The Infinite Wait and Other Stories
The Infinite Wait and Other Stories is the latest book from Julia Wertz, the critically acclaimed author of The Fart Party Vols. 1 and 2 (Atomic Books, 2007 and 2009) and Drinking at the Movies (Random House, 2010). In contrast to her last book, which was a full-length graphic memoir, The Infinite Wait is not a sustained narrative, but rather a collection of three short stories or graphic novellas. The stories in this collection contain Wertz’s signature acerbic wit, ribald humour and keen eye for the everyday, but they also find the cartoonist delving into the personal. “Industry” catalogues 25 years of alternately terrible and terrific jobs, from selling golf balls, feeding and failing to feed animals, waitressing, and finally to cartooning and the publication of her first book. “A Strange and Curious Place” is a love letter to Wertz’s hometown library; its mysteries and revelations, and its ability foster growth, rebellion and even artistic affirmation. The most sustained narrative in the collection, the eponymous “The Infinite Wait,” chronicles Wertz’s move from her small hometown to San Francisco, her diagnosis with an incurable, auto-immune disease and her subsequent discovery of comics and comic making.The collection’s title, The Infinite Wait and Other Stories, intentionally and ironically recalls the vacuous and pretentious book titles of the literary elite, but these stories are the polar opposite of pretension. They are comics born out of illness, but not defined by it, and they are filled with the sometimes messy, heartbreaking and hilarious moments that make up a life.

The Infinite Wait and Other Stories Details

TitleThe Infinite Wait and Other Stories
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 14th, 2019
PublisherKoyama Press
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Graphic Novels Comics

The Infinite Wait and Other Stories Review

  • Greta
    January 1, 1970
    The Infinite Wait and Other Stories Is Julia's graphic memoir in three parts. The first story, “Industry,” is about her family, her student life, but mostly about her many jobs and her occupations in the restaurant business. It also deals with her alcoholism. The story is funny, relatable and charming, but I thought it was too long and repetitive. The second story, “The Infinite Wait,” tells about Julia's diagnosis with a chronic auto-immune disease, Systemic Lupus (SLE). In the midst of Julia' The Infinite Wait and Other Stories Is Julia's graphic memoir in three parts. The first story, “Industry,” is about her family, her student life, but mostly about her many jobs and her occupations in the restaurant business. It also deals with her alcoholism. The story is funny, relatable and charming, but I thought it was too long and repetitive. The second story, “The Infinite Wait,” tells about Julia's diagnosis with a chronic auto-immune disease, Systemic Lupus (SLE). In the midst of Julia's struggle with this disease, she discovers comics and graphic novels. It's the starting point of her new career as a cartoonist and comics writer. This was my favorite story. The third story, “A Strange and Curious Place,” is a love letter to her life of libraries and reading. It will appeal to everyone whose life is made up of reading. This is definitely a book for the grownups. There is sexual content and alcohol abuse. The book is humorous, but the jokes are often rude and dark. Julia is unconventional and crass to the point of being misanthropic ; yet she is winsomely honest. The book is rather text heavy for a graphic novel. I had a problem with her drawings. The backgrounds of the illustrations seemed accomplished, but I thought she lacks skill in drawing persons and facial expressions. All characters in the book basically looked similar and somehow childish, which sometimes annoyed me. While this is a graphic novel, in which the art is as important as the writing, I can't give it more than three stars, although I really enjoyed reading it.
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  • Josh Wertz
    January 1, 1970
    A terrible book full of loathsome characters.
  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Last year, Neil Gaiman gave an inspiring speech called "Make Good Art" in which he told graduating students that whatever happens to you in life - make good art. Though not connected to Gaiman and his speech in any way, Julia Wertz did just that when she was diagnosed with systemic lupus, an incurable autoimmune disease, and started to make comics. "The Infinite Wait and Other Stories" is Wertz's fourth comic book (The Fart Party Vols 1 and 2, Drinking at the Movies being the previous three) but Last year, Neil Gaiman gave an inspiring speech called "Make Good Art" in which he told graduating students that whatever happens to you in life - make good art. Though not connected to Gaiman and his speech in any way, Julia Wertz did just that when she was diagnosed with systemic lupus, an incurable autoimmune disease, and started to make comics. "The Infinite Wait and Other Stories" is Wertz's fourth comic book (The Fart Party Vols 1 and 2, Drinking at the Movies being the previous three) but the first to directly address her illness - and it's a fantastic book.The title is deliberately lofty-sounding as the comic instead takes a breezy and defiantly unsentimental tone to talk about crappy jobs, discovering comics, becoming a comics artist herself, her illness, and her hometown library. While you might think that a memoir about such mundane topics from someone so young (Wertz is barely past 30) would be too self-centred to bother with, you'd be wrong. Everyone can write about their lives and nearly everyone doing it would bore you with their efforts - Wertz can write about her life and completely immerse you in it. Reading about Wertz's dishwashing jobs, waitressing, and teenage rebellion is the kind of material many people can relate to but few could write about in a way that's worth reading about.And herein lies the reason this book is so brilliant: Wertz has lived a life less ordinary but the moments she chooses to write about are often the least exciting. Boring jobs, reading comics, libraries - this is a memoirist who stringently keeps the reader at arms' length while telling you about her personal life. But the experiences resonate with an honesty that is reflective in a way that many people in their 20s and 30s can relate to. Who didn't have crappy jobs growing up? Who doesn't feel miserable and disappointed with the state of their lives during this time? Underachievement? Who doesn't feel a nostalgia for their childhoods when all the time they are moving further away from it?Moreover - and this quality might be more limited than the others - who doesn't hate being around people? Making friends, having a social life, dating, are all things Wertz dislikes and are viewpoints any bookish person can well understand. The feelings and experiences of this generation are plainly mapped onto Wertz's work but in a signature unserious way. Wertz is curmudgeonly but entertainingly so, presenting her disappointments, misanthropy, and misfortunes in funny, smart, and enjoyable stories that, what should be depressing subject matter, becomes the stuff of great comics.Combining these stories with her own dramas that include substance abuse and addiction, a hilarious but mentally unstable father, and a successful career in comics written with her unique voice, makes for a thoroughly great read. The Infinite Wait and Other Stories is a frequently brilliant, often entertaining book that any fan of non-superhero comics would do well to check out.
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  • emily
    January 1, 1970
    okay SO i enjoyed Drinking at the Movies more, i really liked the format of 1-2 page anecdotes and it definitely made me laugh out loud a lot more. but The Infinite Wait and Other Stories brought a lot of different things to the table. it had the same Julia Wertz charm--cynical, pessimistic, shockingly detached from emotion--but it was more revealing and intimate, and possibly inadvertently. the three stories are about the jobs she's had in her life, her experience with lupus, and her relationsh okay SO i enjoyed Drinking at the Movies more, i really liked the format of 1-2 page anecdotes and it definitely made me laugh out loud a lot more. but The Infinite Wait and Other Stories brought a lot of different things to the table. it had the same Julia Wertz charm--cynical, pessimistic, shockingly detached from emotion--but it was more revealing and intimate, and possibly inadvertently. the three stories are about the jobs she's had in her life, her experience with lupus, and her relationship with libraries. the first story was interesting, but most of it felt redundant for someone who already read DatM because a lot of that info was in that graphic novel. the story about lupus was very interesting, though, because that's something that is hardly mentioned in DatM. the way Wertz presents her life is meant to be in this emotionally detached way, like i said earlier, but in doing that it revealed a lot more about Wertz and her personality and thought process and relationship with comics, which was both surprising and nice. i was going to give this collection 4 stars but had to bump it up to 5 after reading the last story about libraries because it was shockingly open and genuine and really emotionally honest. i *loved* getting to see how her relationships with libraries and reading ebbed and flowed and it acted as a perfect ending to the collection as a whole. i'm still exploring and finding my footing in the graphic novel world, but Julia Wertz continues to be my favorite cartoonist.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Well of course this was going to get 5 stars. I love Julia Wertz. Julia Wertz is one possibility of what I could have been had I never gotten married and had kids, minus the cool indie cartooning career. I really get where she's coming from. I dig it, man.This is a book made up of three stories. I liked them all, but my favorite was the last one. Then the second and then the first, but all of them get 5 stars. Julia Wertz is awesome at taking a rainy day and turning it into the most amusing, cra Well of course this was going to get 5 stars. I love Julia Wertz. Julia Wertz is one possibility of what I could have been had I never gotten married and had kids, minus the cool indie cartooning career. I really get where she's coming from. I dig it, man.This is a book made up of three stories. I liked them all, but my favorite was the last one. Then the second and then the first, but all of them get 5 stars. Julia Wertz is awesome at taking a rainy day and turning it into the most amusing, crappy rainy day ever. Thanks for publishing another great book, Julia!!!! Keep making comics and publishing them, okay? Great! THANKS!!!!
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    Julia Wertz is one the alt-comics scene's latest success stories and not unlike Lynda Barry, it seemed to happen for her sort of by accident. I've only read one of her previous books before, Drinking at The Movies, which was published by a mainstream outfit, Three Rivers Press. I really enjoyed it and found Wertz's persona, that of a profane, no-bullshit, tough-but-tender-deep-down-on-the-inside type, very refreshing and often hilarious. This new book is still highly entertaining and laugh out l Julia Wertz is one the alt-comics scene's latest success stories and not unlike Lynda Barry, it seemed to happen for her sort of by accident. I've only read one of her previous books before, Drinking at The Movies, which was published by a mainstream outfit, Three Rivers Press. I really enjoyed it and found Wertz's persona, that of a profane, no-bullshit, tough-but-tender-deep-down-on-the-inside type, very refreshing and often hilarious. This new book is still highly entertaining and laugh out loud funny, but Wertz goes deeper here, seemingly dropping some of her defenses, revealing more of herself. The two long stories are "Industry," which is an account of Wertz's wage earning history, and the title story, which focuses on the diagnosis of Lupus she received in her early 20's and the physical and emotional fallout of that (Lupus is treatable but there is no cure). Both accounts are ramble-y, almost free-form in their digressions in a very appealing way and for the most part these deviations from the main storylines go smoothly and are always entertaining. Some of the best sequences are those with her and her brother. The two are obviously very close but don't let each other get away with a thing, resulting in some of the funniest dialogue and moments in the book. The last story, a sort of love letter to libraries and her love of reading, is downright poignant, instantly relatable to this died-in-the-wool bookworm. I found it very moving. The ending is perfect.The packaging for the book is very attractive and along with the title, really does make it seem deceptively like the sort of high-end tome perfectly suited for a New Yorker-reading, Latte-swilling, Public Radio-supporting type of crowd, as Wertz wryly notes in her intro. Oh, before I forget, a shout out to her skill at rendering street scenes, cluttered apartments and the like - her attention to detail makes studying these sorts panels a lot of fun. 12/14/15: Reread over the last week. I'd forgotten how relatively hefty a book it is. I loved how Wertz was able to really take her time with the stories, the first two in particular; they also link together nicely, making the book all of a piece. Pretty much everything was as I perceived it above. I again shook with laughter with several scenes involving she and her brother razzing each other. It's an exceptionally entertaining read, a real keeper. Five stars.
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    Three memoir stories that are hard to put down, almost always entertaining. I''ll admit it took a bit of time to like Wertz. Her attractively titled memoir, Drinking at the Movies initially didn't appeal to me, as a kind of drunk twenties story. Her dark, smart ass humor was maybe initially too dark for me… but like a friend you meet, I got used to it, and now I like it, and see some warmth coming through, she's never nasty, especially as I see her engage in her wonderful relationship with her b Three memoir stories that are hard to put down, almost always entertaining. I''ll admit it took a bit of time to like Wertz. Her attractively titled memoir, Drinking at the Movies initially didn't appeal to me, as a kind of drunk twenties story. Her dark, smart ass humor was maybe initially too dark for me… but like a friend you meet, I got used to it, and now I like it, and see some warmth coming through, she's never nasty, especially as I see her engage in her wonderful relationship with her brother Josh (who's comments I also love on book jacket blurbs and Goodreads reviews). These two are funny, and should work together, somehow, as they are consistently good together in the stories Wertz relates. The first story is about jobs she had early in her life until she discovered comics writing, and this is familiar funny memoir territory, and consistently funny as Wertz depicts it. It works. And you know, you see drinking as a theme even in these young stories. Like it's always there, and inappropriate, and never glorified as really unproblematic. The second story is like Drinking at the Movies, in a sense; it is Wertz talking about a serious health issue she has, and this time it is her incurable but treatable lupus, but not sentimentally or self-pityingly described. Again, it is how lupus helped her discovered comics, since she had to stay home sick for months and then not only read comics but began to draw them! This, the second story, on lupus, is the best story because it is honest and doesn't deny the real health problems and who she really is. She is consistently hard on herself and others equally. The third story has almost no dark humor in it, so it is almost startling! This is the story of her life as a reader, and again, it is in part how she became a… comics reader, which unifies the collection. It's kind of love letter to books, yay.I recommend it! Next for me, to go back to The Fart Party stories I have never read.
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  • Maggie Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    Julia Wertz is, in many ways, my twin soul: sardonic and kinda messed up. In The Infinite Wait, Wertz takes readers on a journey through her life in the form of three stories. One relives her working career, another her experiences with lupus, and the last is a love letter to libraries. Her humour and willingness to showcase her mistakes make this book a delightful, but also affecting read.
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  • christa
    January 1, 1970
    In the movie world, this would be considered experimental: Artist creates a full-length story about the time she moved from San Francisco to Brooklyn, drank a bunch of her meals, hung with fellow cartoonists or sacked out with a bottle of wine and DVDs of “The Gilmore Girls,” got canned from a bunch of jobs, struggled with guilt over her brother’s drug addiction, and then gets the A-OK to be a full time cartoonist. Then, the experimental part, a few years later she revisits a lot of the same ter In the movie world, this would be considered experimental: Artist creates a full-length story about the time she moved from San Francisco to Brooklyn, drank a bunch of her meals, hung with fellow cartoonists or sacked out with a bottle of wine and DVDs of “The Gilmore Girls,” got canned from a bunch of jobs, struggled with guilt over her brother’s drug addiction, and then gets the A-OK to be a full time cartoonist. Then, the experimental part, a few years later she revisits a lot of the same territory but in a more detailed, novella-length way that really takes a toothbrush to some of the grit she washed over more broadly in the last go-round. Julia Wertz’s collection “The Infinite Wait” is a series of three longer pieces where she considers 1) the litany of shit jobs she’s held, 2) her diagnosis of Systemic Lupus at age 20, 3) the public library and the reading spaces and books that shaped her. The three-pack follows “Drinking at the Movies,” which is told in quick-hit short bursts of misanthropic comedy and focuses on a year in her life after the big cross country move, but occasionally dips back and mentions things that appear in the stories of her new collection. For the most part, the re-tread works. Especially if both books -- and I’d imagine her “Fart Party” stuff, too -- is all read at around the same time. The gaps you don’t realize exist in one tend to get filled in the other book and it becomes a bit like piecing together a person’s life puzzle. It’s the title story that is the reason for the season. Wertz says in the introduction the big deal book types at the kind of major publishing houses that briefly glommed on to the comic book biz in 2010 would never sign off on a comic book about her diagnosis of lupus, so she took this one to a small comics publisher. Wertz is at community college when she starts suffering with joint pain, random fevers, fainting and inexplicable weight loss. It takes months for the doctor figure out what Wertz’s mom figures out in a single Google search: Systemic Lupus. There is no cure, it can be managed. She ends up on chemo-caliber drugs and eventually finds the right combination to live pain free. Then she goes through a period of remission. Despite the grimness of this forever diagnosis, Wertz has this really adorable back-and-forth banter with her brother Josh. He’s a more troubled character in “Drinking at the Movies,” but in these pages his own struggles with addiction are barely mentioned and instead there is just a friendship full of comic riffs and hijinks. She stops by Josh’s house to tell him about the diagnosis. Julia: This really isn’t that bad. I could be much, much worse. I could have …Josh: CancerAIDS. Oh man. Is there anything worse than CancerAIDS?The story kind of off-roads from lupus to some stuff about Wertz’s relationships, including finding out she was dating an old man and attending a party for people in the porn industry. The story ends with her off to profess feelings for a guy she slept with in high school so she could comfortably shed her virginity without getting feelings involved. The story ends where her first “Fart Party” story starts. The first of the “other stories” is “Industry,” Wertz’s chronicle of about 25 years worth of employment, beginning with garden-variety rock sales to waitressing and newspaper delivery, a ball polisher at a pool hall and a short stint at a hipster mag. This also includes the early years of zine slinging at comic book shows. The final story is “A Strange and Curious Place,” which is about young Julia’s affinity for forts and reading nooks and the book sale day at the public library. It’s kind of a love letter to all types of literature and the things she’s read and learned over the years. It’s definitely a different style for Wertz, who is rarely mentioned without a reference to the fart jokes that first launched her career. It becomes a bit oozy-goozy, as strange as the earnest moment when Josh tells her in “The Infinite Wait” that he’s sorry she has to go through this, and -- she stops him and tells him to keep it light. There is a weird set of repeated panels in the book and a few typos, which sucks for Wertz. There are also footnotes that cite the page numbers of where one of her autobiographical stories has been told more completely in another of her books. I ended up re-reading “Drinking at the Movies” right after I finished “The Infinite Wait.” Writing-wise, I think the shorter form suits Wertz better. She kind of loses the thread as the longer pieces go on. On the other hand, she’s got this great way of mentioning something briefly -- like eating saltines and peppermints -- in one story and then explaining its origin later in the book in an entirely different piece. It gives the feel of being in the inner circle of a long running joke. Ultimately, short form or long form, her strength is in dialogue and one-liners so it shouldn’t really matter how she choses to package it.
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    This is the perfect graphic novel go-to if you're feeling down and want someone to commiserate with. Wertz is delightfully negative aka honest aka refreshing.
  • Eric Piotrowski
    January 1, 1970
    Julia Wertz is one of my favorite comics artists, and -- aside from Alison Bechdel -- the coolest comics artist I've ever had sign my book. She's come a long way from the distracted scribbles of "The Fart Party", and she gets better with every story told. What makes this collection so glorious is not just the artistic refinement and constantly-increasing attention to detail. It's the fantastic probably-not-what-really-happened-but-who-cares commentary she (and her brother) provides for every ina Julia Wertz is one of my favorite comics artists, and -- aside from Alison Bechdel -- the coolest comics artist I've ever had sign my book. She's come a long way from the distracted scribbles of "The Fart Party", and she gets better with every story told. What makes this collection so glorious is not just the artistic refinement and constantly-increasing attention to detail. It's the fantastic probably-not-what-really-happened-but-who-cares commentary she (and her brother) provides for every inane, absurd, and idiotic situation in which she finds herself. Much of the "here's my life in comics form" work being produced today is simplistic and tired, but Wertz brings a sly joy to everything she touches. I will be reading this over and over in the future, and I can't wait until her next book appears.
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  • MariNaomi
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed, I cried, I laughed again. I love Julia with all my heart.
  • Liam
    January 1, 1970
    A pleasant, easy read about figuring out your twenties. Reminds me of Mimi Pond's "Over Easy".I don't know why Julia didn't have more friends in her twenties, this book is pretty funny. A pretty real insight into living with a chronic disease and struggling with an addiction.While she's my second 'lupus-affected' author, I'm sort of perplexed as to why it has such a high average rating (higher than Alison Bechdel's 'Fun Home'). Is it just because Julia is so likeable by the end you'd feel cruel A pleasant, easy read about figuring out your twenties. Reminds me of Mimi Pond's "Over Easy".I don't know why Julia didn't have more friends in her twenties, this book is pretty funny. A pretty real insight into living with a chronic disease and struggling with an addiction.While she's my second 'lupus-affected' author, I'm sort of perplexed as to why it has such a high average rating (higher than Alison Bechdel's 'Fun Home'). Is it just because Julia is so likeable by the end you'd feel cruel not rating it highly? Or do all of the reviewers have systemic lupus? Regardless of how other people find it, this was probably too light-hearted and 'emotionally shallow' enough for me to love it or find it particularly memorable.
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  • Slithy
    January 1, 1970
    A kajillion stars for the last story about libraries
  • Jennie
    January 1, 1970
    The first Julia Wertz graphic novel that I read was Drinking at the Movies and, as I read it, I realized I’d found a kindred spirit. Wertz is a sarcastic curmudgeon who drinks too much and makes the same mistakes over and over and yet still remains realistically optimistic about her life. So. She’s a person, I guess. She also has a fucking filthy mouth and is hilarious and reminds me of my friends. So reading her books is like hanging out with a friend. (That sounded super goofy and is not somet The first Julia Wertz graphic novel that I read was Drinking at the Movies and, as I read it, I realized I’d found a kindred spirit. Wertz is a sarcastic curmudgeon who drinks too much and makes the same mistakes over and over and yet still remains realistically optimistic about her life. So. She’s a person, I guess. She also has a fucking filthy mouth and is hilarious and reminds me of my friends. So reading her books is like hanging out with a friend. (That sounded super goofy and is not something Wertz would ever say about her own book, probably.) Anyway.The Infinite Wait is a collection of three comics, and all follow Wertz through her succession of shitty jobs, romantic trials and tribulations, a bit about her alcohol problem, and her eventual diagnosis of lupus, which is a chronic, autoimmune disease. It’s that thing that’s always on House (or never on House, your pick).I find it difficult to review these autobiographical novels, because it feels shitty to say anything bad about them. I don’t have anything bad to say about this novel (or any of her other novels) but when reviewing someone’s life, I’m always hesitant because I don’t want to say anything that would offend them if BY SOME CHANCE they were to ever read my review.Luckily, I loved this book, just like I loved Drinking at the Movies, and I realized while reading it that I never read her first two novels, Fart Party: volumes 1 and 2. Fart Party was the name of her original webcomic. (I mean, seriously, how can you not love someone who named her comic Fart Party?)I’ve gotten far off track but let’s try to get back, shall we? We shall. In The Infinite Wait, not only are we treated to Wertz’s thoughts on her numerous shitty jobs, but she’s beginning to work through her feelings toward her alcohol abuse, and she’s diagnosed with a chronic disease, which is enough to shit on anyone’s day. She tackles the diagnosis with humor, though that is a huge thing to have to deal with (especially while struggling with alcoholism and that whole Figuring Yourself Out thing that happens in your twenties). The fact that she’s able to keep her sense of humor about it says a lot about Wertz as a person. In this novel, she also discovers her love of comics, not just reading them, but making them, and we’re all extremely lucky that she did.
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  • Ksenia
    January 1, 1970
    It was great to sit down and finally finish this over the weekend, and of course the last story about libraries really hit me in the chest. Fart Party was one of the first web comics I ever read and I've really enjoyed the... maturing-without-loosing-the-fart-jokes that Julia has done over the years.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    This small-press comic from Wertz features three stories: the first is about all of the jobs she's worked; the second about her diagnosis of Lupus; the third about her love for the library. All three are precisely the kind of humor you'd expect from Wertz. It's crude but really human. At times, it's laugh-out-loud funny (the scene of her first babysitting job being my favorite). It's interesting to me how open Wertz is about how her last book with Random House didn't do well, and how that led he This small-press comic from Wertz features three stories: the first is about all of the jobs she's worked; the second about her diagnosis of Lupus; the third about her love for the library. All three are precisely the kind of humor you'd expect from Wertz. It's crude but really human. At times, it's laugh-out-loud funny (the scene of her first babysitting job being my favorite). It's interesting to me how open Wertz is about how her last book with Random House didn't do well, and how that led her to publish with Koyama. Really, these are naval-gazing comics, but that's why I love them so much. There's no real depth. There's nothing to walk away with. It's just a few hours watching the world through someone else's really humorous perspective. I keep saying it, but if "new adult" is a thing, then there needs to be bigger consideration for graphic novels because this is where those stories are.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Can't get enough of Julia Wertz's comics! Every time I get one of her books I finish it in pretty close to one sitting. I especially liked this one because it deals, in part, with her struggle with systemic lupus. There are very few memoirs by people with lupus, and the ones that are out there are either dated, penned by people who are middle-aged or older, or both. I really connected with her descriptions/depictions of being a young person with a serious chronic disease, and wish that there wer Can't get enough of Julia Wertz's comics! Every time I get one of her books I finish it in pretty close to one sitting. I especially liked this one because it deals, in part, with her struggle with systemic lupus. There are very few memoirs by people with lupus, and the ones that are out there are either dated, penned by people who are middle-aged or older, or both. I really connected with her descriptions/depictions of being a young person with a serious chronic disease, and wish that there were more books in this vein.
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  • Tasara
    January 1, 1970
    Just phenomenal. And the last story is about all the libraries she's used and loved? Are you kidding me? I thought I couldn't love her any more.
  • Jonathan
    January 1, 1970
    The Infinite Wait and Other Stories (2012) by Julia Wertz: Three pieces make up this comics collection from Julia Wertz. The first, entitled "Industry," chronicles the jobs she's had over two decades and two coasts, from a lot of waitressing and bartending jobs to her later days as a professional cartoonist who doesn't have to hold down another job.The second, the eponymous "The Infinite Wait," covers Wertz's move to San Francisco from Napa in 2002 and her subsequent diagnosis of having the auto The Infinite Wait and Other Stories (2012) by Julia Wertz: Three pieces make up this comics collection from Julia Wertz. The first, entitled "Industry," chronicles the jobs she's had over two decades and two coasts, from a lot of waitressing and bartending jobs to her later days as a professional cartoonist who doesn't have to hold down another job.The second, the eponymous "The Infinite Wait," covers Wertz's move to San Francisco from Napa in 2002 and her subsequent diagnosis of having the auto-immune disease Lupus. The third, "A Strange and Curious Place," is, in Wertz's own words, "basically just a love letter to my hometown library and everything it taught me.""Industry" probably has the most laughs per panel, even as Wertz starts to lose jobs because of her incessant drinking. The publishing success of her first two books, Fart Party I and II, moves "Industry" to an often hilarious evaluation of how Hollywood tries to adapt work, and specifically autobiographical work. "The Infinite Wait," Wertz informs the reader, was a title chosen for its pretension and "seriousness" as a joke related to the decidedly unpretentious tale of Wertz vs. Lupus. This is certainly one of the funniest comics stories ever created about an incurable auto-immune disease. Well, any disease, any sickness. It may catch at the heart, but the story never stops presenting situations of high wit and low comedy.Then there's "A Strange and Curious Place," the shortest piece in the book. It is indeed a paean to Wertz's hometown library, and to the joys of reading for a child. The depiction of Julia and her brother's excitement at the annual library booksale is a gem of humourous, pithily observed sentiment. The book, too, is a gem of autobiographical self-evaluation and often raunchy, sometimes obscene brilliance. Highly recommended.
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  • Lisa Macklem
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this volume so much more than Drinking at the Movies. Wertz's style is simple, but with the underlying artistic flourish that you see it's an assumed simplicity - ie, this kid can draw! This volume was a lot more poignant and revealing than DatM. By letting me in, she very much won me over and gave me a better understanding of what was going on in the previous book. At first, I was disappointed that I'd bought both books - I wasn't looking forward to reading this one, but now, I'll def I enjoyed this volume so much more than Drinking at the Movies. Wertz's style is simple, but with the underlying artistic flourish that you see it's an assumed simplicity - ie, this kid can draw! This volume was a lot more poignant and revealing than DatM. By letting me in, she very much won me over and gave me a better understanding of what was going on in the previous book. At first, I was disappointed that I'd bought both books - I wasn't looking forward to reading this one, but now, I'll definitely be on the hunt for all her books. I'll approach the early works with the caution they'll deserve - but now I'll be ready for her to keep me at bay with those.
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  • Fantasy Literature
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars from Brad, read the full review at FANTASY LITERATUREDisclaimer: just so you know, some of the books we review are received free from publishersThe Infinite Wait and Other Stories by Julia Wertz is one of my favorite “slice of life” comics, and it is one I’ve taught several times in my course on comics. A memoir in three parts, The Infinite Wait and Other Stories is memorable for the reader because of Wertz’s strong voice as presented in two ways: through the drawn character we see — the 5 stars from Brad, read the full review at FANTASY LITERATUREDisclaimer: just so you know, some of the books we review are received free from publishersThe Infinite Wait and Other Stories by Julia Wertz is one of my favorite “slice of life” comics, and it is one I’ve taught several times in my course on comics. A memoir in three parts, The Infinite Wait and Other Stories is memorable for the reader because of Wertz’s strong voice as presented in two ways: through the drawn character we see — the “Julia” we watch living through the events recounted — and through the voice of the narrator, a future Wertz we “hear” but do not see, as she looks back and comments on the Julia in each panel as she lives and reacts in the moment. This layering effect is best suited to comics as an art form, in my opinion, though I’ve rarely seen someone use this technique so effectively in a memoir graphic novel.Wertz’s voice is smart and funny, and she combines those into a searing wit that, though it is often aimed at others, is just as often employed as self-deprecating humor. Her subjects are serious and her narrator’s seeming ability to gain emotional distance from these problems through the “Julia” portrayed in the book actually heightens the emotional intensity while preventing it from being sappy in any way. (She deals in her book with the problem of expectations when people meet her and expect her to be identical with the “Julia” portrayed)....5 stars from Brad, read the full review at FANTASY LITERATURE
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  • Federica Guglietta - illunedideilibri.it
    January 1, 1970
    L’ironia di Julia Wertz in The Infinite Wait And Other Stories (questo il titolo per intero nella versione orginale) svela che, per quanto ci possa fare schifo al momento, la vita offre sempre un ampio ventaglio di soluzioni alternative. Magari faranno schifo anche quelle, ma intanto ci si sforza di tirare avanti e cercare qualcos’altro. Leggi la recensione completa qui: http://bit.ly/LunedìPienoWait
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  • Marie Bouteille
    January 1, 1970
    The story of a young girl leaving her home in a small town in California to live in San Francisco, discovering comics because of a nasty chronic disease, hence discovering that she wants to be a cartoonist. She manages to tell us all about it with a lot of humour. I loved the relationship she has with her brother.
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  • Stef
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes I felt like the comics were too long because of all the moments where Wertz seems to pat herself on the back regarding her own cleverness (like her conversations with her brother), but I like her storytelling and art -- it's really accessible and engaging.
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  • Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    Three short autobiographical stories that I found to be very enjoyable. My favorite was her ode to the library. Totally reminded me of my own youth as my mom would take my brother and I to the local library once a month.
  • Kristin Mack
    January 1, 1970
    Not a style I normally read but this is on our shelves at home. So fun and refreshing. I loved the cartooning/comic storytelling and didn’t want to put the book down. I laughed and worried (like a mom) and really enjoyed reading. I’ll have to check out her other work.
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  • AJ
    January 1, 1970
    I have long been a fan of Julia Wertz and have taken it upon myself to finally finish reading all of her books that I haven't gotten to yet. Like her other works, The Infinite Wait does not disappoint.
  • J
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious, the book is at its funniest in just straight scenes of dialogue, but Wertz's autobiographical bits are dark, touching without being sentimental and gross, human, and awkwardly entertaining.
  • Lucy Green
    January 1, 1970
    Not a lot of "deep truths", but I know that wasn't the point. Certainly entertaining, Wertz has lived a lot of life and has a great sense of humor.
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