Strangers in Paradise, Pocket Book 1
Strangers In Paradise: Pocket Edition 1Katchoo is a beautiful young woman living a quiet life with everything going for her. She's smart, independent and very much in love with her best friend, Francine. Then Katchoo meets David, a gentle but persistent young man who is determined to win Katchoo's heart. The resulting love triangle is a touching comedy of romantic errors until Katchoo's former employer comes looking for her and $850,000 in missing mob money. As her idyllic life begins to fall apart, Katchoo discovers no one can be trusted and that the past she thought she left behind now threatens to destroy her and everything she loves, including Francine.Keywords: GRAPHIC NOVEL

Strangers in Paradise, Pocket Book 1 Details

TitleStrangers in Paradise, Pocket Book 1
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseAug 10th, 2004
PublisherAbstract Studio
ISBN1892597268
ISBN-139781892597267
Number of pages360 pages
Rating
GenreFiction, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, Glbt, Queer, Comics, Graphic Novels Comics

Strangers in Paradise, Pocket Book 1 Review

  • Audrey
    April 8, 2008
    I was handed this in trade paperback form when I wandered into a comic book shop one day asking if there were any "realistic" comics without all of the tights and capes. I took it home and fell in love with Katchoo, Francine, and David. Over the years I have re-read this story over an over again as the trio worked their way to the only possible conclusion they could have. It is a beautiful adventure and I recommend whenever I am given the opportunity. It was my gateway drug to the comicbook worl I was handed this in trade paperback form when I wandered into a comic book shop one day asking if there were any "realistic" comics without all of the tights and capes. I took it home and fell in love with Katchoo, Francine, and David. Over the years I have re-read this story over an over again as the trio worked their way to the only possible conclusion they could have. It is a beautiful adventure and I recommend whenever I am given the opportunity. It was my gateway drug to the comicbook world and I am forever grateful. The series has recently ended, which only means you don't have to wait for the next issue to get written to keep reading. There are 7 pocket books in all and I would highly suggest buying them all after reading the first one. You won't want to put this one down.
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  • Andrew
    February 11, 2013
    I loved Terry Moore's Echo. It was mature, intelligent, and scary as heck's hockeysticks. Naturally, and after numerous recommendations, I was looking forward to Strangers in Paradise. What a joy it would be to dip back into a story focused on complex and interesting female characters – from a male author, no less! I've just finished Vol. 1 of the Pocket Editions. Well...Pros:- Great, expressive art.- Compulsively readable, despite its flaws.Cons:- Two parallel authorial impulses: An almost cree I loved Terry Moore's Echo. It was mature, intelligent, and scary as heck's hockeysticks. Naturally, and after numerous recommendations, I was looking forward to Strangers in Paradise. What a joy it would be to dip back into a story focused on complex and interesting female characters – from a male author, no less! I've just finished Vol. 1 of the Pocket Editions. Well...Pros:- Great, expressive art.- Compulsively readable, despite its flaws.Cons:- Two parallel authorial impulses: An almost creepily-calculated feminism, and hetero-male fantasy- Cheesecake illustration with frequent Clothes-Fall-Off syndrome- Fetishized scenarios and numerous clichés: women kissing even though they aren't really gay; female nudity-fueled public humiliation; hookers with hearts of gold; insecure ice cream eating; a man-hating lesbian who is just bisexual enough to fulfill male fantasies, Tuff Girlz, etc.- Much of the drama comes from the female need for a man, even, or especially, if she hates men.- Condescending, pseudo-feminist depiction of male characters (either horny scumbags, or saints – what does this say about the female characters?).- Complex characterization sometimes becomes merely messy.- Frequent diversion into adolescent romanticism.- "Katchoo."- Absurd conclusion to the criminal plot.- Moore does not create enough visual distinction between his female characters. Their faces are often interchangeable in a pin-up, girl-next-door style. In a structurally complicated narrative, this creates moments of confusion (Okay, she has dark, shoulder-length hair... Francie! Emma! Um... Parker?)- Oh, and why did David fall in love with Katchoo (to the point where he expresses it in a creepy, it's-okay-if-you-physically-abuse-me way)? Her looks. Nothing more.
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  • George
    May 3, 2009
    Just read the first volume of Strangers in Paradise. Boy oh boy, did it rile me up. In a good way, of course. Let's just say I admire this graphic novel, but I'm not its intended audience. Loved the art. It put me in the mind of Berke Breathed's Bloom County. For some reason Francine's mother reminded me of Bill the Cat.OK, let's get down to it. Every single male character in this volume is an asshole. Every. Single. One. Does Terry Moore hate men? I doubt it – he is a man, after all. I think it Just read the first volume of Strangers in Paradise. Boy oh boy, did it rile me up. In a good way, of course. Let's just say I admire this graphic novel, but I'm not its intended audience. Loved the art. It put me in the mind of Berke Breathed's Bloom County. For some reason Francine's mother reminded me of Bill the Cat.OK, let's get down to it. Every single male character in this volume is an asshole. Every. Single. One. Does Terry Moore hate men? I doubt it – he is a man, after all. I think it's more likely that he's a shrewd marketer who knows his audience. I admire his audacity: you've got to admire a guy who can make moving statements about feminine empowerment and draw great cheesecake at the same time and get away with it.SIP is a graphic novel about sex, minus the sex (the first volume is, anyway). Instead we have the slow, richly deserved torment of the male characters. Let's talk about those male characters, shall we? Freddie and David, the scalp-taker and the teddy bear. Freddie, first; he's the scalp-taker. Go to a used-car lot and he'll try to sell you a car. Go to a bar and he'll try to pick you up. He's an asshole, but at least he's up-front about it. In the interests of fairness I must also state that guys like Freddie get laid a lot. Moore nails him; the only thing he doesn't get right is that there's no way he would wait a year for sex. A real scalp-taker cuts ties and says bye-bye after two weeks. David is the teddy bear. He's worst than Freddie, because he can’t take responsibility for his filthy sexual urges. Here’s a scoop: every man has filthy sexual urges. David neuters himself. He is the mascot, the little buddy, the pet. David is the type of character women like, because he’s harmless; men despise and pity him. Unfortunately for him, no woman will ever, ever find him attractive. I give Katchoo credit; she tells David to go away. He doesn't, of course. David’s job is to read puerile poetry and tell Katchoo he loves her and be her designated punching bag while she works out her aggression. This is empowering, for Katchoo. In the spirit of abusive relationships David sits there and takes it. At one point he tells her he had it coming. I guess it’s Katchoo's pure soul; either that, or he likes being slapped in the face. Whatever; he stays.The laundered Mob money storyline was a bit incoherent. It also put my Melodrama Meter off the charts. One of the characters ends up being related to another character, which - in the words of the Church Lady - is rather convenient.Oh, and there's a wonderful fight scene between a female assassin and a fat guy. Yes, I know comic book violence is not realistic, but if you outweigh somebody by 100 pounds, all you need to do is sit on them and the fight is over. By the end of that one I was waiting for the ninjas to show up; maybe they will, in Volume 2.
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  • christa
    August 25, 2012
    Remember that summer that you read Scott Pilgrim, lighting one book off the next, until you were dreaming in Pilgrim-ese and finished the entire series in what seemed like minutes. Then you went into that post-Pilgrim funk, missing those loveable -- and sometimes infuriating -- characters and thought that hole would never be filled. Then you said, “Screw it. I’ll turn this hole into a doorway into the graphic novel genre.” You started searching for that magical series that would capture the inex Remember that summer that you read Scott Pilgrim, lighting one book off the next, until you were dreaming in Pilgrim-ese and finished the entire series in what seemed like minutes. Then you went into that post-Pilgrim funk, missing those loveable -- and sometimes infuriating -- characters and thought that hole would never be filled. Then you said, “Screw it. I’ll turn this hole into a doorway into the graphic novel genre.” You started searching for that magical series that would capture the inexplicable thing that Brian Lee O'Malley captured with those six volume. While you never found anything that made you feel like you felt when you scoured the city limits for the second and third volumes, you did stumble on some dynamite stuff that deviates from the whole dark-alley, caped do-gooder vein. So that was good. I have a hypothesis: If Scott Pilgrim had never been born, I might have had a similar experience with Terry Moore’s “Strangers In Paradise." I’m don’t have that same “Must. Buy. Book. Two.” rush, but that’s more because a) I now understand the addictive nature of a series; b) I’ve read more comic books since that summer. Scott Pilgrim had the added tug of being a first love. I will read book two, I just won’t be at the bookstore, blurry-eyed, when it opens tomorrow. Hell. I could wait a month. Pocket Book 1 of Moore’s series is the first 13 volumes of the story about Katchoo and Francine -- longtime best friends and currently roommates. The former has the hots for the latter and Francine has the playing-it-cools for Freddie Femur, her boyfriend for the past 364 days. Francine has cinched on her chastity belt for length of the relationship, which really (ahem) rubs Femurs the wrong way. First he storms out of her apartment, then when she goes to make nice she finds him sawing away at one of the women who works in his office. This enrages Katchoo, a woman one does not want to piss off. Consider this: She fires bullets into her alarm clock one morning. While Francine dissolves into self destruction, Katchoo finds a way to publically humiliate the jerk, first scaring the beejeebees out of him with a common kitchen utensil. In the meantime, David has entered the scene. He’s an arty sort who is totally smitten with Katchoo and won’t take her “I don’t like men” for an answer. He inches his way into her life as a friends, but does nothing to hide his interest in more. Book one includes an always-shifting love triangle, secrets will be revealed, characters will almost die, and some mysterious characters hunt Kachoo to shake her down for the $850,000 they believe she stole from the mob. Oddly enough: I picked up “Strangers in Paradise” at one comic bookstore before walking into another one and having the owner recommend it to me. These kind of quirky coincidences always make it mandatory that I read the book in question. This series is fun, funny, fresh and sometimes almost sexy. Katchoo, part artist, part ass kicker,  is a sassy character. It leans a little too close to madcap and some of the poetic and lyrical moments are a little oh-for-crying-out-loud-ish, but whatever.
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  • Quentin Wallace
    January 7, 2017
    This year I'm going to finally read the complete Strangers in Paradise series. I've read much of it over the years, but never the entire series from start to finish.This is different than pretty much any other comic ever published. It's almost like a comic book soap opera, but it's got enough going on it doesn't seem stale or turn off comic book readers. It's a story of two women who are best friends and the different baggage they bring with them through the journey of life.This first issue intr This year I'm going to finally read the complete Strangers in Paradise series. I've read much of it over the years, but never the entire series from start to finish.This is different than pretty much any other comic ever published. It's almost like a comic book soap opera, but it's got enough going on it doesn't seem stale or turn off comic book readers. It's a story of two women who are best friends and the different baggage they bring with them through the journey of life.This first issue introduces us to Katchoo and Francine, who are very sexy characters even though they don't fit the usual "comic book sexy" stereotype. They aren't unrealistic sexual fantasies come to life, they are real women who are just as sexy as the super heroines that normally inhabit the comic world. We see them having real life struggles such as weight, money, relationships, etc. But to keep things interesting, there's also murder and dark secrets from the past.Overall this is a really strong volume. If I have any complaint it's that Terry Moore's art sometimes come across a little cartoony in serious situations. Domestic violence and murder just don't have the right edge with his artstyle, even though he is great at portraying emotion. A really good series and something that many readers, especially female readers, would love even if they've never read a graphic novel.
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  • Jason
    May 2, 2009
    Bad, really bad. Trashy, soapy and with annoyingly stupid characters.
  • Zeynep Dilara
    September 11, 2015
    http://kraliceicinkitap.blogspot.com....
  • Mary Shyne
    September 9, 2012
    Let me clarify: the art in this comic deserves nothing less than a 5. The linework is incredible, the pacing of the panels is top-notch, the light/dark contrasts stagger, and everything works to convey the story Moore is trying to get across. Unfortunately, the stars get docked off for the story itself. It feels like a whole bunch of tropes and cliches haphazardly thrown together: macho lesbian former prostitute (if this was a fan fiction we would all be rolling our eyes), emotional over-eater b Let me clarify: the art in this comic deserves nothing less than a 5. The linework is incredible, the pacing of the panels is top-notch, the light/dark contrasts stagger, and everything works to convey the story Moore is trying to get across. Unfortunately, the stars get docked off for the story itself. It feels like a whole bunch of tropes and cliches haphazardly thrown together: macho lesbian former prostitute (if this was a fan fiction we would all be rolling our eyes), emotional over-eater bombshell, sleazy rich sharkskin-suit wearing boyfriend (who gets walked in on having an office affair? come ON!), and overly-understanding-artist-dude-standing-in-for-the-author. It's so over-the-top and soap-opera-esque, which is jarring considering the careful and precise artwork. I also almost went inSANE when there was suddenly PAGES OF TEXT we were expected to read (why didn't Moore illustrate these instead?!), and I just flat-out skipped over any poetry/lyrics because FUCK DAT SHIT. I can understand how this was groundbreaking, but I think it's more groundbreaking as a bridge between great works than a great work itself: the artwork and composition brings new dignity to the graphic novel genre despite the story staying firmly in the melodramatic vein of older comic books. Nevertheless, still planning on finishing this series just for the artwork and panel composition, because DAMN.
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  • Printable Tire
    August 23, 2011
    Gee, even though this is pretty stupid and annoying and the guy in it is such a pony-tailed sissy and the poetry and songs are terrible and everybody is needy and mooshy and all the men are sleazy even though it's clearly written by a man whatwithall the flirtatious lesbian shit and whatnot and it has this nerdy manga vibe and I can't tell if the far-fetched gangster plotline is a distraction or the only thing keeping this book together- it's still really readable, and the lettering is well done Gee, even though this is pretty stupid and annoying and the guy in it is such a pony-tailed sissy and the poetry and songs are terrible and everybody is needy and mooshy and all the men are sleazy even though it's clearly written by a man whatwithall the flirtatious lesbian shit and whatnot and it has this nerdy manga vibe and I can't tell if the far-fetched gangster plotline is a distraction or the only thing keeping this book together- it's still really readable, and the lettering is well done, and I read it all in one sitting. I'll probably read the rest because it will keep me out of trouble. I don't know, I hate to use the term, but could this be... a guilty pleasure?(PS This book isn't as bad as 1-star but it sure doesn't deserve 4.5 stars so I thought I'd fuck with the statistics)
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  • Jenny Devildoll
    November 22, 2010
    This is like a rip-off of "Love & Rockets" for people who are intimidated by punk rock and Latinas(Katchoo & Francine are JUST LIKE Hopey and Maggie, but you know--more "girl next door" looking!). And written by a Nice Guy(tm) hoping to get into a pseudo-lesbian's pants(cuz he can CHANGE her with his love!) if he acts sympathetic enough to the fact that "yeah, men are jerks, amirite"? Ever notice that everyone with a penis (save Moore's milquetoasty Gary-Stu stand-in David) in this book This is like a rip-off of "Love & Rockets" for people who are intimidated by punk rock and Latinas(Katchoo & Francine are JUST LIKE Hopey and Maggie, but you know--more "girl next door" looking!). And written by a Nice Guy(tm) hoping to get into a pseudo-lesbian's pants(cuz he can CHANGE her with his love!) if he acts sympathetic enough to the fact that "yeah, men are jerks, amirite"? Ever notice that everyone with a penis (save Moore's milquetoasty Gary-Stu stand-in David) in this book is EEEEEEEE-VUUUUUULLLLLL? Or at least has to make an ass of themselves. I've encountered many people who adore "Strangers In Paradise", but I can't help it---it creeps me out! Do yourself a favor and get some actual "Love & Rockets" books instead!
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  • Ryan
    June 25, 2010
    I'm a big fan of poutine. For those of you who are not Canadian, nor have Canadians in your life, poutine is a Quebecois dish based on french fries, which have cheese curds placed on top of them, and then the whole thing is smothered in gravy.This seems off-topic, but I swear it relates.The thing with poutine is that it's a really common dish, because it's simple and easy to put together, but few people make it really well. I've been in restaurants where they've just shredded some mozzarella che I'm a big fan of poutine. For those of you who are not Canadian, nor have Canadians in your life, poutine is a Quebecois dish based on french fries, which have cheese curds placed on top of them, and then the whole thing is smothered in gravy.This seems off-topic, but I swear it relates.The thing with poutine is that it's a really common dish, because it's simple and easy to put together, but few people make it really well. I've been in restaurants where they've just shredded some mozzarella cheese and tossed it on top of the gravy, and other places where the curds are rubbery, or the gravy's watered down or tasteless. It's easy to make, but real easy to get wrong as well. When it's done right, though, poutine is artery-clogging ambrosia, and one of the tastiest foods on the planet.Strangers in Paradise is poutine literature. It takes a lot of common elements from other stories and mixes them together - between the emo-before-emo-was-a-thing characters, the love triangle between those characters, the feminist politics, the complex interplays of sexuality, cross-gender friendships, and attraction, and the "on the run from the mafia" plot, you've got elements of around half of the cinema and indie comics of the early 1990s represented here in some way, shape, or form. And it works. My gods does it work. Everything fits in perfectly together - the plot, the characters, the artwork - and you end up both loving and hating those characters at the same time for the choices that they're making as the story progresses. It's a difficult, demanding story to read at some points, but it's a very rewarding read at the same time, one that gives you all it has and leaves you wanting even more once you're done. Another highlight of this GN is the artwork - Moore's black and white brushwork might seem a little simplistic at first, but it's a concious choice, done to get you to pay more attention to the words on the page, and the way he varies style and layout throughout it (for example, cartoonish styles for dream sequences and complex, multi-balooned conversations in one panel between good friends), as well as incorporating things like music, poetry, and prose writing throughout the book - it's almost like he's using Strangers in Paradise to teach a seminar on what the GN is capable of while at the same time telling a great story.
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  • Stephen Arvidson
    February 22, 2015
    Katina Choovanski—“Katchoo,” to her friends— is a beautiful and talented artist living a quiet life with everything going for her. She's smart, independent, and very much in love with her best friend, Francine Peters. Then Katchoo meets the gentle but persistent David Qin, who is determined to win Katchoo's heart. The ensuing love triangle is a charming comedy of romantic blunders until a second plot element emerges in the form of a suspense thriller-type story involving Katchoo's former employe Katina Choovanski—“Katchoo,” to her friends— is a beautiful and talented artist living a quiet life with everything going for her. She's smart, independent, and very much in love with her best friend, Francine Peters. Then Katchoo meets the gentle but persistent David Qin, who is determined to win Katchoo's heart. The ensuing love triangle is a charming comedy of romantic blunders until a second plot element emerges in the form of a suspense thriller-type story involving Katchoo's former employer, Darcy Parker, who’s now hunting Katchoo and a large sum of stolen mob money.What I like most about Strangers in Paradise—aside from the prospect of hot girl-on-girl action (what can I say? I’m a guy!)—is that its principle plotline is centered on real human drama with genuine characters, not superheroes in spandex. If the outstanding, well-paced writing isn’t enough to draw you in, perhaps then the clean, consistent, and incredibly detailed artwork will do the trick. The book is laced with both incredible humor and intensity, along with bits of song and evocative poetry that wonderfully complement the story. There’s even a couple extended prose segments, including a noir-esque police procedural involving Det. Mike Walsh as he investigates the brutal assault and subsequent murder of a former police officer with lies to the ruthless, predatory crime boss Darcy Parker. The believable and rich characterizations in this book are matched by only a small number of comics. Author Terry Moore's stark artistic black-and-white style deftly captures the variety of characters and the overwhelming emotions etched in their facial expressions. Katina and Francine’s loving friendship is sure to tug at the heartstrings of many readers. What’s more, given the modern cultural and political landscape, Strangers in Paradise imparts a valuable and empowering message about unseen depth and awe-inspiring beauty of women, regardless of their size or outward appearance.While I’ve only completed the first book, I wholly intend to finish the rest of the series in short succession. Strangers in Paradise is both top-notch and utterly addicting!
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  • Summer Ann
    May 2, 2009
    This has to be one of my favorite comic series if not my absolute favorite. The story involves a love triangle between three people: Francine, Katchoo, and David. Katchoo is in love with her best friend Francine, who claims she doesn't see Katchoo that way and is battling some self-image issues. David is introduced a little ways into the story and befriends both of them but develops feelings for Katchoo. All three of them have a past, especially Katchoo's which is probably the most dark and invo This has to be one of my favorite comic series if not my absolute favorite. The story involves a love triangle between three people: Francine, Katchoo, and David. Katchoo is in love with her best friend Francine, who claims she doesn't see Katchoo that way and is battling some self-image issues. David is introduced a little ways into the story and befriends both of them but develops feelings for Katchoo. All three of them have a past, especially Katchoo's which is probably the most dark and involves some unsavory characters to say the least. The comic plays out like a serious drama but the characters and situations feel genuine and real. I will say towards the later part of the series I felt it lagged and could have ended much sooner. But on the whole this is the start to a really original and fantastic series.
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  • Bilge B
    July 1, 2016
    Güzeldi ama basım hatalarıyla doluydu. Yarım cümleler vardı. Pantolon kelimesi birden fazla yerde pantalon olarak yazılmıştı, motherfucker da ana sevici olarak çevrilmişti. Hepsini bir araya toplayınca bir yıldız kırdım.Ayrıca bana iki kitaplık bir seri diye sattılar fuarda, altı kitabı varmış. Görevli arkadaşlara da güvenemeyeceğiz artık girip her alacağımız kitaba bakmamız gerekiyor....
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  • John Wiswell
    December 27, 2010
    This is perhaps the most profound soap opera in the world. It’s not about a plot – the roommates are not going to run from the cops or toss the ring into Mount Doom. Rather, it’s about intertwining lives, and most often defined by either love or friendship between people. Katchoo has been in love with Francine since their teens, but Francine may not even be gay, let alone recognize Katchoo’s affection; David enters the picture, falls for Katchoo, and while Katchoo feels something for him, it’s c This is perhaps the most profound soap opera in the world. It’s not about a plot – the roommates are not going to run from the cops or toss the ring into Mount Doom. Rather, it’s about intertwining lives, and most often defined by either love or friendship between people. Katchoo has been in love with Francine since their teens, but Francine may not even be gay, let alone recognize Katchoo’s affection; David enters the picture, falls for Katchoo, and while Katchoo feels something for him, it’s clear Francine dominates her heart; Francine, meanwhile, dates a string of men who are no good for her; and things spiral from there.What’s profound about that? It’s not in the challenging of heteronormative romance, or the effortless depiction of someone in unconscious questioning of her own sexuality, but in every stage of their relationships. Moore builds characters out of moments most of us don’t even think to record; the overreaction of a friend to your heartbreak, or hiding lust in playful banter, or all those crucial times when the day made us focus on one thing so that we entirely missed the other. There are at least two times in this volume where characters are distracted by serious problems, put into believable mindsets, and then entirely miss out on what might have been the loves of their lives because they overlooked signals. It hurts that your few opportunities at love can be that delicate sometimes, but it’s worth capturing them, every bit as much as capturing the humor of leaving a used tampon as a protest in the hands of a misogynist statue. That happens, too.There is plot. There is big honking, "You stole my mob money, my goons are going to shoot you" plot, and it's great at shaking up the status quo. It certainly fits with the soap opera motif, down to one character (dramatically) turning out to be the sibling of the villain. And honestly, I could have done without it. I (and likely, a much smaller audience than Moore actually attracted) would have happily read a domestic series that was solely about these endearingly flawed, confused and funny people trying to make life work better. Nothing in the police procedurals, or even the eventual rush of a protagonist to the hospital, matches the attachment of simply watching Katchoo's old friend slip away in a long and quiet sequence.I’d praise Moore just for his storycraft, but there’s much more ambition to the series than that. Our first chapter resembles a friendly Comedy, where a lesbian fails to date her (seemingly hetero) best friend, her best friend is emotionally abused by her boyfriend, and so the lesbian sets out to ruin him as payback. It’s somewhat lighthearted, yet not many pages later we enter a deeply mournful, low-dialogue story about a loved one dying of AIDS. This is only the beginning of Moore’s experiments, as he shifts how sequential works, sometimes putting his dialogue in all lower case, or mixing up where the word balloons are, or abandons them entirely and leaves us to guess who is speaking based on what they say. One tense section features bits of a character’s poem running along the bottom of the pages, not intruding on the sequence, but allowing bits of rumination to seep in if you want them. There are a few pages midway into this volume where it turns into a prose short story, pulpy down to its paragraph structure, telling the perspective of a detective on a case related to the women. Not all of the experiments work – the short story is choppy even by pulp standards – but the sheer ambition merits progression.For all that experimentation, Moore exhibits mastery over simple sequential narrative. There’s a three-panel spread of a kidnapper reading something, the victim smirking and asking something derisive, and lastly the kidnapper looking up with a full-faced expression that is pregnant with character. There’s detail in and under the cheeks that few other artists barely ever remember to draw.Just like that ability to focus on singular responses and details in his art, over and over again Moore displays a sense for what matters in the lives of his characters. Companionship, friendly, romantic, or much messier, is what makes this world go around. Why do people shut each other out? How can we help each other through our flaws, and which ones are worth overlooking? No character is a role model for progressive behavior, but the heart behind our leads is something fiction and non-fiction could learn from.
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  • Vicky
    July 5, 2011
    I feel like I got recommended this series multiple times (partly because of the "promise" of a queer woman in the story, lol) but when I tried to start it a few years ago, I wasn't interested in the comic style, or maybe I was just intimidated by the commitment required for serialized books.Returning to Strangers in Paradise now, I like it in the same way that I liked Dykes to Watch Out For: it just "feels good"/is "fun" to read about other people, especially in comic form, and with SiP, the soa I feel like I got recommended this series multiple times (partly because of the "promise" of a queer woman in the story, lol) but when I tried to start it a few years ago, I wasn't interested in the comic style, or maybe I was just intimidated by the commitment required for serialized books.Returning to Strangers in Paradise now, I like it in the same way that I liked Dykes to Watch Out For: it just "feels good"/is "fun" to read about other people, especially in comic form, and with SiP, the soap opera effects are unapologetic, great, and I totally fall for whatever the narrative wants me to fall for. I think.I like the classic trio of friends. Katchoo, who is in love with her best friend Francine, who just got out of a relationship with Freddie who is portrayed as a "bad guy" (not totally comfortable with his "bad" depiction) who wants to get back with Francine, and then David is this sensitive-type-guy who's in love with Katchoo, who doesn't identify as a lesbian but repeats that she hates men often. Not a fan at all re: how David isn't convinced that Katchoo doesn't like men, ugh, and not a fan of the "I have feelings for you so I won't be going away anytime soon just in case and with the hopes that you'll change your mind, heart" theme for the men in this story, but I definitely relate to Katchoo's honest confusion about her feelings for David.Anyway.
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  • Melissa
    September 14, 2007
    Eric will argue aggressively about why Locas is so much better than Strangers in Paradise, but I must admit that I find Terry Moore's paean to plus-size brunettes equally fun. Maybe because I was thrown off by the dinosaur mechanic thing early into Locas, maybe because I like the name Katchoo, I dunno.... Francine is slightly Archie-fied where Maggie is simply HOT, but still, I like the goofy romance comic vibe of Strangers a lot. I'm looking forward to the rest of this series (and, to be fair, Eric will argue aggressively about why Locas is so much better than Strangers in Paradise, but I must admit that I find Terry Moore's paean to plus-size brunettes equally fun. Maybe because I was thrown off by the dinosaur mechanic thing early into Locas, maybe because I like the name Katchoo, I dunno.... Francine is slightly Archie-fied where Maggie is simply HOT, but still, I like the goofy romance comic vibe of Strangers a lot. I'm looking forward to the rest of this series (and, to be fair, Palomar.)
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  • Eric Lach
    April 28, 2012
    Very disappointing. If you are expecting the delicate realistic line drawing, sophisticated characterization, and wry humor of Moore's later works, Rachel Riding and Echo, then Strangers is a big letdown. This is Moore before he got good. He also makes no attempt to keep his sexist oogling of women's bodies in check. It is amazing when you see an artist's work before he found his groove and it's just as bad as the later stuff is good. My advice: Take a pass and go right to the good stuff.
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  • Judah
    January 11, 2012
    This series had been recommended to me more times than I can count, yet for some reason I'd never read it until just now. Wow. I see why it's considered one of the Must Reads. The artwork is beautiful, the story involved, and the characters? Well, they're you and me, with all our quirks and insecurities and pride and ninja-kung-fu-kicks.
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  • Tanabrus
    November 1, 2013
    Ne avevo sentito parlare come di un grande capolavoro e ne sono rimasto abbastanza deluso.Storia carina, per carità, e con il giusto livello di mistero... ma da qui al capolavoro ce ne passa, e le aspettative erano certo altissime per questa lettura.Peccato.
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  • Alsha
    November 30, 2008
    *inarticulate noises of glee and other emotions* That was wonderful. Next!
  • Gerd
    September 23, 2014
    Terry Moore bereitet bei der Eröffnung seines Magnum Opus die Bühne für seine Geschichte, wir steigen ein mit einer Schulaufführung, zehn Jahre zuvor wie uns der Text informiert. Ein Schüler deklamiert die oben genannten Worte, während die üppige Heldin Francine in schlecht sitzender Toga ihrem Auftritt entgegen fiebert. Dann auftritt Katchoo, eigentlich Katina Choovanski, ebenfalls hinter der Bühne, als Francines beste Freundin, und nicht ganz so heimlich verliebt in diese, ignoriert sie ihren Terry Moore bereitet bei der Eröffnung seines Magnum Opus die Bühne für seine Geschichte, wir steigen ein mit einer Schulaufführung, zehn Jahre zuvor wie uns der Text informiert. Ein Schüler deklamiert die oben genannten Worte, während die üppige Heldin Francine in schlecht sitzender Toga ihrem Auftritt entgegen fiebert. Dann auftritt Katchoo, eigentlich Katina Choovanski, ebenfalls hinter der Bühne, als Francines beste Freundin, und nicht ganz so heimlich verliebt in diese, ignoriert sie ihren Schulrauswurf um ihr an diesem Tag beizustehen. Francines Auftritt gerät zum Chaos und endet damit das sie entblößt dasteht vor versammeltem Publikum. Nette harmlose screwball comedy, mit ansprechendem Strich in Szene gesetzt, die amüsiert und die grundlegende Beziehungsdynamik der Geschichte vorstellt:Katchoo liebt Francine, doch Francine sieht in ihr nur die beste Freundin. Leider stürzt die Geschichte danach erst mal gehörig ab, was ein leichfüßig romantischer funny comic hätte werden können begibt sich nun erst mal in die Niederungen des Adult comic und wurstelt sich die nächsten 80 Seiten durch eine Sexklamotte mit gelegentlichem Drama Anspruch, die kein Klischee unangetastet lässt: Francine ist zehn Jahre später zum liebeshungrigen Dummchen herangereift die naiv auf den immer selben Männer-Typ setzt, in diesem Fall Kotzbrocken „Ready“ Freddy Femurs der unter einem übermaß an Egomanie leidet und dessen erster Auftritt Programm ist: Er bettelt Francine nachts um Sex an. Es braucht keinen Doktortitel um zu sehen das Freddy nicht treu sein kann, doch offenbar mehr Verstand als der Liebestrunkenen Francine verblieben ist. Katchoo ist nun die prototypische, männerhassende Lesbe, und immer noch aussichtslos verliebt in Francine. Später wird noch der, seinerseits nicht minder aussichtslos in Katchoo verliebte, zurückhaltende Kunststudent David dazustoßen und unser Helden Duo zum Trio komplettieren.Ansonsten findet sich in diesem ersten Storybogen ein sich als Spanner betätigender Nachbar, ein mit He-Man artigen Charakteren bevölkertes Überfallkommando, ein Knastaufenthalt inklusive sexuellem Übergriff ... Klischee, Klischee, Klischee. Eines der wenigen Highlights ist eine Szene in der Katchoo versucht Freundin Francine zu trösten, nachdem diese endlich herausgefunden hat das ihr Freddy fremdgeht, und sich dabei selbst von ihren Sehnsüchten mitreißen lässt. Hätte ich die Strangers seinerzeit als Einzelbände aufgegriffen, ich hätte das erste Heft zugeklappt und der Serie keinen zweiten Blick gegönnt. Zu wenig eigene Ideen bietet Moore da an, stattdessen liefert etwas das zumeist wie die x-te halbherzige Kopie eines beliebigen Undergroundcomic wirkt. Dann jedoch, im zum Glück weitaus längeren den Mittelteil bildenden zweiten Storyteil, der sich der Vergangenheit Katchoos widmet welche sie überraschend einholt, wendet sich der Erzählstil um 180°. Moore nimmt die Albernheiten weit zurück, bedient sich mehr Realismus in der Erzählung und steigert seine Geschichte über herzzerreisendes Drama hin zum knallharten Thriller. Eine Story in deren Verlauf er alle Register seines Könnens zieht, sich als detaillierter Zeichner profiliert welcher es versteht die Emotionen seiner Charaktere klar herauszuarbeiten in einem Stil der keiner Sprechblasen bedarf um die Botschaft zu transportieren, Dialog ist, gerade in den ruhigen zwischenmenschlichen Momenten oft nebensächlich zu dem was Blicke und Gesten sagen. Auch verabschiedet sich Moore, für den Moment zumindest, hier von seinen Undergroundcomic Einflüssen, und setzt auf ein sehr viel filmischeres Element in seinem Stil. Irgendwo zwischen Grindhouse und Film Noir bewegt sich die Erzählung nun. Aufgelockert und Unterbrochen von Texteinschüben sowie Traumsequenzen in denen Moore mal den Disney Stil, mal die Peanuts aufgreift. Moores Zeichenstil wirkt dabei mit seinen vielen wechseln immer noch etwas unausgereift, die kurzen Hommagen treffsicherer als der eigene. Ein Zeichner der noch immer nach seinem persönlichen Stil sucht. Wohl auch als Erzähler, denn nach dem Ausflug ins Drama und Thrillergenre kehren wir (hoffentlich ein letztes mal?) erneut zurück zu „Ready“ Freddy, in gemäßigterem, weniger stark karikierenden Screwball Stil, aber eben doch wieder mehr hin zur Sexklamotte tendierend. So ganz ist der Funke bei mir nie übergesprungen, Terry Moores „Strangers in Paradise“ ist ein zwar recht amüsanter Funny Comic für Erwachsene, aber kein Bahnbrechender.Die Soap Opera artige Handlung weist leider allzu viele logisch Brüche auf wenn man sie zu sehr unter die Lupe nimmt, und vor allem die extrem Klischee getränkte Einführung hinterlies bei mir einen etwas unangenehmen Geschmack. Positiv überzeugen konnte mich Moores zwar wechselhafter aber immer solider Zeichenstrich sowie die ebenso wechselhafte Beziehung seiner Hauptcharaktere die einen immer wieder neugierig macht, am Lesen hält und dafür sorgt das diese einem nach und nach ans Herz wachsen. Gerade Katchoo ist so ein Charakter der einem ans Herz wächst, mit der man mit leidet, deren Vergangenheit einen abwechselnd Schockiert, Bestürzt und gar in Tränen aufgelöst zurücklässt, mit der man aber auch mit fiebert, und hofft, und liebt, ja, mit der zusammen man sich auch ein stückweit in die naive Francine mit verlieben kann. Als Graphic Novel gelesen könnten die „Strangers“ mich nicht überzeugen, da stehen einfach sehr viel überzeugender rübergebrachte Werke gegen, als Comic Soap Opera gelesen, zeigt Moores Werk dagegen sehr viel potential und überwiegt für mich der Unterhaltungswert klar die kritischen Punkte. Setzt man hinzu das Moore seinen Comic in einer Zeit Zeichnete, Schrieb und Selbstverlegte, als der Amerikanische Superheldenmarkt gerade im Begriff war zu explodieren, in einer Zeit in der Frauen Darstellungen sich immer weiter von der Realität entfernten und die Superheldenmodels der Jae Lee Schule Dominanz gewannen, muss man seinen Mut anerkennen mit einem sich gegen diesen Mainstream stellenden Comic aufzuwarten, und zu dem gerade im erzkonservativen Amerika der nach Reagen und Bush Ära mit einer offen zu ihrer Homosexualität stehenden Heldin. Zur Schreiber und Leser Ausgabe gilt hinzuzufügen das diese in Preis und Ausstattung vollständig überzeugen kann. Die Optische Präsentation gefällt, die Verarbeitung/Bindung ist solide genug das sich der Comic mehrfach lesen lässt ohne befürchten zu müssen dass sich das ganze in ein Kartenspiel auflöst und der Preis ist mehr als angemessen. Da es keine Halbnoten gibt, und der Comic wenn alles gesagt und getan ist mir mehr ist denn einfacher Durchschnitt, gibt’s die 3.5 Sterne aufgerundet auf Vier.
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  • Teresa
    January 25, 2017
    Cosa ci si può aspettare da una protagonista che ha un nome che ricorda uno starnuto ed un orribile rapporto con la sveglia?Questa edizione raccoglie i primi due volumi di Strangers in Paradise, composti rispettivamente da tre e tredici numeri. Avendoli letti tutti insieme, ho sofferto un po’ per queste storie pensate per essere brevi. Inoltre la differenza tra i due volumi si nota abbastanza.L’avvio è esilarante, tenero, ma anche piuttosto nonsense, forse esagerato. Man mano che la storia si sv Cosa ci si può aspettare da una protagonista che ha un nome che ricorda uno starnuto ed un orribile rapporto con la sveglia?Questa edizione raccoglie i primi due volumi di Strangers in Paradise, composti rispettivamente da tre e tredici numeri. Avendoli letti tutti insieme, ho sofferto un po’ per queste storie pensate per essere brevi. Inoltre la differenza tra i due volumi si nota abbastanza.L’avvio è esilarante, tenero, ma anche piuttosto nonsense, forse esagerato. Man mano che la storia si sviluppa, però, acquista respiro. Diventa misteriosa, vengono a galla episodi del passato, si capiscono meglio alcuni atteggiamenti, si finisce nei guai… per non parlare dei complicati rapporti interpersonali!Katchoo, Francine e David sono dei personaggi tutti da scoprire.
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  • Rica
    January 26, 2017
    http://scritti-a-brandelli.blogspot.i...
  • Fran
    January 31, 2013
    To start with, a quote from Terry Moore himself (source) : Start with Vol. 2, #1. Skip the mini-series and go back to read it later. The mini-series is in continuity, but its cartoony and goofy compared to the rest of the series because I was fresh off of comic strips. VOl. 2 with its 14 issues is when the real tone of the comic book series begins. I completely agree with that. It's not a good place to start, unless you know what's going to follow, as you might judge the piece too harshly. To cl To start with, a quote from Terry Moore himself (source) : Start with Vol. 2, #1. Skip the mini-series and go back to read it later. The mini-series is in continuity, but its cartoony and goofy compared to the rest of the series because I was fresh off of comic strips. VOl. 2 with its 14 issues is when the real tone of the comic book series begins. I completely agree with that. It's not a good place to start, unless you know what's going to follow, as you might judge the piece too harshly. To clarify, volume one is the very first three issues - not the first volume of these pocket books which I've added to my shelf. The art is much rougher and more cartoon-y than the refined and beautiful work it becomes by the end of volume 2 (issues #1-13 of volume two as it was published, which is issues #4-16 if you were numbering consecutively and the last issue reprinted in this pocket book - not the second volume of these pocket books). The way the story is told in the first three issues is more over the top and ridiculous than the later storytelling, which becomes much more reflective work mirroring real human emotion.Strangers in Paradise is not so much about the plot devices, but how those plot devices cause the characters to relate to each other. It's fundamentally about relationships, love, and the human condition.I first picked up an issue of SiP from a local comic store in 2002, issue #46, because the girl on the front cover looked Death-ish. That's both a good and bad issue to start with because it's all about Molly Lane (of Molly and Poo); good because it's fairly standalone and I wasn't lost mid-story, bad because it doesn't relate at all to the main SiP story. It got me intrigued though and I bought a few more issues. Eventually I managed to track down all the issues via stores and ebay. So, it's those issues I'm using for my re-read and not actually the pocket book as recorded here. After doing a little research, it sounds like spelling mistakes have been corrected for the omnibus editions (i.e. the pocket editions, I assume). I should get around to buying the omnibus editions at some point I suppose!I've wanted to do a re-read for a while now, and turns out the time is right now - partly because of the SiP 20th anniversary novel that's due out this year, and partly because I just zipped through all the available issues of Rachel Rising (which is amazing btw). I'm getting a lot more out of this than when I first read it. I certainly enjoyed it the first time, but I don't think I had enough Life, or maturity, under my belt to really appreciate its depth. The thirteen issues that comprise the second volume is a brilliant piece of storytelling. I'm looking forward to re-reading through the next 90 issues over the next few months.Also, I'd always assumed that SiP, Echo, and Rachel Rising were three separate works in separate universes. I've not yet read Echo, otherwise I might've realise that that's not the case. Note to self: must read Echo soon.
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  • Timo
    February 25, 2017
    Kannessa lukee "Muukalaisia paratiisissa" ja selässä "Paratiisissa muukalaisia". Toivottavasti tarkoituksella.Hauska ja hyvä ja ihq tämä oli vieläkin, kaikkien näiden vuosien jälkeenkin. Ainoa, mikä särähti silmään ja sieluun ja esti viisi tähteä antamasta ovat nuo tekstiosiot kokoelman jälkimmäisessä puolikkaassa. Kyseessä on sarjakuva, ei kirja. Jos haluat kirjoittaa kirjan, kirjoita kirja. Älä hölmöile ja pistä lukuja kirjasta sarjakuvaan. Se on typerää.
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  • Emily
    September 18, 2016
    I finally read Strangers in Paradise! I read them all in about a week. It was definitely a page turner. Have to love the characters and the art reminds me of Lynn Johnston's drawing style. A lot of violence in the first half of the series, which I don't like thinking about. I enjoyed the alternate endings parts in the middle, and book six was great. I really enjoyed the books overall.. Engrossing! But ok, Terry Moore thought of way too many scenarios for the characters to be wearing underwear or I finally read Strangers in Paradise! I read them all in about a week. It was definitely a page turner. Have to love the characters and the art reminds me of Lynn Johnston's drawing style. A lot of violence in the first half of the series, which I don't like thinking about. I enjoyed the alternate endings parts in the middle, and book six was great. I really enjoyed the books overall.. Engrossing! But ok, Terry Moore thought of way too many scenarios for the characters to be wearing underwear or bikinis. They are always getting ready to go out or in the morning just half dressed, or they are in hawaii so just wearing bikinis, Casey is a showgirl, painting nudes, or just even "it's hot in here". Give me a break! :)
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  • Beth
    January 25, 2017
    This graphic novel series was recommended to me by one of my new friends from the New World Magischola LARP. While not the same caliber as Saga or Runaways, it was a very engaging story and excellent art. My one caveat in this review is that my library only had a random assortment of issues, not the complete story. So I missed some of the adventures, but I got the general story arc.The things I loved about this story:+ Real, messy relationships and complicated feelings+ Tragic, but realistically This graphic novel series was recommended to me by one of my new friends from the New World Magischola LARP. While not the same caliber as Saga or Runaways, it was a very engaging story and excellent art. My one caveat in this review is that my library only had a random assortment of issues, not the complete story. So I missed some of the adventures, but I got the general story arc.The things I loved about this story:+ Real, messy relationships and complicated feelings+ Tragic, but realistically so, pasts+ The female characters have real chins. This sounds weird, I know- but you know how most women, especially slightly overweight women, have a bit of a fat pouch under their chins? Not a full-on second chin, I mean, just that soft curve. Moore draws that, as the female characters are making expressions or in poses that would realistically make that area more prominent. I have never seen that area realistically drawn before. And his entire approach to facial expressions is beautiful.+ Lesbian themes. Yay diversity!+ A good balance of humor and drama, with consistent pacing+ Ensemble cast+ Attention to detail with background items and characters, which always makes me feel like it's a full picture+ The line art was done well enough that I didn't notice the absence of color (normally, I favor colored over black and white graphic novels)The not-so-much:+ There were moments of character idiocy. I know this contributes to the fact that these feel like real, flawed folks...but I did want to smack Francine upside the head several times.+ Some of the side characters were tropish, for laughs, which is fine. But David started to feel that way toward the end- this may be because I was missing issues where he was more fully explored. But we never really saw him make mistakes or have second thoughts, and it made him feel flat.+ There wasn't enough Mike Walsh. :)Overall, I really enjoyed this contemporary drama/action/romance story. The art was wonderfully done, the pacing was great, and I felt very engaged with both Katchoo and Francine. I highly recommend for fans of those genres, and/or graphic novels, and/or Terry Moore.
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  • Robert Beveridge
    January 9, 2010
    Terry Moore, Strangers in Paradise Pocket Book 1 (Abstract Studio, 2004)Terry Moore's “pocket books” for Strangers in Paradise are anything but, and I mean that in the best of ways. They're a bit larger than manga as far as height and width dimensions, and could probably be slipped into a large pocket (assuming you have one) if not for the breadth. Strangers in Paradise Pocket Book 1 clocks in at 344 pages and is a few inches thick. If you've got cargo pants, the pocket thing might work for you, Terry Moore, Strangers in Paradise Pocket Book 1 (Abstract Studio, 2004)Terry Moore's “pocket books” for Strangers in Paradise are anything but, and I mean that in the best of ways. They're a bit larger than manga as far as height and width dimensions, and could probably be slipped into a large pocket (assuming you have one) if not for the breadth. Strangers in Paradise Pocket Book 1 clocks in at 344 pages and is a few inches thick. If you've got cargo pants, the pocket thing might work for you, but otherwise, ain't happening. This is a good thing because Moore packs a whole lot of punches into those three hundred forty-four pages; I think the last first volume of a series I was this impressed with was Black Hole. Katchoo is an artist. She's been in love with her best friend, Francine, forever, but has never quite been able to work up the guts to tell her that, while she watches Francine stumble through a series of unfulfilling heterosexual relationships. Just when she's almost kinda-sorta ready to unburden herself, however, Katchoo meets David, who's instantly smitten with her. Cue the romantic comedy. Yes, it's a pretty stock plot (and the throwing in of a same-sex angle to the triangle isn't even edgy anymore), but Moore is concerned more than most writers of this sort of romantic comedy with building strong, complex characters and putting them in believable situations (okay, until the final third of the book, but by then I was completely smitten and willing to roll with it). The best thing a romance writer can do, in my estimation, is to hand the reader characters he or she not just cares about, but empathizes with. Moore does so far better than most of the non-graphic rom-com novelists I've read recently. Or ever, for that matter. Fantastic stuff. You want this. ****
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  • Dayna Ingram
    November 1, 2010
    *Note: This is a review for the entire series in pocket book format, vol. 1-6*I finished this entire series (originally I think it was about 100 issues or so) in four days because I could not put it down. I still get butterflies in my stomach when I think about it. Francine and Katchoo's main storyline is both adorable and heartbreaking; you can't help but root for these two (and curse Terry Moore for making you wait so long for the payoff!). This is primarily a realistic comic revolving around *Note: This is a review for the entire series in pocket book format, vol. 1-6*I finished this entire series (originally I think it was about 100 issues or so) in four days because I could not put it down. I still get butterflies in my stomach when I think about it. Francine and Katchoo's main storyline is both adorable and heartbreaking; you can't help but root for these two (and curse Terry Moore for making you wait so long for the payoff!). This is primarily a realistic comic revolving around relationships, with much heightened drama and some larger-than-life mafia/Yakuza action thrown in. It's very melodramatic, and the poems and song lyrics can get way too emo for my tastes, but the character progression and ruminations on sexuality/identity pulled me through. There is enough action to keep you turning the page, and enough humor to give you a little breather from all the emotional twists and turns. Moore's art work is amazing, so expressive; there can be four blond women in one panel and you can tell them all apart by their eyes or the way they smile. That's impressive. While there are some loose threads left at the end (what happened to the serial killer who planted bombs inside people's stomachs?), and the sexual fluidity seems only to be explored by the female characters (Chuck and Freddy 4ever, amiright?), this is still the best story featuring queer characters I have read in a long time, not just in the comics world but in all of literature.I would have appreciated a nice scene of Francine and Katchoo (finally!) consummating they're relationship (c'mon, she did it with David twice and they never faded to black on them), but perhaps they're saving that for the movie.There IS going to be a movie, right?
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