Y (Y: The Last Man, #1)
"Y" is none other than unemployed escape artist Yorick Brown (his father was a Shakespeare buff), and he's seemingly the only male human left alive after a mysterious plague kills all Y-chromosome carriers on earth. But why are he and his faithful companion, the often testy male monkey Ampersand, still alive? He sets out to find the answer (and his girlfriend), while running from angry female Republicans (now running the government), Amazon wannabes that include his own sister (seemingly brainwashed), and other threats. The Vertigo team of Brian K. Vaughan, Pia Guerra, and José Marzán Jr. have given us a great read!Collects Y: The Last Man issues #01-#05

Y (Y: The Last Man, #1) Details

TitleY (Y: The Last Man, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2003
PublisherVertigo
ISBN-139781563899805
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Science Fiction, Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics

Y (Y: The Last Man, #1) Review

  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    In typical comic book male-centric fashion, this series wonders what life would be like if all men died spontaneously...except for one. I suppose if we're trying to put ourselves in the head of an early-nineties comic book reading teen, this might feel innovative. Unfortunately, I find that innovative in the world of comics is pretty much Iron Age for the rest of literature. How does Vaughan manage to make a series with gender issues at its center so bizarrely sexist? Example: In a world where a In typical comic book male-centric fashion, this series wonders what life would be like if all men died spontaneously...except for one. I suppose if we're trying to put ourselves in the head of an early-nineties comic book reading teen, this might feel innovative. Unfortunately, I find that innovative in the world of comics is pretty much Iron Age for the rest of literature. How does Vaughan manage to make a series with gender issues at its center so bizarrely sexist? Example: In a world where all men are dead except for one, and the death of that one man will mean the end of humanity, VIOLENT CULTS OF FEMINISTS SPRING UP TO TRY AND HUNT DOWN MEN AND MALE SYMPATHIZERS. What is the motive here? There sure isn't one written into the plot, other than the one speech about social inequality between the sexes--and how the only way to escape this inequality is to KILL ALL MEN. Characterwise, I was exceptionally not impressed. Even the main character has vague motivations. As for the women, pretty much none of them function as anything but placeholders: the token love interest, the sister who has gone astray, the protective mother. IN A WORLD WHERE ONLY ONE MAN SURVIVED...apparently the world still revolves around that man. And here's where the cultural rant starts...This is a symptom of thinking that is still prevalent in most of popular culture, although not to as great an extent in literature. F'rinstance, lets talk about movies: movies are a great medium for making political statements. Statements about social injustices, such as the way that women are objectified, sexualized, expected to live up to some bleached, shaved, makeup-smeared, surgically modified yet waifishly thin ideal that has been developed over centuries of patriarchal society...and how this objectification upon women is psychologically damaging--to men.This poor guy above has been so mentally warped by Hollywood and advertising that he's incapable of developing a physical attraction to any of the normal girls he knows in real life. Let's take a moment to pitty him. Okay, we done? Good. Fortunately, a blonde porn star moves in next door, and immediately falls for him, even though he's intensely dorky, because, you know, it's what's on the inside that counts. But, I'm not just cherry-picking films here. I could point to this one:Another example of an attractive woman with a *cough cough* career who ends up with a loser whose only redeeming trait is that he's willing to "raise" the baby...if sleazy frat boys without jobs can be said to raise babies. But surely this is a phenomenon in teen comedies?Well, look at "romances."Here's a fairly recent romantic comedy where a successful, relatively well-balanced woman who is portrayed as HORRIBLY DESPARATE for being interested in a neighbor....meanwhile, the character played by Gerard Butler mudwrestles with models on television, and has no interest in anything but one-night stands, yet this is understandable because of his childhood. This is a ROMANCE. Aren't these supposed to be geared more towards female audiences? It really bothers me that I'm more bothered by this film than any women I know. End rant. Okay, BUT, regardless of how inadequately this comic deals with gender issues, it at least TRIES to grapple with them, and it does a better job than any of the movies mentioned above. Perhaps by the end of the series, the author's portrayals of gender issues will become more interesting and sophisticated. This was an entertaining comic, and I plan on continuing it for at least a little longer...but I'll admit that I'm highly confused by the acclaim it has gotten.
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  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
    January 1, 1970
    Yorick Brown is that guy who can't hold down a job. Plays with magic..and he is the last man on earth. Something has killed off everything male on the planet. He and his pet monkey are all that's left. Now gangs of women called the Amazons, a bunch of Republicans and his brainwashed sister Hero are all wanting a piece of Yorick. Either to kill him or mate him. He just wants to find his fiance in Australia.This was a fun book. I thought it was going to go very political but quickly became a fun Yorick Brown is that guy who can't hold down a job. Plays with magic..and he is the last man on earth. Something has killed off everything male on the planet. He and his pet monkey are all that's left. Now gangs of women called the Amazons, a bunch of Republicans and his brainwashed sister Hero are all wanting a piece of Yorick. Either to kill him or mate him. He just wants to find his fiance in Australia.This was a fun book. I thought it was going to go very political but quickly became a fun book.
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  • Brad
    January 1, 1970
    So there's this thing that happens in post-apocalypse stories that I need to talk to you about. You know how in a zombiepocalypse story we occassionally receive hints that it might be better for the women to stay safe so they can make babies? Usually it's only hints, and the male characters don't seem to want to offend the post-feminist sensibilities of the women, so instead the women tote guns and put their wombs at risk of becoming a zombie-buffet. But everyone gets along-ish, and there are us So there's this thing that happens in post-apocalypse stories that I need to talk to you about. You know how in a zombiepocalypse story we occassionally receive hints that it might be better for the women to stay safe so they can make babies? Usually it's only hints, and the male characters don't seem to want to offend the post-feminist sensibilities of the women, so instead the women tote guns and put their wombs at risk of becoming a zombie-buffet. But everyone gets along-ish, and there are usually plenty of women and men, so it doesn't seem like fertility is the most important concern. Or you get the big, bad group of fascist men trying to turn some poor girl into a "breeder" for the new human race, but she tends to rise up, spank their patriarchal asses, escape with her girl power intact, and hook up with some nice guy with whom she's fought for survival. And in the bleakest of apocalypses there's no hope anyway, so who gives a shit about procreation? Everyone's dead or dying, cannibalism is running rampant, society has failed, and humans are doomed to extinction. The best the survivors can do is keep hiking down some road to whatever is further down the road with the world as nothing but the road.But I've totally fucking had it now that I've read Y: The Last Man. This book really pisses me off to no end.I'm fine with the Amazonian self-mutilators (I can buy an angry, post-apocalyptic group of violent women). I am willing to suspend my disbelief that Yorick and his monkey make it through the manpocalypse as the only surviving Y chromosomes. I'll yawn and tolerate the Yankee setting of yet another apocalypse. I'll cringe but cope with yet another bad ass, dreadlocked, African-American woman who's the most capable and violent person around. I'll even believe that spindly little Yorick can pass as a woman as long as he has his gas mask on. But what I won't believe, what I won't buy, where I won't suspend by disbelief, where I am not fine is with the idea that Yorick would ever, EVER, be allowed to wander around the winter of homo sapienism with one body guard, risking his testicles for some stupid, pointless, selfish, idiotic search for the love of his life and his sister. His sperm, and Ampersand's, would be the most important substances known to womankind (not because he is a man but because of sheer practicality). He would be protected whether he liked it or not. He would be imprisoned. His sperm would be used to impregnate. It would be used to find an immunity for future boys. It would be used for the survival of homo sapiens. Period. I heard this book was really great -- a must read graphic novel. At best it is okay ... if you look past the idiocy of Yorick's wanderings, his insufferable smarminess, that stupid fucking monkey, and the poorest characterizations of women you're ever likely to see. Why two stars then? Because it isn't quite as bad as the Luna Brothers' Girls -- though it is damn close.
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  • Felicia
    January 1, 1970
    Ok so maybe it's just me but I found this series to be incredibly chauvinist. I know I'm gonna get flamed for it, so many ppl rave about it. I APPRECIATED IT but the premise and execution and what the women were doing, boy oh boy. I'm gonna shut up and not review this. Check box'd.
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    I discovered this series randomly while looking through graphic novels on Hoopla. I had never heard of it before but recognized the author. The premise sounded interesting (view spoiler)[something kills all but one man on the planet (hide spoiler)] so I decided to give it a go. I am glad I did! The story has been great so far! Every page had me interested in finding out what happens next. Also, of all the "apocalyptic" scenarios I have seen, this is the most creative by far.I am looking forward I discovered this series randomly while looking through graphic novels on Hoopla. I had never heard of it before but recognized the author. The premise sounded interesting (view spoiler)[something kills all but one man on the planet (hide spoiler)] so I decided to give it a go. I am glad I did! The story has been great so far! Every page had me interested in finding out what happens next. Also, of all the "apocalyptic" scenarios I have seen, this is the most creative by far.I am looking forward to volume 2!
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  • Whitney Atkinson
    January 1, 1970
    This book is such a neat concept, but there's 4 things I'm stuck on.1. it's a book about a world run by women after all the men die, yet it's still told from the POV of a man because conveniently !!!! one survives. I think I would have loved this more if we were given a story of a world with just all women, because heaven knows we could survive without that one man. 2. This book was way, way, way, way more political than I was expecting it to be. The mother of the MC works in Washington so a lot This book is such a neat concept, but there's 4 things I'm stuck on.1. it's a book about a world run by women after all the men die, yet it's still told from the POV of a man because conveniently !!!! one survives. I think I would have loved this more if we were given a story of a world with just all women, because heaven knows we could survive without that one man. 2. This book was way, way, way, way more political than I was expecting it to be. The mother of the MC works in Washington so a lot of this concerned the government and what to do once a bunch of the male politicians died, and that was cool for a few pages, but got old really fast? I'm sure this will get more interesting throughout the next books, but it was a bit repetitive. 3. I feel like this just feeds the negative image and stereotype of radical feminists. One main antagonist in this book is a group of women called the Amazons who burn sperm banks and basically celebrate the end of men, which I think is farfetched and a bit inappropriate. Even if some women did this, I don't think they would play as major of a role as they did in this book, and I think this misleading depiction could rub off wrong on readers and make feminism seem more militant than it actually is. 4. One of the first things I thought of when I started this was the topic of trans men and how they would be treated and/or react to this situation. I think it would have been awesome to spotlight a trans man navigating this new world. However, this book handled it so poorly. The one mention of a trans man is to tell the reader that he was murdered by the Amazons because they didn't think any men should continue to live. Additionally, a slur (tr*nny) was used to address this person, AND he was misgendered and called a "she" whenever his death was described. This book was written/set in 2002, so I anticipate some of those flaws and the political incorrectness may derive from its outdatedness, but I still couldn't get over those few things.But other than that, I had a great time reading it. The art is nice. It's funny. It's easy to follow, and one of the only graphic novels i've read in a while that I'm eager to find the sequels to immediately.
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  • Rincey
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I get why everyone LOOOVES this book but some of it just rubbed me the wrong way. Like I don't understand why the entire world just stops functioning completely. Are there no female engineers or scientists or electricians in the entirety of the world?
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I haven’t read a comic book since I was a child, saving my measly allowance for Archie and his friends. Once I discovered my mother’s Harold Robbins novels, I never went back to comics…until now.A number of my Goodreads friends enjoy graphic novels (as they are called now), so I became curious and asked my friend Kemper for a recommendation. Y: The Last Man was perfect for me to start with. I love post-apocalyptic stories and wanted some light, easy reading between school books.A plague that des I haven’t read a comic book since I was a child, saving my measly allowance for Archie and his friends. Once I discovered my mother’s Harold Robbins novels, I never went back to comics…until now.A number of my Goodreads friends enjoy graphic novels (as they are called now), so I became curious and asked my friend Kemper for a recommendation. Y: The Last Man was perfect for me to start with. I love post-apocalyptic stories and wanted some light, easy reading between school books.A plague that destroys the world’s male population, except a young man and his monkey. Amazons who want to rid the world of the last vestige of male oppression. A model who disposes of corpses. A mysterious agent who knits. Republicans with guns. Humorous dialogue, great illustrations, fun characters and a fast-paced story made me gobble this up in one sitting. Looking forward to more!
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  • Brian Yahn
    January 1, 1970
    Y: The Last Man has a great premise -- all males (of every species) suddenly die -- except one. The story focuses on the lone male survivor and is an unraveling of why / how he survived the mysterious scourge.It helps that the last man standing is humorous and likable like so many of Brian K. Vaughan's characters. Also that he has this noble desire to make it to the other side of the world to reunite with his girlfriend (and repopulate the world). The story is essentially about all the things ge Y: The Last Man has a great premise -- all males (of every species) suddenly die -- except one. The story focuses on the lone male survivor and is an unraveling of why / how he survived the mysterious scourge.It helps that the last man standing is humorous and likable like so many of Brian K. Vaughan's characters. Also that he has this noble desire to make it to the other side of the world to reunite with his girlfriend (and repopulate the world). The story is essentially about all the things getting in his way.I wish this installment had a little more of a closing to it, but either way, I still want to read more.
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  • Irena
    January 1, 1970
    The story started out so well: fast-paced, intriguing..I can see it's a dude comic, the main character ends up being the last man left on a planet full of allll kinds of women! No matter what kind of an ugly twat you might wanna be, some woman will want you. Yessss!I see half-naked blonde, beachy-style woman, some ex-models running around, army women, special op women, scientist women. That's ookayyy with me. It is a dude comic, after all, no?Then came this:Yorick (main char): I'm not afraid of The story started out so well: fast-paced, intriguing..I can see it's a dude comic, the main character ends up being the last man left on a planet full of allll kinds of women! No matter what kind of an ugly twat you might wanna be, some woman will want you. Yessss!I see half-naked blonde, beachy-style woman, some ex-models running around, army women, special op women, scientist women. That's ookayyy with me. It is a dude comic, after all, no?Then came this:Yorick (main char): I'm not afraid of the world...I'm fraid of a world without you. I mean it, Beth. I really feel lost when we're apart. Beth: I know. I've missed you too, Yorick. I was just thinking about the time we were on the roof in the rain...Yorick: But it's not just that! I mean, of course I miss that, but...You're my best friend, Beth. You're brilliant and funny and your favorite movie is Miller's Crossing. I didn't even know there were women like you.Later the main char (hereafter referred to as: Twat) says to his mother:Twat: But I don't want to sit here and be a...a "stud" for however many anonymous women you expect me to inseminate. Not when the girl I love is out there. (He blankly stares through the window)No, man! NO! Don't do this to me!So much for the dude-comic. Ok.So, next we see Twat encounter a woman that seems to be picking up dead bodies and driving them in a garbage truck in order to exchange them for canned food. I won't even go there, but what I wish to point out is the following: remember Jill from Resident Evil 3? I was always pissed that she's fighting infectious zombies half-naked, when her priority is to shield herself from their bites at any cost? I'd armor up! Now, this tschik seems to do the same. She's an ex-super model, trying to lift the male dead bodies (of 80-100kg each) and toss 'em into the garbage truck. There is no way she can do this alone without getting in heavy body contact with half- or nearly rotten dead bodies. Did I mention that it is also nighttime?Moving on! What appears next seems to be the development of Twat's character, where we see that he's not only a gentle lover, but also momma's boy:And anyway, what could POSSIBLY be worst than the dreadful terrorists that seem to be aiming straight (and only) at America?![pause for more drama]Okay. Leave that be [I won't even go into the topic where the women in power state how the dead men's Constitution doesn't apply anymore, because it is their constitution and that it's time for something NEW! Fuckyea!].So, we come to the main problem. It's manpocalypse and the President decides that the last left man on earth (being as they're apparently too late to grab hold of the sperm bank/s) is being sent on a journey with a: "Godspeed to you both and whatever you do...don't fuck this up"[image error]Now, I don't know about you, but I'd shackle dat man and milk him! Something like..well, this:[One thing I don't get to complain about is the artwork :) love it!]I definitely wouldn't let the immature twat set off on a journey guarded by only one person, no matter how spec op they may be. *shakes head* Oh, and while we're at the White House scene, lookie at this *tries to suppress her chuckle. No, not really :'D gahahahaha*If they did it, you better watch out for what the others do, some srs sh*t!We also have the Amazons who go all Altair on their breast so they can handle the bow better. In the world of powerful firearms and effective cold weapons you chose a..bow? Bow-chicks become popular in 2012, not in the time of the Last Man so nu-huuhhh! Don't even get me started on Dr. Allison, where the throws herself at developing a breast cancer cure for the last generation livin' on this planet:Dr."If we're going to be the last generation of humans, we should at least be allowed to live our miserable lives in good health."*sigh* :'D Why am I so angry at this comic and I've just started?It's 'cause the main character pisses me SO off! He's got great responsibility now and he he literally waits for the moment when his guard looks away for him to go make some shi*. Not only he's totally consumed with seeing his darling did-she-agree-to-marry-him-or-not? fiance [Twat: We both know that I resent you dragging me to some attack-of-the-clones doctor when I could be out there looking for the girl I love. FINE.], he's all too immature [Twat: Jesus, where the hell do you get off lecturing me like I'm some kind of delinquent kid? We're practically the same age! 355 aka Guard: then start acting like it, Yorick!> AND he's a grammar Nazi!*sigh* he doesn't deserve the harem he's got himself into...I forgot what were the positive things I was gonna point out and the reason it actually got two stars instead of one but..Nevermind.
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  • StoryTellerShannon
    January 1, 1970
    What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for volume one of this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities. There's a fair amount of mischievous style humor in the first volume. For instance, women commemorate the dead man at an obvious phallic What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for volume one of this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities. There's a fair amount of mischievous style humor in the first volume. For instance, women commemorate the dead man at an obvious phallic symbol a la The Washington Monument. Extremists women take on the role of the ancient Amazons and tear off one breast and take to believing Mother Earth meant to eradicate the males. Hardcore GOPs may take offense when Republican wives of dead senators show up with guns, arguing they should have a voice in the new government. The main character, Yorick, is a putz and sometimes clueless but believable enough even though some might argue he is a passive character. The super model turned corpse collector who just got her implants is an obvious jab at how the fashion industry and of course female looks are intertwined with male desires. Overall, I'd say this is a very good start but if you're the nitpicking type you may not enjoy it as much because everything hasn't been explained. A good starting read, by the way, for people new to comics/graphic novels. The series has received 5 prestigious Eisner Awards. Hollywood has been trying to make this into a movie since 2007. Some say this series saved Vertigo Comics from financial problems. CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B plus; STORY/PLOTTING: B plus to A minus; ARTWORK: B plus; THEMES: B to B plus; WHEN READ: early January 2012; OVERALL GRADE: B plus.
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  • Estelle
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I knew this was going to be good, but I'm actually blown away. I need Volume 2!!
  • Bruce
    January 1, 1970
    I've read so much here and elsewhere about how brilliant this series is, and from the two books I've read, I'm afraid I can't agree. The concept (plague instantaneously kills all Y-chromosome mammals -- except a guy named Yorick and his pet capuchin monkey -- around the globe without warning) has tremendous promise. However, the execution in the two books I read (this one and Vol. 13) was pedestrian. Characterization, plot, and art were all two-dimensional. (By contrast, Judge Parker has more nu I've read so much here and elsewhere about how brilliant this series is, and from the two books I've read, I'm afraid I can't agree. The concept (plague instantaneously kills all Y-chromosome mammals -- except a guy named Yorick and his pet capuchin monkey -- around the globe without warning) has tremendous promise. However, the execution in the two books I read (this one and Vol. 13) was pedestrian. Characterization, plot, and art were all two-dimensional. (By contrast, Judge Parker has more nuance in the latter category.)By way of example, here's a bit of dialogue (all characters have the same or similar wise-cracking persona) from pp. 74-75 of this graphic novel [panels cut back and forth among disputants, mostly mid-shot seen from the POV of someone relatively tall]:"Who the hell are you?""...I'm the President of the United States. And I say drop the goddamn weapons." ..."Secretary Valentine, we... we thought you were dead.""Don't listen to them, Margaret! The Democrats just shot Bill Woodring's wife!""After you murdered an innocent secret service agent!""You don't understand, we... we didn't have a choice. They've seized control of the White House." ..."Madam President, Congress has only been doing exactly what the Founding Fathers intended.""The Founding Fathers are dead! All of the men are dead! Their Constitution doesn't apply anymore!"[C-U PRESIDENT'S FACE listening:] "It's time for something new."In this universe, the ladies appear inclined to shoot first and ask questions later. Anarchy, violence, and hysteria reign. Each scene is a mini-melodrama. This is not an Alan Moore book (contrast "From Hell," which was about Jack the Ripper, and had both less page-to-page violence and substantially more nuance).That said, this first book of the series really exists solely to accomplish 3 tasks: introduce the premise, the principal characters, and establish the quest-like framework for the story (here's this wicked world, now try getting cross-country). The first two are accomplished with the first 34 pages (the initiating comic in this compilation). The last waits on the penultimate page of the graphic novel.There are a few artistic grace notes here, such as the birds-eye view of an urban Y-intersection on the last page after the leads have determined that they will have to hike from Boston to California (no, no city yet named), but for the most part, sophisticated readers seeking other than lightly-buttered popcorn will be disappointed. It should be interesting to see how the film version of this book stacks up against "Children of Men." I'm sure buzz will be high when it gets released, but personally, I'd wait on raves before plunking down my ten bucks.
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  • Melki
    January 1, 1970
    If you are a woman,You might have to sleep with meSince I'm the Last Man on EarthAnd there ain't nothing wrong with meLoudon Wainwright IIIMeet Yorick, an unemployed English major with moderate-to-poor computer skills. He lives on ramen noodles. And, oh yeah, his hobby is magic.You probably wouldn't sleep with him if he was the...well, nevermind.There he is, ladies - The Last Man on Earth.The dating pool has just gotten a little smaller thanks to a mysterious plague that has wiped out all males, If you are a woman,You might have to sleep with meSince I'm the Last Man on EarthAnd there ain't nothing wrong with meLoudon Wainwright IIIMeet Yorick, an unemployed English major with moderate-to-poor computer skills. He lives on ramen noodles. And, oh yeah, his hobby is magic.You probably wouldn't sleep with him if he was the...well, nevermind.There he is, ladies - The Last Man on Earth.The dating pool has just gotten a little smaller thanks to a mysterious plague that has wiped out all males, cute puppies and kittens included, on the planet. All except for the above mentioned guy and the male helper monkey he's fostering. Yeah. It takes a little getting used to...So what are the gals up to? Surprisingly, they're not laying in a supply of batteries, or rejoicing in that toilet seat thing being forever solved...like I would be. No. Everyone seems to have an agenda, and there are a lot of kick-ass broads out there. So much for Peace on Earth with the women in charge. There are power struggles aplenty.This volume does a great job of setting up the series. I liked the old-fashioned comic book look of it, and the attention to detail. Alas, as poor Yorick and his bodyguard, Agent 355 (she really needs a nickname), set out to find the cause of the plague and a possible cure, we're left with many questions that HAD BETTER be answered in the next volumes, not the least of which is, will Yorick be able to remain faithful to his sweetie when he kind of needs to repopulate the human race?I know a good man is hard to find, but this is ridiculous.
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  • Neja
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first graphic novel I've read, so far. Because after this one..I'm hooked! Yorick is a young guy, wondering where is his place on this planet. He can't find a job, he loves magic and his girlfriend, Beth. She travelled to Australia, to be all smart and to gain some experiences in anthropology, so now Yorick is all alone, feeling like a loser, because he's not doing anything remotely as important as she and the rest of his friends do. He doesn't even want to go out of his apartment an This is the first graphic novel I've read, so far. Because after this one..I'm hooked! Yorick is a young guy, wondering where is his place on this planet. He can't find a job, he loves magic and his girlfriend, Beth. She travelled to Australia, to be all smart and to gain some experiences in anthropology, so now Yorick is all alone, feeling like a loser, because he's not doing anything remotely as important as she and the rest of his friends do. He doesn't even want to go out of his apartment anymore. And just as he wants to ask Beth something important, everything changes. Something crazy happens, I won't write too much about it, so I don't ruin your joy of reading it (but you probably know already). It's a funny story and it kept me interested. It's a mixture of feminists, jokes about republicans, some overused jokes, hey, there's even a Macgyver joke in it! I missed these, since Chuck Norris is so popular to make fun of these days. I can't wait to finish reading other comics of this series.
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  • David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party
    January 1, 1970
    Ask a comic-book geek what the greatest graphic novel of all time was, and at least 9 out of 10 will tell you it's "Watchmen". And there's no denying Watchmen deserves the accolades it gets, as it quite effectively reinvented the graphic novel genre. However, if you asked THIS comic-book geek what the greatest graphic novel of all time was, and I would instantly tell you it's "Y The Last Man"!The book starts out with an intriguing premise...a mysterious plague instantly kills off every man on th Ask a comic-book geek what the greatest graphic novel of all time was, and at least 9 out of 10 will tell you it's "Watchmen". And there's no denying Watchmen deserves the accolades it gets, as it quite effectively reinvented the graphic novel genre. However, if you asked THIS comic-book geek what the greatest graphic novel of all time was, and I would instantly tell you it's "Y The Last Man"!The book starts out with an intriguing premise...a mysterious plague instantly kills off every man on the planet...except for one young man named Yorick Brown. Now, as all the women around the world start to rebuild a society without any men, Yorick goes on a quest to try to learn exactly why he survived the plague. A tale of such epic proportions would have been too much for many writers, but Brian K. Vaughan not only takes the story to its fullest potential, he manages to somehow exceed even that! And the rich, detailed artwork by Pia Guerra is exactly the icing this cake needs. There are so many layers to this story, it's impossible to really touch on everything in one review. Yorick is a fascinating and likeable protagonist. and his quest to learn the truth about himself and the plague is very exciting, but that's really just one out of many elements that makes this such a fun read. Oftentimes, the ladies who were left behind after all the men died are the ones who steal the show. Brian K. Vaughan works in social commentary on many different issues, including sexism, partisan politics, xenophobia, religion and fanaticism. A lesser writer would have come off as preachy, but Vaughan makes everything flow so naturally that you never feel like you're being lectured. Rather than making his point through ham-fisted techniques, Vaughan simply gives you a cerebral, thought-provoking story and trusts that you'll be able to read all the subtext yourself.Another thing that is so amazing about this story is how real it feels. Sure, a plague killing off all the men and none of the women is pretty over-the-top, but the characters themselves are so deep and fleshed-out, they make the story feel completely genuine. As the women cope with losing all the men in their lives, there are a lot of emotions that play out...enough that I had tears in my eyes more than once while reading the series! This is no cheesy popcorn movie that focuses solely on the action, we watch the characters as they fall in love, lose loved ones, become consumed with rage, and struggle to survive. And every bit of emotion that the characters feel is presented so strongly, the reader feels them as well.Anyone who thinks comic books are immature has never read this powerful, Shakespearean story. I highly recommend you read this first volume of one of the greatest stories ever told. No matter what your literary preference is, I guarantee this book has something in it you'll love!
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    so - while i realize that the premise of this book is supposed to be stunning in overturning the stereotypical assumption that women without men will create a feminist/lesbian utopia, a la Herland, by proposing that left to their own devices, women would act like a bunch of goomba guys, arm themselves and create civil war, strife, and general mayhem, can any of us really image a scenario in which large groups of women, left without men for extended periods of time, would NOT 1) hug a lot 2) lick so - while i realize that the premise of this book is supposed to be stunning in overturning the stereotypical assumption that women without men will create a feminist/lesbian utopia, a la Herland, by proposing that left to their own devices, women would act like a bunch of goomba guys, arm themselves and create civil war, strife, and general mayhem, can any of us really image a scenario in which large groups of women, left without men for extended periods of time, would NOT 1) hug a lot 2) lick each others pussies 3) feel weird but talk it out and 4) begin building some sort of egalitarian communal society from the ruins, which, despite its passive-aggressive penal code and lack of vertical monuments, would still probably feed, clothe and manage the resources of the planet less recklessly than anything ever devised by men?
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  • J.G. Keely
    January 1, 1970
    A sort of reversal of the film 'Children of Men', Y the Last Man is sometimes difficult to take seriously. The storytelling itself is not bad, though it sometimes falls into the faults of Lost, with endless, predictable hardship. It is an interesting concept, and Vaughan at least connects himself tangentially to the literary tradition, but these connections are often too flimsy or too coincidental in construction.The worst crime of all may be that one keeps feeling that Yorick is standing in as A sort of reversal of the film 'Children of Men', Y the Last Man is sometimes difficult to take seriously. The storytelling itself is not bad, though it sometimes falls into the faults of Lost, with endless, predictable hardship. It is an interesting concept, and Vaughan at least connects himself tangentially to the literary tradition, but these connections are often too flimsy or too coincidental in construction.The worst crime of all may be that one keeps feeling that Yorick is standing in as an author surrogate; he is the last man on Earth, after all. Of course, anyone writing this story would have to come up against this challenge, but by not really addressing the character's sexual conflict, or his motivations in general, it can begin to feel like an escapist harem romp. My Suggested Readings in Comics
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  • Ezgi Tülü
    January 1, 1970
    Baskı biraz daha iyi olsaydı da, çizgiroman parçalara ayrılmasaydıHem ortadan ikiye ayrıldı, hem de kapağı (cildi) ile sayfaları birbirinden ayrıldı ayrılacakNe kadar zor olabilir düzgün yapıştırmak ???Onun dışında çizgiromanın kendisi epey iyi, konu ilginç, olay örgüsü aksiyon doluSüper meraklı bir yerde bitmese bile insanda devamını okuma isteği uyandırıyorBeğendim cidden
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Solid start to a series. Last man, one male monkey, and a whole world of women.Fortunately, he's not much of a dick. Good with cracking locks and cracking jokes. I think he's going to leave the cracking of heads to his friends. :)What is UP with those Amazons? Such a shame that people are people no matter what the sex. ; ;
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  • Maxwell
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, so overall I thought this was very intriguing, and I definitely care enough about the story to want to read the next volume. However, I did have a few weird issues with some of the content and depiction of certain characters. Also, because this came out in 2002, there are some aspects of it that I find, for lack of a better term, politically incorrect, such as using the word 'retarded' as something negative. The characters are a bit one-note so far, but it is only the first issue. From what Ok, so overall I thought this was very intriguing, and I definitely care enough about the story to want to read the next volume. However, I did have a few weird issues with some of the content and depiction of certain characters. Also, because this came out in 2002, there are some aspects of it that I find, for lack of a better term, politically incorrect, such as using the word 'retarded' as something negative. The characters are a bit one-note so far, but it is only the first issue. From what I've heard of this series, I have a lot of hope. And I am excited to see why things happened and get more backstory.
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  • Keely
    January 1, 1970
    This comic book series has received rave reviews for its rather satirical premise concerning the idea of the extinction of all mammals with the Y chromosome, and how the female population supposedly tries to deal with this global crisis. I've been intrigued by this series for four years now, but put off reading it even after I bought an actual copy about three years ago. It's a Vertigo title which immediately guarantees it's promising. Finally, I got to read the first volume Unmanned which colle This comic book series has received rave reviews for its rather satirical premise concerning the idea of the extinction of all mammals with the Y chromosome, and how the female population supposedly tries to deal with this global crisis. I've been intrigued by this series for four years now, but put off reading it even after I bought an actual copy about three years ago. It's a Vertigo title which immediately guarantees it's promising. Finally, I got to read the first volume Unmanned which collected the first five issues of the series, and as much as I wasn't completely invested yet in the story and characters, I have to agree that it's an interesting beginning. Y: The Last Man was published in 2002 with ten volume all in all, and its official run ended by 2008. It had received and won nominations from Eisner Awards thrice. That being said, this first volume is not something I would personally consider an instant masterpiece which was okay. Neil Gaiman's The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes wasn't so hot either at least until The Sound of Her Wings closing issue, but that series eventually did become one as the story went on. To compare it with the other graphic novels I reviewed since last month, it's still a good entry but not something as magnificently appealing like SAGA or Sex Criminals had proven to be, whose first volumes were immediately so stellar and engrossing. I could even liken Y: The Last Man to Joe Hill's debut volume for Locke and Key which had all the proper elements of supernatural horror and drama and has definitely more potentials to sprout from. However, Y: The Last Man in its first volume Unmanned is off to a slow start with the build-up quite scattered among many placed and with different characters that hopefully will form a more cohesive ensemble once the plot progression settles in a more desirable and suspenseful pace. Hey, at least it wasn't The Wicked and Divine, a series I had so much hopes for but sorely let down in the end that I won't even bother posting a review about it. I also didn't bother picking up the second volume anymore because UGH.But I digress. Illustrated by Pia Guerra and Jose Marzan Jr., penciler and inker respectively, Y the Las Man was visually efficient enough to convey the dystopic landscape of a man-less existence where women are clamoring for survival, power and politics. The tone of the narrative definitely portrays a satirical approach which calls into question and discussion the topics of female empowerment and the radical extremists who pursue a more vicious goal to assert it. Since all the male mammals including humans got wiped out, these feminazis are inclined to believe that nature has taken its course and now it's time to go Amazonian in such a ridiculously chauvinistic way that DC's counterpart of the real Amazons where Wonder Woman hails from would be ashamed to be associated with these women.I can't help but be reminded of that last season of Veronica Mars about said feminazis becoming the villains of that supposedly empowering show. No wonder it got pulled after that season because it was extremely negative in its portrayal of feminist activists. Y: The Last Man, I feel, has a real possibility of crossing that line, but seeing as this was only the first volume and that it did last for ten more, I think I'll assume that the writer and editors of Vertigo found a balance and compromise in how they handled the feminist side of thing for this story. Here are some of the notable pages about it:The ongoing discourse about how feminists values and other pro-women movements have been portrayed for Y: The Last Man certainly invites critical arguments from everyone who has their own opinions about it, whether affirmative or cynical. I'd rather stay away from that and simply review and appreciate this as a work of fiction, no matter how politically heated it tends to become in the later issues. Protagonist Yorick and his monkey companion Amerstad are the only male left in the world (or at least as far as we know). Yorick's mother is a congresswoman who wanted him to take his role as mankind's last chance for procreation more seriously, but Yorick is more concerned to getting back to his girlfriend he had just proposed to over a long-distance phone call to Australia before all this extinction shit went down. It's contextually hilarious but also grim.As far as first impressions go, I am lukewarm towards Yorick. I don't find him that interesting but he is the central character in an interesting situation. I certainly hope to get to know the other female characters who show a more promising depth but whose names I can't tell you on the spot because of how little time this volume spends presenting them and how thinly the entire storyline is spread across the five issues so far. I do hope I warm up to Yorick especially even if he's such a narrow-minded fool who is more concerned about seeing his girlfriend than discover why the hell has he survived the extinction? I'd be more excited to find that out if I was Yorick, but hey, that's only because I would rather solve a good mystery over any kind of romantic ties I may have.Get the fuck out of here, you hopeless sap!In a nutshell, Y: The Last Man shows promise. It has a puzzle that readers can solve and watch develop across its ten-volumed span, and the feminist angle is certainly worth the merit mentioning as well, but it's not the first graphic novel I will be picking up anytime soon once I finished my scheduled GNs for this year. That place still belongs to SAGA, I'm afraid.RECOMMENDED: 7/10READ MY REVIEWS AT:
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Prvo sto bilo koga privuce ovom stripu jeste sama postavka; sta ako sve musko umre na ovom svettu, odnosno skoro sve.Pored interesantne ideje ovde imamo i interesantne likove, fine dijaloge sa dovoljno sarkazma i humora kao i naravno odlicne crteze.Sada samo da se nadam da ce objasnjenje za sve ovo biti dobro na kraju a ne neka glupost (magic).
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  •  ⚔ Sh3lly - Cranky Crone of Rabid Hedgehogs and Fire Breathing Kittens ⚔
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe more like 3.5 stars, but this was pretty good. Yorick is a bit daft, but I have a feeling there's room for growth here. It's the end of the world and somehow all the males are dead (except for Yorick and his male "assistant" shoulder monkey), and instead of a zombie apocalypse it's a bunch of raging female extremists who are the enemy. There's some political jokes aimed at everyone and a few pop culture references to appreciate. I am definitely interested in continuing the series. I don't Maybe more like 3.5 stars, but this was pretty good. Yorick is a bit daft, but I have a feeling there's room for growth here. It's the end of the world and somehow all the males are dead (except for Yorick and his male "assistant" shoulder monkey), and instead of a zombie apocalypse it's a bunch of raging female extremists who are the enemy. There's some political jokes aimed at everyone and a few pop culture references to appreciate. I am definitely interested in continuing the series. I don't think it is as mind-blowing as some of the cover blurb quotes said... but there is good potential here.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Now that I've finished the series (well, the first 9 books -- the 10th is unavailable to me), I'll write a bit about how I feel about the series as a whole.I really wanted to hate this series. It is incredibly sexist in so many ways, and I started taking notes on some of the more ridiculous aspects of it so I would remember by the time I got around to writing this. My husband would find random pieces of paper scattered around the house and ask me what "factories stop working, no electricity, int Now that I've finished the series (well, the first 9 books -- the 10th is unavailable to me), I'll write a bit about how I feel about the series as a whole.I really wanted to hate this series. It is incredibly sexist in so many ways, and I started taking notes on some of the more ridiculous aspects of it so I would remember by the time I got around to writing this. My husband would find random pieces of paper scattered around the house and ask me what "factories stop working, no electricity, internet cafe becomes telegraph center" meant, and I would answer, "Because all the men died, of course!" and we'd laugh about it. The best/worst part is in the 9th book when a comic book reverses the gender wipeout. Instead of all the men, all the women die. All of a sudden, 98% of the secretaries and kindergarten teachers have died! Who knew it would be so devastating? Stupid stuff like this can be a bit infuriating. That said, this series is an enjoyable read if you take it for what it is: a no brainer, page-turning, action packed experience. It's fun, it's quick, it's a good diversion from serious shit. I read each book in one sitting, sometimes two in a day.Most of the female characters in this series look like Maxim models, and even the straight ones engage in hot lesbian sex. It's got every female stereotype you can possibly imagine. On the other hand, the one male left in the world is kind of wimpy. He suffers some ego-shrinking humiliation and overcomes lots of mental insecurities, and he's a decent fellow, an okay guy to be the last guy in the world. I imagine the author of this series to be like him, and this series is his personal fantasy world.I read each book the minute I got my hands on it, but in the end I was really disappointed! What kept me reading was wanting to find out the big mystery of why what happened happened. I already had a good idea of who was responsible, but the why was a huge letdown. Of all the possible reasons... seriously? Lame.
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  • Brandon
    January 1, 1970
    All the men are dead.Yorick Brown remains after a mysterious virus eliminates every last thing with a Y chromosome. While he’s expected to do his part in figuring out why he survived, he’s mainly concerned with finding his would-be fiancé in the outback of Australia.This would be my first experience in reading a graphic novel where the main character isn’t flying/swinging/driving around in spandex. For my first foray into the non-superhero genre, I probably couldn’t have chosen a better series. All the men are dead.Yorick Brown remains after a mysterious virus eliminates every last thing with a Y chromosome. While he’s expected to do his part in figuring out why he survived, he’s mainly concerned with finding his would-be fiancé in the outback of Australia.This would be my first experience in reading a graphic novel where the main character isn’t flying/swinging/driving around in spandex. For my first foray into the non-superhero genre, I probably couldn’t have chosen a better series. Not only does it hold a pretty solid spot on most top graphic novel lists, it comes highly recommended by a lot of trusted friends. It’s interesting to see exactly what would happen if the world were suddenly devoid of men. I mean, we are pretty important, right ladies? I kid, I kid. I was actually shocked with how quickly the world was turned upside down. I almost thought that the author was basically saying that women wouldn’t even know what to do, then quickly remembered the sheer amount of work it would take in just disposing of the roughly 2.8 billion bodies.There's lots going on in this opener but it never feels cluttered. We’re following Yorick, we're following the slowly re-established US government, we're following a cult of extremist females named The Amazons and the leader of an Israeli militant group. There's enough here to keep you interested. When I tossed down the first book, I immediately wanted to pick up the next. I can’t wait to get my hands on it.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Y for the male chromosome (XX is for female). One day, suddenly all men die and after that the world goes on without them. One major problem is that men are needed for reproduction, so the world seemd to come to a certain (dead) end.Our hero is a guy - who - unlike all the other men - is still alive, facing many problems. I loved this series (as I really love other stories by Brian Vaughan) and I would definitely read more of it
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  • Jenn(ifer)
    January 1, 1970
    So far so good! Volume 1 definitely piqued my interest enough to make me want to read Volume 2. And besides, the last man is HOT! What? I can't objectify the last man?*****************Some notes (these are mostly for me to be mindful of as I read the remaining volumes):Yorick- Yorick's father was a Shakespeare buff and named Yorick and his sister after characters from Shakespeare's plays. The name Yorick comes from Hamlet; Yorick is the deceased court jester. He is represented in the play by a s So far so good! Volume 1 definitely piqued my interest enough to make me want to read Volume 2. And besides, the last man is HOT! What? I can't objectify the last man?*****************Some notes (these are mostly for me to be mindful of as I read the remaining volumes):Yorick- Yorick's father was a Shakespeare buff and named Yorick and his sister after characters from Shakespeare's plays. The name Yorick comes from Hamlet; Yorick is the deceased court jester. He is represented in the play by a skull, and example of 'memento mori' or the reminder that one will die. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say Yorick will not survive the series.Hero (Yorick's sister) - In the play Much Ado About Nothing, Hero is depicted as sweet, gentle and demure. Before the "incident," Hero is an emergency services technician. It will be interesting to see what happens with her character as she joins up with the Amazons.The Amazons - In Greek mythology, these female warriors were rumored to eschew male companionship, except once a year to further the Amazon race. I read that if they gave birth to sons, they would often kill the sons or leave them to be raised by men. Another interesting thing about the Amazons is that the popular etymology of the word 'amazon' is 'a-mazas' or "without breast." In mythology, the Amazons were rumored to cut off or burn off their right breast so that they could use a bow more easily. In Y: The Last Man, the Amazons are depicted with their LEFT breast cut off. I wonder if this was just an mistake or if there is some purpose for this. We shall see. To be continued...
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, I thought this would be a comic that portrayed women in a positive way but I was wrong. It's the complete opposite. The women are OH SO HELPLESS without the men. They have no electricity, little food and no proper security. Um why not? If all the men died tomorrow, us women would definitely be able to manage better than the women in this comic. It seems totally illogical to me but I'm willing to give it another chance so it can prove me wrong. I don't understand why the Amazons even exist bu Ok, I thought this would be a comic that portrayed women in a positive way but I was wrong. It's the complete opposite. The women are OH SO HELPLESS without the men. They have no electricity, little food and no proper security. Um why not? If all the men died tomorrow, us women would definitely be able to manage better than the women in this comic. It seems totally illogical to me but I'm willing to give it another chance so it can prove me wrong. I don't understand why the Amazons even exist but I'm hoping that I'll figure it out in the next few volumes. I also don't understand why that woman was picking up dead bodies in a crop top and why Beth was hiking in a bikini top, I suppose it's because most females in comic books are overly-sexualised. I don't like the main character, he is a bit of an ass but he might grow on me yet! I really liked the artwork. I'll keep reading to see if this picks up because I feel like it has potential.
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  • João Carlos
    January 1, 1970
    ”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” é o primeiro volume de uma série de dez escrito por Brian K. Vaughan (n. 1976) – autor e produtor da série televisiva Perdidos/Lost, reputado e premiado escritor de inúmeras novelas gráficas, onde se inclui a série ”Saga” - a que se associou a desenhadora Pia Guerra (n. 1971) e o desenhador José Marzán Jr..”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” é uma novela gráfica que se desenvolve em vários cenários apocalípticos – Nova Iorque, Washing ”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” é o primeiro volume de uma série de dez escrito por Brian K. Vaughan (n. 1976) – autor e produtor da série televisiva Perdidos/Lost, reputado e premiado escritor de inúmeras novelas gráficas, onde se inclui a série ”Saga” - a que se associou a desenhadora Pia Guerra (n. 1971) e o desenhador José Marzán Jr..”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” é uma novela gráfica que se desenvolve em vários cenários apocalípticos – Nova Iorque, Washington, DC, Boston, Alexandria, Baltimore, Putnam – várias cidades de diversos estados do Estados Unidos da América; Nablus e Al Karak na Cisjordânia; Tel-Aviv em Israel e na Austrália. E se de repente surgisse uma praga de origem misteriosa que destruísse todos os mamíferos (incluindo, os fetos) portadores de um cromossoma Y?Efectivamente tal aconteceu em 2002, uma doença ou um vírus desconhecido destruiu todos os seres vivos portadores de um cromossoma Y. ”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” começa vinte e nove minutos antes desse acontecimento trágico.Apesar do cliché inicial, o mundo não melhorou repentinamente por todos os homens terem desaparecido. Antes pelo contrário – em ”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” afirma-se ou reafirma-se que os problemas que a humanidade enfrenta, nomeadamente, a violência, o ódio, a hostilidade, a brutalidade e a raiva não são específicos de um único género humano.”Y: O Último Homem, Vol. 1: Um Mundo Sem Homens” invoca excepcionalmente um futuro apocalíptico assustadoramente real, com a surpresa e o horror a tornarem o enredo verdadeiramente convincente e viciante.Não sei se as mulheres concordam ou se revêm na representação que Brian K. Vaughan lhes confere – palpita-me que não -, associar mulheres extremistas com mulheres feministas não será fácil de encaixar.
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