Der Schrecksenmeister (Zamonien, #5)
In Sledwaya, der Stadt, in der »das Gesunde krank und das Kranke gesund« ist, spielt der neue Roman des zamonischen Großschriftstellers Hildegunst von Mythenmetz. Er handelt von der Auseinandersetzung zwischen Echo, dem hochbegabten Krätzchen, und Succubius Eißpin, dem furchtbaren Schrecksenmeister Sledwayas, der Faust und Mephisto in einer Person zu verkörpern scheint. Dieser lässt nichts unversucht, um sich mittels der Alchimie zum Herrn über Leben und Tod aufzuschwingen – und dazu braucht er nichts notwendiger als das Fett von Echo, der gezwungen ist, einen teuflischen Vertrag mit Eißpin abzuschließen..

Der Schrecksenmeister (Zamonien, #5) Details

TitleDer Schrecksenmeister (Zamonien, #5)
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageGerman
ReleaseAug 31st, 2007
PublisherPiper
ISBN3492049370
ISBN-139783492049375
Number of pages383 pages
Rating
GenreFiction, European Literature, German Literature, Humor

Der Schrecksenmeister (Zamonien, #5) Review

  • Lydia Presley
    November 13, 2009
    The back of this book has a review by the New York Times Book Review with the words "Cheerfully insane..."When I started this story I just didn't know if I could get into it. Walter Moers imagination is off the charts - it felt like I was being sat down and told a fairy tale with names being made up left and right. But then.. I was introduced to Anguish Candles.Not normal candles, mind you - these candles suffer when they burn.. and they inch along..and they moan. And they are never put out of t The back of this book has a review by the New York Times Book Review with the words "Cheerfully insane..."When I started this story I just didn't know if I could get into it. Walter Moers imagination is off the charts - it felt like I was being sat down and told a fairy tale with names being made up left and right. But then.. I was introduced to Anguish Candles.Not normal candles, mind you - these candles suffer when they burn.. and they inch along..and they moan. And they are never put out of their torment.. I was fascinated and couldn't stop reading (I'm laughing even as I type this).Through the book I was introduced to the Tuwituwu, Theodore T. Theodore (the author made note of Echo the Crat not wanting to find out what the T. was for.. possible .. Theodore?) who speaks.. oddly (read it to find out how). Then, there are the Trees of Nutledge. Yes. Nutledge. Not Knowledge. Similar though! Vlad the Seven Hundred and Seventy-Fourth was a fun Leathermouse to meet, and oh.. the descriptions of the Zamonian food created - the essense of tomato consumme with the dumpling of salmon meat.And then, there are the folk tales told by the Alchemaster. Every single time it felt like I was receiving a shock when he'd finish one - because they are not typical folk tales!If you pick up this book to read, give it an honest, thorough chance. It took me a few chapters to really get into the spirit of things, but that's because it's so quirkly and so inventive I had to rearrange the way I was thinking to really start enjoying it.Bravo to Walter Moers for a thoroughly entertaining tale.
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  • Sylvester
    September 3, 2015
    I was walking slowly through the Fantasy stacks at my favorite library, caressing the spines of the Walter Moers as I came to them, when I stopped in surprise and nearly fell over myself trying to snatch this book off the shelf before anyone else could. You see, not enough of Moers' books have been translated, in my opinion, and I have been bemoaning that fact since the last of his that I read - SO!! Joy! Joy! This was a bonus I hadn't expected.And I was not disappointed. I loved the Crat. Moers I was walking slowly through the Fantasy stacks at my favorite library, caressing the spines of the Walter Moers as I came to them, when I stopped in surprise and nearly fell over myself trying to snatch this book off the shelf before anyone else could. You see, not enough of Moers' books have been translated, in my opinion, and I have been bemoaning that fact since the last of his that I read - SO!! Joy! Joy! This was a bonus I hadn't expected.And I was not disappointed. I loved the Crat. Moers' imagination is still every bit as wonderful and varied as ever, and this book hold to the plot fairly tight as well, which is nice, though not essential to my reading pleasure.Moers is weird. He's unique. He is so refreshing. He's one of those writers that makes me want to exercise my imagination muscle more - just to see what would happen.The world needs more of Moers.
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  • Joshua
    January 29, 2010
    Another winner by Walter Moers! This book follows Echo the Crat (a cat that can speak all creature's languages) as he is saved from starvation by the Alchemaster, Ghoolion. Ghoolion's proposal is to treat Echo to the most amazing culinary treats in order to fatten him up to then, well end his life to take his fat.Not only does Echo find out a lot about Ghoolion and his love(s) but also about the inhabitants of Ghoolion's castle and the secrets of the house itself. His (one-month) life's mission Another winner by Walter Moers! This book follows Echo the Crat (a cat that can speak all creature's languages) as he is saved from starvation by the Alchemaster, Ghoolion. Ghoolion's proposal is to treat Echo to the most amazing culinary treats in order to fatten him up to then, well end his life to take his fat.Not only does Echo find out a lot about Ghoolion and his love(s) but also about the inhabitants of Ghoolion's castle and the secrets of the house itself. His (one-month) life's mission becomes to outwit Ghoolion and escape with his life and fat intact. Amazing and witty.
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  • Cyrus
    December 14, 2011
    Giving this a pre-emptive 5 stars, though I am not done yet. Reviews call this a "children's book for adults," and I don't think that's too far from the truth. What makes it "adult" is not large-scale political troubles or the horrors of the human condition a la The Guy Who Wrote Wicked and Other Stuff I Don't Particularly Care For, but a willingness to go to places the Brothers Grimm might go, and the modern fortitude to make fun of their absurdity. It's the sort of thing I'd love to read out l Giving this a pre-emptive 5 stars, though I am not done yet. Reviews call this a "children's book for adults," and I don't think that's too far from the truth. What makes it "adult" is not large-scale political troubles or the horrors of the human condition a la The Guy Who Wrote Wicked and Other Stuff I Don't Particularly Care For, but a willingness to go to places the Brothers Grimm might go, and the modern fortitude to make fun of their absurdity. It's the sort of thing I'd love to read out loud to another adult, complete with silly voices. I'm kind of in love.
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  • Bine
    January 11, 2015
    Es ist nicht mein liebster Zamonienroman, aber er war trotzdem natürlich mal wieder super. Vor allen Dingen war das Ende mal wieder super spektakulär und einfach nur schön. Vor allem auch die intertexutellen Bezüge machen den Reiz dieses Buches aus und auch die Nachwörter des Autors und des Übersetzers sind zum Schreien komisch und absolut lesenswert!
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  • John
    April 12, 2011
    Another entertaining yarn from Walter Moers.This time, it is interesting to see Moers take his creativity into the realm of cooking. I am a picky eater who doesn't want to try much of anything, but his vivid imagery couldn't help but make me drool a little.Furthermore, the lead character - a Crat - is a fun, protagonist. You are on his side right from the beginning, but there are moments where Moers wants you to think about why exactly you like this character...should you?As always, I love whene Another entertaining yarn from Walter Moers.This time, it is interesting to see Moers take his creativity into the realm of cooking. I am a picky eater who doesn't want to try much of anything, but his vivid imagery couldn't help but make me drool a little.Furthermore, the lead character - a Crat - is a fun, protagonist. You are on his side right from the beginning, but there are moments where Moers wants you to think about why exactly you like this character...should you?As always, I love whenever one of Moers' characters tells a historical tale of Zamonia. There are a few of those in 'Alchemaster's' and they are wonderful.Many great moments to enjoy from this book, but one of my "favorites" (if I can refer to it that way) is actually a very sad/grotesque/heart-breaking scene. I've read enough books that rarely when I am reading something does my heart jump, but there is a scene about 2/3rds through the book that does just this. It is amazing writing that can take completely far-fetched, fantastic creatures - in very gruesome environments - and yet create a scene that is so heart-wrenching. I don't want to give any spoilers...but if anyone reads this review and has read the book, I would love the chance to discuss the scene I am discussing.Very fun and entertaining read. Another great tale by Walter Moers.
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  • Serena.. Sery-ously?
    August 27, 2015
    Se non avete mai letto Moers, non sapete cosa sia un libro geniale e fantasioso!Arrivo al punto di dire che, per me, Moers ha più fantasia della Rowling stessa. Non prendetemi per eretica, la Rowling è la mia dea e colleziono edizioni di HP in tutte le lingue.. Ma Moers.. Diamine, Moers non è umano!L'accalappiastreghe è un libro complesso e complicato, non fatevi ingannare dalla copertina né dalla dicitura 'libro per bambini'.. Qui come non mai considero assurda la catalogazione (non credo lo fa Se non avete mai letto Moers, non sapete cosa sia un libro geniale e fantasioso!Arrivo al punto di dire che, per me, Moers ha più fantasia della Rowling stessa. Non prendetemi per eretica, la Rowling è la mia dea e colleziono edizioni di HP in tutte le lingue.. Ma Moers.. Diamine, Moers non è umano!L'accalappiastreghe è un libro complesso e complicato, non fatevi ingannare dalla copertina né dalla dicitura 'libro per bambini'.. Qui come non mai considero assurda la catalogazione (non credo lo farei leggere ad un giovanissimo..), al suo interno troverete tutto ciò che riuscite ad immaginare e per il restante 98% ondate di genialità a non finire :DIl libro è evocativo da far paura.. Vi consiglio di aver mangiato prima, perché certi piatti descritti mettono una fame incredibile!E.. Non fidatevi di Malfrosto!
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  • Kate Sherrod
    September 19, 2012
    Every new-to-me Walter Moers book I pick up immediately becomes my new favorite Walter Moers book, and thus one of my favorite books, full stop. This has happened ever since I first stumbled across a somewhat battered copy of Rumo and his Miraculous Adventures several years ago at my local public library and wondered what the hell was going on with that. One is always going on with the mix of over-the-top imaginative fantasy, adorable illustrations, sophisticated plotting and outrageous wordplay Every new-to-me Walter Moers book I pick up immediately becomes my new favorite Walter Moers book, and thus one of my favorite books, full stop. This has happened ever since I first stumbled across a somewhat battered copy of Rumo and his Miraculous Adventures several years ago at my local public library and wondered what the hell was going on with that. One is always going on with the mix of over-the-top imaginative fantasy, adorable illustrations, sophisticated plotting and outrageous wordplay that is Walter Moers. Oh, do I love this man. And his translator into English, the wonderfully named John Brownjohn, who has the unenviable task of turning all of those invented and ordinary compound German nouns and verbs into something intelligible in English without losing any of the original's wit and charm and, as far as I can tell, succeeds brilliantly.Or at any rate, if Brownjohn is in any way not hitting Moers' mark, then I'm not sure I could handle more Moers. As such. Feel free to throw something at me now.The Alchemaster's Apprentice is another Zamonia book, Zamonia being, of course, a lost continent that once took up most of the Atlantic Ocean and was home not only to sentient and literate dinosaurs who achieved a very high standard of culture indeed (at least a high Middle Ages standard), but to a myriad of other astonishing creatures as well, including the new-to-this-fifth-novel Crat. A Crat being a sort of cat who can speak every language, human or animal, in the known world, and whose body fat is an alchemist's, well, I would say an alchemist's philosopher's stone, but everyone knows that the philosopher's stone is the alchemists' philosopher's stone, so something just short of that. At any rate, very desirable indeed.Enter one Succubius Ghoolion*, titular Alchemaster, who is a sort of Jean-Baptiste Greouille through Moers' funhouse mirror in that, like the perfidious perfumer of Suskind's most famous novel, he is obsessed with capturing the essences of things in the most durable possible form, that form being the rendered fat of rare and fabulous creatures like Crats. Of whom Ghoolion suspects our adorable little hero, Echo the Kitty Crat, to possibly be the very last one. Um.What follows from this state of affairs is another deliciously daffy Moers adventure -- perhaps the most delicious of all because, when Ghoolion finds Echo, Echo is starving to death and has no fat on him, but Ghoolion is a culinary genius and so sets about fattening his foundling in outlandishly opulent ways. If one doesn't drool through at least a few of these chapters, one is obviously some kind of icky ascetic who subsists on room temperature water and celery sticks or something.** Echo befriends a cyclopean owl-type thing who speaks in spoonerisms (Brownjohn must have had a heck of a time with those. He needs all of the awards for translating. All of them, do you understand me?) and is dedicated to helping Echo escape the terrible fate that awaits him, learns a lot of alchemical secrets, eats a lot of absurdly delicious food, and develops a charmingly weird relationship with Ghoolion in the process.Along the way he picks up some other weird allies, such as a Cooked Ghost (which Echo helps to cook himself as part of his education), a couple thousand Leathermice (like extraordinarily ugly vampire bats with extremely strange habits of thought. Nobody understands Leathermice, dude. Not even Leathermice), and the last remaining Uggly in the city -- an Uggly being, of course, a sort of gypsy practitioner of a natural/homeopathic/herbal medicine that is pretty much the absolute antithesis of what Ghoolion does. Who despite Ghoolion's long history of persecution of Ugglies in every horrible way imaginable, has a crush on Ghoolion. Yeah, it's complicated.It all builds to a thrilling and insane climax, Moers' best yet! So yeah, The Alchemaster's Apprentice is my new favorite Walter Moers. At least until the next one.But yeah, I'm still puzzled about that roast wildfowl Echo was sort of tricked into eating mid-story. That's a head-scratcher of a loose end. But Echo does spend a lot of this novel tripping balls on some hallucinogenic meal or other... so... umm... yeah, I've got nothing.*The character names are part of the fun of Moers, most of them being anagrams of popular authors' names, though so far I can't figure out whose name became Succubius Ghoolion, and I have tried. Oh, have I tried. But I'm a poor hand at anagram solving.**Seriously, the food porn in this book is completely off the hook. Imagine Lewis Carroll and China Mieville collaborating on a cookbook and you might just get a hint of the flavor. WOW.
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  • Saskia Marijke Niehorster-Cook
    July 15, 2010
    Walter Moers is one of the most imaginative people I have ever read. His novels are full of quests and goals that take the reader along for an unmistakable ride that just does not stop till the book is over, and it is so addicting that you want to go back to the beginning and start all over again. The Alchemaster is his latest novel, and though this time around we do not get to explore much of the world of Zamonia, the ride is nerve wrecking just the same. The main character in this book is a " Walter Moers is one of the most imaginative people I have ever read. His novels are full of quests and goals that take the reader along for an unmistakable ride that just does not stop till the book is over, and it is so addicting that you want to go back to the beginning and start all over again. The Alchemaster is his latest novel, and though this time around we do not get to explore much of the world of Zamonia, the ride is nerve wrecking just the same. The main character in this book is a "Crat" a type of cat that can speak just about any language in existence. About famished and with only a couple of days left to live, he exchanges his life for a month of food and pampering from an alchemist master who has big plans for the crat. This master is a combination of endearing master chef and diabolically sadist alchemist. The Castle is filled with strange places like a dungeon with red bearded dwarf skeletons and a strange Medusa like brain, a roof where there is a lake of milk that has floating roast birds and smoked fish in boats ready to be eaten by our crat friend, and many more spook-tacular corners. Our friend meets moaning candles and strange witches and even a nifty owl (with an affected language that had me in tears) that help him on his quest to try to escape his "contract" signed fate.Once again, Walter Moers's world is fascinating!
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  • Dave
    February 17, 2010
    The forth (translated, we've yet to see Hansel und Gretal in english) book in Walter Moers Zamonia sequence. This is different from the previous books as, following just one month in the life of Echo the Crat (exactly like a cat, except it talks) it avoids the pattern of the whimsical, if somewhat dark, travelogue.After the death of his mistress and on the point of starvation, Echo signs a contract with the evil alchemaster to be fed magnificent meals for a month, before giving his life so that The forth (translated, we've yet to see Hansel und Gretal in english) book in Walter Moers Zamonia sequence. This is different from the previous books as, following just one month in the life of Echo the Crat (exactly like a cat, except it talks) it avoids the pattern of the whimsical, if somewhat dark, travelogue.After the death of his mistress and on the point of starvation, Echo signs a contract with the evil alchemaster to be fed magnificent meals for a month, before giving his life so that the alchemaster can rend him down for his fat, which has remarkable alchemical properties. This is the story of the growth and maturing of the central character, learing of the world around him. Much as in the previous books. Echo must learn, and overcome massive obstacles in order to evade the finality of the contract.As usual, the level of invention is vast, with all types of strange beasts and sciences (culinary and otherwide) being created.Actually, it is quite similar in structure to the previous books, but it is still glorious. It does not quite the reach the heights of Captain Bluebear or City of Dreaming Books, but is every bit as dark as Rumo. This is a whimsical book in which good characters die.
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  • Kim
    January 11, 2012
    This was my second Walter Moers book, the first being The City of Dreaming Books. He's the MOST imaginative writer I've come across in a while, and I'll definitely be reading the rest of his books. But not only am I amazed at the creativity of Moers, I'm stunned by the translation into English. (Wish I had the translator's name here, but I don't.) The original German prose is filled with made-up words, and the English translation SOMEHOW manages to retain the author's intended impressions (at le This was my second Walter Moers book, the first being The City of Dreaming Books. He's the MOST imaginative writer I've come across in a while, and I'll definitely be reading the rest of his books. But not only am I amazed at the creativity of Moers, I'm stunned by the translation into English. (Wish I had the translator's name here, but I don't.) The original German prose is filled with made-up words, and the English translation SOMEHOW manages to retain the author's intended impressions (at least I presume). It's very hard to explain what I mean by this, but just read a few pages of any of his books and you'll begin to understand.I almost wish I could read this in its original German. Almost.I should add that I'm reading his books in paperback rather than on the Kindle because of the wonderful illustrations that add so much to the story.And by the way, it apparently doesn't matter if you read the Zamonia series in order. I started with #3, then #4...maybe I'll go to #1 next.
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  • Amber
    February 9, 2011
    This book was full of surprises! It's the best kind of story, where you think you know exactly what's going on, and then there's a zig or zag in the road that catches you off guard. I've read 3 of Mr. Moers Zamonia novels now, and it fascinates me how each of the novels has had such a distinctive flavor to it. This book truly had the flair of an undiluted Grimm's fairy tale. It had all the horrific elements that you would want to have in a scary story, and it had a protagonist with an indomitabl This book was full of surprises! It's the best kind of story, where you think you know exactly what's going on, and then there's a zig or zag in the road that catches you off guard. I've read 3 of Mr. Moers Zamonia novels now, and it fascinates me how each of the novels has had such a distinctive flavor to it. This book truly had the flair of an undiluted Grimm's fairy tale. It had all the horrific elements that you would want to have in a scary story, and it had a protagonist with an indomitable will to survive. I also appreciate how evil the villain was. There's nothing worse than reading a book whose villain is all talk. Remember watching the animated Anastasia and wondering why anyone bothered pretending to be afraid of Rasputin? I hate that. Ghoolion the Alchemaster, however, fully delivers. He's truly evil and despicable. Give this book a read! It's very much worth your while.
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  • Dieter
    April 27, 2009
    Auch das vierte Buch aus der Zamonien-Serie ist einfach überwältigend. Neben Höhenflügen der Phantasie bietet Moers auch sprachlich einfach Unvergleichbares. Die kulinarisch-alchimistischen Abenteuer Echos, eines Krätzchens (vergleichbar einem Kätzchen, nur kann es sprechen und hat zwei Lebern) im kranksten Ort von Zamonien sind unwiderstehlich. Man fühlt sich nachher jedenfalls, als ob man Erkenntnüsse (vom Baum der Erkenntnuss) gegessen hätte. Oder vielleicht Kaviar vom Tarnkappenstör, die die Auch das vierte Buch aus der Zamonien-Serie ist einfach überwältigend. Neben Höhenflügen der Phantasie bietet Moers auch sprachlich einfach Unvergleichbares. Die kulinarisch-alchimistischen Abenteuer Echos, eines Krätzchens (vergleichbar einem Kätzchen, nur kann es sprechen und hat zwei Lebern) im kranksten Ort von Zamonien sind unwiderstehlich. Man fühlt sich nachher jedenfalls, als ob man Erkenntnüsse (vom Baum der Erkenntnuss) gegessen hätte. Oder vielleicht Kaviar vom Tarnkappenstör, die die Zunge zum Verschwinden bringt... Und man wünscht sich nur eines: So schreiben können!
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  • Ravzeldinkov
    September 23, 2015
    UN libro maravilloso, lleno de imaginación y giros inesperados. Un terror infantil hermosamente narrado sin ahorrarse detalles macabros y sin endulzar una historia para todas las edades. Muy entretenido y original.
  • Boris
    April 26, 2015
    zalige mengeling van de zotte fantasie van Moers, culinaire geneugden, spanning en alchemie.
  • Shashi Martynova
    March 16, 2015
    Мёрс в лучшем виде. По сравнению с Капитаном Синькой это камерная сказка, но от этого нисколько не хуже. И да, от нее все время хочется есть и в родимый вуз - там сплошная еда и "химия".
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  • Angela Visalli
    September 11, 2013
    "Malfrosto venne sempre più vicino, si fermò infine davanti al cratto, si chinò su di lui e l'osservò, a lungo e spietatamente. Il vento gli faceva fremere l'ossuto collare e gli occhi scintillarono di scoperta e maligna soddisfazione di fronte alle evidenti sofferenze d'una creatura in procinto di tirare il calzino. Il puzzo di ammoniaca e etere, di zolfo e petrolio, di acido prussico e essenza cadaverica penetrò come un fascio d'aghi affilati nel sensibile nasino di Eco, ma lui non si spostò d "Malfrosto venne sempre più vicino, si fermò infine davanti al cratto, si chinò su di lui e l'osservò, a lungo e spietatamente. Il vento gli faceva fremere l'ossuto collare e gli occhi scintillarono di scoperta e maligna soddisfazione di fronte alle evidenti sofferenze d'una creatura in procinto di tirare il calzino. Il puzzo di ammoniaca e etere, di zolfo e petrolio, di acido prussico e essenza cadaverica penetrò come un fascio d'aghi affilati nel sensibile nasino di Eco, ma lui non si spostò d'un dito. "Mi fa la carità, signor accalappiastreghe municipale?" gnaulò miserevolmente. "Ho una fame tremenda". Lo sguardo di Malfrosto s'accese di lampi ancor più demoniaci, e un largo ghigno gli comparve sulla facciaccia pallida. Sfoderò l'indice lungo e secco per solleticare le costole sporgenti di Eco. "Sai parlare?" domandò. "Dunque non sei un gatto qualunque, ma un crattino. Uno degli ultimi esemplari della tua specie". Gli occhi di Malfrosto si strinsero quasi impercettibilmente. "Che ne diresti di vendermi il tuo grasso?"L'accalappiastreghe è un libro per me di difficile classificazione, narrativa per ragazzi? Fantasy? Favola? Narrativa per ragazzi, ma è piacevole da leggersi anche per gli adulti. Un fantasy in cui la fantasia la fa veramente da padrona, ma forse in alcuni tratti un po' troppo roboante (sono stata costretta a saltare frasi e pezzi pieni di cose totalmente inventate e non ben specificate che non mi dicevano nulla, non riuscendo a immaginarmele). Una favola classica, come lo stile infatti il romanzo è scritto in terza persona con narratore onnisciente (cosa che mi ha reso difficile l'immedesimarmi nei protagonisti e patire per loro), ma allo stesso tempo innovativo rispetto a ciò che si vede oggi giorno. Di orrore sinceramente ci ho visto poco o nulla, visto che il romanzo è stato classificato anche così, ma al mio avviso erroneamente (forse può incutere timore solo a un pubblico giovanissimo).Definita dallo stesso autore: "Favola culinaria zamonica di Gofid Letterkel, ripoetata da Ildefonso de' Sventramitis, tradotta dallo zamonko e illustrata da Walter Moers." L'autore finge in questo caso di esserne solo il traduttore e l'illustratore, non se ne capisce bene il motivo forse per incuriosire i giovani lettori. Le illustrazioni in bianco e nero devo dire sono fatte bene e in alcuni casi mi hanno aiutato a figurarmi le strambe creature protagoniste delle vicende. I temi portanti della vicenda sono appunto l'ambito culinario, l'alchimia, l'ambito medico, streghe un po' particolari e un gatto, un bel mix. Una cosa mi ha dato fastidio: l'uso delle note, in sé e per sé utili nella finzione dell'esserne solo il traduttore e no lo scrittore, però veramente di cattivo gusto quando invece di descrivere una creatura mi mette la nota con scritto "Si veda libro x o libro y di Moers" un astuto modo di vendere altri dei suoi romanziIl protagonista della nostra favola è Eco, un gatto o meglio un cratto, poiché a differenza dei normali gatti egli è in grado di parlare e conosce tutte le lingue (anche quelle degli animali). Vive a Sledwaya, una città di Zamonia, il mondo creato da Moers. Ogni città di Zamonia ha una sua peculiare caratteristica, in questo caso Sledwaya è la città dei malati, è piena di dottori di ogni tipo, farmacie, ospedali e qualsiasi si voglia elemento analogo. Non proprio un luogo allegro dove andare a vivere.Per continuare a leggere la recensione su Club Urban Fantasy:http://cluburbanfantasy.blogspot.it/2...
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  • Lisa
    October 12, 2016
    Hab das tolle Hörbuch gehört
  • Kris
    March 4, 2016
    This is a great fantasy novel in all the best ways. I found myself comparing it a little bit to a Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman with a dash of Douglas Adams. Originally written in German, it definitely has the feel of a traditional fairy tale a la the Brother's Grimm.The story revolves around Echo the Crat (yes, Crat, that is not a spelling error) who has been captured by the local Alchemaster of Malaisea, his name is Ghoolion, and Echo is being held and fattened up so that the Alchemaster can This is a great fantasy novel in all the best ways. I found myself comparing it a little bit to a Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman with a dash of Douglas Adams. Originally written in German, it definitely has the feel of a traditional fairy tale a la the Brother's Grimm.The story revolves around Echo the Crat (yes, Crat, that is not a spelling error) who has been captured by the local Alchemaster of Malaisea, his name is Ghoolion, and Echo is being held and fattened up so that the Alchemaster can obtain his fat for his potion library. As the story rolls along, we find out more about Ghoolion and how Malaisea became the illness capital of the Kingdom of Zamonia. We find out more about Echo and what it means to be a Crat. Echo has the opportunity not only to eat to his hearts content, but also to explore Ghoolion's castle – a place the locals fear and dread.Along the way, Echo makes friends with Leathermice (a vampiric race of mice/bats), Theodore T. Theodore (an owl with a speech impediment), Cooking Ghosts, a Snow White Widow, Ugglies, a mossback Toad and a whole host of other fantastical residents of Malaisea. There is a method and means to Ghoolion's madness that unfolds as the story unfolds. I try to read widely and from all genre's. This book was given to me as a gift and I am glad I got it because I doubt I would have grabbed it off the shelf under my own volition. You know how it is – you go to your favorite bookstore and you tend to gravitate to those shelves that usually yield you a reliable selection. I am not a discerning enough fan of fantasy to always grab these novels, so often, I am introduced to authors through friends giving me gifts or making recommendations.I have also discovered something about readers – unless they are fantasy fans from the outset, many readers are adamantly opposed to dipping their toes into this genre. I'm not sure why. Partly I think it comes from an inability or unwillingness to suspend belief. Partly because readers feel that the fantasy genre somehow translates to children's writing. Another(no offense intended here) the genre is associated with fan geeks. For me, it has been because there aren't many stand alone pieces in the genre. They all revolve around a series and one feels that once you have committed to one book, you just have to read the rest.This is the beginning of a series. However, I would be very comfortable in advising those who find the ideas and story intriguing, that it can be read as a stand alone novel. There is resolution at the end of the story as well as an opening for future works. And for those who love the genre, there are future works.The other thing I loved about this story is that it is written by a European author and translated into English. I always find it refreshing to read authors who are from other countries. Their viewpoint on the world enriches me as a reader and engages my imagination as a writer to explore the world in different ways. This is a book for all ages. It can be read to children (although there are some parts that small children would consider frightening or scary.) It is a great novel for an older elementary schooler to cut their teeth on in adult fiction. It is great for adults because the story is engaging and fun with a bit of black humor. An easy 4 stars for all to enjoy.
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  • Calimero747
    August 7, 2014
    This is a must read for all the fantasy fans out there! Walter Moers is a genius. It's magical, it's creepy, it's intelligent, it's funny and it's just fantastic. Read it!Well, this book is a part of series, but it really doesn't matter where you start because the stories aren't connected. Aside from the fact that it's happening in the same world: Zamonia. Echo is a crat, which is a very similar being as a cat except that he has two livers and can talk. Crats are also so clever, that they speak This is a must read for all the fantasy fans out there! Walter Moers is a genius. It's magical, it's creepy, it's intelligent, it's funny and it's just fantastic. Read it!Well, this book is a part of series, but it really doesn't matter where you start because the stories aren't connected. Aside from the fact that it's happening in the same world: Zamonia. Echo is a crat, which is a very similar being as a cat except that he has two livers and can talk. Crats are also so clever, that they speak every language, including the animal ones. After his mistress dies, Echo is left to live on streets of the most ill city in Zamonia. Everyone is sick there. Their main priorities aren't food or water, but medicine. Everyone only cares about themselves and their health. Why is that, you might wonder. It's all the Alchemaster's fault. Alchemaster Ghoolion governs the city, everyone is afraid of him and his sick mind. Besides, he has magic, so they have a reason to be afraid. Ghoolion is repeatedly poisoning the air with various diseases, so everyone'd get ill, but no one can say anything, because they're basically zombies by this point and because he'd just curse them with something and they'd die a slow and painful death. In this horrible city of illness and death, who would care about a hungry crat? Echo almost dies of starvation, and that's how the Alchemaster finds him. What a coincidence! Ghoolion needs a crat's fat, to finish a twisted experiment of his, an immortality potion. He offers Echo a safe home with lots of food and entertainment until the next full moon. And then he'd kill him. Echo signs the contract. After all, the full moon seems so far away and Echo thinks that it's better dying satisfied, full and happy, than on the street, hungry and in pain. However, after weeks of the Alchemaster caring for him, feeding him the most delicious food he can think of, showing him all of his experiments and magic tricks, teaching him everything he knows about alchemy... Echo starts to realize that he's not prepared to die yet.I love everything about this book. From the writing style, to the descriptions the writer literally paints into your head, to the creepiness, to the magical story. The parts where Ghoolion teaches Echo about alchemy is amazing. And how Moers describes scenes... breathtaking, I tell you! And Fjodor F. Fjodor (the middle F. probably stands for another Fjodor) is the best. His grammatical issues are really fun to read. I even care about Ghoolion. I mean, sure, he's nuts and horrible and his ideas are totally sick, but his tragical story makes us feel sorry for him. And I think that if he didn't go crazy, he'd be a pretty decent person. He doesn't want immortality potion for himself after all... I especially love the bond that forms between Ghoolion and Echo. Not just in the teacher-student kind of way. They literally become friends. Ghoolion himself states that he thinks Echo has a good influence on him, making him more sane, more down to earth. It's a shame that the Ghoolion's love towards a certain someone overpowers their friendship. I loved the book and you're probably going to like it too. If you don't, well, I guess it's not everyone's cup of tea. But give it a try. I'm soooo glad that I did.
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  • Lisa
    April 20, 2014
    Der kleine Echo, ein fast verhungertes Krätzchen, streift herrenlos durch die kränkste Stadt Zamoniens - Sledwaya - und trifft dabei plötzlich auf den Schrecksenmeister Succubius Eißpin, den legendenumwogenen, gefürchteten Tyrannen der Stadt. Die beiden schließen einen Vertrag ab: Eißpin wird Echo den nächsten Monat mit den ausgefallensten Leckereien verwöhnen und mästen, damit er beim nächsten Vollmond sein Fett auskochen kann, das er für seine alchimistischen Machenschaften benötigt.Es folgen Der kleine Echo, ein fast verhungertes Krätzchen, streift herrenlos durch die kränkste Stadt Zamoniens - Sledwaya - und trifft dabei plötzlich auf den Schrecksenmeister Succubius Eißpin, den legendenumwogenen, gefürchteten Tyrannen der Stadt. Die beiden schließen einen Vertrag ab: Eißpin wird Echo den nächsten Monat mit den ausgefallensten Leckereien verwöhnen und mästen, damit er beim nächsten Vollmond sein Fett auskochen kann, das er für seine alchimistischen Machenschaften benötigt.Es folgen hunderte von Seiten voller Abenteuer, die Echo in Eißpins Schloss erlebt, alchimistischer Lehrstunden und, natürlich, Essen. Vieeel Essen... Erster Punkt, der mich veranlasste, diesem Buch keine 5 Sterne zu geben. Ich empfand die Beschreibungen der verschiedensten Speisen und der Zubereitungsart als ein wenig langatmig und angesichts der Häufigkeit eben dieser Stellen, irgendwann nur noch ermüdend. Man ist es zwar bereits gewohnt, dass Walter Moers - ich meine natürlich Hildegunst von Mythemetz - in seinen Romanen dazu neigt, ausschweifend zu werden und bisher habe ich mich daran auch kein bisschen gestört, in diesem Fall jedoch machte der Plot zeitweilig diesen endlosen Essensbeschreibungen Platz und das fand ich schade.(Allerdings wurde vom Autor selbst im Nachwort erwähnt, dies sei eine modernisierte Form eines "Kulinarischen Märchens" von Gofid Letterkerl, daher schätze ich, mir liegt diese Literaturgattung einfach nicht. ;) )Irgendwann wurde es spannender, da die Geschichte sich zu verstricken begann. (view spoiler)[Ich neigte dazu, zu vergessen, dass es sich bei dem Schrecksenmeister um einen grauenhaften Menschen handelt, da er und Echo eine respektvolle, sogar freundschaftliche Beziehung zueinander aufbauten. Daher fiel mir insbesondere der Schluss des Buches äußerst schwer... Eißpin sollte ihn ja nach wie vor umbringen.Das stetig aufrecht erhaltene Bild des wahnsinnigen Tyrannen stimmt nicht überein mit dem, was man von ihm erfährt und wie man ihn im Verlauf des Buches erlebt. Sicher, er ist ein sadistischer, Schrecksen verabscheuender Mann, der den Bewohnern seiner Stadt mit allen Mitteln der Kunst das Leben schwer macht, doch er hat auch andere Seiten... Man verspürt häufig sogar Mitleid mit ihm, das zum Ende des Buches leider weggeworfen werden kann. (hide spoiler)]Trotz meiner eigenen Unzufriedenheit mit der Entwicklung der Beziehung der beiden Hauptprotagonisten und dem Ausgang des Ganzen, liegt hier ein wiedermal grandioses Werk von Walter Moers - äh, Hildegunst von Mythemetz - vor. Der für seine vorhergegangenen Werke typische Humor ist wiederzufinden, die fantastischen, fremden Lebewesen Zamoniens werden wieder wunderbar ausgeführt und die Geschichten, die Eißpin Echo gelegentlich erzählt sind traumhaft und fesseln einen erfolgreich. Alles in allem also ein Buch, das sich zu lesen lohnt, wenn einem wahnsinnige, bemitleidenswerte Hauptcharaktere nicht zu sehr ans Herz wachsen und man sich nicht auf einer Diät befindet.
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  • Eva-Maria Obermann
    October 9, 2014
    Walter Moers ist mir einer der liebsten deutschen Autoren, der mit Zamonien ein magisches Reich erschaffen hat, in dem Blaubären, Lindwürmer, Wolpertinger und andere Sagengestalten leben. Sein Buch Der Schrecksenmeister hat mir ganz besonders Freude gemacht, denn anders als bei Rumo ist hier kein hundeähnliches Tier Held der Geschichte, sondern die Kratze Echo, die sich äußerlich von einer Katze nicht unterscheiden lässt. Doch Echo ist unsagbar intelligent, versteht jede Sprache Zamoniens und le Walter Moers ist mir einer der liebsten deutschen Autoren, der mit Zamonien ein magisches Reich erschaffen hat, in dem Blaubären, Lindwürmer, Wolpertinger und andere Sagengestalten leben. Sein Buch Der Schrecksenmeister hat mir ganz besonders Freude gemacht, denn anders als bei Rumo ist hier kein hundeähnliches Tier Held der Geschichte, sondern die Kratze Echo, die sich äußerlich von einer Katze nicht unterscheiden lässt. Doch Echo ist unsagbar intelligent, versteht jede Sprache Zamoniens und lernt in Sekunden. Als sein Frauchen stirbt muss er einen Vertrag mit dem gefürchteten Schrecksenmeister eingehen, der ihn einen Monat mästen und danach auskochen will, um an sein Fett zu kommen, dass er für ein wichtiges Experiment braucht. Zunächst ist Echo froh, einen Monat im kulinarischen Schlaraffenland gewonnen zu haben, anstatt sofort zu verhungern, doch nach und nach dämmert ihm, dass es noch andere Gründe gibt, den Schrecksenmeister Eißpin davon abzuhalten, ihn umzubringen, als nur das eigene Leben. Gleichzeitig lernt er bei Eißpin Alchemie und entdeckt die erstaunlichsten Kreaturen. Auch das Geheimnis, wie der Alchemist so grausam und verrücktgeworden ist, eine tragische Liebesgeschichte, lüftet Echo. Um Eißpin aufzuhalten wendet sich Echo an die letzte Schreckse der Stadt, denn alle anderen hat der Schrecksenmeister erfolgreich vertrieben. Selbst verliebt in ihren Gegner, stimmt sie zu, Eißpin per Liebestrank von seinem Wahn zu lösen und Echos Leben zu retten. Doch ein Schrecksenmeister, der sich gegen ein bisschen Schreckserei nicht zur Wehr setzten kann, wäre kein Schrecksenmeister. Die ungewöhnlichsten Wesen kommen Echo mehr oder weniger freiwillig zu Hilfe und auf mehr als eine Weise wird dabei sein Leben bedroht.Moers Zamonien ist eine Welt, auf der ein Schriftsteller nur neidisch sein kann. Die Detail und Feinheiten, die wiederkehrenden Sagen und Figuren, die alle Geschichten miteinander vereinigt – nicht zuletzt der große Hildegunst von Mythenmetz, der als Autor des Buches ausgegeben wird (siehe das Nachwort), wobei Moers selbst zum Übersetzter wird, sind geniale Erfindungen. Alles ist durchdacht, aufeinander abgestimmt und passt ins Bild. Die Metaphern und Analogien sind darauf abgestimmt, souverän, innovativ und dennoch sofort zu verstehen. Immer wieder gibt es Neues zu entdecken und anfänglich voraussehbare Wege werden unerwartet umgestaltet. Im Grunde geht es bei Moers dabei immer um die Liebe, die als großer Antrieb und Prinzip fungiert. Dahinter entdeckt der aufmerksame Leser aber vor allem die Liebe zur Literatur und Sprache. Wortspielerein, Neuschöpfungen, die auf schon bekannte Charaktere verweisen (Kratze – Katze, Schreckse – Hexe, etc. ), ein Mischung aus Gewohntem und Neuem. Moers kennt seine Sprache und zieht den Leser über sie in eine Welt, die nur auf den ersten Blick so anders ist als die unsrige. Absolute Leseempfehlung und Hunger nach mehr Moers!
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  • Mike Keirsbilck
    May 29, 2012
    Just finished The Alchemaster's Apprentice, another exhilarating Zamonia tale by Walter Moers. In contrast to Rumo, The 13 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear or The City of Dreaming Books. This time the story evolves around Echo the Crat - a feline creature that can speak every language known to man and animal. He's rescued from starvation by an Alchemaster - a master alchemist as it were. Though his rescue is somewhat overstated. In return for being thoroughly fed and amused for one month, Echo is t Just finished The Alchemaster's Apprentice, another exhilarating Zamonia tale by Walter Moers. In contrast to Rumo, The 13 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear or The City of Dreaming Books. This time the story evolves around Echo the Crat - a feline creature that can speak every language known to man and animal. He's rescued from starvation by an Alchemaster - a master alchemist as it were. Though his rescue is somewhat overstated. In return for being thoroughly fed and amused for one month, Echo is to give his life to the Alchemaster. Crats are a rare breed. The fat of the Crat possesses many Alchemistic benefits, making Echo of great value to end the Alchemaster's life's work. As the month draws to an end, Echo will, together with the friends he made during his voluntary imprisonment, start plotting to break the contract.Spanning only some 360 pages, *The Alchemaster's Apprentice*, in comparison to the other novels, really is novella. The page-count could also have to do with the modest amount of drawings Moers included in contrast to his other work. In the other novels, almost every page was illuminated with at least one drawing. In this novel there are far less drawings. This is a double edged knife. On the one hand, your imagination is forced to fill in the pictorial blanks, but on the other hand, having grown accustomed to Moers interweaving of text and drawings, it feels like something's missing.Nevertheless, I did enjoy this novel, as I did with the others. I've fallen in love with Moers adventurous tales for grown-ups. It's always a delight. And a pity not more of his novels have been translated. Having said that, I did feel this novel fell short in comparison to the other novels. The novel isn't as elaborate as the others. The plot is pretty straight-forward, and is only side-stepped with excursions that somehow support the main plot line. I even felt that he made a side-step to many. The plot can only endure that much exploiting...Near the end, there was indeed an interesting twist that made me read at the tip of my chair, but the unraveling of the plot seemed to be put together all too hastily. The deus ex machina ending was a tad over the top. Although I did enjoy the novel, I feel it could've benefited some more texture in order to live up to its predecessors. Usually, Moers's novels are an intertextual playground, but even this has been severely limited this time around. I could only pinpoint one intertextual element (although it's always possible I missed some), which is a pity. Spotting the references to me is half of the fun.So all and all, even though it's still ever so much fun, I was slightly disappointed. If anyone would want to get to know Moers's work, I'd recommend to start with another novel. This one is nice, but not essential.
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  • Emmy
    September 11, 2016
    This is the third Walter Moers book I've read, and so far, I've enjoyed each one. I almost didn't finish this one, though. It starts off at an okay pace, but quickly slows down, and I started to lose interest. Trust me, when this happens, keep reading. A friend encouraged me to give it a little bit more time, and I'm so glad that I did. By the time I reached the halfway point, I found it almost impossible to put down.The plot is simple: Echo the crat is starving to death after the death of his m This is the third Walter Moers book I've read, and so far, I've enjoyed each one. I almost didn't finish this one, though. It starts off at an okay pace, but quickly slows down, and I started to lose interest. Trust me, when this happens, keep reading. A friend encouraged me to give it a little bit more time, and I'm so glad that I did. By the time I reached the halfway point, I found it almost impossible to put down.The plot is simple: Echo the crat is starving to death after the death of his mistress. He encounters the town's Alchemaster, a wicked creature, who offers him a crazy deal: He will take care of Echo until the next full moon, providing him with all of the most delicious foods he could possibly imagine, as well as all the comforts he could ask for, and at the end of the month, Echo will allow the Alchemaster to slit his throat and rend him down for his fat, which he needs for a special procedure. Given the option between starvation and a quick flick of the knife, Echo agrees, and what follows is the tale of his life with the Alchemaster and his attempts to get out of the contract that will take his life at the next full moon.While Echo himself was a very simple character, not really a heroic type, or particularly noble (he's basically just a cat: interested in his own affairs, not heartless, but not especially compassionate), the character of Alchemaster Ghoolion was one of the best written villains I have read about in a long time. I found him absolutely fascinating. His character was rich, developed, and kept me glued to the page.(view spoiler)[I loved Ghoolion's scenes, especially towards the end. Whenever he did something "out of character," it didn't feel forced. Rather, it felt like an extension of the character. When he revealed his love for Floria, or let Echo sit on his lap, it showed that this was a character with a softer side that he tried to suppress. I secretly hoped that he would finally allow Echo to live, and the two of them could spend the rest of their lives together. After all, at one point, he even says that under different circumstances, the two of them could have been friends. He was amazingly sympathetic, and one of my favorite characters in Moers' books. Honestly, I would put him in my list of favorite characters, period. He's just that well-written. (hide spoiler)]My only complaint was that the ending was a bit weak. There is a lot of build-up, which creates an excellent sense of atmosphere, and I really enjoyed reading the last 100 or so pages. The ultimate climax was a bit weak in comparison, but still an overall good ending, so I guess that I can't really complain. This is a book that I think is going to sit with me for a while. I'm really glad that I read it, and I highly recommend it.
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  • Beaux Cooper
    October 14, 2015
    There's a difference between a cat and a crat, such a difference it will leave you wondering which one your feline friend is.Echo is a crat down on his luck - forced to live on the streets in an unkind neighborhood after his adoring mistress passes away. He's at the end, starved and beaten with no hope of survival... that is until he makes a deal with the town's Alchemaster: thirty days of living in gastronomical luxury in exchange for his life. It's a deal he is desperately willing to make unti There's a difference between a cat and a crat, such a difference it will leave you wondering which one your feline friend is.Echo is a crat down on his luck - forced to live on the streets in an unkind neighborhood after his adoring mistress passes away. He's at the end, starved and beaten with no hope of survival... that is until he makes a deal with the town's Alchemaster: thirty days of living in gastronomical luxury in exchange for his life. It's a deal he is desperately willing to make until he realizes maybe he wants to live after all.Walter Moers has to be the only author I pre-order books from. As a bargain shopper, I very rarely buy a book at the $16-20 full price. With Moers, however, I make an exception and don't ever look back on the cost. I stumbled upon Moers in just such a way while rooting through the shelves of Half Priced Books (my favorite big-box book store) in Arizona in 2007. His book, Rumo and His Miraculous Adventures, was listed at $2.00 so I eagerly snatched it up and, after two days in reader's paradise, I returned and purchased any other book under his banner that I could find. But then, sadly, I ran out of novels to read. Though he has written many in German not so many were translated into English.By complete happenstance, I saw on Amazon that a new arrival was soon coming - The Alchemaster's Apprentice. I pre-ordered it so fast I'm not sure my wallet knew what was happening.... and then I waited. It felt like forever, but the hardcover finally graced my door step and the reading commenced. This was all the way back in 2009 and I can honestly say I've read this book probably three or four more times since then. That's the beauty of Moers' work. Their readability. The stories never get old. Even when you already know what is coming the beauty of his rule breaking with fonts, layout, and design (not to mention his artwork) is worthy of appreciation each time you flip the page. As a writer, I'm inspired... and envious.Though these books fall under fantasy, it is directed toward an adult audience. For those of you who love young adult fiction for the imaginative characters and storylines, but whom are looking for something a little more grown up, I highly recommend any of Moers' books, The Alchemaster's Apprentice is no exception.
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  • Isabell
    February 4, 2012
    An English version of this review follows once I find the time for it.Der Einfallsreichtum dieses Mannes ist wirklich unendlich! Nach "Die Stadt der träumenden Bücher" und "Die 13 1/2 Leben des Kaptain Blaubär" ist "Der Schrecksenmeister" mein drittes Buch von Walter Moers. Ich habe abermals jede Minute des Hörbuchs genossen.Die Geschichte spielt in Zamonien und handelt von dem kleinen Krätzchen Echo (zamonische Kratzen unterscheiden sich von normalen Katzen dadurch, dass sie mit allen Wesen kom An English version of this review follows once I find the time for it.Der Einfallsreichtum dieses Mannes ist wirklich unendlich! Nach "Die Stadt der träumenden Bücher" und "Die 13 1/2 Leben des Kaptain Blaubär" ist "Der Schrecksenmeister" mein drittes Buch von Walter Moers. Ich habe abermals jede Minute des Hörbuchs genossen.Die Geschichte spielt in Zamonien und handelt von dem kleinen Krätzchen Echo (zamonische Kratzen unterscheiden sich von normalen Katzen dadurch, dass sie mit allen Wesen kommunizieren können und ein sehr gutes Gedächtnis haben). Nach dem Tod seines Frauchens ist Echo auf sich allein gestellt und ist dem Verhungern nahe. Da wird er vom Schrecksenmeister "gerettet". Der Schrecksenmeister schließt mit Echo einen Vertrag, wonach Echo vom Schrecksenmeister für einen Monat bestens verpflegt wird. Im Gegenzug dafür muss Echo nach Ablauf dieses Monats sein Leben lassen, damit der Schrecksenmeister sein wertvolles Fett bekommen kann. Der Schrecksenmeister ist von allen gefürchtet für seine Grausam- und Gefühllosigkeit. Von ihm lernt Echo so einiges über Alchemie und im Schloss des Schrecksenmeister schließt er unter anderem Freundschaft mit einem gekochten Gespenst ("das Hemd") und einem intellenten Schuhu. Doch um aus dem Vertrag herauszukommen, da werden ihm seine Freunde wohl nicht helfen können. Diesbezüglich ist Echos einzige Hoffnung die letzte Schreckse von Sledvaja.Echo ist höchst sympathisch. Das die Geschichte aus seiner Sicht geschildert ist, macht sie umso nachvollziehbarer. Die Geschichte ist dabei gleichzeitig spannend, immerhin bangt Echo um sein Leben, und humorvoll. Da kommt keine Minute Langeweile auf, egal ob Moers etwas beschreibt oder ob gerade etwas Spannendes passiert.Ein großes Lob gebührt auch dem Sprecher des Hörbuchs, Andreas Fröhlich. Zuvor habe ich ihn nur von den deutschen Eragon-Büchern gekannt und seine humoristische Seite kommt da nicht so wirklich zur Geltung und ich fand ihn zwar gut aber nicht überragend. Nach "Der Schrecksenmeister" muss ich diese Einstellung revidieren. Fröhlich schafft es, Echo genau den richtigen Ton zu verleihen und durch seine Erzählung der Geschichte erst den richtigen Ton zu geben.Alles in allem ein sehr gutes Hörbuch, dass die Bestnote redlich verdient.
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  • Donna
    January 9, 2010
    This was another BEA grab I made. Really, I need to learn to be much more selective the next time around. Ok, so I thought the cat (which is actually a Crat) was cute. So I snagged it. Do you blame me? Could you resist? Plus it sounded like a really interesting world so I wanted to try it out.And you know what, it was good. Actually, it was better than that despite how dense in description it was. And I mean really dense. That was why I stopped reading it. Not because I got bored or didn't enjoy This was another BEA grab I made. Really, I need to learn to be much more selective the next time around. Ok, so I thought the cat (which is actually a Crat) was cute. So I snagged it. Do you blame me? Could you resist? Plus it sounded like a really interesting world so I wanted to try it out.And you know what, it was good. Actually, it was better than that despite how dense in description it was. And I mean really dense. That was why I stopped reading it. Not because I got bored or didn't enjoy what I was reading. I just didn't have the patience to get through it all. It's long. 372 pages. It's a trade paperback so it's bigger than a mass market size. The font is tiny and so are the margins. And the plot progresses excessively slowly because of all of the description.But the thing is, it's really fun description. And I love the tone. It's quirky and darkly humorous and you can't help but pity this little Crat for the situation he's in. Right when I stopped was when the plot regarding Ghoolion was starting to get pretty interesting (not that it wasn't already) and I wanted to read on but by that point I'd already spent a week on the book and I hadn't even broached 100 pages yet. See what I mean? It's going to take some patience to get through this.It's such a rich world. I would say enchanting but there isn't anything all that enchanting about it thanks to the alchemaster. Grotesque would be more like it. Every single character, even those in passing, are insanely well-developed from the second they're mentioned that you can't help but picture them in your head. The illustrations in the book don't hurt either! They're great and at times unnerving but you can't take your eyes away from them. They just make the words that much richer.If I didn't have such a huge TBR pile with a bunch of time-sensitive books still left to read, I would have read this one to the end because, at the end of the day, I really wanted to. But I just don't have the patience to take 3 weeks to read one book right now. No rating for this one since I didn't finish it.
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  • Canem
    February 22, 2016
    "Oben ist unten, und hässlich ist schön." - Motto der LedermäuseSolche skurril, lustigen Zitate gibt es viele in Walter Moers' Der Schrecksenmeister.Wie immer in seinen Zamonien-Romanen entführt uns Walter Moers, oder besser gesagt: Hildegunst von Mythenmetz, in eine abenteuerliche, spannende, aufregende und skurril magische Welt.Im Mittelpunkt dieser Geschichte steht unser Protagonist Echo, eine sympathisch naive Kratze und der Schrecksenmeister Eißpin.Walter Moers weiß, wie man Charaktere förm "Oben ist unten, und hässlich ist schön." - Motto der LedermäuseSolche skurril, lustigen Zitate gibt es viele in Walter Moers' Der Schrecksenmeister.Wie immer in seinen Zamonien-Romanen entführt uns Walter Moers, oder besser gesagt: Hildegunst von Mythenmetz, in eine abenteuerliche, spannende, aufregende und skurril magische Welt.Im Mittelpunkt dieser Geschichte steht unser Protagonist Echo, eine sympathisch naive Kratze und der Schrecksenmeister Eißpin.Walter Moers weiß, wie man Charaktere förmlich zum Leben erweckt. Sein unverwechselbarer Schreibstil und die (wie immer) wunderschönen Illustrationen machen diese Geschichte lebendig.Es wird mit großer Wortgewalt und epischem Ausmaß über die Geschichte des Schrecksenmeisters gesprochen, über die krankeste Stadt ganz Zamoniens; Sledwaya und ihre ebenso kranken Einwohner.Mit viel Liebe zum Detail, ja so kann man es ungefähr beschreiben für jemanden, der noch nie einen Moers gelesen hat, schafft es dieser Autor eine Welt zu erschaffen, die für mich zu so etwas wie einer zweiten Heimat geworden ist. Ja, ich übertreibe nicht; einen Zamonien-Roman von Walter Moers zu lesen, ist wie nach Hause kommen. Wieso das so ist, kann ich nicht prezise in Worte fassen. Dieser schwarze Humor.. diese süß-schaurig-naiv-gruseligen zamonischen Märchen.. diese weder guten noch bösen aber immer liebenswürdigen Charaktere.. diese wunderbar einzigartigen Zeichnungen.. diese poetischen Gedichte zwischendurch.. diese Unvorhersehbarkeit..Es müsste mehr solch begnadete Autoren geben wie ihn!Nicht ein Satz, nicht eine Passage, nicht ein einziger Buchstabe ist hier zu viel oder zu wenig, ja diese Geschichte ist perfekt.Für Leute wie mich, die schon mehrere Bücher von Moers gelesen haben, werden sich freuen, einige "alte Bekannte" in Zamonien wiederzutreffen.Mehr kann ich nicht sagen, wundervoll. Danke Walter Moers und hör bitte, bitte NIE auf zu schreiben.
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  • Noctifer
    August 9, 2010
    "Der Schrecksenmeister" ist das fünfte der von Walter Moers geschriebenen Zamonien-Romane und bildet meinen persönlichen Einstieg in diese abstrakte, überraschende und wunderbare Welt. Schon die ersten Zeilen zeigen, dass es sich beim "Schrecksenmeister" um ein eine Art literarisches Überraschungsei handelt: Als Leser weiß man nie, womit der Autor einen in der nächsten Zeile verblüffen wird.Wir lernen Echo kennen, ein halb verhungertes Hauskrätzchen, das von den Bewohnern der Stadt keinerlei Unt "Der Schrecksenmeister" ist das fünfte der von Walter Moers geschriebenen Zamonien-Romane und bildet meinen persönlichen Einstieg in diese abstrakte, überraschende und wunderbare Welt. Schon die ersten Zeilen zeigen, dass es sich beim "Schrecksenmeister" um ein eine Art literarisches Überraschungsei handelt: Als Leser weiß man nie, womit der Autor einen in der nächsten Zeile verblüffen wird.Wir lernen Echo kennen, ein halb verhungertes Hauskrätzchen, das von den Bewohnern der Stadt keinerlei Unterstützung erhält. Den Hungertod vor Augen geht er auf einen Pakt mit dem gefürchteten Schrecksenmeister der Stadt Sledwaya ein; Dieser darf ihn töten, dafür würde er ihn einen Monat lang bis zum nächsten Vollmond fürstlich bewirten. Eßpin begehrt das wertvolle Kratzenfett von Echo, das seine Wirkung nur entfalten kann, wenn das betroffenen Krätzchen sein Fett frewillig gegeben hat.In Eißpins Schloss erwarten Echo allerlei kulinarische Genüsse und metamorphose Mahlzeiten und, natürlich, neue Freunde und Verbündete. Ob Echo tatsächlich im alchemistischen Kochtopf endet?Walter Moers Zamonische Mythen versetzen den Leser in eine magische, neue und überraschende Welt voller lebendiger Charaktere vor einem fantastischen Hintergrund. Sprachliche Anekdoten, Wortdreher und die reichlich farbenprächtige Fanastie des Autors dominieren den Verlauf. Das Buch muss man zwei, drei Mal lesen, um die Vielfältigkeit der sprachlichen Kunst auskosten zu können, bei jedem neuen Lesen entdeckte ich etwas Neues, das mir vorher noch nicht aufgefallen ist. Ein kleines Meisterwerk sicherlich.Es gibt einen (rein subjektiven) Kritikpunkt: Der Geschichtenverlauf ist linear, was die Stimmung und den Lesespaß jedoch nicht dämpft. Moers überrascht durch skurrile Charaktere und oftmals erreicht er das vorhersehbare Ziel durch unvorhergesehene, groteske und spaßige Umwege.
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  • Courtney
    June 28, 2012
    "Nobody understands the Leathermice! Not even the Leathermice!" This here is classic Moers. And I love Walter Moers for his unbelievable imagination and completely unique stories. In this particular tale, which takes place in the Zamonian city of Malaisea, a little Crat (very similar to a cat, but can communicate with every species) named Echo makes a desperate deal with the ruling alchemaster, Ghoolion. Malaisea is a miserable place; disease and despair abound. Ghoolion is perfectly content to "Nobody understands the Leathermice! Not even the Leathermice!" This here is classic Moers. And I love Walter Moers for his unbelievable imagination and completely unique stories. In this particular tale, which takes place in the Zamonian city of Malaisea, a little Crat (very similar to a cat, but can communicate with every species) named Echo makes a desperate deal with the ruling alchemaster, Ghoolion. Malaisea is a miserable place; disease and despair abound. Ghoolion is perfectly content to keep it that way. His life centers entirely around his alchemy, which frequently inhibits the well-being of other creatures. Ghoolion is terribly excited to meet Echo as the starving little Crat represents the biggest alchemic opportunity Ghoolion has ever had. The deal is for Echo to live with the alchemaster, who will fatten him up until the next full moon. At that point, little Echo will have his throat slit and his fat rendered by the alchemist to create the ultimate ingredient. In spite of himself, Echo finds the alchemaster and his world oddly fascinating. Not fascinating enough, however, to want to actually fulfill his contract though. He needs some help and it will come in the form of more of Moers' whimsical characters, such as the aforementioned Leathermice, an owl-like Tiwituwu who transposes letters in longer words, a cooked ghost and the best/worst/only Uggly in town, Isadora. It's a strange and harrowing month for Echo, but if he wants to live, he's going to have to outsmart the cleverest and most powerful man in town. Again, loved this book. Wished there were more illustrations. Moers has a gift for word-play as well, which fortunately comes across with his long-time translator, John Brownjohn. Now, if we can just get the rest of Moers' books translated, I will be exceedingly happy.
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