The Plateau Effect
The Plateau Effect is a powerful law of nature that affects everyone.  Learn to identify plateaus and break through any stagnancy in your life— from diet and exercise, to work, to relationships. The Plateau Effect shows how athletes, scientists, therapists, companies, and musicians around the world are learning to break through their plateaus—to turn off the forces that cause people to “get used to” things—and turn on human potential and happiness in ways that seemed impossible. The book identifies three key flattening forces that generate plateaus, two principles to guide readers in engineering a plateau’s destruction, and three actions to take to achieve peak behavior. It helps us to stop wasting time on things that are no longer of value and to focus on the things that leverage our time and energy in spectacular ways. Anything you want to do better—play guitar, make friends, communicate with your children, run a business—you can accomplish faster by understanding the plateau effect.

The Plateau Effect Details

TitleThe Plateau Effect
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 2nd, 2013
PublisherDutton Books
ISBN-139780525952800
Rating
GenreSelf Help, Business, Leadership

The Plateau Effect Review

  • luv4pez
    January 1, 1970
    These guys are obviously smart and mixed math, psychology, and scientific research into this book. Most of it was interesting, but nothing new or ground-breaking. This book lacked any serious application or suggestions on how to break through plateaus; basically the entire premise of the book was to recognize that you're at a plateau and then do something different to get past it. Pretty simple advice that is buried within 300 hundred pages of other stuff.There were a lot of typos in the book, These guys are obviously smart and mixed math, psychology, and scientific research into this book. Most of it was interesting, but nothing new or ground-breaking. This book lacked any serious application or suggestions on how to break through plateaus; basically the entire premise of the book was to recognize that you're at a plateau and then do something different to get past it. Pretty simple advice that is buried within 300 hundred pages of other stuff.There were a lot of typos in the book, which resulted in losing a star off my rating. I would really have given this 1.5 stars if Goodreads allowed half stars. There was an entire chapter about how perfectionism is bad; that may be true, but multiple typos are also bad.I wouldn't recommend this book if you're actually looking for any type of solution. Like I said, their main suggestion is if you're stuck, do something different. There's nothing new in this book; don't waste your limited time reading it.
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  • Jaideep Khanduja
    January 1, 1970
    http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget...Book Review: The Plateau Effect: When Outer Success Blindfolds Inner StrengthThe Plateau Effect: Getting From Stuck To Success written by Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson is a great insight on the reality of life that for each person there is a limit to success. This book tries to make its readers understand first that any person belonging to any kind of pursuit will be able to climb the ladder of their success to a height and then will get stuck there. This http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget...Book Review: The Plateau Effect: When Outer Success Blindfolds Inner StrengthThe Plateau Effect: Getting From Stuck To Success written by Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson is a great insight on the reality of life that for each person there is a limit to success. This book tries to make its readers understand first that any person belonging to any kind of pursuit will be able to climb the ladder of their success to a height and then will get stuck there. This height may vary from a person to person but this is what happens to each person who is running the race of success. A point comes in their life when they get stagnant and helpless at that point to get the same pace and further height to their success though till that point they were succeeding consistently and substantially.Why this happens? Why all of a sudden a person who is capable of touching new heights and climbing ladder of his success consistently gets helpless at certain point of time in his success path and gets blocked for further growth. What is that stops him? What forces him to become so helpless so that he is not able to find a clear cut way out of this crisis? What makes him blindfolded in such a way that the path that was clear to him so far all of a sudden vanishes from his sight? Has it reached to its peak? Has he got choked in terms of improvement? Has he stopped generating inner strength to drive him on his own? What exactly causes it?This book from Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson tries to simplify this complex situation in one’s life to find out solution to this road blocking problem.
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  • Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    Been doing the same workout program since you joined your gym? Stuck in the same job for 8 1/2 years? Haven't increased your Spanish vocab since your last year of high school? You may be experiencing the plateau effect. The two authors, Sullivan and Thompson, say there is an S-shaped curve that defines how we learn or get used to anything, be it the smell of garlic or a new diet or new job. If it's something routine you want to put on auto-pilot, such as developing the habit of flossing your Been doing the same workout program since you joined your gym? Stuck in the same job for 8 1/2 years? Haven't increased your Spanish vocab since your last year of high school? You may be experiencing the plateau effect. The two authors, Sullivan and Thompson, say there is an S-shaped curve that defines how we learn or get used to anything, be it the smell of garlic or a new diet or new job. If it's something routine you want to put on auto-pilot, such as developing the habit of flossing your teeth every morning, it's OK to plateau at the top of the S-curve. But that same topping-out pattern is a bad idea if you want to, say, become a better writer / tennis player / graphic designer. This book is about how to pursue those who want to get beyond the plateau and move on to higher levels of skill and mastery.The authors have identified eight elements of what gets us stuck: 1) Immunity: you get used to things, and no longer get the same pleasure you used to. Solution: Try something new. Shake things up.2) Greedy algorithm: you go for the quick payoff over the long-term reward. Solution: Visualize the long-term rewards. Plan the steps to get there. Put emotional energy and commitment behind that plan.3) Bad timing: You may simply be sated with what you're doing. Solution: Take a break, try something different.4) Flow: You may have hit a chokepoint, or be experiencing some kind of step function that requires a large investment of effort to move to the next level up, or be lacking some kind of mystery ingredient (stimulus of others to share ideas with?). Solution: This is a grab bag of a category, so the solutions are varied. Find the obstacle, figure out how to break the step function into smaller steps, look for more creative approaches, brainstorm with others...5) Bad data: You may be measuring the wrong things in assessing your progress or obsessing about sunk costs that you are powerless to change. Solution: Make sure your goal and what you're measuring are really a good fit. Look at the decisions you need to make now -- not what you may have paid last year for a house that has now lost 10% of its value.6) Distraction: If you think you're good at multi-tasking, then you're probably precisely the sort of person who is bad at it. Solution: Put distance between yourself and your distracting digital toys. Don't try to do three things at once. Be present with what you're doing now.7) Failing slowly: Your ship is sinking, but it's going down slowly, and you can't bear to take to the life-rafts and make your way to shore. Solution: If the venture is not working and can't be salvaged, abandon ship. Better to fail fast than to fail slowly.8) Perfectionism: The desire to make everything perfect is usually a formula for procrastination. Distinguish between what matters enough that it really does need to be excellent vs. all those tasks where "good enough" is all you need. This is a book with a lot of good ideas. It's best to read it with a specific issue (or very short list of issues) in mind as you read it, and jot down the usable tactics that are relevant to that overcoming that issue.
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  • Blakely
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book for two reasons:1.) Bob Sullivan's "Stop Getting Ripped Off" is my favorite financial book (I've actually given it to many people); I'll probably read anything that Sullivan writes from now on.2.) It seemed the the type of thing I'd be interested in reading anyways.While it doesn't achieve the same level of awesomeness as "Stop Getting Ripped Off", it's still an excellent book that shouldn't disappoint anyone.Sullivan and Thompson discuss various ways our efforts to achieve I read this book for two reasons:1.) Bob Sullivan's "Stop Getting Ripped Off" is my favorite financial book (I've actually given it to many people); I'll probably read anything that Sullivan writes from now on.2.) It seemed the the type of thing I'd be interested in reading anyways.While it doesn't achieve the same level of awesomeness as "Stop Getting Ripped Off", it's still an excellent book that shouldn't disappoint anyone.Sullivan and Thompson discuss various ways our efforts to achieve something can meet with diminishing results and how to combat this. There are great tidbits throughout the book, one that stood out for me was a discussion of how people confuse decisions that are difficult with decisions that are important. I read that on the train coming into work. Later that day six of us spent about 45 minutes in a meeting trying to decide the best way to collect tickets outside of an event (discussions on wi-fi availability were involved, but still...).While reading the book I kept wishing that the authors would connect the dots a bit more and basically state outright "this is an x type plateau, symptoms are a, b, and c; you combat it by doing d, e, and f." They do this at the very end of the book with a summary of all of the plateaus. The summary is helpful but more connections in the individual chapters themselves would have been nice.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I got into this because I currently feel like I'm on a plateau in my life and this book has been sitting at the back of the kindle queue for ages. I found it to be a bit meandering, I like more of a laser focus in my self-help books, but overall the information was good. However, even though there were sections entirely devoted toward getting over your plateau, I felt like there could have been more specific action plans for those of us who need to see someone else's plan first to then think I got into this because I currently feel like I'm on a plateau in my life and this book has been sitting at the back of the kindle queue for ages. I found it to be a bit meandering, I like more of a laser focus in my self-help books, but overall the information was good. However, even though there were sections entirely devoted toward getting over your plateau, I felt like there could have been more specific action plans for those of us who need to see someone else's plan first to then think about their own. The book is more narrative and informative than directly hands on, which is great for some, not as great for me.
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  • AliceinWonderland
    January 1, 1970
    - Loved the concept, but found that aside from numerous case studies and examples, this book did not actually provide any concrete steps or actions for those wanting to get out of the "plateau effect".- It's all just too general and vague, like "stop being distracted" or "don't be a perfectionist", etc...
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  • Ralph Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good read but wasn't specific to what I was looking for. It provides good advice for anyone wanting to start their own business or just looking to stay focused and motivated.
  • Enko Khurlee
    January 1, 1970
    Informative yet lacks definitive solutions to overcome plateaus
  • Scott Wozniak
    January 1, 1970
    This book went through a series of ways to grow more and faster. Some were very individual, such as the optimal method for locking information in long-term memory. Some were more organizational, such as measuring the wrong thing. And others were philosophical, such as a whole chapter on the dangers of perfectionism. Each piece was written well. I gave 4 instead of 5 stars because the overlying theme was pretty weak. So if you're up for a series of loosely related chapters on growth/improvement This book went through a series of ways to grow more and faster. Some were very individual, such as the optimal method for locking information in long-term memory. Some were more organizational, such as measuring the wrong thing. And others were philosophical, such as a whole chapter on the dangers of perfectionism. Each piece was written well. I gave 4 instead of 5 stars because the overlying theme was pretty weak. So if you're up for a series of loosely related chapters on growth/improvement then this is a good book for you.
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  • Krystian
    January 1, 1970
    The premise of the book had potential, but the execution could be better. It seems like the authors found a hammer (Plateau effect) and now everything is a nail. The book is still full of valuable information, and the authors did their research and refer us to valid scientific studies - but in my opinion, it would be better if they went straight to the point (namely figuring a proven plateau overcoming protocol).
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  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    *** I received this book for free in a goodreads giveaway. The Plateau Effect – Getting from Stuck to Success by Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson is an informative read that discusses and dissects the internal barriers of our flawed consciousness. Sullivan and Thompson have successfully mixed elements together from both of their experienced repertoires. Ultimately, they have created this concoction which is interesting, educational and motivational. I must say that there is a great tone throughout *** I received this book for free in a goodreads giveaway. The Plateau Effect – Getting from Stuck to Success by Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson is an informative read that discusses and dissects the internal barriers of our flawed consciousness. Sullivan and Thompson have successfully mixed elements together from both of their experienced repertoires. Ultimately, they have created this concoction which is interesting, educational and motivational. I must say that there is a great tone throughout this book. Both of these guys have a great sense of humor and it jumps out periodically throughout the read. There were a few times that I literally laughed out loud. This book is not centralized on being funny though. This book is about learning and finding encouragement. It has the potential to stimulate your thought process while simultaneously showing you how and why other people have failed or succeeded. Both authors come from mathematical backgrounds and you can definitely feel the presence of it behind the psychology. Don’t worry. There is only one equation in the book and it is hidden back in the notes. What I mean by, ‘the presence of math,’ is that the book carries a proper and scientific analysis to each of the concepts being explained. Each chapter has a calculated logic that reinforces the foundation of their theories while being fluent to the layman.An example of some of the material you will learn, for instance, is a technique proven by neuroscience to improve your memory. These guys are able to tell you why memorization fails you in the long run and how you fix it. I learned a few new techniques on improving my memory just from reading this. For instance: EBH > DRE > SQT. Anyone who reads this book will know that these symbols are meaningless and trivial aside from the singular fact that the authors prove a process to the reader that increases memorization through them. Unfortunately, it is probable that I will never forget those symbols!This book is more than just learning about memory techniques though. This book teaches you to throw away any habit which is stopping you from achieving your goals. You see, as humans living in this technological 21st century, we have this self-handicapping idea of perfectionism inherent to our brains thanks to our social structure. Most of us tend to over think every decision and it limits us in future prospects (remember: calculus connoisseurs wrote this thing!) Hell, because of this book I will no longer slave over my insane urge to perfect each and every little sentence of this review. I’m going to complete it here and now, take a slow breath and move on with my life without kicking myself over it. The fact is that over thinking some situation can cause us to fail to even attempt it.So what else does this self-help book have to say? Well, a couple of things but I don't feel the need to dive much deeper. The important thing is it says we eventually hit a plateau when we reach a point where we are no longer changing for the better. The lush mountain slope of progress slowly flattens into gray fields of sagebrush. Our key to continuously climbing those vast slopes calls for defiance in the face of these plateaus. Reading this is about learning to unlearn those stagnant ideas and finding new angles of observation.3.7/5
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  • Charmin
    January 1, 1970
    Highlights:1. There is great power in doing nothing at just the right time. The in-between time is just as important as every other time. 2. The ability to know when to wait, know when to pause. 3. Nearly all good decisions are made early in the day, when self-control and willpower are at their best. 4. The discipline of innovation demands failure. 5. Perfectionism can also be used to conceal a lack of competence. Perfectionism can be misplaced efforts. Kills beginnings. 6. There is an Highlights:1. There is great power in doing nothing at just the right time. The in-between time is just as important as every other time. 2. The ability to know when to wait, know when to pause. 3. Nearly all good decisions are made early in the day, when self-control and willpower are at their best. 4. The discipline of innovation demands failure. 5. Perfectionism can also be used to conceal a lack of competence. Perfectionism can be misplaced efforts. Kills beginnings. 6. There is an inflection point we must constantly apply ourselves to judging: the moment at which continued efforts produce little or no added benefit. 7. Time is the universe’s most significant non-replenishing resource – a hard look at wasted efforts in your life will unleash your potential and liberate you to do the things you love. 8. Seeking incremental solutions until you can justify the step up in resources is the key. 9. Satisficing takes much more into consideration than results: It weighs equally the pain and the process that are required to achieve a result. Helps you make a good enough choice. 10. Tell the type A’s in the room to be quiet for a while, and seek out some frontline introverts and ask for their advice. Giving voice to the quietest person in the room might be the most unique exercise your firm undertakes in an entire year. That’s the power of real diversity.
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a lazy collage of studies you’ve already heard of, and are better written about in other books, with no real, actionable advice. If you want to get from stuck to success, skip this and read “Peak” instead.
  • Celena
    January 1, 1970
    Suffers from the problem of a weak thesis. Some interesting thoughts sprinkled throughout. But save your self the time and just read the conclusion, where they graciously wrote a "cliff notes verison."
  • Chung Chin
    January 1, 1970
    The Plateau Effect is a highly interesting book that tries to solve plateaus through mathematics. At least that's my understanding when I read the first few parts of the book. However the reason and solution for plateaus given seems to be more psychological and street smart wisdom than mathematics in my humble opinion. Yet, that does not diminish those advice. I enjoy reading the book because of how the authors manage to explain certain concepts that happen to me, which I take as "naturally". The Plateau Effect is a highly interesting book that tries to solve plateaus through mathematics. At least that's my understanding when I read the first few parts of the book. However the reason and solution for plateaus given seems to be more psychological and street smart wisdom than mathematics in my humble opinion. Yet, that does not diminish those advice. I enjoy reading the book because of how the authors manage to explain certain concepts that happen to me, which I take as "naturally". But as they explain it, and I grasp the concept, it becomes "Oh, so that's how it is." For example, the authors wrote about the effect of homeostasis, which explains (if you believe in this theory) why we resist change. To counter this effect, set a new bar that pulls you naturally towards it - a new homeostasis level if you will. There are a lot more of these in this book, and if you're intrigued, dive in!There are certain parts of the book where the authors lost me. Specifically, I have no clue at all on how to apply their ideas in chapter 5: Flow Mechanisms. Step functions, choke points, and mystery ingredients. This is the only frustrating part of the book for me. Otherwise, the rest of is is good in my opinion. I highly recommend it to anyone feeling like they are stuck as this book may gives you some ideas on how to shake things up, and also to anyone who is looking to improve any areas of their life as the suggestions given by the authors are practical. Finally, I would like to highlight the effort of the authors to verify their hypothesis by doing scientific and non-scientific studies, either by themselves or in partnership with university. I'm impressed!
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  • Evita
    January 1, 1970
    Call me naive–don't worry; I won't mind; and I won't hold it against you–but it's only after reading the first few pages, that I fully realised I had bought me a self-help book. One of those bubbly American self-help pop psychology reads. This was sometime around the summer of last year. And, here comes the irony of all irony; though I had bought the book because I felt I was stuck on a personal as well as on a professional level; adding fire to fury, I found myself stuck reading a book titled Call me naive–don't worry; I won't mind; and I won't hold it against you–but it's only after reading the first few pages, that I fully realised I had bought me a self-help book. One of those bubbly American self-help pop psychology reads. This was sometime around the summer of last year. And, here comes the irony of all irony; though I had bought the book because I felt I was stuck on a personal as well as on a professional level; adding fire to fury, I found myself stuck reading a book titled 'The Plateau Effect'...It wasn't until recently, when a best friend saw the book lying around my disorganised study, aka home-office; asked me what it was about and I heard myself giving him a blabla answer; that it kind of jerked me into picking up the book again. Grinding my teeth, and arming myself with way too much black chocolate and bucket loads of herb tea, I struggled to overcome the arrogant, selfdeluded Dutch part of me and dig into this sugary American bubbliness. And yes. I am glad I did. For guess what? It's a good book. It's a darn good book. As far as self-help book goes.I recognised a lot of myself in some of the passages; and was even able to laugh at myself. A lot. And quite loudly, I might add. That's a good sign...? I hope...? Anyways, I've already started putting some of what I've read and learnt into practice. The plan is to gradually internalise it all. My final verdict: you will probably learn more than you bargained for. And yes. This book is worth your dime. And time.
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  • Laura Holford-Green
    January 1, 1970
    I was very excited to win this book through Good Reads.The Plateau Effect is an interesting read. It opened my eyes to different ways we allow ourselves to become stuck in the every day inertia of life. Which, no doubt, leads to frustration for all of us. Have you ever wondered why you aren't moving forward? Why you seem to be living the same, mundane existence day after day? This book will give you some insight as to why this may be happening and some solutions on how to "get out of the rut" I was very excited to win this book through Good Reads.The Plateau Effect is an interesting read. It opened my eyes to different ways we allow ourselves to become stuck in the every day inertia of life. Which, no doubt, leads to frustration for all of us. Have you ever wondered why you aren't moving forward? Why you seem to be living the same, mundane existence day after day? This book will give you some insight as to why this may be happening and some solutions on how to "get out of the rut" that you've created for yourself.While I found it difficult to figure out why some of the scenarios were in the book ultimately I was rewarded with a different point of view. For instance, sometimes getting 'unstuck' is as simple as breathing. I think this book would be helpful for entrepreneurs out there that are looking for business strategies. For instance, what a 'greedy algorithm' is and how to avoid the pitfalls. I am going to try to incorporate some of the ideas into my own personal life as well.On a side note, I think if I were Hugh I would have stopped pushing the button. What if that silly game had accidently struck up a relationship with the flight control module. I bet nobody thought of that fuzzing test now did they?Hugh and Bob won me over when they made the announcement that there may be more then one way to do things perfectly. I agree completely with that statement but I'm anxiously awaiting their next book to tell me how to convince my perfectionist husband of this.
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  • Joanne
    January 1, 1970
    I've been going through these phases of rotating books and I've been in my little "self-help" phase, if that's what you want to call it. I felt a little stuck in my career so I figured, what a good book to read - "Getting Unstuck"The book itself has a lot of stories and information on why we often plateau in life. It talks about ways you can break that plateau and reach optimal performance. The stories and the research that the authors did were great additions and helped explain a lot about the I've been going through these phases of rotating books and I've been in my little "self-help" phase, if that's what you want to call it. I felt a little stuck in my career so I figured, what a good book to read - "Getting Unstuck"The book itself has a lot of stories and information on why we often plateau in life. It talks about ways you can break that plateau and reach optimal performance. The stories and the research that the authors did were great additions and helped explain a lot about the plateau effect and how that could translate to your every day life. That being said, I wanted to love this book more than I actually did. What I valued most out of the book were the little tips and advice of how you could push past your plateau to something better than what you had before. One of the biggest ones that resonated with me was the idea of being "perfect" - this is often my enemy and I've often been caught in the crosshairs of perfect and good enough. For me, this was probably the most valuable piece I got out of the book. In general, however, one must be reminded that with their tips, it only pushes you to another plateau, after which you again have to repeat whatever steps you took to surpass that next one. It's not an uphill battle to the mountain top and then you call it day. It's a continuos struggle to not level out and continually improve. Overall, a good read for those who are looking to push themselves past their plateau.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of The Plateau Effect: Getting from Stuck to Success through a Goodreads giveaway. To begin with, I have to note that I have not read very many books that deal with motivation, psychology or self-help. So I have little, if anything, to compare this book to in regards to its subject matter. That being said, I found this insightful and motivational. I found a lot that I could relate to and a lot of ideas I want to apply to my lifestyle. Only time will tell if these solvents work for I won a copy of The Plateau Effect: Getting from Stuck to Success through a Goodreads giveaway. To begin with, I have to note that I have not read very many books that deal with motivation, psychology or self-help. So I have little, if anything, to compare this book to in regards to its subject matter. That being said, I found this insightful and motivational. I found a lot that I could relate to and a lot of ideas I want to apply to my lifestyle. Only time will tell if these solvents work for me. If they do, I would definitely give this book another star. I also want to note that I really appreciated the appendix, or Sullivan and Thompson's version of CliffNotes. In a book like this where the material is meant to be applied to your everyday life it is convenient to have all the information summed up at the end of the book. I am much more likely to refer back to the book knowing I do not have to skim through pages and pages of information and examples to get to the key points.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks Goodreads for the book!This book was a super engaging read with fascinating vignettes of how people and companies became successful in different ways. It completely kept my interest from page to page. But every time I'd step back from the book, I'd think: So what? There was seemingly little coherence to the book. In fact, the plateau metaphor conflicts with the mathematical plateaus they use as examples. (E.g., the plateaus they are talking about are stuck points on your way up. The Thanks Goodreads for the book!This book was a super engaging read with fascinating vignettes of how people and companies became successful in different ways. It completely kept my interest from page to page. But every time I'd step back from the book, I'd think: So what? There was seemingly little coherence to the book. In fact, the plateau metaphor conflicts with the mathematical plateaus they use as examples. (E.g., the plateaus they are talking about are stuck points on your way up. The mathematical examples they use boil down to the y axis rising as x increases, until it goes back down again.) The essence seems to be: Plateaus happen when increased efforts don't produce increased results, so stop working so hard at that thing that isn't working, and start working really hard at something new. If you didn't ever think of that, this book is probably amazing. If you did, there's no point in reading it except for the engaging storytelling. I gave this book a 3 vs. a 2 simply because it is entertaining. For applicability, try really hard at reading something else.
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  • Vera Dlugatch
    January 1, 1970
    I found the Plateau Effect to be informative and funny; I learned a lot.Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson's research was extensive which is obvious once you start reading this book.They include examples of business failures and why they failed. There are examples of small businesses who shared the workspace and the rent. The businesses complemented each other; one business operated in the morning, the other in the afternoon. This ensured that the space was used and the businesses were not only able I found the Plateau Effect to be informative and funny; I learned a lot.Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson's research was extensive which is obvious once you start reading this book.They include examples of business failures and why they failed. There are examples of small businesses who shared the workspace and the rent. The businesses complemented each other; one business operated in the morning, the other in the afternoon. This ensured that the space was used and the businesses were not only able to survive and thrive.One of the most important parts of this book is the subject of perfection. The authors said that the word "perfect" was a badly translated hebrew word; tahan, which means the whole or complete.When you try to be perfect things don't get done or they don't get started if you can't do it perfectly the first time I'm guilty of this. This review is an example of that and if you read the book especially the section on perfection you will understand when I say. This may not be perfect but it's done.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    A very clean, straightforward book about obstacles and how to overcome them. I liked how clearly the ideas were expressed, and how they were illustrated with good examples. I do wish that there was more applicable advice given to overcoming plateaus, though. Some of the advice the authors gave seemed a bit too general. And since some of the plateau types were illustrated using large-scale examples, such as in businesses or other organizations, it was not always clear how to identify and address A very clean, straightforward book about obstacles and how to overcome them. I liked how clearly the ideas were expressed, and how they were illustrated with good examples. I do wish that there was more applicable advice given to overcoming plateaus, though. Some of the advice the authors gave seemed a bit too general. And since some of the plateau types were illustrated using large-scale examples, such as in businesses or other organizations, it was not always clear how to identify and address them on a personal scale. I walked away from this book with vague notions of how to address problems, but no tangible strategies. (In their defense, though, the authors do describe how the idea that there is always a one-size-fits all solution can actually cause plateaus).One really helpful part, though, was the appendix. Within a couple of pages, the authors list their main points and recommended actions. Perfect for printing out and hanging on a wall!
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  • Marc Stanley
    January 1, 1970
    written in a conversational tone that was easily read and understood. The authors used poignant real world examples and anecdotes to emphasize the research they had collected. Many of the stories they shared hit home and paralleled my own life experiences...especially entering the final pages when i was procrastinating and not finishing the book as quickly as i should have. Luckily, the authors understand the human weaknesses and probably predicted many of the delays which I have met on my written in a conversational tone that was easily read and understood. The authors used poignant real world examples and anecdotes to emphasize the research they had collected. Many of the stories they shared hit home and paralleled my own life experiences...especially entering the final pages when i was procrastinating and not finishing the book as quickly as i should have. Luckily, the authors understand the human weaknesses and probably predicted many of the delays which I have met on my reading mission. I would definitely recommend this book for anyone looking into why we are not as efficient as we would like to be, and those who feel they are in a rut...finding a muse or lightening in a bottle can be more difficult than we think.
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  • Leanna Manuel
    January 1, 1970
    I'm pleasantly surprised by how much I liked this book. I won this one in a goodreads giveaway and was somewhat overwhelmed when it arrived. It's big, the cover looks very serious, and it started out talking about things like garlic and calculus. I kept reading, mostly out of a sense of obligation. (I always review the books I receive through give aways.) By the time I finished the book earlier today, there were numerous sticky notes jutting out from the pages. There were so many things that I I'm pleasantly surprised by how much I liked this book. I won this one in a goodreads giveaway and was somewhat overwhelmed when it arrived. It's big, the cover looks very serious, and it started out talking about things like garlic and calculus. I kept reading, mostly out of a sense of obligation. (I always review the books I receive through give aways.) By the time I finished the book earlier today, there were numerous sticky notes jutting out from the pages. There were so many things that I want to go back and re-read, as well as tidbits that I plan to "steal" and use with my psychology clients. Well done.
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  • Donna Chiang CA(SA)
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely love this book! One of the best books written of all time!Seemingly random and quirky with their examples but when you see everything pull together practically it makes it so easy to apply in your life. I love the anecdotes and the little sense of humour and the actual referenced examples. What I loved most is that sometimes confusion is the best thing that gets you out of your rut. This may require learning something new or diversifying but they explain it so well. They address so I absolutely love this book! One of the best books written of all time!Seemingly random and quirky with their examples but when you see everything pull together practically it makes it so easy to apply in your life. I love the anecdotes and the little sense of humour and the actual referenced examples. What I loved most is that sometimes confusion is the best thing that gets you out of your rut. This may require learning something new or diversifying but they explain it so well. They address so many misconceptions we have developed as a society over time: what the actual issue is and how we move past it. Highly highly recommend it!
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  • Tyson Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    An extensive collection of ideas related to diminished growth in the real world, as well as strategies to overcome stagnation. While the ideas themselves were rather compelling, the structure and flow seemed a bit disjointed at times. However, the last chapter was incredibly insightful and should be read by all. The summary at the end was also extremely helpful, and in my opinion, would be better served at the beginning of the book to provide context and a framework for the following chapters. An extensive collection of ideas related to diminished growth in the real world, as well as strategies to overcome stagnation. While the ideas themselves were rather compelling, the structure and flow seemed a bit disjointed at times. However, the last chapter was incredibly insightful and should be read by all. The summary at the end was also extremely helpful, and in my opinion, would be better served at the beginning of the book to provide context and a framework for the following chapters. Overall, a very useful and engaging read.
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  • Svetlana Kurilova
    January 1, 1970
    I particularly enjoyed the parts on the perfectionism and the effect of saturation."If you're still held captive by a fear of failure, you've hit perhaps the most toxic plateau cause of all: perfectionism.""Your relationships can be saturated. Sex can be saturated. Your career can be saturated. The simple cause of these kinds of saturations is excessive repetition: When you've overdone your favorite... you can end up hating what you do, who you date, even who you are. You end up killing what you I particularly enjoyed the parts on the perfectionism and the effect of saturation."If you're still held captive by a fear of failure, you've hit perhaps the most toxic plateau cause of all: perfectionism.""Your relationships can be saturated. Sex can be saturated. Your career can be saturated. The simple cause of these kinds of saturations is excessive repetition: When you've overdone your favorite... you can end up hating what you do, who you date, even who you are. You end up killing what you love."
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the mix of science and real life examples in this book. Definitely a book to read if you feel like you are stuck. However, the book is also very good at motivating you to look at every aspect of your life to see if improvement can be made. An entertaining and informative read. I would recommend reading this and Making Habits, Breaking Habits by Jeremy Dean. These books complement each other nicely.
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  • Marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway and appreciate the opportunity to read it. I have read many similar books and other resources. I was looking for some specific guidance - action steps. This book is more general and probably aimed at a person who has read fewer business/leadership/motivation books. It provides a great overview, but not many actionable tools.
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  • Maiken
    January 1, 1970
    getting from sucks to this really sucks... a plateau effect = a problem. the plateau effect: getting from stuck to success = a list of good advice and obvious solutions to random everyday problemsthe only bright spot are the few pages on procrastination. you can find other good texts on procrastination, get those instead
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