.
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  • Keri
    January 1, 1970
    The 2nd book in the Lady Darby series kept me just as enthralled as the first one did. While I did figure out the whodunit and why pretty early in the book, it was the relationship aspects that kept me turning the pages until the end. Darn it Sebastian is still such a mysterious character. Keira and I both wanted to bash him over the head for not just kissing the stuffing out of us a time or two. :-) I wish that I had the 3rd book in the series in my hot hand so I could find out where this The 2nd book in the Lady Darby series kept me just as enthralled as the first one did. While I did figure out the whodunit and why pretty early in the book, it was the relationship aspects that kept me turning the pages until the end. Darn it Sebastian is still such a mysterious character. Keira and I both wanted to bash him over the head for not just kissing the stuffing out of us a time or two. :-) I wish that I had the 3rd book in the series in my hot hand so I could find out where this romance is headed! Awesome read!
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    Mortal Arts is the second offering in the Lady Darby series. I liked it even better than the first book, The Anatomist's Wife. Anna Lee Huber offers mysteries set in 1800s Scotland. She paints a clear picture of what life was like during the time period and location. In addition to the mystery, there is a budding romance between the two main characters. I recommend the Lady Darby mysteries for those that enjoy Charles Todd and/or Regency Mysteries. I do recommend starting with The Anatomist's Mortal Arts is the second offering in the Lady Darby series. I liked it even better than the first book, The Anatomist's Wife. Anna Lee Huber offers mysteries set in 1800s Scotland. She paints a clear picture of what life was like during the time period and location. In addition to the mystery, there is a budding romance between the two main characters. I recommend the Lady Darby mysteries for those that enjoy Charles Todd and/or Regency Mysteries. I do recommend starting with The Anatomist's Wife as there are continuing characters.
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  • Melodie
    January 1, 1970
    This was just excellent! I liked the first one, but this one just hit all the right notes for me. The mystery almost felt like an afterthought to me with this book. It was more about mental illness, most especially what we now call PTSD, and how people were treated at the time. The horrors they were often subjected to were unspeakable. I have a personal interest in the treatment of depression, what was referred to as simply melancholy during the time period these books are set in, and a book This was just excellent! I liked the first one, but this one just hit all the right notes for me. The mystery almost felt like an afterthought to me with this book. It was more about mental illness, most especially what we now call PTSD, and how people were treated at the time. The horrors they were often subjected to were unspeakable. I have a personal interest in the treatment of depression, what was referred to as simply melancholy during the time period these books are set in, and a book like this will get my attention every time. Kiera's empathy toward William made this story. RECOMMEND!
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely bloody brilliant. Great story, fabulous, intense characters but a real ensemble piece lead by the best hero and heroine and superbly written. The thought of having to wait for the next installment is physically painful, it's that good.5 stars. All time favorites list. Absolutely loved it.
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished the second Lady Darby mystery and loved it very much. Anna Lee Huber is a master at crafting a great mystery. This one deals with some seriously painful situations, and in a great addition to the series. Kept me guessing, to be sure.Now I must wait till Amazon delivers the third Lady Darby mystery.
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  • Donna Weaver
    January 1, 1970
    WHAT IT'S ABOUTScotland, 1830. Lady Kiera Darby is no stranger to intrigue—in fact, it seems to follow wherever she goes. After her foray into murder investigation, Kiera must journey to Edinburgh with her family so that her pregnant sister can be close to proper medical care. But the city is full of many things Kiera isn’t quite ready to face: the society ladies keen on judging her, her fellow investigator—and romantic entanglement—Sebastian Gage, and ultimately, another deadly mystery.Kiera’s WHAT IT'S ABOUTScotland, 1830. Lady Kiera Darby is no stranger to intrigue—in fact, it seems to follow wherever she goes. After her foray into murder investigation, Kiera must journey to Edinburgh with her family so that her pregnant sister can be close to proper medical care. But the city is full of many things Kiera isn’t quite ready to face: the society ladies keen on judging her, her fellow investigator—and romantic entanglement—Sebastian Gage, and ultimately, another deadly mystery.Kiera’s old friend Michael Dalmay is about to be married, but the arrival of his older brother—and Kiera’s childhood art tutor—William, has thrown everything into chaos. For ten years Will has been missing, committed to an insane asylum by his own father. Kiera is sympathetic to her mentor’s plight, especially when rumors swirl about a local girl gone missing. Now Kiera must once again employ her knowledge of the macabre and join forces with Gage in order to prove the innocence of a beloved family friend—and save the marriage of another…MY TAKEI liked this book even better than the first. It still had a creepy murder mystery to solve, but the history between Kiera and Gage already had its footing in the first book and their tantalizing relationship continues to grow.We learn more about Kiera's icky and brutal first husband and also things about Gage and the public face he wears. I like him better because of it.The ending is bittersweet, and my heart ached for Kiera. The storyline for this book has resolution, but she's not in a good place. As with the first book, this one ends with a teaser for the next.4 1/2 stars
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    The Lady Darby series has caught my attention and I want to read all the books now. The cost of the ebooks will slow me down. The Books I have read remind me of Victoria Holt's gothic mysteries. This book covers the treatment of a mental health patient and PDTS.Lord Cromarty is moving his family from the Castle to Edinburgh so that Alana, Keira sister can have excellent physician care during her pregnancy. A stop at Michael Dalmay home they learned that that is brother William is alive and their The Lady Darby series has caught my attention and I want to read all the books now. The cost of the ebooks will slow me down. The Books I have read remind me of Victoria Holt's gothic mysteries. This book covers the treatment of a mental health patient and PDTS.Lord Cromarty is moving his family from the Castle to Edinburgh so that Alana, Keira sister can have excellent physician care during her pregnancy. A stop at Michael Dalmay home they learned that that is brother William is alive and their Father had placed him in a mental institution. The twists and turns that follow will hold your attention. Sebastian Gage is a guest and he aids in the events. It is not sure what he is doing but has plans of his own. A village girl is missing and the question is William responsible?I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK AND SERIES.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    2nd read
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This second installment was exactly what I had been anticipating after all the recommendations. I adore Gage and his banter/chemistry with Kiera. I can't wait to learn more about their pasts.On to book 3!
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