Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls
A guy walks into a bar car and...From here the story could take many turns. When this guy is David Sedaris, the possibilities are endless, but the result is always the same: he will both delight you with twists of humor and intelligence and leave you deeply moved. Sedaris remembers his father's dinnertime attire (shirtsleeves and underpants), his first colonoscopy (remarkably pleasant), and the time he considered buying the skeleton of a murdered Pygmy. With Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, David Sedaris shows once again why his work has been called "hilarious, elegant, and surprisingly moving" (Washington Post).

Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls Details

TitleLet's Explore Diabetes with Owls
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 23rd, 2013
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316154697
Rating
GenreHumor, Nonfiction, Writing, Essays, Autobiography, Memoir, Short Stories, Audiobook

Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls Review

  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    When I told my mom what I was reading, she thought I said "Let's Explore Dead Babies with Owls."Bravo, Mr. Sedaris. 4.5 stars
  • Gary Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    I usually like the work of David Sedaris. He’s at his best when talking about his family or childhood memories, or wryly observing society’s foibles. Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls has moments of that trademark understated irony, but it’s more self-absorbed than his earlier collections. This book’s primary theme seems to be the travails of a successful author as he fulfills his tiresome obligations to accept invitations to read his work out loud in exotic locations like China, Rotterdam, and C I usually like the work of David Sedaris. He’s at his best when talking about his family or childhood memories, or wryly observing society’s foibles. Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls has moments of that trademark understated irony, but it’s more self-absorbed than his earlier collections. This book’s primary theme seems to be the travails of a successful author as he fulfills his tiresome obligations to accept invitations to read his work out loud in exotic locations like China, Rotterdam, and Costco. But travel wearies Sedaris, as do most other people. It’s no surprise that he doesn’t allow those who stand in line to purchase an autographed book to take pictures with him. Then he retires to one of his homes in England or France or Japan or New York and writes about how awful it is to be anywhere.Although this book gave me a few chuckles, some topics are inherently unfunny, although Sedaris uses them as punch lines: teen suicide, cancer, ingestion of human feces, eye socket sex. Yuck. Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls is a disappointment because it is so much meaner and cruder--not to mention less funny--than earlier Sedaris books.
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  • Mitch
    January 1, 1970
    You know I'm shocked by all the high ratings for this book. Maybe it's because I'm younger than the average David Sedaris reader, but my eyes were literally bleeding towards the end of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls. I don't even rate nonfiction, but I'm making an exception for this... thing that reads like the inane, self-absorbed ramblings of a Grampa Simpson type - 'when I was young...' I killed endangered animals, never got the approval of my dad, wrote a racist rant, got my passport stole You know I'm shocked by all the high ratings for this book. Maybe it's because I'm younger than the average David Sedaris reader, but my eyes were literally bleeding towards the end of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls. I don't even rate nonfiction, but I'm making an exception for this... thing that reads like the inane, self-absorbed ramblings of a Grampa Simpson type - 'when I was young...' I killed endangered animals, never got the approval of my dad, wrote a racist rant, got my passport stolen... is this supposed to be funny? Insightful? Flippant? No? Not even a little bit? Well, whatever it is, it's not funny, it's humorless, bitter, and offensive.
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  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    I love David Sedaris but I HATED his last book, 'Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk'. I'm hoping he redeems himself here. UPDATE: I read this book and I was happy to find short stories and essays. I laughed out loud many times. The story about the taxidermist is my favorite out of this collection.
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  • Jason Koivu
    January 1, 1970
    David's mah dawg, yo! I love this little guy!I always listen to him read his own stuff in audiobook form, as opposed to reading it myself. I can't do his little elfin voice justice. Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls is more of the same Sedaris: observations skewed by his quirky worldview, which produces within me squirmy giggles with the occasional guffaw explosion. This collection of essays gets an extra star on the rating from sheer worn-shoe comfort joy. It's no better than his previous books. David's mah dawg, yo! I love this little guy!I always listen to him read his own stuff in audiobook form, as opposed to reading it myself. I can't do his little elfin voice justice. Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls is more of the same Sedaris: observations skewed by his quirky worldview, which produces within me squirmy giggles with the occasional guffaw explosion. This collection of essays gets an extra star on the rating from sheer worn-shoe comfort joy. It's no better than his previous books. Certainly not as introspective and tell-all as Dress Your Family Up.... It's just good, solid humor carpetted by light thought-bombs. The topics this time around are mostly dominated by lots of travel stuff, obviously due to all the book tours he's done since becoming wildly famous. So, in a way he's turning into an irreverent, gay Rick Steves. Sedaris also spends a good deal of time writing about writing. In general, his material has become quite self-referential (no, I won't use the buzzword meta), and I fear that with his continued fame this is a trend on the rise. Luckily for me, he's one of those people that can make anything funny. It may get to the point when all he has left to talk about is the experience of writing the last thing he wrote, and I will read it, chortle or squeal, and tinkle in my trousers.
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  • Raeleen Lemay
    January 1, 1970
    (I listened to this on audiobook.)I went into this book with little knowledge on David Sedaris's work/life, so I learned a lot about him while listening to this! Overall it was enjoyable, but it definitely didn't blow me away. I do plan to give Me Talk Pretty One Day a read, but probably not any time soon.
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  • B.J.
    January 1, 1970
    Let's get one thing out of the way right now - David Sedaris is the preeminent satirist/essayist working and writing today. Maybe it's because of his radio readings or listening to his audio books, but his is a distinctive voice that fills your head as you read his work. For me, I can't help but think as I read a Sedaris essay that he's standing right there next to me, speaking word for word what is written on the page, which makes for interesting mental company.When I delved into "Let's Explore Let's get one thing out of the way right now - David Sedaris is the preeminent satirist/essayist working and writing today. Maybe it's because of his radio readings or listening to his audio books, but his is a distinctive voice that fills your head as you read his work. For me, I can't help but think as I read a Sedaris essay that he's standing right there next to me, speaking word for word what is written on the page, which makes for interesting mental company.When I delved into "Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls" (a great title if ever there was one), I expected the same rat-a-tat yet subdued sarcasm that made his other works so completely hilarious. Perhaps it was those expectations that contributed to my disappointment in this latest effort. There is still the trademark wit of Sedaris's prose and observations, but it also comes with a sizable dose of regret, disappointment, and an undercurrent of mid-life crisis. It almost seems in this book that Sedaris is coming to terms with being at the 'half-way' marker in life and can't quite believe how little has changed since his youth. It's a familiar theme that has been described many times before, but I was hoping that Sedaris would bring a fresh perspective to it. Instead, the theme seems to creep into his humor and sour it. Sedaris explores death, the regret of missed opportunities(or misunderstood, as in the essay "A Guy Walks Into A Boxcar") fear and the idea of helplessness (in particular during an essay that recounts an attack on his sister Gretchen). Not that there is nothing to laugh about in this work - the essay in which he describes a colonoscopy is classic Sedaris... that is to say, hilarious - but there seem to be too few moments of levity in what turns out to be a heavy tome. The last half of the book offers up some fictional social commentary as Sedaris takes on the guise of various characters steeped in conservative ideology. The first story, in which a man murders his wife, adult daughter, and mother-in-law as a reaction to legalization of gay marriage, rings a bit hollow and seems more harsh than funny. Then again, I can understand Sedaris's anger at living in a society that still denies him the rights afforded to others - I just hoped that he would approach it with a more measured and biting style than the rather unimaginative product put out in this book. However, the piece about the woman who plans to join a Tea Party march in Washington by enlisting the help of her son is quite funny. While I don't find Sedaris's fictional efforts to be his strong point, the latter is the sort I would hope to see more of from him in the future.It's disappointing when an writer steps out of his or her expected realm to try new things and doesn't quite deliver; but in the case of "Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls", it also allows for a reflection on one's own life, missed chances, regrets - and the hope that at the end of this day, another one will present new chances and new opportunities tomorrow. And if not, you'll at least have enough snark on hand to mock it appropriately.
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  • Heidi The Hippie Reader
    January 1, 1970
    David Sedaris is a unique American humorist. Sometimes I love his essays and other times I hate them, so ranking a collection of his work fairly is difficult. I listened to the audiobook of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls on my daily commute and he's a wonderful narrator. Actually, having read a handful of his other books, I'd recommend listening to him read his essays. His timing and inflections are perfection. He's one of the few humorists who has literally made me laugh out loud.The high poi David Sedaris is a unique American humorist. Sometimes I love his essays and other times I hate them, so ranking a collection of his work fairly is difficult. I listened to the audiobook of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls on my daily commute and he's a wonderful narrator. Actually, having read a handful of his other books, I'd recommend listening to him read his essays. His timing and inflections are perfection. He's one of the few humorists who has literally made me laugh out loud.The high points of this collection are Understanding Understanding Owls, Laugh Kookaburra, and A Guy Walks into a Bar Car. They're unbelievably funny and have a lot of heart. The low points were: Health-Care Freedoms and Why I want my Country Back, If I Ruled the World, and Dog Days. It's as if he ran out of material and tacked the worst of it on the end. Dog Days was awful and reminded me of Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary which I couldn't stand. Vulgar prose just isn't my thing, I guess.Recommended for adult readers who are looking for a laugh and don't mind some profanity and general silliness. More humorous books that I've enjoyed: Are You There, Vodka? It's Me, Chelsea, Dad Is Fat, and It's All Relative: Two Families, Three Dogs, 34 Holidays, and 50 Boxes of Wine.
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  • Madeline
    January 1, 1970
    As part of the promotional tour for this book, David Sedaris made a stop in a Barnes and Noble in my city, and I ended up going sort of by accident (I bought a copy of the book on a whim the day before the event and learned that, by purchasing the book, I had also unknowingly purchased a ticket to the reading the next day). It was a fun event - Sedaris is charming and adorable in person, and was very polite to the requisite crazy people who tend to show up at every author reading I've ever atten As part of the promotional tour for this book, David Sedaris made a stop in a Barnes and Noble in my city, and I ended up going sort of by accident (I bought a copy of the book on a whim the day before the event and learned that, by purchasing the book, I had also unknowingly purchased a ticket to the reading the next day). It was a fun event - Sedaris is charming and adorable in person, and was very polite to the requisite crazy people who tend to show up at every author reading I've ever attended (I remember one particularly memorable woman at a Margaret Atwood reading who started out asking Atwood's opinion about Britney Spears and her costumes throughout the years, and ended by shrieking that "What they did to Britney was A SIN! It was A SIN!" and it was the most amazing thing I've ever seen). A word of advice for anyone attending a Sedaris event in the future, though: the man is chatty. There were only a few dozen people in line to get their books signed, but he stopped and talked with every single person, sometimes for almost five minutes each. It took a long fucking time, which I wasn't expecting, so be prepared for that. By the time it was my turn, I was just tired and didn't have anything fascinating to say, but he was very nice and asked me some polite questions as he drew an owl on my book, and then he offered me one of the chocolates that another fan had apparently made for him. I suggested jokingly that they had been poisoned, because I don't know how to talk like a normal human being, and he just kind of blinked at me, so I thanked him, grabbed my signed book, and ran. Anyway, add that to the list of Madeline's Awkward Author Encounters and let's get to the real review bit.Like Sedaris's previous collections, the essays here can be divided into three categories: stories about Sedaris's childhood and early twenties, stories about his travels (usually featuring his boyfriend Hugh, who I'm sort of in love with), and essays written from the perspective of a fictional character. The last category is the hardest to spot, because often they'll have the exact same tone and voice as his other essays, so you assume that they're nonfiction until he reveals that the speaker is not, in fact, him. My favorite kind of Sedaris essay has always been the travel kind, and this book has plenty of those. I always love reading about his experiences learning new languages, and there's a good passage about the differences between Japanese and German lessons: "There's no discord in Pimsleur's Japan, but its Germany is a moody and often savage place. In one of the exercises, you're encouraged to argue with a bellhop who tries to cheat you out of your change and who ends up sneering, 'You don't understand German.''Oh, but I do,' you learn to say. 'I do understand German.'It's a program full of odd sentence combinations. 'We don't live here. We want mineral water' implies that if the couple did live in this particular town they'd be getting drunk like everyone else. Another standout is 'Der Wein ist zu teuer und Sie sprechen zu schnell.' ('The wine is too expensive and you talk too fast.') The response to this would be 'Anything else, Herr Asshole?' But of course they don't teach you that."The essays dealing with Sedaris's childhood are distinctly bittersweet, because although they're still funny, there's an underlying sadness to them that's brought into the open much more than it was in his previous collections. This was the first time I had read anything about the abuse of the Sedaris children, and the saddest thing about these details was the way David Sedaris seems to calmly accept it as a normal part of everyone's childhood, which I don't think is true. Someone at the reading actually asked him about how his parents would beat him when he was a kid, and his response was essentially the same as it is in the book: he shrugged, and said that that was normal at the time and that he still didn't find anything unusual about it.
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  • Xandra
    January 1, 1970
    I needed a laugh and Sedaris didn't disappoint. A few times I was laughing so hard, I expected angry neighbors to kick in my door and duct tape my mouth shut while shaking their heads disapprovingly or sighing theatrically at the evidence that I have finally gone insane. It’s not just the jokes and the context they’re in, it’s also the parallels I can draw with my own life, with my own cynical personality and my facetious nature. And a bit of empathy is essential when it comes to memoirs.For ful I needed a laugh and Sedaris didn't disappoint. A few times I was laughing so hard, I expected angry neighbors to kick in my door and duct tape my mouth shut while shaking their heads disapprovingly or sighing theatrically at the evidence that I have finally gone insane. It’s not just the jokes and the context they’re in, it’s also the parallels I can draw with my own life, with my own cynical personality and my facetious nature. And a bit of empathy is essential when it comes to memoirs.For full disclosure, I should mention that this is the first David Sedaris book I've read and it was great. On the surface, all the trivial experiences presented here are not that interesting. Just boring little life stories most of us don’t pay attention to let alone write down in a diary to ponder on them days or, god forbid, years later. What makes them interesting is David Sedaris’ voice, his wit, his irony and, occasionally, his depth.Here we have the blistering drama of the middle class dysfunctional family in 1960s U.S., the nostalgic recounting of missed chances, the joyous preparations for an author tour, the morbid fascination with the skeleton of a Pigmy girl in a taxidermy shop on Valentine’s Day, the cultural peculiarities of foreign countries, the harassment women have to deal with, Obama drama, a poem about dogs and six fiction stories in which Sedaris impersonates different types of people in order to mock their ugly traits. I could have done without the fiction stories which I consider to be the low points of the book.If I were to choose, A Guy Walks into a Bar Car would be my favorite story because it blends humor with nostalgia with some touching moments that hit home for me, but they’re all very strong pieces. Now, if only I could get the damn Kookaburra song out of my head…
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  • Melki
    January 1, 1970
    Yay! David Sedaris is even older than I am. (Every year it gets harder and harder to find someone who is...) BUT, he IS close enough in age that we are basically contemporaries, therefore, his gripes are my gripes, and this makes me happy.Like Sedaris, I can clearly remember mundane incidents that occurred in third grade - the day THAT BASTARD, Marty W., pushed me down in the playground and tore my favorite pants (true, they were plaid, so maybe he did it as a favor), but, no, I cannot remember Yay! David Sedaris is even older than I am. (Every year it gets harder and harder to find someone who is...) BUT, he IS close enough in age that we are basically contemporaries, therefore, his gripes are my gripes, and this makes me happy.Like Sedaris, I can clearly remember mundane incidents that occurred in third grade - the day THAT BASTARD, Marty W., pushed me down in the playground and tore my favorite pants (true, they were plaid, so maybe he did it as a favor), but, no, I cannot remember the birth of my first child. He CAME OUT OF ME, and I don't remember it happening! And I, too, get annoyed that no one dresses up for air travel anymore:It's as if the person next to you had been washing shoe polish off a pig, then suddenly threw down his sponge saying, "Fuck this. I'm going to Los Angeles!"Maybe it was just the right book at the right time, or maybe it's due to the jittery stage of life I'm currently experiencing, but from the joys of colonoscopies to finding the perfect taxidermied owl, I loved every essay in this book.I guess the only question still remaining is how am I going to get my mother-in-law, a woman who still sends me regular e-mails about the distinct possibility of President Obama's being born in another country, to wear a conical-shaped hat emblazened with the words:AnotherSavvySeniorHopesObamaLoses Everything
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  • mohsen pourramezani
    January 1, 1970
    جدیدترین اثر «دیوید سداریس» طنزنویس امریکایی است که در سال 2013 منتشر شده. مانند بقیهی کتابهایش، در این کتاب نیز خاطراتش را به زبان طنز روایت میکند. این کتاب شامل 21 جستار از 27 جستار کتاب اصلی است. مثل بقیهی کتابهایش روان و جذاب بود. وقتی آخرین بخش کتاب را میخواندم که در مورد عادت خاطرهنویسیاش بود و اینکه چندین جلد دفتر خاطرات دارد، تازه میفهمیدم که چطور اینقدر خوب میتواند خاطرات را با جزییات به یاد بیاورد و اینکه این همه سوژه را از کجا میآورد. کتابهای سداریس علاوه بر اینکه برایم جذاب و خواندنی جدیدترین اثر «دیوید سداریس» طنزنویس امریکایی است که در سال 2013 منتشر شده. مانند بقیه‌ی کتاب‌هایش، در این کتاب نیز خاطراتش را به زبان طنز روایت می‌کند. این کتاب شامل 21 جستار از 27 جستار کتاب اصلی است. مثل بقیه‌ی کتاب‌هایش روان و جذاب بود. وقتی آخرین بخش کتاب را می‌خواندم که در مورد عادت خاطره‌نویسی‌اش بود و اینکه چندین جلد دفتر خاطرات دارد، تازه می‌فهمیدم که چطور اینقدر خوب می‌تواند خاطرات را با جزییات به یاد بیاورد و اینکه این همه سوژه را از کجا می‌آورد. کتاب‌های سداریس علاوه بر اینکه برایم جذاب و خواندنی هستند، جنبه‌ی آموزشی از لحاظ طنزنویسی هم دارد. http://choobalef.blog.ir/1394/10/30/%...
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  • Lyn
    January 1, 1970
    David Sedaris makes me laugh.I love to read, want to encourage reading every chance I get, but here, in this one instance, let me invite potential readers to listen instead. Sedaris’ books are hilarious, but to truly enjoy and to really understand the David Sedaris experience, you need to listen to him read his essays and sketches. The audiobook is the key. His delivery, nasal and borderline effeminate, is perfect. Sedaris has the timing of a veteran comedian and he is just too funny.Let's Explo David Sedaris makes me laugh.I love to read, want to encourage reading every chance I get, but here, in this one instance, let me invite potential readers to listen instead. Sedaris’ books are hilarious, but to truly enjoy and to really understand the David Sedaris experience, you need to listen to him read his essays and sketches. The audiobook is the key. His delivery, nasal and borderline effeminate, is perfect. Sedaris has the timing of a veteran comedian and he is just too funny.Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, his 2013 collection of essays, short stories and observations might be my favorite work from him that I have read so far. David walks us through his childhood in North Carolina and we visit again his family and partner. Sedaris is also a world traveller and his wit and sharp eye for detail abroad make for some memorable and hilarious scenes.A funny, enjoyable visit with a talented man.
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed some parts of the book more than others. I kept thinking ---It would have (always would be) much more fun to 'hear' David Sedaris reading these stories -rather than read them to myself.It wasn't my 'favorite' book --yet I laughed. (and was touched)Plus, how can anyone 'not' smile just saying 'David Sedaris's name! :)
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  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    The hi-larious humorist David Sedaris returns for another collection of rib-tickling, side-splitting… ok, enough of that! But Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls isn’t a bad read and a few of the essays had me LOL-ing hard though it’s definitely not as consistently good as his other books. His Homer Simpson-ish dad steals the show whenever he crops up, thundering about David’s childhood home in his underpants with a drink in his hand. In Attaboy, he chokes out a neighbourhood boy he wrongly mistake The hi-larious humorist David Sedaris returns for another collection of rib-tickling, side-splitting… ok, enough of that! But Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls isn’t a bad read and a few of the essays had me LOL-ing hard though it’s definitely not as consistently good as his other books. His Homer Simpson-ish dad steals the show whenever he crops up, thundering about David’s childhood home in his underpants with a drink in his hand. In Attaboy, he chokes out a neighbourhood boy he wrongly mistakes for having called his wife a bitch, but, hey, it was the late ‘60s/early ’70s and that’s just how parenting was! And the kid got some shit ice-cream so fair’s fair! Standing Still was my favourite story. David’s sister Gretchen is almost raped walking home late at night and, during the police interview, they ask if her attacker was wearing short or long pants. She says long. Sedaris writes “My father slapped his palm on the tabletop. ‘There you go,’ he said. ‘NOW we’re getting somewhere!’” before buying a baseball bat and prowling the neighbourhood in his car seeing if he can catch his daughter’s would-be rapist himself (a situation made all the more loaded by the fact that it was a black man and this was in North Carolina!). Easy, Tiger also made me laugh as Sedaris reviews the differences between learning Japanese and German languages on tape. This scenario appears on both: a wife announces to her husband that she wants to buy something - in the Japanese one, the husband asks her how much she has, she tells him, he offers to increase it; on the German one the husband replies coldly “I’m not giving you any more. You have enough.” Oh, Germany! That said, most of the essays are fairly ordinary and unmemorable without anything funny or impressive happening. It’s very noticeable that the best stuff is largely from Sedaris’ childhood/wayward youth while his recent stuff isn’t nearly as interesting. It’s like a successful band who spent years crafting their first record and made it big then their second album is all uninspired guff about the road and hotels; most of Sedaris’ recent essays are about going on book tours and travel, while the ones that aren’t - going to the dentist, getting a colonoscopy, buying a stuffed owl, getting into picking up litter - are equally humdrum and mundane with just the occasional sparkling sentence to tide you by (from the essay, Rubbish: “My arms are scratched from reaching into blackberry bushes for empty potato chip bags, of which there are a never-ending supply, potato chips in the UK being like meals in space. ‘Argentinean Flame Grilled Steak’ a bag will read, or the new ‘Cajun Squirrel.’” - as a Brit I can confirm this is a very wry, very true observation of the insane variety of crisp flavours!) Also included are six fictional monologues dotted throughout, all of which are mega-crappy and added nothing. Most are predictably liberal caricatures of conservative stereotypes - easy, unimaginative targets to make fun of. These were definitely the worst parts of the book. It’s no surprise Sedaris made his name with nonfiction if this is the quality of his fiction. There’s enough decent material here to make reading it worthwhile for most David Sedaris fans, and the book as a whole is well-written and easy to read, so Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls is a decent-enough read. But I definitely think that unfortunately at this point we’ve seen his best stuff in his earlier, far funnier, books and the occasional gems amidst the growing amount of dross is the most we can expect from him going forward.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like I'm now on some sort of NPR blacklist for not liking David Sedaris. Like, I'll call in to the next fund drive and they'll say "I'm sorry but our records show you gave ...Diabetes with Owls two stars. We don't want your money." Two stars, because he's a competent writer, especially when he's not writing as himself, and he made me chuckle a few times but, wow, I haven't felt this alienated by a book in a while. Maybe it was because I listened to the audiobook and hearing the howls of l I feel like I'm now on some sort of NPR blacklist for not liking David Sedaris. Like, I'll call in to the next fund drive and they'll say "I'm sorry but our records show you gave ...Diabetes with Owls two stars. We don't want your money." Two stars, because he's a competent writer, especially when he's not writing as himself, and he made me chuckle a few times but, wow, I haven't felt this alienated by a book in a while. Maybe it was because I listened to the audiobook and hearing the howls of laughter at some of the essays while not finding them funny is reminiscent of my least favorite kind of social interactions. I mean, are upper middle class people so stuffy that they've never heard of "crop dusting" or is this the whole "live studio audience" anticipatory laugh phenomenon that creates exponentially larger laughs that jokes deserve? Either way, "people don't dress well at airports" or "Chinese people eat weird food" are not really compelling things to read about, and neither are his multiple stories involving dead, dying, and injured animals, or stories where he uses "Black" or "Latino" accents, or when he talks about his time in voluntary poverty. It just reeked of "this is not for you" and boo to that.
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  • Wendell
    January 1, 1970
    It is no happy work to break the hearts of tens, but I can do nothing less than my duty. So here it is: David Sedaris is not funny. He is not clever, observant, witty, pithy, or trenchant. He is not deadpan or droll.What he is, is not funny.I do not argue that he has never been funny or that he may never be funny in some theoretical future. I argue that he is specifically, painfully not funny in Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls, his latest book of “essays, etc.” (and it’s that “etc.” that should It is no happy work to break the hearts of tens, but I can do nothing less than my duty. So here it is: David Sedaris is not funny. He is not clever, observant, witty, pithy, or trenchant. He is not deadpan or droll.What he is, is not funny.I do not argue that he has never been funny or that he may never be funny in some theoretical future. I argue that he is specifically, painfully not funny in Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls, his latest book of “essays, etc.” (and it’s that “etc.” that should warn you off like a double-red pennant at the yacht basin).Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls has all the penetrating insight of your slightly tipsy Uncle Irv doing his Jerry Seinfeld impression (“So what is the deal with corn on the cob, anyway? I mean, c’mon!”).Come to think of it, even Jerry Seinfeld would be bored by Sedaris’s hollow riffs on the absurdities of modern life, and that’s a man who would claim to find gently ironic humor at a suicide bombing.A few of the treats in Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls:- China. The food isn’t anything at all like what you’re used to from the food court at the mall, plus the Chinese have an entirely different take on personal hygiene, if you know what I mean. Also: did you know they eat cats?- Parodies of the illogical beliefs of conservative Christians. A quickie to bulk up the manuscript. Actually two quickies, if we’re counting. I could have done these as fill-in-the-blanks, but it’s my barrel and my fish and I’m shooting them. Get your own book contract.- Colonoscopies. Isn’t it weird that they knock you out and stick things in your ass? Some people go to jail for that. There’s an irony for you! Ha ha! Plus a lot of stuff about flatulence—a guaranteed crowd-pleaser if ever my agent saw one.- British bureaucracy. Six months to get a stamp on your passport. Is that crazy or what?- Online language courses. How come they teach you things like “The hat of my aunt is on the table” and never anything useful? I’ll bet no one’s ever mentioned that to you before, have they? Have they? Huh? Huh? Well, have they?When I checked this book out from the library, the librarian tapped the cover with her fingernail and said, “This book is so funny. You’re going to love it.”It isn’t, and I didn’t. This book is David Sedaris getting a hernia in the desperate attempt to be funny, failing pathetically, and still expecting people to send him on book tours and pay his publisher $27 American per hardcover copy.No wonder our public libraries are going to hell.
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  • FeReSHte
    January 1, 1970
    نمی دونم چه صیغه ایه که همیشه صبر می کنم تا پیمان خاکسار یکی از کتاب های سداریس رو ترجمه کنه ککه بعدش من بدو بدو برم انگلیسیش رو بخونم :))به هر حال اینم خوب بود. طبق عادت همیشگی نویسنده مجموعه ای داستان کوتاه بود با محتوای یادآوری خاطرات خود نویسنده از اتفاقات ریز و درشت زندگیش که چاشنی طنز هم بهش اضافه شده . بد نیست وقتی غمگین هستین یا بی حوصله این یا دلتون خنده می خواد یا حوصله کتاب های سنگین رو ندارین یا مثلا موتور کتاب خوانی تون خاموش شده و می خواین با یه محرکی روشنش کنین به این کتاب رو بیار نمی دونم چه صیغه ایه که همیشه صبر می کنم تا پیمان خاکسار یکی از کتاب های سداریس رو ترجمه کنه ککه بعدش من بدو بدو برم انگلیسیش رو بخونم :))به هر حال اینم خوب بود. طبق عادت همیشگی نویسنده مجموعه ای داستان کوتاه بود با محتوای یادآوری خاطرات خود نویسنده از اتفاقات ریز و درشت زندگیش که چاشنی طنز هم بهش اضافه شده . بد نیست وقتی غمگین هستین یا بی حوصله این یا دلتون خنده می خواد یا حوصله کتاب های سنگین رو ندارین یا مثلا موتور کتاب خوانی تون خاموش شده و می خواین با یه محرکی روشنش کنین به این کتاب رو بیارین. تجربه مفرحی خواهد بود
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  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    January 1, 1970
    Lets Explore Diabetes with Owls, David Sedarisتاریخ نخستین خوانش: یازدهم آوریل سال 2016 میلادیعنوان: بیا با جغدها درباره ی دیابت تحقیق کنیم ؛ نویسنده: دیوید سداریس؛ مترجم: پیمان خاکسار؛ تهران؛ نشر چشمه، 1394؛ در 183 ص؛ شابک: 9786002293947؛ موضوع: شوخیها و بذله گوئیهای امریکایی، سرگذشتنامه طنزنویسان امریکایی، قرن 21 معناوین بخشهایی از کتاب: دندان پزشکان بدون مرز؛ بارک الله پسر؛ متفاوتتر فکر کن؛ کنار ایستادن؛ من هوادار ازدواج سنتی هستم؛ درک جغدهای فهیم؛ بخند کوکابورا؛ و ...؛از متن: اگر یک چیز به د Lets Explore Diabetes with Owls, David Sedarisتاریخ نخستین خوانش: یازدهم آوریل سال 2016 میلادیعنوان: بیا با جغدها درباره‌ ی دیابت تحقیق کنیم ؛ نویسنده: دیوید سداریس؛ مترجم: پیمان خاکسار؛ تهران؛ نشر چشمه، 1394؛ در 183 ص؛ شابک: 9786002293947؛ موضوع: شوخیها و بذله گوئیهای امریکایی، سرگذشتنامه طنزنویسان امریکایی، قرن 21 معناوین بخشهایی از کتاب: دندان‌ پزشکان بدون مرز؛ بارک‌ الله پسر؛ متفاوت‌تر فکر کن؛ کنار ایستادن؛ من هوادار ازدواج سنتی هستم؛ درک جغدهای فهیم؛ بخند کوکابورا؛ و ...؛از متن: اگر یک چیز به دردبخور توی آن خانه بود، چیزی حتی شبیه بستنی، مدت‌ها پیش خورده شده بود. این را می‌دانستم و برای همین از فریزر دوم که توی انباری بود صرف نظر کردم، و یک‌راست رفتم سراغ فریزر برهوت توی زیرزمین. پشت مرغ‌هایی که پارسال توی حراج خریده بودیم و بسته‌ های گوشتی شبیه شاه‌ بلوط که روی‌شان را لایه‌ ای ضخیم از برفک خون رنگ پوشانده بود، یک قوطی بستنی پیدا کردم. وانیلی و به رنگ چرک. این‌‌قدر درفریزر مانده بود که حتا من بچه هم با دیدن برچسب قیمتش احساس کردم سنی ازم گذشته، «سی و پنج سنت! با این پول تو این دوره و زمونه هیچی نمی‌شه خرید!» ؛ پایان نقلنقل از متن: «نمی‌دانم این زن و شوهرها چطور از عهده‌ ی این همه چیز برمی‌آیند، هر شب چند ساعت وقت صرف می‌کنند تا بچه‌ هایشان را ببرند به رختخواب و برایشان از روی کتاب، قصه‌ ی بچه‌ گربه‌ های بی‌ تربیت و فُک‌های یونیفرم‌ پوش بخوانند و بعد اگر بچه دوباره دستور داد دوباره از اول شروع کنند به خواندن. در خانه‌ ی ما پدر و مادرمان ما را فقط با دو کلمه می‌گذاشتند توی رختخواب «خفه شو.» این آخرین چیزی بود که قبل از خاموش شدن چراغ‌ها می‌شنیدیم…»؛ ص 20؛ پایان نقلنقل از متن:- با خودم فکر می‌کردم هرگز نباید گفت هرگز، خصوصا درباره‌ ی خاطرات. ملت پیر می‌شوند و آدم حیرت می‌کند که چه چیزهایی را فراموش می‌کنند. مثلا چند هفته پیش به مادرم زنگ زدم تا تولدش را تبریک بگویم، هشتاد سالگی‌ اش را. گفتم: «شرط می‌بندم آرزو می‌کردی بابا زنده بود تا تولدت رو با هم جشن می‌گرفتین.»؛گفت «ولی اون هنوز زنده است.»؛«زنده‌ ست؟»گفت: «البته. پس کی تلفن رو برداشت؟»؛حالا تازه پنجاه سالم شده و یادم رفته پدرم هنوز نمرده! (ص 27)؛نقل از متن:- پدرم شبیه افسرهای نیروی زمینی بود، فقط به جای این که مثل آن‌ها آدم را داغان کند و بعد از نو بسازد بخش اول را انجام می‌داد و می‌رفت پی کارش. (ص 39)؛نقل از متن:- راستش بعد از صرف آن همه وقت در هواپیما دوست داری وقتی از هواپیما پیاده می‌شوی، با یک دنیای کاملا جدید رو به‌ رو شوی، سیاره‌ ی عطارد مثلا، یا دست کم مکزیکوسیتی. ولی استرالیا برای یک امریکایی هیچ چیز جدیدی ندارد: همان خیابان‌های پهن، همان برج‌های اداری، کاناداست با شورت نخی، لااقل برداشت اول آدم این است. (ص 77)؛نقل از متن:- سال 2004 پیشنهاد دادم که سیگاری‌ها برای امضای کتاب در الویت قرار بگیرند. دلیلش هم اینکه سیگاری‌ها زیاد عمر نمی‌کنند و وقتشان با ارزش‌تر است. (ص 106)؛نقل از متن:- در امریکا کسی از شما سئوال سیاسی نمی‌پرسد مگر اینکه راجع به سیاست نوشته باشید. ولی در خارج هرچی ازتان بپرسند سیاسی است، مخصوصا اگر امریکایی باشید. اگر تاریخچه‌ ی تزیین کیک را هم نوشته بودم باز هم ازم راجع به گوانتانامو و امضای پیمان کیوتو توسط کشورم سوال می‌پرسیدند. (ص 109)؛ا. شربیانی
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  • Johanna
    January 1, 1970
    The most embarrassing part about writing a review of a David Sedaris book is the moment when you realize that what you are really trying to do is to write a David Sedaris-style essay. Something cute about how you were reading his book on the subway and you started laughing so hard that even the drunk homeless people moved away from you, but slowly because they hoped you wouldn't notice. You'd segue into a bit about how this made you realize that even when everyone around you makes you feel like The most embarrassing part about writing a review of a David Sedaris book is the moment when you realize that what you are really trying to do is to write a David Sedaris-style essay. Something cute about how you were reading his book on the subway and you started laughing so hard that even the drunk homeless people moved away from you, but slowly because they hoped you wouldn't notice. You'd segue into a bit about how this made you realize that even when everyone around you makes you feel like a singular freak, you can still feel a profound connection to this man you've never met, because when he writes about his crystal meth addiction and being paddled by his father, he does it SO WELL that you actually think to yourself (contrary to all the evidence), "That's just like MY life!". Then of course you realize that your enterprise is doomed, because David Sedaris is David Sedaris and you are just you, and no, he probably wouldn't want to hang out with you in real life because, well, obviously.
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  • Darwin8u
    January 1, 1970
    “And I'm here to tell you that, as long as you keep your eyes shut, it's really not that bad.” ― David Sedaris, Let's Explore Diabetes with OwlsWhile I enjoyed this collection more than Sedaris' previous book 'Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk', it just didn't rise to the levels of his great collections ('Naked' or 'Me Talk Pretty Someday'), or even his very good collections ('When You Are Engulfed in Flames' or 'Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim'). I just feel like he is retreading the same ground, “And I'm here to tell you that, as long as you keep your eyes shut, it's really not that bad.” ― David Sedaris, Let's Explore Diabetes with OwlsWhile I enjoyed this collection more than Sedaris' previous book 'Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk', it just didn't rise to the levels of his great collections ('Naked' or 'Me Talk Pretty Someday'), or even his very good collections ('When You Are Engulfed in Flames' or 'Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim'). I just feel like he is retreading the same ground, picking up the same litter, and is starting that phase in his career where he is like a band from the 80s that isn't creating as much as exploiting his better work. I hope I am being overly pessimistic, and maybe I am just jaded from the horrible audio experience my wife and I had last night listening to him at Gammage Auditorium in Tempe, AZ, but it seems that the reading typified my feelings about his book. Sedaris was reading to a comfortable group in comfortable shoes, reading comfortable stories. We all laughed at the appropriate parts, we all knew what we expected and David Sedaris delivered the goods -- mostly. The audio quality wasn't great, but I walked away mostly amused that I somehow ended up parting with 1 credit at Audible, $15 bucks on Amazon, $45 for a live reading, and while mildly entertained ... I wasn't particularly blown away. It was like I was a beer-bellied, middle-aged man at a Journey concert. I figure I didn't pay for the new set, just for the couple hours of nostalgia at how great it was ten or twenty years ago. Now, I've just got to figure out now how much nostalgia will cost me tomorrow.
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  • Amy | shoutame
    January 1, 1970
    I really disliked this book. I honestly have no idea how this book makes people laugh. I consider myself to have a pretty dry 'British' humour and it felt like David Sedaris was attempting to do this but completely missed the mark. I kept pushing myself through hoping the bigger joke was coming along and I was suddenly going to understand it all but it was just crude and pretty vile in places. Sedaris successfully manages to insult so many different people in this book that I spent the whole tim I really disliked this book. I honestly have no idea how this book makes people laugh. I consider myself to have a pretty dry 'British' humour and it felt like David Sedaris was attempting to do this but completely missed the mark. I kept pushing myself through hoping the bigger joke was coming along and I was suddenly going to understand it all but it was just crude and pretty vile in places. Sedaris successfully manages to insult so many different people in this book that I spent the whole time wondering how this managed to get published. The book simply highlights Sedaris as an extremely arrogant and bigoted man whom I know I shall never read another book from. First one star review of 2016!
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  • kian
    January 1, 1970
    فقط دو جا از آدم، دزدي ميكنند؛ در تلويزيون و در دنياي واقعي.در تلويزيون اموال آدم پيدا ميشود ولي در دنياي واقعي، تازه اگر خوش شانس باشيد، پليسي كه به خانه تان ميايد ميپرسد: كامپيوتر دزديده شده چه جور كامپيوتري بوده؟اجازه ندهيد اين سوال، سطح توقعتان را ببرد بالا. به احتمال قوي اين را پرسيده چون يك سوال نرم افزاري دارد.ميشه گفت اين كتاب يه مجموعه از يادداشتهاي شخصي سداريسه. درمورد سفرهاش. خاطراتش از چيزهاي مختلف. با همون رگه هاي طنز كه تو همه جملاتش خيلي واضح وجود داره. با سداريس نميشه نخنديد.انگا فقط دو جا از آدم، دزدي ميكنند؛ در تلويزيون و در دنياي واقعي.در تلويزيون اموال آدم پيدا ميشود ولي در دنياي واقعي، تازه اگر خوش شانس باشيد، پليسي كه به خانه تان ميايد ميپرسد: كامپيوتر دزديده شده چه جور كامپيوتري بوده؟اجازه ندهيد اين سوال، سطح توقعتان را ببرد بالا. به احتمال قوي اين را پرسيده چون يك سوال نرم افزاري دارد.ميشه گفت اين كتاب يه مجموعه از يادداشتهاي شخصي سداريسه. درمورد سفرهاش. خاطراتش از چيزهاي مختلف. با همون رگه هاي طنز كه تو همه جملاتش خيلي واضح وجود داره. با سداريس نميشه نخنديد.انگار يه دوست نشسته روبروت و داره جريان زندگيش رو برات مو به مو با لحن خاص و خنده دار خودش خيلي صادقانه تعريف ميكنه:)با اينحال، بنظرم مادربزرگتو از اينجا ببر بهتر بود از اين.
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  • Nathalie
    January 1, 1970
    I'm continually amazed at David Sedaris' detail. The way he writes conversations and chance encounters - brilliant. "Day In, Day Out" describes his journal-writing process, and is it surprising? The man works nonstop at it - recording the minutest of details for later use. I've seen him read from one of these journals. His satire and sarcasm just get me all weepy...with laughter. I love this man.
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  • Paria
    January 1, 1970
    کتاب مجموعه ای 26 داستان کوتاه طنزه که توسط دیوید سداریس به نگارش درومده و این داستان ها درحقیقت خاطرات نویسنده هستن.ارتباط برقرار کردن با کتاب های طنزی که متعلق به کشورها و فرهنگ های دیگه هستن معمولا ساده نیست. ولی این کتاب بنظرم کتاب خیلی جذابی اومد و بعضی از قسمت هاش منو وادار به خندیدن با صدای بلند کرد! البته داستان هایی هم داشت که چندان نمیشد باهاشون ارتباط برقرار کرد.ترجمه ی این کتاب توسط نشر چشمه و با ترجمه ی پیمان خاکسار (البته با حذف 6 داستان از کتاب) منتشر شده. واسم جالبه که بدونم کدوم کتاب مجموعه ای 26 داستان کوتاه طنزه که توسط دیوید سداریس به نگارش درومده و این داستان ها درحقیقت خاطرات نویسنده هستن.ارتباط برقرار کردن با کتاب های طنزی که متعلق به کشورها و فرهنگ های دیگه هستن معمولا ساده نیست. ولی این کتاب بنظرم کتاب خیلی جذابی اومد و بعضی از قسمت هاش منو وادار به خندیدن با صدای بلند کرد! البته داستان هایی هم داشت که چندان نمیشد باهاشون ارتباط برقرار کرد.ترجمه ی این کتاب توسط نشر چشمه و با ترجمه ی پیمان خاکسار (البته با حذف 6 داستان از کتاب) منتشر شده. واسم جالبه که بدونم کدوم داستان های کتاب حذف شدن. چون بنظرم نهایتا دو تا از داستان هاش امکان سانسور داشتن نه دیگه شیش تا :||||
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  • Ghazaleh
    January 1, 1970
    صد صفحه اول رو بیشتر دوست داشتم
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls is a collection of contemplative but humorous autobiographical essays written by humorist/ comedian/ author/ radio contributor: David Sedaris. Before reading this book, I was not familiar with Mr. Sedaris, but I gotta say I kind of like him! He offers the reader material that stirs both thought and emotion...it's not just an easy laugh. That will take some getting used to for me personally because when I think of comedy, my brain automatically takes a backseat an Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls is a collection of contemplative but humorous autobiographical essays written by humorist/ comedian/ author/ radio contributor: David Sedaris. Before reading this book, I was not familiar with Mr. Sedaris, but I gotta say I kind of like him! He offers the reader material that stirs both thought and emotion...it's not just an easy laugh. That will take some getting used to for me personally because when I think of comedy, my brain automatically takes a backseat and I ready myself for effortless entertainment. This isn't your typical comedy but it's good stuff. I like this author and am definitely interested in exploring some more of his work. Factoid: The audio version of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls is a 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominee for Best Spoken Word Album. I listened to it and it really is a great collection of both live and studio performances. Check it out!My favorite quote:“States vote to take away my marriage rights, and even though I don't want to get married, it tends to hurt my feelings. I guess what bugs me is that it was put to a vote in the first place. If you don't want to marry a homosexual, then don't. But what gives you the right to weigh in on your neighbor's options? It's like voting whether or not redheads should be allowed to celebrate Christmas.”David Sedaris has authored the following books as of July 2015. They are not considered a series to my knowledge, but they are similar in regards to being collections of personal essays.
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  • Brian Warren
    January 1, 1970
    April 23 marks the end of a long wait for David Sedaris fans. It has been five years since his last book of essays, “When You Are Engulfed in Flames,” was published. I’ve had an advance copy of “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” for a week now and it’s been fun making my friends jealous (one of the perks of the job). And, of course, it’s been fun to read. I’m not usually one of those, “you gotta’ hear this” kind of readers who insist on reading aloud to whomever happens to be in the room, but on April 23 marks the end of a long wait for David Sedaris fans. It has been five years since his last book of essays, “When You Are Engulfed in Flames,” was published. I’ve had an advance copy of “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” for a week now and it’s been fun making my friends jealous (one of the perks of the job). And, of course, it’s been fun to read. I’m not usually one of those, “you gotta’ hear this” kind of readers who insist on reading aloud to whomever happens to be in the room, but on a few occasions in the past few days, I’ve not been able to resist reading passages to my wife; while she was watching T.V., while she was cooking dinner and while she was driving us to work.“Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” covers a variety of themes, from family members’ eccentricities, living abroad, writing, colonoscopies and the wonders of sedation, the condition of public toilets in China and more. In a particularly memorable passage from the essay “Understanding Understanding Owls,” Sedaris describes the experience of visiting a taxidermy shop in London where he hoped to buy a stuffed owl as a Valentine’s Day gift, and an overly eager taxidermist who showed him several of the shop’s undisplayed oddities. Because the items were not on display for the run-of-the-mill taxidermy enthusiast, Sedaris wondered what it was about his personality that prompted the taxidermist to think he’d find these gruesome objects interesting enough to bring them out of hiding. Among the odd specimens was a small human skeleton, whose identity Sedaris was asked to guess. Reasoning the size made it likely the skeleton’s original owner was not fully grown, he guessed it belonged to a teenage girl. The taxidermist then revealed that the skeleton belonged, in fact, to a Pygmy, who, he informed Sedaris, the English were fond of hunting for sport in the Congo during the nineteenth century. “It would have been disturbing to see the skeleton of a slain Pygmy in a museum, but finding him in a shop, for sale, raised certain questions, uncomfortable ones, like How much is he?”In the essay “Rubbish,” Sedaris, who seems to live in a new location or country every few years, has moved to a picturesque hamlet in West Sussex, England, and quickly discovers its charming country roads teem with trash tossed out of passing vehicles. Disturbed, he sets out on a mission to pick up the ever accumulating leavings by himself. As he does so, he recounts the variety of debris left in woods and footpaths and ponders the psychology of litter bugs and his own obsessive nature which compels him to go out day after day to singlehandedly beautify the roadsides of southern England. “Since cleaning roadsides has become my life, my fingertips have turned black, like spent matches, this the result of prying up bottle caps.There are always leaves and twigs in my hair, and because I know I’m going to get filthy, I dress for the occasion: in rags, like a hobo.” While the writings in “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” are mostly the autobiographical essays David Sedaris is known for, there are a few purely fictional stories that mostly miss their mark. The exception is “Mind the Gap,” which is a short piece about an American exchange student who, after just a brief time abroad affects a British accent without the slightest hint of irony. David Sedaris is a master of chronicling the ubiquitous and the obscure, the mundane and the profane with a fearless, yet vulnerable and dark sense of humor. His sense of humor is as deadpan as it is dead on.
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  • Phyllis
    January 1, 1970
    Most of the essays in this book are funny, but I kept getting major deja vu from earlier David Sedaris hits. I feel bad for Sedaris because I get the impression his successes have kind of painted him into a corner, and when he tries to do something new people are like "bleh, we liked your old stuff better" and when he settles into his familiar territory of wry essays about the various weirdnesses (I don't think that's a real word, BUT IT SHOULD BE) of his life people are like, "SEEN IT!!!" I'm s Most of the essays in this book are funny, but I kept getting major deja vu from earlier David Sedaris hits. I feel bad for Sedaris because I get the impression his successes have kind of painted him into a corner, and when he tries to do something new people are like "bleh, we liked your old stuff better" and when he settles into his familiar territory of wry essays about the various weirdnesses (I don't think that's a real word, BUT IT SHOULD BE) of his life people are like, "SEEN IT!!!" I'm sure my pity for him will soothe his tortured soul as this book soars to the top of the New York Times bestseller list. Speaking of trying something new, the short fiction pieces lampooning conservatives in this book read like something from the worst, most ham-fisted unsubtle pieces from a collegiate humor newspaper. I'm a big liberal wacko, so I wasn't offended, I just felt like he was shooting fish in a barrel. With a gigantic fish shooting cannon. I guess Sedaris is such a bigshot now that his editors didn't have the nerve to say "these are really horrible, take them out." The dog limericks that end the book gave me a major WHY ARE THESE HERE???? reaction, too. The essay on his journaling habits made me hope that someday some of his journals are published, because THOSE sound like an amazing read. I want fewer dog limericks and more lists of weird overheard conversations.
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  • Gypsy
    January 1, 1970
    با اغماض سه دادم. فکر میکردم این از " بالأخره یه روزی قشنگ حرف میزنم" بامزهتر باشه. یه جاهایی واقعاً بود و تو ذهن من موندن. بیشتر از همه نگاه انتقادیشو دوست داشتم که اصلاً هم تحمیلی نبود و با طنز ملموسترش کرده بود. شاید از یه سری عقایدش خوشم نیاد و به هر حال شخصیت عجیبی که داره. به نظرم یه آدم اپیکوری میآد، منتها منطقیتر و جاافتادهتر. اما بعضی طنزهاش هم خندهدار نبود خب. یکمی سلیقهایه این چیزا بیشتر. با اغماض سه دادم. فکر می‌کردم این از " بالأخره یه روزی قشنگ حرف می‌زنم" بامزه‌تر باشه. یه جاهایی واقعاً بود و تو ذهن من موندن. بیشتر از همه نگاه انتقادی‌شو دوست داشتم که اصلاً هم تحمیلی نبود و با طنز ملموس‌ترش کرده بود. شاید از یه سری عقایدش خوشم نیاد و به هر حال شخصیت عجیبی که داره. به نظرم یه آدم اپیکوری می‌آد، منتها منطقی‌تر و جاافتاده‌تر. اما بعضی طنزهاش هم خنده‌دار نبود خب. یکمی سلیقه‌ایه این چیزا بیشتر.
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