Coming Closer to Ourselves
How to Befriend Your Most Challenging Emotions and ExperiencesIn challenging times, why do so many of us turn to Pema Chödrön for guidance? Many say that it’s her honest and caring way of communicating the core teachings of Buddhism—not just conceptually, but directly from her heart to ours. In these inspiring sessions, she teaches us how to give that compassion to the person we neglect most often—ourselves. With her, you will explore:What to do when it feels impossible to be kind to ourselves• In challenging relationships and situations, how to let go of our story and see what’s really happening• Cultivating inner comfort and greater kindness toward our bodies• Leaning into frustration, sadness, and fear with a spirit of trust and intimacy• Many other insights and recommendations to befriend the difficult places within usThrough gentle and clear guidance, Coming Closer to Ourselves shows us how, even in the tumult of life’s uncertainties, we can begin with a glimmer of curiosity, move closer into our experiences, and discover a place of welcome and refuge within.Course objectives:Discuss what to do when it feels impossible to be kind to ourselves• Describe how to let go of our story and see what’s really happening within challenging relationships and situations• Explain how to cultivate inner comfort and greater kindness toward our bodies• Discuss how to lean into frustration, sadness, and fear with a spirit of trust and intimacy

Coming Closer to Ourselves Details

TitleComing Closer to Ourselves
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 1st, 2012
PublisherSounds True
ISBN-139781604077940
Rating
GenreReligion, Buddhism, Nonfiction, Spirituality, Audiobook, Philosophy, Self Help

Coming Closer to Ourselves Review

  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    We think that by protecting ourselves from suffering, we are being kind to ourselves. The truth is we only become more fearful, more hardened and more alienated. We experience ourselves as being separate from the whole. This separateness becomes like a prison for us - a prison that restricts us to our personal hopes and fears, and to caring only for the people nearest to us. Curiously enough, if we primarily try to shield ourselves from discomfort, we suffer. Yet, when we don't close off, when w We think that by protecting ourselves from suffering, we are being kind to ourselves. The truth is we only become more fearful, more hardened and more alienated. We experience ourselves as being separate from the whole. This separateness becomes like a prison for us - a prison that restricts us to our personal hopes and fears, and to caring only for the people nearest to us. Curiously enough, if we primarily try to shield ourselves from discomfort, we suffer. Yet, when we don't close off, when we let our hearts break, we discover our kinship with all beings.It isn't the things that are happening to us that cause us to suffer, it's what we say to ourselves about the things that are happening.
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  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    I never get tired of this. (Audio)
  • Ivan Kulis
    January 1, 1970
    This series of six talks is about one thing: stay. stay. stay.Pema gives an excellent series of six classes structured around the three jhanas (or vehicles). After running through some more technical aspects of Tibetan Buddhism, she delivers the evergreen Buddhist message of "staying": staying with our discomfort, pain, sorrow, anxiety and anger will allow us to understand it, accept it, recognise it in other people and subsequently feel compassion. All our actions through which we try to escape This series of six talks is about one thing: stay. stay. stay.Pema gives an excellent series of six classes structured around the three jhanas (or vehicles). After running through some more technical aspects of Tibetan Buddhism, she delivers the evergreen Buddhist message of "staying": staying with our discomfort, pain, sorrow, anxiety and anger will allow us to understand it, accept it, recognise it in other people and subsequently feel compassion. All our actions through which we try to escape discomfort (numbing out, lashing out, etc.) provide provisional relief, but inflict long-term damage.The talks are delivered with lot of grace and sense of lightness and humor, and Pema leaves us wanting for more of her words and teachings.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    I love everything by Pema. This is no exception. The reminder to love myself and scoot closer myself is powerful. Trying to escape pain through alcohol, drugs, TV, eating, or the myriad of other ways we have invented is ineffective. The most effective way is through the pain--move towards it, not away from it.Somehow, when she shares, it is not trite and it rings true. She has a gift.
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  • Camia Young
    January 1, 1970
    I could read this a dozen times and still hear something for the first time, this is a powerful book in staying with and learning from unwanted feelings.
  • J. Maximilian Jarrett II
    January 1, 1970
    Another insightful gem from one of my favourite modern Buddhist teachers. Recommended reading for neophyte stream entrants and those further along the path.
  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    Another Pema Chodron great. I always takes something away from her teaching
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    I kinda feel like I'm cheating, listing this as an audiobook because I'm pretty sure this is just a recording of a series of talks she gave. However, it was already listed in Goodreads so I'm playing along! I can't deny how fun it is to hear her speak. When she laughs it sounds like joy incarnate.This felt way more Buddhist focused than other works of hers. She talked about different sects of Buddhism and how they teach certain things differently. It's a little ironic that it's presented as an a I kinda feel like I'm cheating, listing this as an audiobook because I'm pretty sure this is just a recording of a series of talks she gave. However, it was already listed in Goodreads so I'm playing along! I can't deny how fun it is to hear her speak. When she laughs it sounds like joy incarnate.This felt way more Buddhist focused than other works of hers. She talked about different sects of Buddhism and how they teach certain things differently. It's a little ironic that it's presented as an audiobook because I felt like I needed to see her words in print more than ever just to follow along and maybe learn something vs. let her words wash over me like water.
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  • Constance
    January 1, 1970
    Recommended.
  • Dt
    January 1, 1970
    Such a good message for those connecting with self and spirit.
  • ΛNNΞ
    January 1, 1970
    If you can get past the obtuse Buddhist references, this audio-book has life changing potential. Deeply grateful ... powerful stuff!
  • Lisa Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Pema is a gifted teacher and she so humbly shares that the way through fear is to get closer to it--to get comfortable with the discomfort.
  • Tess Mertens-Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Great message. Could listen to her all day
  • Erin Rouleau
    January 1, 1970
    I adore her. She's my hero. She's funny, patient and to the point.
  • Leslie Cook
    January 1, 1970
    I listen to these dharma talks over and over again. This collection is one I can learn something new from every time.
  • Arminda Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this so much. It was my first exposure to Pema Chodron's work and these live sessions were a pure delight to listen to. She is so accessible in her explanations, personal stories, and real life applications of the reasons why accessing and healing yourself from the inside out is essential. Self compassion and cultivating an inner sanctuary are not just fanciful constructs, but available to each of us as a life practice.
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  • Rob Hermanowski
    January 1, 1970
    This "book" - only available in audio format - is actually a series of lectures given by the renowned American Buddhist nun Pema Chodron. She is, as always, a joy to listen to - filled with calm, compassion, good humor, and wisdom. These lectures might benefit from slightly more organization, but this is a minor quibble, and they remain inspiring lessons in the areas of mindfulness and meditation.
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  • Sigrun Hodne
    January 1, 1970
    I believe Pema Chödrön must be one of the wisest women around. She's intelligent, challenging, and very funny - I love listening to her talks, and the ones collected on this audiobook is amongst her best!
  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    Priceless teachings...
  • LemontreeLime
    January 1, 1970
    Pema just gets better with every dharma talk, it seems. Here her humanity shines out, and her wonderful sense of humor.
  • Abby Wynne
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars really. She's an entertaining speaker. A lot of detail about the layers of Buddhism, maybe a little bit more detail than I wanted. Enjoyed the first three quarters immensely.
  • Christine Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This is more of a lecture series but still has a lot of wisdom.
  • Jacquie Underdown
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this. Incredibly insightful and practical teachings.
  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    BCD
  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    As always Pema is a balm for our minds. Not as good as the previous one I listened to, but still a good listen.
  • Louise Silk
    January 1, 1970
    One can never listen to too much Pema Chodron. She is brilliant and so accessible.
  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book! Excellent. I like how Pema presents teaching in a way that make them easy to understand and yet allows us to question and think for ourselves.
  • Benjamin
    January 1, 1970
    A thoughtful, and fun, survey of what Chodron calls the "three yanas" of Buddhism.
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    A bit advanced for me but I did pick up some good tips.
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