Sherlock Holmes
It's the autumn of 1890, and a spate of bombings has hit London. The newspapers are full of fevered speculation about anarchists, anti-monarchists and Fenians. But one man suspects an even more sinister hand behind the violence.  Sherlock Holmes believes Professor Moriarty is orchestrating a nationwide campaign of terror, but to what end? At the same time, a bizarrely garbed figure has been spotted on the rooftops and in the grimy back alleys of the capital.  He moves with the extraordinary agility of a latter-day Spring-heeled Jack.  He possesses weaponry and armour of unprecedented sophistication.  He is known only by the name Baron Cauchemar, and he appears to be a scourge of crime and villainy. But is this masked man truly the force for good that he seems?  Is he connected somehow to the bombings?  Holmes and his faithful companion Dr. Watson are about to embark on one of their strangest and most exhilarating adventures yet.

Sherlock Holmes Details

TitleSherlock Holmes
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 27th, 2013
PublisherTitan Books
ISBN-139781781165416
Rating
GenreMystery, Science Fiction, Steampunk, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Crime, Fantasy

Sherlock Holmes Review

  • Stephen Robert Collins
    January 1, 1970
    Starts with a bang a bomb goes of Waterloo station & Watson nearly goes with it.When gets to 221b Baker St he is hardly in a chair with glass of Brandy before Mycroft summons arrives.Meanwhile a strange super hero straight out of pages of Marvel a Stan Lee style creation is Baron Cauhemar dressed like Captain Britain & on huge legs, jumping about London like Robin Hood. Holmes is not interested in his brother 's case he is more interested in the mythical Spring-Heeled Jack of the Baron W Starts with a bang a bomb goes of Waterloo station & Watson nearly goes with it.When gets to 221b Baker St he is hardly in a chair with glass of Brandy before Mycroft summons arrives.Meanwhile a strange super hero straight out of pages of Marvel a Stan Lee style creation is Baron Cauhemar dressed like Captain Britain & on huge legs, jumping about London like Robin Hood. Holmes is not interested in his brother 's case he is more interested in the mythical Spring-Heeled Jack of the Baron Who he thinks is real but The police don't. His brother thinks Sherlock Is mad as a Hatter. But then Holmes sees the Baron in action right in front of him. Thus proving The Myth is real. But who is he & why does Holmes think 60 bodies from the bombings may lie at the Baron's feet?Here we have the 'anti Semitic & lets Blame the Irish 'bashing a very common place in Victorian Era. But have Holmes brawling in the streets with a pedio Frenchman tooThe Baron Is Iron man, Batman, Doc Savage, Spider-Man, Doctor Octopus, The Vulture,Captain Nemo, & Mr Fantastic all rolled into one. Oh there is also a certain Professor hiding in the shadows .TOP SHERLOCK HOLMES 2018
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  • F.R.
    January 1, 1970
    Much like Sherlock Holmes, Batman is often hailed as the World’s Greatest Detective. Now I freely admit that I primarily know The Bat through film and TV, so I’m not entirely sure how he’s gained this title. You don’t see many Batman locked-room mysteries; The Joker and The Riddler are normally very blasé about their crimes, and don’t hide behind a series of red herrings; while you don’t often see Batman get all the suspects together at the end of tell them whodunit. I can vaguely remember seein Much like Sherlock Holmes, Batman is often hailed as the World’s Greatest Detective. Now I freely admit that I primarily know The Bat through film and TV, so I’m not entirely sure how he’s gained this title. You don’t see many Batman locked-room mysteries; The Joker and The Riddler are normally very blasé about their crimes, and don’t hide behind a series of red herrings; while you don’t often see Batman get all the suspects together at the end of tell them whodunit. I can vaguely remember seeing an old comic book image of Batman with his cowl still on, sitting behind a microscope examining evidence (an odd image, as the cowl would be really impractical for the task, don’t you think?) Beyond that though, I can’t think why Batman has that title and yet he does.Here then in literature is the coming together of the two Great Detectives: ‘Sherlock Holmes v. Batman: Dawn of Steampunk’.Well, actually no, the appearance of Batman in a novel like this would lead to three dozen IP lawyers having excited palpitations. Instead we have a Batman-esque hero, one with the resources and the gadgets and a name which strikes supernatural terror into the criminal underworld. Only this one is based in the East End rather than Gotham City.A series of explosions rocks London, and whereas Mycroft Holmes is desperate for his brother to investigate, Sherlock himself is anxious to pursue the so called Baron Cauchemar. Some say this Baron is but a myth, some think the tales of him are nothing but the exaggerations of frightened criminals, but without a doubt he is the scourge of the East End and Holmes is convinced that his appearance is not unconnected to the wave of bombings.It’s a diverting tale, although one which is so excited by the possibilities of its steampunk superhero, that it sometimes feels like Holmes and Watson are passengers in their own story – a distinct feat when Watson is narrating him. Still it’s a hell of a lot of fun, and that’s more that can be said for a lot of faux Holmes stories.
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  • Jasper
    January 1, 1970
    originally posted at:http://thebookplank.blogspot.com/2013/08/the-stuff-of-nightmares.htmlTitan Books has been a steadily releasing new Sherlock Holmes fiction over the last couple of years. Sherlock Holmes with his witty remarks and his remarkable sense of observations has always been of interest of me. I read The Army of Dr. Moreau by Guy Adams which has the same type of cover art, there isn't a mentioning of a series that I can find. But what I did discover is that both the books: The Army of originally posted at:http://thebookplank.blogspot.com/2013/08/the-stuff-of-nightmares.htmlTitan Books has been a steadily releasing new Sherlock Holmes fiction over the last couple of years. Sherlock Holmes with his witty remarks and his remarkable sense of observations has always been of interest of me. I read The Army of Dr. Moreau by Guy Adams which has the same type of cover art, there isn't a mentioning of a series that I can find. But what I did discover is that both the books: The Army of Dr. Moreau and The Stuff of Nightmares have a lot of supernatural influences. The Stuff of Nightmares is written by James Lovegrove, who is well known for his Pantheon and Redlaw series. It's hard to say whether Sherlock and Watson really go through a development from book to book. There has been many stories written that feature Sherlock and his assistant Dr. Watson, but when I think of this enigmatic duo, I think classic Victorian London, walking sticks, bowler and top type hats and pipes. And yes, each writer has its own writing style and I was wondering how James Lovegrove would voice and let show Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. He did it in the way that most fans will like it, the classic Victorian take, with Sherlock taking the lead, being his typical "dare-devilish" nature and his keen eye of observation and Watson taking the more “let’s think it over before we act” side. Because they themselves are already well established, they can be readily used and allowed James Lovegrove to write up a detailed case study for Sherlock and Dr. Watson. The narration in the way that Watson is writing a book, partly reflecting back on the adventures themselves this allowed a unique way of showing the story as there was one part when Sherlock could have died but the reflection that Watson does with: “Well I could prolong the assumption that Sherlock was dead” but he jumps right back into the story.For the story of The Stuff of Nightmares, think steampunk, a lot. The story starts off with a the mentioning of recent bombings that have been plaguing the city of London and the perpetrator or perpetrators haven’t been caught so far. Now Sherlock is drawn in to this mystery by his ever-present curiosity to find out who is behind these attacks and why. In the initial set-up of the story you are introduced to several storylines; the first is the case with the bombings that present a threat and the second one is the masked man known as Baron Cauchemar. As you can make up from the synopsis and cover of the book, the steampunk influence I mentioned above is heavily proven by the character of Baron Cauchemar with his various nifty gadgets. But I will get to him in a bit. The first 2/3 of The Stuff of Nightmares is all about showing exposure to current events, what is happening and introducing you to a lot of characters, some to be trusted more than others. You, or I at least, started to make my mind up who the bomber would be and could, in the beginning only make up one character, but by the intervention at the church I was proven wrong. From this point onwards, James Lovegrove, carefully start to release more and more information about one specific character and later Sherlock, as clever as he is, connects the dots. We are still only 2/3 into the story so far and you learn who the bad guy is, now this can break a book, by revealing the culprit to soon it could climax its plot to soon as well. Well that's not the case at all. As you now also learn what the intentions are of the ultimate bad guy of the book and does produce a mad rush for our duo to save the country! I really liked how all of a sudden, by just a few hints, a lot of the earlier proposed things feel into place and how the story in the end was broadened to a whole other level. Well I just have to say this of the plot, the mad race in the end, with Sherlock and Watson in an airship chasing a train, in Victorian steampunk London, that just gives some cool graphic images in the back of my mind. Next to the bombings, which proof to be the major part of the storyline there was also the introduction of Baron Cauchemar, first as a myth then as a real person. He is the proposed scourge for the villains of the dark streets of London, only shows himself at night to mete out justice. When I first read about him, I just couldn't trust him, like there has to be more to his character. Baron Cauchemar is a piece of engineering and making bombs also requires a certain finesse and skill... However soon along the lines of the book you learn more about his intentions and in the end his whole story of how it came to be is told, which made it all even that more understandable to what happened earlier. The part that I liked most about his character was his whole set of gear. Yes, he is the guy on the cover. When he "undresses" his armor its told in such a way that I saw this red and yellow suite hovering in the back of my mind! All the gadgets from steamblasters, gas emmisions and his springheels is just awesome to read about, especially taken into consideration his vigilante role and the day and age this story take place.Now as for the ultimate bad guy of the story, I won't reveal who it is, it's some you have to find out for yourself. But the ending of this book, it something that even the sharpest investigator won't be able to pick out of how as the story starts to unravel. In those last few chapters! brilliant right there. I had this big ear to ear smile on my face when I read Chapter 40 and was making a particular sound, that undoubtedly many other readers will do as well when they read these scenes. This is really talking about lets introduce something totally different.The whole story of The Stuff of Nightmares managed to grab me from the start but the ending in particular really made this story much more enjoyable super to read. Because on one hand you have the classic Victorian Sherlock Holmes and John Watson and on the other hand you have the influences of something supernatural that makes the whole story just come to life. The Stuff of Nightmares is a great read, which a lot a fantasy enthusiasts will enjoy, it’s has the good point of both worlds, the crime investigation that show a more darker side to the story combined with a lot of cool steampunk and other fantasy elements. If you are looking for a transformed story of your favorite investigative duo, you really have to pick the new Sherlock Holmes books of Titan, they have a fine set of authors steadily turning out more and more books, the next Sherlock Holmes adventure The Will of the Dead by George Mann is out the 8th of November
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  • Marleen
    January 1, 1970
    When Dr. Watson returns to London by train he finds himself caught up in a bombing at Waterloo station. After giving what attention he can to those injured in the attack he wastes no time in getting to 221B Baker Street and his friend Sherlock Holmes.This is the third in a series of bombings which hold London and its inhabitants in a scary hold, with theories about the bombers and their reasons getting more hysterical by the day. But the bombings are not the only strange phenomena in London at t When Dr. Watson returns to London by train he finds himself caught up in a bombing at Waterloo station. After giving what attention he can to those injured in the attack he wastes no time in getting to 221B Baker Street and his friend Sherlock Holmes.This is the third in a series of bombings which hold London and its inhabitants in a scary hold, with theories about the bombers and their reasons getting more hysterical by the day. But the bombings are not the only strange phenomena in London at the time. A strange creature, about eight feet tall, with enormous strength and a scary arsenal of weapons has taken on London’s underworld. He interrupts misdeeds and incapacitates the villains although he never kills his opponents. Only known by the name Baron Cauchemar, many consider this man a myth, yet Sherlock Holmes is convinced that the Baron may be the key that will lead to unlocking the identity of those behind the bombings. And although both his brother, Mycroft and Dr. Watson have their doubts, he is determined to conduct his investigation along those lines.What follows is an investigation that will bring our two heroes face to face with pure evil. Confronting mortal danger more than once Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson have not only men’s evil to contend with, but also technological advances beyond their wildest imaginations. With the future of the British Empire at stake, Holmes and Watson have to embrace an unlikely ally if there are going to prevent disaster.I have to say that I’m greatly enjoying this series of newly written Sherlock Holmes adventures. While the stories in this series are close enough to the originals to keep fans of Arthur Conan Doyle happy, they also provide us with story lines that go beyond what he might have been able to conceive of in his days.The Stuff of Nightmares is an intriguing, well plotted and fast paced mystery, just as you would expect from a Sherlock Holmes story. What makes this book that little bit more special is the fact that it also contains elements that strongly remind me of Steam-Punk. It was fun to see Watson immediately think of the supernatural whenever he encounters something he doesn’t understand while Holmes, even when he has no better idea what exactly he is dealing with than his partner does, insists that there has to be a logical explanation.Apart from the steam-punkish elements, this is exactly what you would expect from a Sherlock Holmes story. We are given a dire threat, no obvious clues, quite a bit of misdirection and Holmes talking in riddles, just as he would in one of the traditional stories. We encounter familiar names from the Sherlock Holmes stories: the Baker Street Irregulars, Professor Moriarty, Mycroft Holmes, Inspector Lestrade, they all make an appearance and live up to their established reputation. While Sherlock Holmes purists may well find one or more things to object to in this book, I found great pleasure in the non-traditional elements of this story.James Lovegrove is an established and successful author of Science Fiction books and his writing experience shines through in this book. The story is smooth, the plot well developed and the mystery intriguing enough to keep the reader guessing until the author, or Sherlock Holmes, is ready to enlighten them. The author’s background is clear though when you read the technological descriptions in this book; the machines and contraptions are described in such detail that it is easy to visualise them. Overall I would call this a very welcome addition to the Sherlock Holmes stories that we know and love. Filled with danger, action and mystery, this is a book that is hard to put down once started. If Mr. Lovegrove ever decides to write another Sherlock Holmes story I will definitely read it.
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  • Tac Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    This was an excellent book. The writing was strong, and Lovegrove knows his Sherlock Holmes. The premise of the book is that it's written by Watson much later in life and there are shed loads of references to Doyle's other Sherlock stories. In fact, Lovegrove even takes it upon himself to rectify a few earlier inconsistencies. Some people might find this a bit pretentious as it didn't really add anything to the story but I found it a fun nod to the Holmes cannonites who might be reading. The wri This was an excellent book. The writing was strong, and Lovegrove knows his Sherlock Holmes. The premise of the book is that it's written by Watson much later in life and there are shed loads of references to Doyle's other Sherlock stories. In fact, Lovegrove even takes it upon himself to rectify a few earlier inconsistencies. Some people might find this a bit pretentious as it didn't really add anything to the story but I found it a fun nod to the Holmes cannonites who might be reading. The writing is not for from Doyle's but I don't think Lovegrove was trying to mimic him and I tend to like it better when authors of pastiches don't. Besides the steampunk nature of the story there are some modern themes that Doyle would not likely address, like various sexual predilections. A note on the steampunk, it's not over the top (except the end) but it's not bashful either. There's a 19th century Iron Man and vigilante, there's a lighter than air flying machine, and there's a train that transforms into a steampunk mech robot. Yeah that's the one over the top part and I could have lived without it. In fact if it wasn't for that part of the ending, I probably would have given this a 4 star rating.
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  • Riju Ganguly
    January 1, 1970
    This was a steampunk novel (not a very good one) that merely used the names (and supposedly characters) of Sherlock Holmes, Dr John Watson, Professor Moriarty, Inspector Lestrade et.al. It had not a single redeeming feature that might make this novel re-readable. Although Titan Books have provided us with enormously pleasing reprints and new pastiches dealing with the great detective, unfortunately this one was a rather sad miss: a drab, boring, long-winded affair which would have incurred the w This was a steampunk novel (not a very good one) that merely used the names (and supposedly characters) of Sherlock Holmes, Dr John Watson, Professor Moriarty, Inspector Lestrade et.al. It had not a single redeeming feature that might make this novel re-readable. Although Titan Books have provided us with enormously pleasing reprints and new pastiches dealing with the great detective, unfortunately this one was a rather sad miss: a drab, boring, long-winded affair which would have incurred the wrath not only of ACD but of any storyteller. AVOID IT.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    Sherlock Holmes and John Watson slightly out of character. Mycroft so badly out of character that it is disgusting that he even CALLED the character Mycroft.Only thing that makes this a 3 star read is the fast paced plot.
  • Patrick Scattergood
    January 1, 1970
    It's a shame that this site doesn't do half stars because neither is this book bad enough to warrant a three but neither is it good enough to warrant a four so I feel kind of bad down rating it.Neither way the one flaw of the story is the fact that every thing grinds to a halt whenever a explanation by Watson is given or a long diatribe by the Baron. It kind of felt like it was being used to pad out the book.However take that flaw out and you have a cracking Sherlock Holmes yarn. There are quite It's a shame that this site doesn't do half stars because neither is this book bad enough to warrant a three but neither is it good enough to warrant a four so I feel kind of bad down rating it.Neither way the one flaw of the story is the fact that every thing grinds to a halt whenever a explanation by Watson is given or a long diatribe by the Baron. It kind of felt like it was being used to pad out the book.However take that flaw out and you have a cracking Sherlock Holmes yarn. There are quite a few twists and turns as well as some shocking moments that make this worth picking up.For the full review by all means click the link to be site to my review site Curiosity of a Social Misfit.http://curiosityofasocialmisfit.blogs...
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  • Kati
    January 1, 1970
    Hm, the idea was good, very steam-punk-ish - especially the steam-powered suits at the end, the battle - but a) the book seemed way too long and b) I didn't really like the man hiding behind the Baron Cauchemar moniker, his story didn't really move me because his very own stupidity led to the downfall and death of innocent people. So, overall, I was rather disappointed.What I did like a lot was the very beginning, Watson thinking of his wife, Mary, who was recuperating from yet another failed pr Hm, the idea was good, very steam-punk-ish - especially the steam-powered suits at the end, the battle - but a) the book seemed way too long and b) I didn't really like the man hiding behind the Baron Cauchemar moniker, his story didn't really move me because his very own stupidity led to the downfall and death of innocent people. So, overall, I was rather disappointed.What I did like a lot was the very beginning, Watson thinking of his wife, Mary, who was recuperating from yet another failed pregnancy that hit her really hard, his need to hide the reason behind her failing health from Holmes, the explosion at the railway station, Watson helping the wounded... that was really great and I wish the whole book was like that, deeply emotional and close to heart. Unfortunately, it wasn't.
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  • Sarah Kenhard
    January 1, 1970
    Good readReally enjoyed this book. I think Arthur Conan Doyle would have too. Recommend for SH fans everywhere. Downloading the next one now.
  • Charles Prepolec
    January 1, 1970
    Characterization of Holmes, Watson and Mycroft was rather wobbly, but it was a fun, fast moving, comicbook-like, steampunk sort of romp. An enjoyable breezy read.
  • J
    January 1, 1970
    I have to say, I enjoyed this book in the Titan Books Sherlock series more than The Breath of God.Maybe it's not true of all Sherlock fans, but I definitely prefer the more canon characterization (nothing against other series, but I couldn't stomach reading about a married Sherlock), and I believe Lovegrove did a fantastic job staying true to canon.Included are boatloads of references and (perhaps cheeky) corrections to the inconsistencies in the original series. But I loved that those were in t I have to say, I enjoyed this book in the Titan Books Sherlock series more than The Breath of God.Maybe it's not true of all Sherlock fans, but I definitely prefer the more canon characterization (nothing against other series, but I couldn't stomach reading about a married Sherlock), and I believe Lovegrove did a fantastic job staying true to canon.Included are boatloads of references and (perhaps cheeky) corrections to the inconsistencies in the original series. But I loved that those were in there, making me feel the narrative was all the more connected to the on-going legacy of Sherlock Holmes.Double-score for me was the steampunk aspect of the mystery. The mystery itself was decent, up until 2/3 of the way in when I had pretty much guessed the "solution" but which wasn't revealed until the very end, so the ending did drag a tiny bit for me. And one teensy weensy additional issue: Sherlock admitted to making more than one error in judgment during the case - while it has been shown that my perfect Sherlock does make mistakes from time to time, I don't find it believable that he would make more than one error in a case.All in all, a cracking good addition to the Sherlock legacy.
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  • K.A. Laity
    January 1, 1970
    I was looking forward to this mash-up of steampunk and everybody’s favourite Baker Street investigator. Titan has a whole series of Sherlock Holmes novels that demonstrate his lasting appeal (in case two recent television series and the schlock films haven’t already done so). It’s a frustrating read in some ways: there’s good ideas here and some excellent action. The is-he-a-hero-or-villain Baron Cauchemar is a fun idea and the chance to bring together a heady mix of political maneuvering and po I was looking forward to this mash-up of steampunk and everybody’s favourite Baker Street investigator. Titan has a whole series of Sherlock Holmes novels that demonstrate his lasting appeal (in case two recent television series and the schlock films haven’t already done so). It’s a frustrating read in some ways: there’s good ideas here and some excellent action. The is-he-a-hero-or-villain Baron Cauchemar is a fun idea and the chance to bring together a heady mix of political maneuvering and popular prejudice around the bombings offers an opportunity for oblique commentary on the present. But the narrative frequently comes to a complete halt in the midst of action whether it’s for Watson to explain the history of baritsu or for the Baron to give an elaborate backstory. I was ready to scream several times, when the story gets to the action, it moves along at a good clip with good detail (though I did not for a moment believe the key Transformer-like moment). Like a lot of faux historical texts, it uses its time period as an excuse to reduce female characters to nothing more than servants of men whether angels who keep the house (Mrs Hudson and Mrs Watson) or prostitutes. How refreshing it would be to have Holmes stories that recognised the genuine history of the New Woman.
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  • Adventures in SciFi Publishing Podcast
    January 1, 1970
    ... Even as tightly placed as The Stuff of Nightmares is, Lovegrove has been able to put his own spin on the mythos. He does so with such apparent elan that it’s easy to dismiss the fact that for all intents and purposes Lovegrove has managed to include the steampunk equivalent of the Transformers and Batman. ...Full review at: http://www.adventuresinscifipublishin...
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  • Ken
    January 1, 1970
    If Arthur Conan Doyle had teamed up with H.G. Wells and Jules Verne to write his Sherlock Holmes stories, I am sure the result would have been something like James Lovegrove's "The Stuff of Nightmares".I enjoyed the book and its steampunk-ish ideas. One leap in logic that did not land on a firm footing early on in the novel did not settle well with me and stuck in my craw enough to outweigh what was a generally well written Holmes pastiche.3 STARS
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  • James Swenson
    January 1, 1970
    See my Fantasy Matters review here.(view spoiler)[Want to see Sherlock Holmes fight a Transformer? This is the book for you. (hide spoiler)]
  • Eukaryote
    January 1, 1970
    I feel bad giving it two stars because there were parts of this story that I REALLY liked. The beginning was strong, and Watson was not hiding behind Holmes in these stories - his true self was not so invisible. I loved that Watson became very upset when he thought Holmes was gone. I liked that the crimes in this story were very taboo and un-Victorian-like, because we all know that rape happened back then too, even though literature from the time didn't talk about things like that. I loved that I feel bad giving it two stars because there were parts of this story that I REALLY liked. The beginning was strong, and Watson was not hiding behind Holmes in these stories - his true self was not so invisible. I loved that Watson became very upset when he thought Holmes was gone. I liked that the crimes in this story were very taboo and un-Victorian-like, because we all know that rape happened back then too, even though literature from the time didn't talk about things like that. I loved that Holmes knew how homosexual men "recognized" and signed to one another... hmm... But I HATED CAUCHEMORE (sp?). I cared about him so little I cannot even remember if I am spelling it right. He was so cliche. He was an extremely poorly done character. No real depth to him. He was a character a novice writer would pen. Lovegrove tried to make him fascinating, like Sherlock Holmes himself, make him an intellectual equal to Holmes and whatnot, but I was very unconvinced. And his story at the end. Gawd! The end was freaking awful. Lovegrove started off so strong, but by the end, he just gave up and wrote a cringe-worthy conclusion. What was the climax of this story even? I was so unaffected by it, I don't even know if there was one. Once Cauchemore showed up in a steampunk (view spoiler)[flying vehicle (hide spoiler)], I was over this story. And then when the other steam-powered train turned into a (view spoiler)[freaking transformer to do battle, machine against machine, (hide spoiler)] I wanted to throw the book out the window. Holmes and Watson were often always out of character. They often didn't read like Watson and Holmes at all. This is definitely one that had a few shining moments, but that ending was just unforgivable. It's too bad, because I really liked Lovegrove's Labyrinth Sherlock Holmes novel. But he had a lot of practice since this book and Labyrinth. So I guess he grew a lot as an author, but this novel of his is definitely getting donated to the public library.
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  • William
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun read. Perfect Watson style=5*, One key scene= -2*, Great fun adventure=+1*I've been reading a lot of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, so it was interesting to try this "pastiche" story. I had reached 1890 in the "real" Sherlock stories, so I thought that I would step sideways into Mr Lovegrove's version to see how it went.The result was interesting. Coming fresh from the originals I can say with authority that James Lovegrove has the characters and tone spot on. Absolute This was a fun read. Perfect Watson style=5*, One key scene= -2*, Great fun adventure=+1*I've been reading a lot of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, so it was interesting to try this "pastiche" story. I had reached 1890 in the "real" Sherlock stories, so I thought that I would step sideways into Mr Lovegrove's version to see how it went.The result was interesting. Coming fresh from the originals I can say with authority that James Lovegrove has the characters and tone spot on. Absolute bulls-eye. There are many scenes (view spoiler)[particularly Holmes' first visit to the Vicomte de Villegrand (hide spoiler)] that I could easily believe were lost papers from Sir Arthur himself (if not from Dr Watson). While most of the book was not quite as far fetched as the blurb/cover implies, the scenes with the "Baron" were often a little far fetched for a Holmes novel, with the very notable exception of a key scene (view spoiler)[ the visit to his lair (hide spoiler)] which was Holmes gold. That said, all characters stayed perfectly in character throughout, which to me allowed James Lovegrove to somehow pull it off.There was just one moment at the very end (coming hot on the heels of a brilliant Sir Arthur style showdown) where I did feel it had overstepped the mark (view spoiler)[when the train turned out to be a transformer/battlemech (hide spoiler)] and I was knocked out of the book for a moment. That was too far fetched and not needed. I did press on however and was very glad I did because within a few moments we were back in the swing again and Holmes was dealing with things with his usual mixture of insight and quick reflexes.So overall, if you are a Holmes purist, probably stay away. If you love the characters of Holmes and Watson and want a rip-roaring adventure/mystery with a Conan Doyle style romance backstory, then give this a go.
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  • Sissy
    January 1, 1970
    Steampunk Batman meets Transformers. I kid you not, it was Steampunk Batman vs. Transformers in an all out brawl.But aside from the...ridiculousness...that ensued between Steampunk Batman and the Transformers—Decepticons, to be exact because no Autobot would be caught dead preforming such deeds—I would have probably enjoyed The Stuff of Nightmares a lot more if not for the bits where Steampunk Batman relates how his sweetheart was violently raped and the Decepticon alludes to tongues tasting cer Steampunk Batman meets Transformers. I kid you not, it was Steampunk Batman vs. Transformers in an all out brawl.But aside from the...ridiculousness...that ensued between Steampunk Batman and the Transformers—Decepticons, to be exact because no Autobot would be caught dead preforming such deeds—I would have probably enjoyed The Stuff of Nightmares a lot more if not for the bits where Steampunk Batman relates how his sweetheart was violently raped and the Decepticon alludes to tongues tasting certain erogenous zones. I just found the whole thing in very poor taste and something that the good and chivalrous Watson would have censored, if not expunged, from his narrative.I get that this sort of thing happens and that it will be written about, but it's not what I'm expecting to stumble across in a Sherlock Holmes story. Or, at least, not in the way it was approached. To be sure, Sherlock has dealt with the scum of London and has come across more than one rapist, but the way Lovegrove deigned to write it...it just didn't sit well with me, personally.
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  • Colin Andrews
    January 1, 1970
    Despite Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle failed attempt to kill off his hero, Sherlock Holmes has achieved immortality not only through the continuing popularity of the Conan-Doyle's original stories but through new stories written by modern authors - not to mention some imaginative new interpretations for television! James Lovegrove successfully manages to reproduce the atmosphere of Holmes' Victorian London and does a creditable job in recreating the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson in keepin Despite Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle failed attempt to kill off his hero, Sherlock Holmes has achieved immortality not only through the continuing popularity of the Conan-Doyle's original stories but through new stories written by modern authors - not to mention some imaginative new interpretations for television! James Lovegrove successfully manages to reproduce the atmosphere of Holmes' Victorian London and does a creditable job in recreating the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson in keeping with the originals. The story, however, lacks any such credibilty. Although it was mildly enjoyable, one felt almost as if one was looking at a James Bond script set in the late nineteenth century - Sherlock Holmes surviving enemy fire unscathed and undertaking daredevil stunts in order to catch the villain. The mechanical monsters and futuristic transport devices, too, were more what one might expect in a 007 film, with of course the usual explosions in the finale. Rather too much influence of science fiction, in my opinion.
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  • Matthew Kresal
    January 1, 1970
    The Stuff Of Nightmare is, without a doubt, one of the worst Sherlock Holmes pastiches I have ever read. Its tale of Holmes and Watson pursuing both the culprits behind a rash of bombings in London as well as a Batman like Steampunk hero could have been a highly interesting one. Instead, it's hampered by poor characterizations (including an unrecognizable pair of protagonists), dialogue full of anachronisms, and a plethora of Holmes pastiche cliches. Then there's the ending which, even with the The Stuff Of Nightmare is, without a doubt, one of the worst Sherlock Holmes pastiches I have ever read. Its tale of Holmes and Watson pursuing both the culprits behind a rash of bombings in London as well as a Batman like Steampunk hero could have been a highly interesting one. Instead, it's hampered by poor characterizations (including an unrecognizable pair of protagonists), dialogue full of anachronisms, and a plethora of Holmes pastiche cliches. Then there's the ending which, even with the steampunk elements of the novel, feels completely out of place. The novel has some good moments but not enough to save it from its overwhelming issues. A major disappointment.
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  • Stefanie
    January 1, 1970
    It was a pretty good book, I like how Lovegrove imagines Sherlock and Watson, but our beloved doctor seemed a bit simple in this book. He spent many years and adventures with Holmes, but he still doesn't realize why his friend says or thinks what he does and he always gets surprised.Also, the transformer-like steampunk engine was a bit much for me.
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  • David Griffiths
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic mix of mystery and adventureI had a great time with this book, a fast moving Victorian adventure with the world's greatest detective and his faithful assistant to guide us
  • Shawn Bramanti
    January 1, 1970
    Another author gets to take up the job of chronicling the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. I happen to like the character so I was interested to read one of Lovegrove's stories and I found it to be very entertaining. I will look forward to reading further of his stories.
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  • Rhiannon Grant
    January 1, 1970
    Like most of these, this is light, fun, almost fluffy fanfic - well, with less sex than your typical online fanfic. This particular one is distinctly steampunk, very much in the Holmes-as-scifi line, and as such is especially enjoyable if you enjoy that sort of thing.
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  • Robert Spencer
    January 1, 1970
    I really like this pastiche concept, and it feels like Lovegrove had a lot of fun aping Doyle's writing style. The steampunk element does seem a little wedged-in, but it's all good fun.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Utter tosh, but entertaining fluff. The fight at the end did stretch my ability to suspend disbelief tho' .
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Not enough awesome ladies in the book, but are there ever? Otherwise fantastic. Highly recommend!
  • John Mcnamee
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book. Another good take on Sherlock Holmes.
  • D. Wickles
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories and this one did not disappoint.
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