Marxism And Politics
This readable survey of Marxist political theory and key texts by seminal thinkers including Marx, Engels, and Lenin highlights formative concepts and debates within Marxist thought. The argument is presented that a democratic socialism can defend and extend freedoms and thereby remove class distinctions. This introduction considers the nature of class conflict, the proposed defense of the old order, and the possibilities for reform and revolution.About the Author:Ralph Miliband was a professor of politics at the London School of Economics, Leeds University, and York University. He was a founding editor of the Socialist Editor and the author of Socialism for a Skeptical Age.

Marxism And Politics Details

TitleMarxism And Politics
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 16th, 1978
PublisherOxford University Press, USA
ISBN-139780198760627
Rating
GenrePolitics, Philosophy, Nonfiction

Marxism And Politics Review

  • Micah
    January 1, 1970
    this book is fantastic. Miliband is GOAT
  • Daniel Cheng
    January 1, 1970
    Ralph Miliband’s main goal in Marxism and Politics is to string together a theory of politics from the writings of Marx, Engels, and Lenin. While the text occasionally reads like a lit review and is not a comprehensive theory, the book is nonetheless impressive in how it compiles the scattered writings of all of these authors in order to produce a number of coherent theses on Marxist politics.Probably most interesting here is his view of the state. Marxism is notoriously weak at theorizing the s Ralph Miliband’s main goal in Marxism and Politics is to string together a theory of politics from the writings of Marx, Engels, and Lenin. While the text occasionally reads like a lit review and is not a comprehensive theory, the book is nonetheless impressive in how it compiles the scattered writings of all of these authors in order to produce a number of coherent theses on Marxist politics.Probably most interesting here is his view of the state. Marxism is notoriously weak at theorizing the state and this still remains a notable gap in Marxist theory. After going through the typical instrumentalist and resource arguments, he offers a structural explanation for why the state must support the capitalism. Because of the state’s position within the capitalist mode of production, it must support the system as a whole. Capitalism creates its own “rationality,” i.e. its own set of rules that determine which decisions will be or not be rational. Because the state’s goal is always to maintain law and order, its actions are greatly limited by this rationality and the logic of capitalism.This structuralist explanation moves away from the instrumentalist view in which the state simply takes marching orders from the capitalist class. As Miliband concisely states: “While the state does act… on behalf of the ‘ruling class,’ it does not for the most part act at its behest.” It is precisely this autonomy from the capitalist class that gives the state its special function in acting for them, but not by simply carrying out their commands. The state offers reforms that ultimately preserve the system, even when the capitalist class is kicking and screaming about them. While capitalists are trying to win the game, the state makes sure that the rules don’t change. Because capitalists are so narrowly focused on their own profits, they can’t see when the system itself is at risk. Making sure that the capitalist mode of production and the fundamentals of its social relations remain in place is the goal of the state.Throughout the rest of the text, Miliband goes through some of the big questions in Marxism: What is the relation between class and party? Reform or revolution? Miliband has great insights into all of these questions and largely draws upon the debates occurring within the Second International. Overall, this book comes highly recommended. It’s marvelously easy to read and is useful for both newcomers to Marxism, as well as those who have torn through Marx’s oeuvre/
    more
  • Sean Estelle
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this! Clear, relatively accessible language, a set amount of topics to cover rather than trying to survey the totality of Marxist politics, and a rigorous insistence on being grounded in reality rather than “being led astray by sloganeering”. Highly recommend for anyone grappling with questions of the state and how to build an organization that can represent the working class.
    more
  • laura
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting and engaging read. It flows naturally, more so than other books similar that I have read. There doesn't seem to be much in the way of a conclusion, but as I prefer to be presented with arguments and think about them critically on my own anyway this suited me. ANOTHER POINT TO THE MILIFANDOM TBH
    more
  • Steve Hart
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must read on leftist politics. Really enjoyable.
Write a review