Le Dernier Lapon
L’hiver est froid et dur en Laponie. À Kautokeino, un grand village sami au milieu de la toundra, au centre culturel, on se prépare à montrer un tambour de chaman que vient de donner un scientifique français, compagnon de Paul-Emile Victor. C’est un événement dans le village. Dans la nuit le tambour est volé. On soupçonne les fondamentalistes protestants laestadiens : ils ont dans le passé détruit de nombreux tambours pour combattre le paganisme. Puis on pense que ce sont les indépendantistes sami qui ont fait le coup pour faire parler d’eux.La mort d’un éleveur de rennes n’arrange rien à l’affaire. Deux enquêteurs de la police des rennes, Klemet Nango le Lapon et son équipière Nina Nansen, fraîche émoulue de l’école de police, sont persuadés que les deux affaires sont liées. Mais à Kautokeino on n’aime pas remuer les vieilles histoires et ils sont renvoyés à leurs courses sur leurs scooters des neiges à travers l’immensité glacée de la Laponie, et à la pacification des éternelles querelles entre éleveurs de rennes dont les troupeaux se mélangent. Au cours de l’enquête sur le meurtre Nina est fascinée par la beauté sauvage d’Aslak, qui vit comme ses ancêtres et connaît parfaitement ce monde sauvage et blanc.

Le Dernier Lapon Details

TitleLe Dernier Lapon
Author
LanguageFrench
ReleaseSep 13th, 2012
PublisherMétailié
ISBN-139782864248835
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Thriller, Fiction

Le Dernier Lapon Review

  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Trapdoor for providing me with a free copy for an honest review!A priceless local relic is stolen from Kautokeino, a village in Lapland, that lies in the middle of the isolated snowy tundra. Two reindeer polices, Klemet Nango, an experienced police, and Nina Nansen, fresh from the local police academy, sends out to investigate the crime. Then a local reindeer herder is murdered and Klemet and Nina suspect that the two events are linked to each other.The Sámis in Sweden, Norway, and Fin Thank you Trapdoor for providing me with a free copy for an honest review!A priceless local relic is stolen from Kautokeino, a village in Lapland, that lies in the middle of the isolated snowy tundra. Two reindeer polices, Klemet Nango, an experienced police, and Nina Nansen, fresh from the local police academy, sends out to investigate the crime. Then a local reindeer herder is murdered and Klemet and Nina suspect that the two events are linked to each other.The Sámis in Sweden, Norway, and Finland has during century’s, just like other indigenous populations, been oppressed, and one thing the church did against them was burning their drums, there used to be thousands of them, now there are only 71 documented left. I have been for years fascinated by the Sámis so that made the experience of reading this book so much greater. Because even though this is a crime novel, it’s also a glimpse into the Sámi world, both the present one and the one the high power was hell bent on destroying when they sent up people to colonize and make Christians out of the natives.This book was truly well written, I mean it took me days to get through because I just couldn’t skim any part because it was so well-written and interesting to read. Of course, the characters was great even though the police, for instance, fell into the risk of being stereotypes, bad cop, good cop, a new cop, but I didn't mind that. One character I really came to like was Aslak, the reindeer herder that preferred the old traditional way of herding reindeer instead the modern way with snow scooters.The only part that I didn’t like was the abrupt ending; suddenly the book was just finished and I wanted more. I hope Olivier Truc writes more books, because this, his debut book was marvelous!4.5 stars!Olivier Truc was born in France in 1964. He has worked as a journalist since 1986 and has been based in Stockholm since 1994, where he is currently the Nordic and Baltic correspondent for Le Monde and Le Point. As a reporter, Olivier Truc covers subjects from politics and economics to social issues like immigration and minorities. He has also produced TV documentaries, including one that portrays a group of Norwegian policemen in Lapland. This is his debut novel.
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  • Malin
    January 1, 1970
    Being Swedish I have to take into account that the author is not from this part of Europe. One of the main characters, Nina, is from the south of Norway, but I don't for a second believe anyone from Scandinavia can be so totally ignorant of the history and reality of life in Sapmi. Especially not one with a police education, that must have contained at least some elements of sociology and overview of national ongoing conflicts. But if I try to see Nina as the eyes of the author it makes more sen Being Swedish I have to take into account that the author is not from this part of Europe. One of the main characters, Nina, is from the south of Norway, but I don't for a second believe anyone from Scandinavia can be so totally ignorant of the history and reality of life in Sapmi. Especially not one with a police education, that must have contained at least some elements of sociology and overview of national ongoing conflicts. But if I try to see Nina as the eyes of the author it makes more sense. This might be a good introduction to Sapmi controversies for someone from outside of Scandinavia.Sadly it gives a picture of a culture that is already more or less extinct. In many parts that may be so, but in others there are still positive forces. I hope that a few other native authors from this region will soon be avaliable in translations, so outsiders can get a more nuanced perception.Still, the political dimension, of a growing nationalist party in Norway, and the effects they have on local communities in the North was interesting. And the crime investigation became pretty good too after Nina had overcome a bit of her initial naivite.
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  • Marina Sofia
    January 1, 1970
    There's something about the cold reaches of the Far North which appeals to me endlessly. I loved M.J. McGrath's series set in the Northern Territories of Canada and I love this depiction of cross-border Lapland and the Reindeer Police. I keep hesitating between 3 and 4 stars, because the atmosphere, the promising main characters (a Sami nearing retirement and a fresh-faced young Norwegian woman just out of police school), the description of a lifestyle in danger of getting lost, the intricate pl There's something about the cold reaches of the Far North which appeals to me endlessly. I loved M.J. McGrath's series set in the Northern Territories of Canada and I love this depiction of cross-border Lapland and the Reindeer Police. I keep hesitating between 3 and 4 stars, because the atmosphere, the promising main characters (a Sami nearing retirement and a fresh-faced young Norwegian woman just out of police school), the description of a lifestyle in danger of getting lost, the intricate plot were all worth 4 stars, but there were some longish passages in the middle which sagged a bit, too many explanations and repetitions, and some rather stereotypical situations or side characters.
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  • Rosiemae Burton
    January 1, 1970
    A highly intriging, interesting, well-written exiciting plot. I love that it was set in Lapland (although it had mentions of Scandinavia) and I love the history and points of view of the 2 cultures. The only bad thing about the book was that the ending was slightly abrupt but overall a very enjoyable crime novel
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  • MaryG2E
    January 1, 1970
    The setting for this book is the Scandinavian Arctic. The title refers to the mid-winter period at high latitudes, during which the sun does not rise above the horizon for forty days. No sun = no shadow. Lapland is the traditional home of the indigenous Sami people. The author prefers to use its traditional name of Sapmi, a cultural region which sits astride political boundaries to include northernmost parts of Sweden, Finland, Norway, and Russia. While the Sami have their own Parliament, it is The setting for this book is the Scandinavian Arctic. The title refers to the mid-winter period at high latitudes, during which the sun does not rise above the horizon for forty days. No sun = no shadow. Lapland is the traditional home of the indigenous Sami people. The author prefers to use its traditional name of Sapmi, a cultural region which sits astride political boundaries to include northernmost parts of Sweden, Finland, Norway, and Russia. While the Sami have their own Parliament, it is tokenistic at best, and the majority of the administration of the region is done via intergovernmental agencies, mainly sourced from Olso and Stockholm.One of these agencies is the Reindeer Police, a force set up to enforce laws and manage issues relating to the annual migration of reindeer from winter to summer pastures. A minority of Sami continue to live a traditional lifestyle, breeding reindeer and managing the herds as they move across the region in age-old patterns. Our heroes, Klemet Nango, a Sami, and his young partner Nina Nanson, newly arrived from southern Norway, make up Patrol P9 of the Reindeer Police, stationed at Kautokeino. In the course of routine procedures to warn local herder Matti Labba about straying reindeer, they discover his mutilated corpse at his trailer out on the tundra. What looks like a simple case of murder over a boundary dispute soon turns into a complex situation. In addition to the mysterious death of Matti, a second crime in 24 hours has occurred, with the theft of a rare artefact from the local museum. An ancient Sami shaman drum, used by traditional priests for healing and communion with the spirits, has been stolen. In a remote community where the most action for the police is the usual Saturday night barroom brawl, these two major crimes galvanise the local constabulary.Thus Olivier Truc sets up the plot in which this intriguing mystery plays out.I heard a radio review of Forty Days without Shadow on ABC Radio National’s Blueprint for Living program recently. The review was given by Mary Dalmau, of Melbourne’s much loved bookshop Reader’s Feast, whose opinions I value.The book was represented as a crime novel, and its own subtitle is An Arctic Thriller. The publisher’s blurb describes it as a ‘compelling thriller’ and ‘a truly dark, gripping crime novel’. Sorry, but I beg to disagree. I’ve read much better crime fiction and tighter thrillers than Forty Days without Shadow.After a longish prologue set in the 17th century, the present-day story commences with us being introduced to the detectives, Klemet and Nina of the Reindeer Police, and the initial crime, the theft of a precious tribal drum. Within a short space the author brings in a whole host of minor characters, Sami and non-Sami, and the second crime, the murder of Matti. We meet characters like the coarse Rolf Brattsen, with his petty hates and undisguised prejudice against the Sami, who is in cahoots with the equally odious Councilman Karl Olson. Truc introduces two key characters, Aslak, an enigmatic Sami herder who is living an authentic, traditional lifestyle on the tundra, without modern conveniences, and Andre Racagnal, a rather unsavoury yet brilliant French geologist, making applications to prospect for minerals in Sapmi. In my opinion we are introduced to so many minor characters, most with their own sub-plots, that the narrative becomes rather confused for a while. Somewhere after the halfway point of the book, the various elements swirling around the pages like an Arctic snowstorm start to converge, and then we get a bit of forward momentum with the plot. The pace picks up eventually, leading to a dramatic climax and resolution of the mysteries.Truc brings into the story a welter of issues which are fascinating, but somewhat distracting from the central tale. He uses the characters as plot devices to air political, social and cultural issues which are relevant to modern Sami society. Brattsen represents the red-neck element, contemptuous of so-called liberal perspectives, always ready with spiteful racist remarks. Charismatic Sami activist Olaf Renson represents the perennial provocateur, poised ready to make political mileage out of any situation. Murder victim Matti Labba is a classic example of the damaged indigenous individual, trying to fit into modern society while holding on to traditional beliefs. His life is dogged by poverty, mental health issues and alcoholism. As well as the social and political wrangles that Truc plays out among his characters, the environment features in an important way. There are implications for the entire region if Racagnal’s geological survey finds a major source of precious minerals. The delicate ecosystem of the tundra might be unbalanced, and the annual migration of the reindeer herds could be disrupted. Those Sami clinging to the vestiges of the traditional way of life would lose their livelihoods. It is thought-provoking stuff, sufficiently so to get me googling the topic. For readers of this book, I recommend looking up Sami drums on-line, to get a decent visual sense of what the author is describing. While looking at the shape and make of the drums, I viewed a number of historical photos of the Sami, which gave me a better sense of the character of this indigenous culture.This story has much relevance for us in modern Australian society. We too have an indigenous population whose traditional way of life has been thoroughly disrupted. Many of our aboriginals live impoverished existences on the margins of today’s society. Like Sapmi, we have vast areas of under-populated land, where riches may be gained from exploiting natural resources. Our unique Australian environment is just as fragile and subject to degradation as that of Sapmi. Our politics at local, state and federal levels is bedevilled by vested interests and ambitious, uncaring politicians, just like those portrayed in Forty Days without Shadow. The spectres of paedophilia and rape stalk the pages of our newspapers and our TV screens almost weekly.As a crime novel, yeah, it’s not bad, though I’ve read much better books in this genre. As a thriller, it is certainly no edge-of-seat, can’t-put down kind of read. Yet it is an enjoyable and intriguing book. As a slow-burning mystery novel, it really works well. I see this novel as a very good piece of contemporary fiction, which uses the device of a murder as the platform from which the author launches his examination of key issues in modern society. This is a rich, multi-layered story, which stimulated my mind and triggered thoughts about my own society and culture, and the situation of Australia’s indigenous peoples.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    The language almost felt like it was translated by someone not quite native in Swedish, or somehow trying to incorporate the original French syntax into Swedish. It just seems odd at times.The first half of the book is pure world-buildning, meant to entice people that probably hasn't experienced a true Scandinavian winter (far up in the north) where -20 degrees Celsius is considered milder weather. But at the same time, if you have, it describes it so vividly it's like you're there, like you can The language almost felt like it was translated by someone not quite native in Swedish, or somehow trying to incorporate the original French syntax into Swedish. It just seems odd at times.The first half of the book is pure world-buildning, meant to entice people that probably hasn't experienced a true Scandinavian winter (far up in the north) where -20 degrees Celsius is considered milder weather. But at the same time, if you have, it describes it so vividly it's like you're there, like you can feel and taste and smell the cold.The second half picks up the pace and the search for a native drum and a murderer gets you really involved in the story. I love reading about the Sami, their history and traditions, since I'm terribly uneducated about them. I can't attest to how accurate the info is or the depiction of them, but for what I have heard of the awful treatment of them, so similar to how other indigenous people are treated elsewhere.In the end, most storylines are neatly tied up, just a few loose ends that I think the author might have saved for book 2.I did enjoy it more than I predicted in the beginning, but it's getting a bit of a reduction for being almost glacially paced at times.
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  • Shomeret
    January 1, 1970
    When I was a child my favorite book was Lapland Outlaw by Arthur Catherall which I got from the Weekly Reader Book Club. Catherall’s children’s book may have involved some inaccuracies, but it taught me that people in other cultures have different values which need to be respected. The sixteen year old Sami boy who was the central character had grown up as a nomadic herder of reindeer. He felt panicked by being enclosed within four walls and fought to maintain his ancestral way of life. I haven’ When I was a child my favorite book was Lapland Outlaw by Arthur Catherall which I got from the Weekly Reader Book Club. Catherall’s children’s book may have involved some inaccuracies, but it taught me that people in other cultures have different values which need to be respected. The sixteen year old Sami boy who was the central character had grown up as a nomadic herder of reindeer. He felt panicked by being enclosed within four walls and fought to maintain his ancestral way of life. I haven’t visited with the Sami through the pages of a book for a great many years, but it was my memory of Lapland Outlaw that caused me to obtain Forty Days Without Shadow which is an English translation of the French thriller Le Dernier Lapon by Olivier Truc. I was very interested in finding out more about the Sami. I found it especially intriguing that the roofs of traditional Sami tents were covered with interlaced antlers that were supposed to be arranged so that you could see the sky through them. This is similar to the huts that are constructed for the Jewish holiday of Sukkot. My Jewish ancestors were also once nomadic herders. Perhaps this is why I feel a connection to the Sami. I thought the characters were well drawn and well-motivated. I found both of the protagonists sympathetic, and although the villains weren’t at all sympathetic, they were very credible. I appreciated the fact that Nina played an active role in the case. Since she knew French, she went to France to interview the French collector who had donated the drum to the museum to find out more about the stolen drum and the circumstances in which he acquired it. She also brought about a major break in the case due to her rapport with a female Sami who trusted her. This was an excellent novel from the thriller perspective. There were issues involving party politics in Norway, racism, World War II and predatory behavior by mining companies. It was a suspenseful and involving story line from start to finish. I loved Forty Days Without Shadow.For my complete review see http://shomeretmasked.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Alba
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on: http://www.albainbookland.com/2015/01... I found this story really interesting. The dark atmosphere (a lot can happen in the vast tundra in Lapland when the sun only shines some minutes per day), the detailed descriptions of a culture and lifestyle quite unknown to me but that probably has its days numbered, and the well developed main characters, all added to the intricate plot of this story, that had me glued to its pages, wanting to know more, to learn more. Because Oliv Originally posted on: http://www.albainbookland.com/2015/01... I found this story really interesting. The dark atmosphere (a lot can happen in the vast tundra in Lapland when the sun only shines some minutes per day), the detailed descriptions of a culture and lifestyle quite unknown to me but that probably has its days numbered, and the well developed main characters, all added to the intricate plot of this story, that had me glued to its pages, wanting to know more, to learn more. Because Olivier Truc not only offers us a fantastic thriller but also a glimpse to the Sámi world, present and past, as we learn how they live now but also how they used to life and all the oppression they have suffered since the seventeenth century.Even if the pace of the story was a bit slow, given all the factors and parties that had a role in the story, I really enjoyed it. Just as Klemet and Nina, our intuitive investigators from the reindeer police, I collected all the evidence and details that the author left during the novel so I could guess who was behind the artefact theft and the murder and I was glad to see that I was actually on the right path.The only thing that didn't convince me about the story was the abrupt ending as I would have liked everything to end a bit more settled. I do hope though that we hear more from Klemet and Nina, this strange but effective duo and Olivier Truc takes us back to the desolate tundra. I would love to read more about the reindeer police and their cases.
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  • Mr. Gottshalk
    January 1, 1970
    I never knew there were such things as Reindeer Police, but in northern Scandanavia, apparently it's true. The plot was slow to get going, but once the characters started to get in gear and find out who murdered the sachem of the northern Norway region, the book was difficult to put down. The author did a decent job of holding my attention - following all the different characters, both good and evil, for just a few pages at a time, and them jumping to another subplot. I enjoy reading books that I never knew there were such things as Reindeer Police, but in northern Scandanavia, apparently it's true. The plot was slow to get going, but once the characters started to get in gear and find out who murdered the sachem of the northern Norway region, the book was difficult to put down. The author did a decent job of holding my attention - following all the different characters, both good and evil, for just a few pages at a time, and them jumping to another subplot. I enjoy reading books that put me in a place and teach a bit about the local geography - location, place, regions, relationships and movement.
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    The respectful focus on Sami history and culture -- and the fact that it's written by a Frenchman -- sets this apart from the flood of Nordic Noir. I figured out quite a bit of it before the Reindeer Patrol officers did, but the interesting characters and unique setting made this a compelling page turner. Reading Forty Days Without Shadow inspired a lot of googling -- I love when I can learn something from a crime novel. Really, really hope that Truc's next novel gets an English translation as w The respectful focus on Sami history and culture -- and the fact that it's written by a Frenchman -- sets this apart from the flood of Nordic Noir. I figured out quite a bit of it before the Reindeer Patrol officers did, but the interesting characters and unique setting made this a compelling page turner. Reading Forty Days Without Shadow inspired a lot of googling -- I love when I can learn something from a crime novel. Really, really hope that Truc's next novel gets an English translation as well -- can't wait to see what's in store for Klemet and Nina!
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  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    If accurate, the insight this book gives to the Sami culture and it's clashes with modern day Norway are really interesting. Overall though I found this book a bit of a drag to read. The characters were one dimensional and lacked subtlety. I found the male gaze throughout the story extremely tiresome and the ending was oddly abrupt and ultimately unsatisfying.
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  • AngryGreyCat
    January 1, 1970
    Forty Days Without Shadow is termed an Arctic thriller, set in the Norwegian tundra and involving the indigenous Sami people who live there. There is really a pair of protagonists, Detective Klemet Nango, a native Sami, and Detective Nina Nasen, an outsider fresh out of the police academy. The detectives main job is to regulate disputes involving reindeer herding, but they are dragged into the theft of an important Sami artifact from a local museum. The storyline also involves a Lutheran sect in Forty Days Without Shadow is termed an Arctic thriller, set in the Norwegian tundra and involving the indigenous Sami people who live there. There is really a pair of protagonists, Detective Klemet Nango, a native Sami, and Detective Nina Nasen, an outsider fresh out of the police academy. The detectives main job is to regulate disputes involving reindeer herding, but they are dragged into the theft of an important Sami artifact from a local museum. The storyline also involves a Lutheran sect intent on destroying Sami culture, which the Pastor sees as counter to the Lutheran religious beliefs, disputes between the reindeer herders, and geologists who are anxious to mine the pristine wilderness.The author did an excellent job of establishing a sense of place and in developing the detectives, through their interactions between themselves and the community. The pacing was slow but that was in keeping with the building tension and sense of isolation. This book provided a glimpse into life in an isolated northern outpost among people who live life under harsh, life threatening conditions.I did enjoy this book, but be prepared for a slow building tension rather than the fast paced page turners usually associated with thrillers.
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  • Andy Weston
    January 1, 1970
    Is there anywhere on this planet that has not yet been the backdrop to a crime thriller? If there is, then I doubt that will be the case for long. Truc sets his effort in Lapland amongst the Sami people and the reindeer police (not another branch like the church police if you were a Python lover). The setting is amongst my favourites and the author has done his research into Sami culture well. Those aspects of this novel work well. The story drags though. It starts well, with the predictable mur Is there anywhere on this planet that has not yet been the backdrop to a crime thriller? If there is, then I doubt that will be the case for long. Truc sets his effort in Lapland amongst the Sami people and the reindeer police (not another branch like the church police if you were a Python lover). The setting is amongst my favourites and the author has done his research into Sami culture well. Those aspects of this novel work well. The story drags though. It starts well, with the predictable murder, but loses its way somewhat amidst relationships between the real police (who are portrayed like a type of keystone kop) and the reindeer police. What exactly do reindeer police do? Certainly read and you will find out, and as I say earlier, it may be the most regarding feature of the novel.
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  • Tim Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    Very enjoyable well put together novel. Maybe started a bit slow, wasn't sure what I was getting, but once it got its groove it was a real page turner. really puts the "N" in Nordic crime fiction and takes you into the far reaches of far northern Lappland as a twisting tale that weaves old plot lines with present ones as our two Reindeer Police race to catch their man before powerful forces work to stop them.
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  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book, and was prepared to give it five stars. However, for as slow as this book moved, I felt the end was rushed and left me with too many questions! It is very late, so hopefully tomorrow when I review a few things I will have the answers I need. I absolutely love books that teach me about a place and people I never knew anything about. This book was definitely a delight in that area.
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  • Clashton
    January 1, 1970
    It was ok, a bit long and slow moving. Some of the characters seemed a bit formulaic, as did some of the plot elements (events stretching to other events in the past).The key test is: Would I read another by the author?The answer is no. I know a lot of people like it, but it is just not to my taste.
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  • Inga
    January 1, 1970
    First of all I really liked author's choice of the theme. (If you know more books about Sámis let me know in the comment section down below.) I took it from the shelve just because of that and the expectations were high even though the author is a foreigner or at least not originally from Scandinavia. I was surprised how good he is when it comes to details and I really liked the way the dialogues are written. It reminded me the time and the people I met in Sweden. Or at least those from Norrland First of all I really liked author's choice of the theme. (If you know more books about Sámis let me know in the comment section down below.) I took it from the shelve just because of that and the expectations were high even though the author is a foreigner or at least not originally from Scandinavia. I was surprised how good he is when it comes to details and I really liked the way the dialogues are written. It reminded me the time and the people I met in Sweden. Or at least those from Norrland (North of Sweden). The plot was intriguing but it had a lack of dinamics which is needed for an every crime story. Some parts were going too slowly and that let me guess quite early in the book what will be the bad guys. I liked detailed describtion of traditions and historical details but the nowadays' action could still be more dinamic.I highly recommend the book for those who are interested in Scandinavian culture and lifestyle.
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  • Ward
    January 1, 1970
    4.7. An international mystery set inn modern-day Lappland, the northern territory near where the borders of Norway, Sweden and Finland converge, but still inhabited mainly by the indigenous Sami native. While the Sami may still be the majority, their way of life (such as reindeer herding) and culture are falling to the wayside and overtaken by the Europeans ways from the south. Breaking the hum-drum of small-town drunkenness and delinquent crime, the isolated village of Kautokeino incurs two maj 4.7. An international mystery set inn modern-day Lappland, the northern territory near where the borders of Norway, Sweden and Finland converge, but still inhabited mainly by the indigenous Sami native. While the Sami may still be the majority, their way of life (such as reindeer herding) and culture are falling to the wayside and overtaken by the Europeans ways from the south. Breaking the hum-drum of small-town drunkenness and delinquent crime, the isolated village of Kautokeino incurs two major crimes within a week -- the murder of a Sami reindeer herder and the steeling of a rare cultural artifact from the local Sami museum. A well-plotted police procedure ensues involving well-developed denizens of the north in the grips of cultural angst of the indigenous Sami haunted by centuries of "civilizing" by Lutheran and Caucasian invaders.
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  • Heather Kidd
    January 1, 1970
    An exceptionally unique setting with a gripping plot that just holds you fast TIL the end. A little hard to get into at first but I really started to enjoy the main characters of the P9 Patrol of the Reindeer Police. Learned a lot of new stuff. Always have a soft spot for anything Scandinavia after going to school in Sweden. And really enjoyed the geology treasure hunt. The pulling together of all the clues and finding proof to support intuition and gut feelings. It’s an extraordinary read and I An exceptionally unique setting with a gripping plot that just holds you fast TIL the end. A little hard to get into at first but I really started to enjoy the main characters of the P9 Patrol of the Reindeer Police. Learned a lot of new stuff. Always have a soft spot for anything Scandinavia after going to school in Sweden. And really enjoyed the geology treasure hunt. The pulling together of all the clues and finding proof to support intuition and gut feelings. It’s an extraordinary read and I can see why it’s a worldwide bestseller.
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  • Elana
    January 1, 1970
    Like any good mystery, this one conveys a powerful sense of place: Finnmark, on the borders of Northern Norway, Finland and Sweden. Having been there recently, I can testify that darkness, snow and biting cold are more memorable characters in this novel than the actual human protagonists. This is not necessarily a bad thing. In addition, the murder mystery is intertwined with the complicated history of the Sámi people in a way that is both illuminating and powerful. The ending seems a little rus Like any good mystery, this one conveys a powerful sense of place: Finnmark, on the borders of Northern Norway, Finland and Sweden. Having been there recently, I can testify that darkness, snow and biting cold are more memorable characters in this novel than the actual human protagonists. This is not necessarily a bad thing. In addition, the murder mystery is intertwined with the complicated history of the Sámi people in a way that is both illuminating and powerful. The ending seems a little rushed but the novel is very much worth reading.
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  • Camille Medart
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve started this book on Saturday and finished it today. I loved it ! The atmosphere, the place, characters. The mystical aspect gives something special to the book. But I can’t understand the end.. What’s happen between Klemet and Aslak when they were 7? I’m confused. I’m starting now « Le Detroit du loup » by Olivier Truc.
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  • William
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable read. Fairly true to the North as I know it from Northern Canada although I don't know Lapland and the Sami. The Tundra, Northern lights, and geology were well researched and seemed accurate to my thinking. The story was a good one and not full of unbelievable heroics that seem to fill so many thrillers these days.
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  • Heather G
    January 1, 1970
    It was a struggle to finish this book, partly because I couldn't get into it but also I left it at the hairdresser's for several months and then I left it in my trunk, forgetting about it for a while. But the story was difficult because everyone was hyper stereotypical. I hope to visit this part of the world someday.
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  • Dana Slaughter
    January 1, 1970
    Great murder mystery. Combine winter in the far north and the plight of the is indigneous Sami people, and you have an unusual read!
  • Mary Ahlgren
    January 1, 1970
    I learned so much.
  • PG Pariseau
    January 1, 1970
    Not bad, but hardly gripping. Not really a fair-play mystery, not suspenseful enough to be thriller. BUT - a fascinating setting, interesting characters.
  • Lucia Ramos
    January 1, 1970
    Exceptional Nordic Crime Book that introduced a completely different culture to the reader!
  • Gage Herrmann
    January 1, 1970
    Got about 20 pages in. Just not interesting.
  • Ursula
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it. Loved the concept of daylight
  • Jack Heath
    January 1, 1970
    Synopsis: when a priceless relic is stolen from Kautokeino in Lapland, Detective Nango gets help from a newcomer.
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