How To Find Fulfilling Work
This is a book about how to take working life in new directions - how to negotiate the labyrinth of choices, how to think about personal ambitions and motivations, and ultimately how to take concrete steps to finding a fulfilling career.

How To Find Fulfilling Work Details

TitleHow To Find Fulfilling Work
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2012
PublisherPan Publishing
ISBN-139781447202288
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Philosophy, Psychology, Business, Personal Development

How To Find Fulfilling Work Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Doing what it says in the title, Roman Krznaric explores the concept of meaningful work for those who are unhappy with their 9-5 and looking to change that. And he does a pretty good job of it!Approaching his subject via a variety of disciplines, Roman frames work itself within a historical context, showing how it has evolved over time (mainly with an eye to the West) as well as incorporating psychology to explain how we can entrap ourselves in jobs that offer us money and status but fail to pro Doing what it says in the title, Roman Krznaric explores the concept of meaningful work for those who are unhappy with their 9-5 and looking to change that. And he does a pretty good job of it!Approaching his subject via a variety of disciplines, Roman frames work itself within a historical context, showing how it has evolved over time (mainly with an eye to the West) as well as incorporating psychology to explain how we can entrap ourselves in jobs that offer us money and status but fail to provide meaning or utilise our talents. People’s fear of change and why failure is more potent than success are concepts that are also addressed to encourage the reader onwards, past the doubt. He also includes inspiring stories about people who were stuck in jobs they hated but who took a risk (and often a steep pay cut!) and are now in jobs they love and are much happier, as well as people who had no idea what they wanted to do so went out with the express purpose of trying as many professions as they could (usually for no money) to find out where their passions lie.By far the most useful aspect of the book were the pointed questions scattered throughout to get you thinking about your own situation, how you can change it and what you really want to do. I also liked the idea of creating your own job - a bespoke career – as well as Marie Curie’s life story as an example of working up to the career you want over time. It’s a concept that’s not as dramatic as handing in your notice and immediately jumping into something completely different but made more sense, at least to me.The chapter on juggling parenting and a working life was the only part of the book I didn’t go for and that’s because I’m not a parent and don’t plan to be.Otherwise, this book gave me a lot to think about, as I hoped it would, and is full of great ideas, advice and inspiring stories to help anyone looking to get an idea of what they really want to do with their working life and help them realise it. I didn’t come away from this knowing exactly what I want to do but I feel like it has pointed me in the right direction with an idea for figuring it out, and that’s very positive.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    The lowdown:We all hate our jobs. Well, I hated my job, which is exactly why this book ended up in my handbag. That, and my adoration for The School of Life and anything connected to Alain De Botton. In How to Find Fulfilling Work, Roman Krznaric gives compact advice on how we can use our passions and talents to create a meaningful career and live a simpler existence.Supporting his advice with statistical data and an historical perspective on the evolution of work, Krznaric asserts that nothing The lowdown:We all hate our jobs. Well, I hated my job, which is exactly why this book ended up in my handbag. That, and my adoration for The School of Life and anything connected to Alain De Botton. In How to Find Fulfilling Work, Roman Krznaric gives compact advice on how we can use our passions and talents to create a meaningful career and live a simpler existence.Supporting his advice with statistical data and an historical perspective on the evolution of work, Krznaric asserts that nothing is beyond our reach so long as we consider hybrid careers and direct our potential toward ‘wide achievement’: excelling in multiple areas rather than swallowing the popular notion of specialisation. The book itself is neatly set into five sections in an attempt to keep a daunting topic easy and forthright; instead of quoting journal articles, examples are made of Hollywood movies and notorious personalities.What I liked:I felt less alone in my discontent. The use of case studies helped disprove the idea that something is wrong if we don’t find our work fulfilling. Dissatisfaction at work is widespread and does not discriminate amongst industries or personal temperament. Exercises in brainstorming empower the reader to think outside the box and break a potentially scary change into manageable baby steps, often by recruiting others to provide suggestions and/or an element of mentorship.What I didn’t like: Although the content was reassuring, I felt I was already one step ahead of Krznaric’s ideas. This is possibly just my personal impression due to months of career-change rumination; those just beginning to feel restless may be enlightened by the suggestions on offer.Also, the exercise that suggested sending a mock personal ad to ten people was beyond my reach. Yes, I could have scraped together some friends and family to throw ideas at me, but I couldn’t get past the fear that they’d think I was circulating chain mail. Again, possibly just me. Verdict:For those who’ve ever wondered if there was more to life, this pocket-sized manual will prove that there is. Encouraging and written with kindness, How to Find Fulfilling Work is for anyone wanting to get a sense of value and meaning out of their working life. As John Burroughs said, ‘Leap, and the net will appear’.4/5 StarsFollow my blog! ----> https://ponderdeeper.wordpress.com/
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Do you have a niggling feeling that you could be doing something amazing with your life, but you're not quite sure what that is? Do you want to change careers, but get confused by all the options?I've asked these questions many times, and was extremely happy to find a book about careers that was neither dry nor off with the fairies. 'How to find fulfilling work' is a self-help book without the fluff, positive affirmations, and uncovering your childhood trauma. This is self-help for thinking peop Do you have a niggling feeling that you could be doing something amazing with your life, but you're not quite sure what that is? Do you want to change careers, but get confused by all the options?I've asked these questions many times, and was extremely happy to find a book about careers that was neither dry nor off with the fairies. 'How to find fulfilling work' is a self-help book without the fluff, positive affirmations, and uncovering your childhood trauma. This is self-help for thinking people.'How to Find Fulfilling Work' draws on ideas from psychology, history, sociology, philosophy, and a variety of interviews and autobiographies. It turns out that fulfilling work is something that people have been researching for many decades now. It is great to know that this is a problem of society, and not just you.Roman Krznaric's great book on how to find fulfilling work examines the contemporary world of work and career confusion. I'm one of many people searching for answers about what to do with my life. We've spent endless hours searching online for career advice. We've taken all sorts of personality tests and skills tests, to see what career we're most suited for. And we've also come up with lots of answers that we're not so happy with. Many websites and books sound promising, but they are always missing something somewhere. 'How to Find Fulfilling Work' is by far the best book I've read on finding a career that you enjoy. I love it because it's practical, shares real stories and science, and it just makes a whole lot of sense to me.For example, I was so relieved to read that we are confused by career choices these days simply because psychologically there are too many choices for our brains to deal with.The book is not filled with a bunch of time consuming exercises. Rather, Krznaric asks a few simple questions along the way, with a few tasks that help you uncover you career motivations, like whether you prioritise success, respect, passion, talent, money or making a difference in your career decisions. He then advocates taking action to discover the work you find fulfilling through actually trying out different jobs. Rather than sitting at home reflecting on what you might want to do, follow someone around for a few days who does a job you think you might like, or interview people about their careers and what they enjoy about them.Taking action is one of the most valuable messages from this book. I've spent far too long thinking about what I could be doing, or trying to come up with how I can create careers from my passions. But in the end I'll never really know what I like until I try things out.The practicalities of doing fulfilling work are also explored in this book. I love the story of the Pulitzer prize winning poet, Wallace Stevens, who continued working at an insurance agency despite being offered a faculty position at Harvard. It is just one example of different ways we can view our working life. It made me think that perhaps I don't need to find the perfect career - I just need to find one that is good enough, and allows me to pursue other interests in my free time.Here are some of the things that went through my head while I read this book: "That is so true! Why hasn't anyone said this before? Finally, I know the history of careers! I'm reading this too quickly, I'd better slow down or I won't remember it all!".This is the thinking person's guide to changing careers or finding fulfilling work. Reading this book will help you find your place in the history of work, understand what academics have uncovered in their research, and provide an action-orientated path to feeling fulfilled in your career.Now I just have to start doing...
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  • Eleanor Liu
    January 1, 1970
    I don't want to join the rat race.Not be enslaved by machines, bureaucracies, boredom, ugliness.I dont want to be a moron, robert, commuter. I don't want to become a fragment of a person. I want to do my own thing.I want to live relatively simplyI want to deal with people, not masks. People matter. Nature matters. Beauty matters. Wholeness matters. I want to be able to care.
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  • Anita Ashland
    January 1, 1970
    The topic of how to find fulfilling work is such a first world problem that I was prepared for this to be a book worthy of dissing. Additionally, because none of the stories and advice in the first half of address people who have the responsibility of providing for children, and therefore don't have the luxury of taking a "radical sabbatical" and so forth, I was ready to toss it aside. But then I came to the three exercises on pages 88-93. The first exercise asks you to spend 10 minutes making a The topic of how to find fulfilling work is such a first world problem that I was prepared for this to be a book worthy of dissing. Additionally, because none of the stories and advice in the first half of address people who have the responsibility of providing for children, and therefore don't have the luxury of taking a "radical sabbatical" and so forth, I was ready to toss it aside. But then I came to the three exercises on pages 88-93. The first exercise asks you to spend 10 minutes making a map of sorts of all the jobs you've held. I went ahead and listed everything, from my part-time jobs in high school and college, the temp jobs in between my "real" jobs, and also my self-employment. It's the first time I've studied my work history in this way, rather than as something simply to put on a resume, and it was eye-opening. Another exercise asks you to list five jobs you might want to try if you have a year off to work any job you wanted. It was interesting to both the patterns and wild disparities. The third exercise is to write a half page personal advertisement about yourself wherein you describe your interests and motivations (but don't mention specific jobs) and then show it to 10 people you know in different walks of life and ask them to read it and recommend 2-3 different careers for you. I haven't done that exercise yet but can see how it could be helpful.I liked the story of the poet Wallace Stevens. His day job was in insurance and he even declined a professor job at Harvard after he became famous. The Marie Curie story was interesting too.Yep: "without work, all life goes rotten, but when work is soulless, life stifles and dies." - Albert Camus. "Where the needs of the world and your talents cross, there lies your vocation. - Aristotle. That sounds good but how to achieve it? This book will at least spark a few ideas about vocation and career.
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  • Viènna
    January 1, 1970
    Inspiring and thought provoking, but I wouldn't have it any other way coming from 'the School of Life'. I enjoyed the doing and thinking about the various excercises and questions posed through-out the book. In a way it is an extension of ideas already floating around in my head. Having figured out that I'm not driven by money or status, I'm experimenting with branching out and have had my first conversational research to find work and activities more closely linked with my passions and/or that Inspiring and thought provoking, but I wouldn't have it any other way coming from 'the School of Life'. I enjoyed the doing and thinking about the various excercises and questions posed through-out the book. In a way it is an extension of ideas already floating around in my head. Having figured out that I'm not driven by money or status, I'm experimenting with branching out and have had my first conversational research to find work and activities more closely linked with my passions and/or that have some sense of meaning. This may not be for everyone, we can't all be yoga teacher or career coaches, but even thinking differently about your paid work, and seeing if you can make some small changes there, may make it less of a obligation/struggle. Can recommend this little book of thoughts, especially if you, like me, wish to and like putting ideas into action.
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  • Astrid
    January 1, 1970
    Read in one day. Insightful and inspirational.
  • Michael Nazari
    January 1, 1970
    I recommend this to anyone who is unsure of choosing a career or unfulfilled at their current job. Krznaric really captures the modern challenges of vocation and how to go about exploring different jobs. As someone who feels as though I'm not the one-career-forever type, it's relieving to hear about others who changed careers or have multiple ones. For those of us who have a hefty handful of interests, this book is a wonderful tool.
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  • Ingrid
    January 1, 1970
    I really appreciated this, I felt like i could relate to it a lot and it had feminist perspectives so that was well done imo!
  • Rob Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    About the book: If you feel trapped in your job or long for more fulfilling work, you’re not alone. How to Find Fulfilling Work explores the core components of what makes work meaningful and full of purpose, detailing exactly which steps you need to take to find work that brings out the best in you and keeps you truly happy.About the author: The Observer named author Roman Krznaric one of Britain’s leading popular philosophers. He teaches at The School of Life, of which he’s a founding member, a About the book: If you feel trapped in your job or long for more fulfilling work, you’re not alone. How to Find Fulfilling Work explores the core components of what makes work meaningful and full of purpose, detailing exactly which steps you need to take to find work that brings out the best in you and keeps you truly happy.About the author: The Observer named author Roman Krznaric one of Britain’s leading popular philosophers. He teaches at The School of Life, of which he’s a founding member, and is a counselor to organizations such as Oxfam and the United Nations. His other works include Empathy and The Wonder Box.My highlights:We’re dissatisfied when our expectations about work aren’t met. The dissatisfaction we feel at work often stems from the fact that our expectations are higher than ever before.Either lower your expectations (supporters of this approach say that work has always been tedious and never a joy, and that therefore we should lower our expectations and look for fulfillment outside of work) or you can join those who think finding fulfilling work is possible, if perhaps challenging.The latter approach encourages you to pursue your dreams, instead of regretting that you never tried to free yourself from the shackles of your unfulfilling job.In today’s world, there is an overwhelming number of job choices. we’re haunted by the possibility that our choice was the wrong one.We’re haunted by the possibility that our choice was the wrong one.We’re haunted by the possibility that our choice was the wrong one.It's not easy to leave the career path we're already on – but if it isn’t fulfilling, make a change! we feel bound by our educational past.If you want to make a career change, you have to change your mindset and overcome this psychological hurdle. Think of it as a decision between two types of regret: you’ll either regret that you abandoned the career you invested so much time and energy in, or you’ll regret that you never had the guts to quit and set out in pursuit of a more fulfilling future.Perhaps this will help you choose: psychological research has shown that the regret of not taking action on things that are really important to you is one of the most corrosive emotions you can experience.Money and status aren't as fulfilling as we think. there is no clear relationship between happiness and monetary wealth. While evidence shows that money contributes to your well-being up to a certain point – the meeting of your basic needs – it gives but little satisfaction once you earn beyond this point. This is due to a psychological mechanism called the “hedonic treadmill”Making a difference gives you a sense of meaning, though it’s not easy to combine with enterprise. There are different core elements that make up fulfilling work. One of these elements is the sense that your work has meaning. That is, your work imparts a feeling of contributing to the world in a positive way.Following your passions and finding your flow experiences will make you happy. to find out what you’re passionate about, set aside some time to mull over what gives you a flow experience.Flow is a state of total focus and concentration where you're so absorbed in your activity that you forget about everything else. Engaging in what you love is usually accompanied by this feeling.The flow experience is crucial to happiness in life and work because it gives us a gratifying sense of being able to fully access our potential.Observe yourself and your flow experiences by keeping a flow diary.If you want fulfilling work, you should seek freedom. A core element proven to be part of job satisfaction is to have a “span of autonomy,” that is, some time where you're at liberty to make your own decisions. The more freedom you experience, the happier you’ll be.Find freedom outside the office by working less.To find fulfilling work, you should abandon meticulous planning and test it out. A far more effective approach is adopting the mantra “act first, and reflect later” – meaning it’s better to try out several jobs than to fritter away the hours in search of the perfect position in print or online. Recent research has shown that substantial change is best seen by “experiential learning.”A less radical approach is the “temporary assignment.”Take your time: vocation can't be found overnight – it slowly grows within you. vocation is something that gives purpose to your work in its entirety. It’s a broader goal that you are pursuing, the thing that gets you out of bed every day.The perfect vocation; instead, it germinates within you, slowly growing as your sustained work nurtures it.It really does pay, then, not to demand that your vocation be revealed to you immediately. Instead, allow it to form through your experience.Final summary good pay and social status are no longer good enough. We want our work to be purposeful, meaningful and rich with freedom and flow. In order to find exactly that, we must abort meticulous planning, try things out, take some risks and learn from our experiences.
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  • Thurston Hunger
    January 1, 1970
    Someone had recommended this author and this was the only book I could quickly find by him, which is a bad match for me. I'm too old and weirdly too well compensated to seriously consider jumping trains at this pointHe addresses this on pp57 and then goes on a money can't buy you happiness arc. Which, yeah of course I agree in parts, but as my 11-year old quoted the other day while walking our dog and chatting, "Money can't buy me happiness. A puppy makes me happy. I need money to buy a puppy."I Someone had recommended this author and this was the only book I could quickly find by him, which is a bad match for me. I'm too old and weirdly too well compensated to seriously consider jumping trains at this pointHe addresses this on pp57 and then goes on a money can't buy you happiness arc. Which, yeah of course I agree in parts, but as my 11-year old quoted the other day while walking our dog and chatting, "Money can't buy me happiness. A puppy makes me happy. I need money to buy a puppy."I feel my son's point is well-taken as well, even though we are NOT getting a second dog. I honestly don't know how many people are really happy in their vocation, I can think of one person, but for many a job inherently will have tasks that have to be done, and aspects of drudgery and well, expectations. For a more pure happiness, I think find hobbies that can fit financially and time-wise into your non-work like. No great wisdom there I know...And Krznaric offers up the idea of a job that has flow, freedom and probably another "F-word" Fulfillment? Funds? Farfenuggen? Flow is actually pretty important and helps with the hobby aspect I think. It helps to be able to have those "this is not who I am moments" as in I am not a QA tester I am a poet/bridge players, and your hobby is your secret you. (It even helps to say I am not (just) a parent, I am a ....)So I'm lucky to have some flow with my day job. And I've already taken three of his "radical sabbaticals" and enjoyed them, but they definitely do cost you. I wish I had maybe found this book 20 years ago whenever I went to a "career counselor" who did have me take something like the Briggs-Myer dealy and I ended up never completing my sessions with that person.I do admire the notion that Kzrnaric pushes to get people out and interacting and active, making lists, etc. Hey good luck to you, seriously.But when I read some of the five examples that the author tosses around"food photographer, member of parliament, tai chi instructor, social entrepeneur running a youth project and wide-acheiveing Renaissance generalist" That was one proposed set, followed by a "real" example ofmassage therapist, sculptor, cellist, screen play writer and owner of her own bar on a tiny old-fashioned Canarian island."These suggested options trigger a kind of response in me that one reserves for people talking about their past lives.Looking around Silicon Valley circa 2014, I sure see a lot of cubicles, and maybe there are some secret sculpting cellists in them (I truly hope so) but they're rosining their bow with less party favor jobs.And more power to them, bring creativity to your tech writer days and spend your nights covered in rosin and clay. (In fact just do that and maybe skip reading this book).I may read something else by the writer but not sure if the School of Life is too cool for me.
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  • Mark Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    I try to avoid self help books, finding them patronising, poorly written and more often than not stating the bleedin' obvious as a pretext for selling something. How to Find Fulfilling Work is none of those things and is refreshingly free of the pseudo-spiritual bollocks typical of this genre. It also hits a sweet spot between being grounded in the real world of mortgages, families and responsibilities but also sufficiently provocative to spark some meaningful soul searching about one’s previous I try to avoid self help books, finding them patronising, poorly written and more often than not stating the bleedin' obvious as a pretext for selling something. How to Find Fulfilling Work is none of those things and is refreshingly free of the pseudo-spiritual bollocks typical of this genre. It also hits a sweet spot between being grounded in the real world of mortgages, families and responsibilities but also sufficiently provocative to spark some meaningful soul searching about one’s previous and future career choices. It won’t work for everybody, and the author pretty much acknowledges this is a book aimed squarely at the educated professional experiencing a mid-career wobble/existential crisis market. If you fall into that demographic and frequently lie awake at night wondering how you got there, then I’d suggest the couple of hours it takes to read this slim book would be well spent. At worst, you’ll go into that next Monday morning team meeting in the comforting knowledge that you are almost certainly not the only ball of self-loathing, anxious, mis-directed energy sat around the table. At best, it might prompt some practical new ideas of what you can do about it.
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  • Adler
    January 1, 1970
    Best book I've read on what it means in finding fulfilling work. I haven't read many book in this area, however, this brief book offers an excellent compilation of what lies behind fulfilling work while having few, simple yet deep exercises to get started. Other books, booklets or artilcles that I've read were longer, more elaborated and so forth, but they ended up aiming at perfection instead of getting me really thinking and working into this topic. These other book, eg, the wonderful, well wr Best book I've read on what it means in finding fulfilling work. I haven't read many book in this area, however, this brief book offers an excellent compilation of what lies behind fulfilling work while having few, simple yet deep exercises to get started. Other books, booklets or artilcles that I've read were longer, more elaborated and so forth, but they ended up aiming at perfection instead of getting me really thinking and working into this topic. These other book, eg, the wonderful, well written and useful 'finding your element' by Sir Ken Robinsson, are now probably more useful as I've done some basic, ground word and experiments with the simple exercises from Roman Krznaric 'How to Find Fulfilling Work'.Krznaric has written a great piece and because is short, one has no excuse to not finish the book and exercises in a few weeks. Very much appreciated. I say short, in number of pages and exercises, but I should say huge in terms of impact on me and how grounded his text seems to be. I'd recommend this to anyone who wants to have more meaning in life regardless of wanting to change jobs or not, because one grows into fulfilment instead of discovering it.
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  • Tamlynem
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book and I definitely recommend. It's roughly 200 pages and he's quoting Rousseau--what have you got to lose?The author has got a little bit of everything in here: exercises, a few people's own experiences as examples with philosophy, history and personal experience mixed in. I think he makes a good point about acting first and reflecting later in trying to find meaningful work and the three ways to do it: radical sabbaticals, branching projects and conversational research. T I really liked this book and I definitely recommend. It's roughly 200 pages and he's quoting Rousseau--what have you got to lose?The author has got a little bit of everything in here: exercises, a few people's own experiences as examples with philosophy, history and personal experience mixed in. I think he makes a good point about acting first and reflecting later in trying to find meaningful work and the three ways to do it: radical sabbaticals, branching projects and conversational research. These are practical enough steps. I guess he's Australian or something? In the U.S. we would call the "branching projects" volunteering and "conversational research" networking (more or less). Using the different terminology was good though, because it forced me to think about these activities in a different way. If you're into the meaningful life/self-help genre this book is a must, along with Alain de Botton's TED talk and Po Bronson's _What Should I Do With My Life?_, which the author also recommends in his homework section.
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  • Mahmoud Shehata
    January 1, 1970
    I think Roman did a great job in collection many of the most useful tips on fulfillment and purpose in one book directed toward a very important topic: career. Although I've read most of the sources from which the book draws its gist, it still worked as a great reminder of what really matters in life and what a "good" career is all about. I found the last two chapters to be the best of value and the idea that a fulfilling career has to give you meaning, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience I think Roman did a great job in collection many of the most useful tips on fulfillment and purpose in one book directed toward a very important topic: career. Although I've read most of the sources from which the book draws its gist, it still worked as a great reminder of what really matters in life and what a "good" career is all about. I found the last two chapters to be the best of value and the idea that a fulfilling career has to give you meaning, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal ExperienceFLOW and freedom is extremely valuable. The book is full of good advice on how to shift careers too and how to deal with the fear and why are we afraid of change. Most importantly, to me, is the way Roman tries to portrait the whole career dilemma in the right light; a society's problem not YOUR problem. Deep reflection on the state of work and corporate slavery and what really matters in life is included and very useful.
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  • Doug Newdick
    January 1, 1970
    While all of the School of Life books I've read have been good, interesting and even helpful, this is the best of the lot. If you are having doubts about your career, are feeling unfulfilled at work, or just don't know what to do next about your job, then this book will be of immense help. From an examination of the history of the problem - how we got to the modern era of choice and an absence of lifelong work, along with the preoccupation with the impossible demands that we make of ourselves - While all of the School of Life books I've read have been good, interesting and even helpful, this is the best of the lot. If you are having doubts about your career, are feeling unfulfilled at work, or just don't know what to do next about your job, then this book will be of immense help. From an examination of the history of the problem - how we got to the modern era of choice and an absence of lifelong work, along with the preoccupation with the impossible demands that we make of ourselves - through to thinking hard about the root causes of your own situation and ending on practical advice on how you can deal with it Roman Krzaric leads you on a journey of finding out is really important to you and doing something about it. This is a great piece of practical philosophy, thinking hard about hard problems that directly effect our lives, taking into account what recent science and the great thinkers of the past have to say on the matter.
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  • Stephen Bell
    January 1, 1970
    The school of life is a fresh outlook on the philosophical self-help book, edited by Alain De Botton, the series contains six books by various authors.Possible a little preachy and condescend at times, Krznaric covers the struggle of the monotonous process of work with aplomb. Opening with Dostevesky and finishing with Kierkegaard, we are taken on a crash course of philosophical thought, allowing us to think differently and hopefully work out what's best for us when making career defining decisi The school of life is a fresh outlook on the philosophical self-help book, edited by Alain De Botton, the series contains six books by various authors.Possible a little preachy and condescend at times, Krznaric covers the struggle of the monotonous process of work with aplomb. Opening with Dostevesky and finishing with Kierkegaard, we are taken on a crash course of philosophical thought, allowing us to think differently and hopefully work out what's best for us when making career defining decisions.Although not ideally catered for someone in my position, Roman Kznaric's allowed me to restore my thoughts and ideas on the subject of living the un-fulfilled working life with much more clarity and desire to do not.Looking forward to reding more books in the series.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Not exactly a prescription or a blue print, but it helps to explain why we’re always looking for one and not likely to find one. More of a philosophical approach to thinking about work and job satisfaction. He argues we need meaning, flow and freedom in our work lives. And that while meaningful work is possible, it’s also possible to find meaning and fulfillment outside of work. I don’t know how helpful all of this manages to be in terms of figuring out where you want to be, but there was someth Not exactly a prescription or a blue print, but it helps to explain why we’re always looking for one and not likely to find one. More of a philosophical approach to thinking about work and job satisfaction. He argues we need meaning, flow and freedom in our work lives. And that while meaningful work is possible, it’s also possible to find meaning and fulfillment outside of work. I don’t know how helpful all of this manages to be in terms of figuring out where you want to be, but there was something comforting and well-written enough about it to quell some anxiety, which is valuable in and of itself.
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  • Adira
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book! There are a lot of gems within it's pages for anyone who's trying to decide where they want to take their lives career wise. Unlike a lot of other self-help books, Roman Krznaric's book offers concrete, tangible methods to help readers figure out their next career move. The book itself is short and will take you maybe an hour or two to get through (3 hours and 48 minutes is the actual audiobook duration). I highly recommend everyone read this book if you get the chanc I really enjoyed this book! There are a lot of gems within it's pages for anyone who's trying to decide where they want to take their lives career wise. Unlike a lot of other self-help books, Roman Krznaric's book offers concrete, tangible methods to help readers figure out their next career move. The book itself is short and will take you maybe an hour or two to get through (3 hours and 48 minutes is the actual audiobook duration). I highly recommend everyone read this book if you get the chance!
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  • Sophie Butler
    January 1, 1970
    This is exactly what I needed at this stage of my life. Roman gives you the tools to work things out for yourself without being overbearing. The use of philosophy etc to explore the subject matter is fascinating and means the book is educational on a number of levels. The breakdown of fulfilling work into the categories of flow, meaning and freedom was eye opening but also touched on things I already knew yet hadn’t been brought into such sharp focus for me. I think this is the most important bo This is exactly what I needed at this stage of my life. Roman gives you the tools to work things out for yourself without being overbearing. The use of philosophy etc to explore the subject matter is fascinating and means the book is educational on a number of levels. The breakdown of fulfilling work into the categories of flow, meaning and freedom was eye opening but also touched on things I already knew yet hadn’t been brought into such sharp focus for me. I think this is the most important book I’ve read this year in terms of my personal development. Thank you Roman.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting and insightful book about finding a job that is fulfilling. Many people today complain that their jobs are not satisfying, and this book aims to help those people, both with philosophy and practicality. It analyzes what "fulfilling work" means and then makes recommendations about how to go about finding it. A short quick read, though one I found full of useful information that I had to put down at times to just take in. Highly recommended, particularly for those seeking a new care An interesting and insightful book about finding a job that is fulfilling. Many people today complain that their jobs are not satisfying, and this book aims to help those people, both with philosophy and practicality. It analyzes what "fulfilling work" means and then makes recommendations about how to go about finding it. A short quick read, though one I found full of useful information that I had to put down at times to just take in. Highly recommended, particularly for those seeking a new career path and personal satisfaction.
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  • Dave Emmett
    January 1, 1970
    A nice quick read to help you find work that will be meaningful to you. I really liked the perspective that there isn't one 'right' job for everyone. The goal isn't to discover the best possible thing for you to do, because all other things aren't ideal: he more rationally explains how there are many possible fulfilling careers out there for everyone, the key is using your current context to find the option that will work right now.
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  • Sippy
    January 1, 1970
    Nice concise little book about making your way to meaningful work. The only thingI was less impressed with was the natural assumption and the talk about combining work/careers with families. I am sure it is relevant to many but to me it was just unwanted noise taking away the focus. Other than that, I liked it a lot and finished it within a day.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars...Some of this is conjecture and opinion that won't necessarily apply to everyone, but I gave this book the bump to 5 stars because I would recommend it to anyone looking for career change. Good mix of wisdom, common sense, and reframing of cultural fears..practical exercises in getting started. Read the 2013 version, because it appears to be slightly expanded.
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  • Sarah Evan
    January 1, 1970
    Very neat examination of the concept of work, and stories of individuals who found fulfilling work through various modes. Also, what it means for work to be fulfilling and some trial-and-error experiences to learn from!
  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    If you're at a crossroads (like I am) this is well worth a butchers...
  • Keriann
    January 1, 1970
    Targeted at people with highly paid, unfulfilling jobs, but a thought-provoking read for all of us. I very much like the idea of the "radical sabbatical".
  • Keith Brooks
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommended . Lots of wisdom here .
  • Alan Fricker
    January 1, 1970
    A short read but worth the time. Ways of thinking about work and ways to explore thinking about what work could be.
  • Rui Mesquita
    January 1, 1970
    Good book to change some perspectives on the intersection between life and work.
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