How Not to Worry
How to defeat stress, worry, and anxiety to achieve more in business and life. From the international bestselling author of Self-Confidence.Are You A Worrier?Do you seem to worry more than most? Do you find that insignificant things stress you out? Do you sweat the small stuff and the big stuff too? Well, now's the time to stop worrying and start living.Worry, stress, anxiety - whichever label you prefer to use - can have consequences that impact not only our lives, but the lives of others around us. When we worry it's like the engine of our mind is constantly being revved up. It doesn't allow us time to switch off and rest. It tires you out. And when you're tired you're less likely to think straight. And when you're not thinking straight it's easy to make stupid mistakes and confuse priorities...But relax. There is a way forward.In How Not to Worry Paul McGee shows us that there is a way to tackle life's challenges in a calmer and more considered way. It is possible to use a certain degree of worry and anxiety to spur us on towards positive, constructive action, and then leave the rest behind. With down to earth, real life advice, How Not to Worry helps us understand why worrying is such a big deal and the reasons for it, exposing the behavioural traps we fall into when faced with challenges. It then helps us to move on with tools and ideas to deal with our worries in a more constructive way.

How Not to Worry Details

TitleHow Not to Worry
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 7th, 2012
PublisherCapstone
ISBN-139780857082862
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Psychology

How Not to Worry Review

  • Michael Huang
    January 1, 1970
    The solution the author gives is basically this: stop worrying and think. If you can help the situation do it. If not why do you worry.
  • chantel nouseforaname
    January 1, 1970
    The magic of this book is in its simplicity and truth speak. It's not telling you anything new or unheard of, but it does so in a way that's approachable and doesn't pull any punches. As a counselor and women's workshop facilitator, I love self-improvement texts and this one is a 5-star effort in its ability to be straight up and encourage real world, no bullshit self-reflection.
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  • ✟Roxanne✟(Death by Book Avalanche) ☠
    January 1, 1970
    What a great book! I highly recommend it to people who struggle with anxiety and worry. I gave this book such a high rating as I was able to relate to it and I very much took to the dry, sarcastic humour of the author, I found myself laughing out loud on several occasions. I liked the activities that were included so you could turn the advice into something more practical to see if it works for you. The 'Hammock Time' was also very good I thought, it allowed self reflection at the end of each ch What a great book! I highly recommend it to people who struggle with anxiety and worry. I gave this book such a high rating as I was able to relate to it and I very much took to the dry, sarcastic humour of the author, I found myself laughing out loud on several occasions. I liked the activities that were included so you could turn the advice into something more practical to see if it works for you. The 'Hammock Time' was also very good I thought, it allowed self reflection at the end of each chapter. Overall, I was very impressed with this book.
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  • David Algeo
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant book giving a straight forward view of worrying and how to overcome it. Paul, in his usual humourous and non 'happy clappy' style provides a great tool for those of us plagues with this problem. Here's my video review - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39Ctg...
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  • Felipe CZ
    January 1, 1970
    A book that can become a helpful roadmap for defeating stress. It makes you realize the importance of confronting the cause of our worries, whether from past experiences or fear of the unknown; the first step is to have awareness by asking yourself where is your worry coming from; next, sort your worry into situational (anxiety happening in the present), anticipatory (stress thinking about the future) or residual (from the past, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder); then analyzing worries to understa A book that can become a helpful roadmap for defeating stress. It makes you realize the importance of confronting the cause of our worries, whether from past experiences or fear of the unknown; the first step is to have awareness by asking yourself where is your worry coming from; next, sort your worry into situational (anxiety happening in the present), anticipatory (stress thinking about the future) or residual (from the past, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder); then analyzing worries to understand their root cause and finally, taking action and focusing on outcomes that we can influence. We must change our personal worry triggers, and stop trying to please others, instead, learn to ask for help.
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  • Karen Broughton
    January 1, 1970
    I was introduced to the SUMO way of thinking after going on a short SUMO course early in the year, it's probably the single best thing ive done in all my life and is having the biggest positive impact in my life. This is the second book of Paul Mcghee's ive read , i love them. The language, the style and the theories it seems to have a really hit a nerve. There really is a different way of dealing with anxieties and worry. The best news of all the advice/small changes he suggests are actually do I was introduced to the SUMO way of thinking after going on a short SUMO course early in the year, it's probably the single best thing ive done in all my life and is having the biggest positive impact in my life. This is the second book of Paul Mcghee's ive read , i love them. The language, the style and the theories it seems to have a really hit a nerve. There really is a different way of dealing with anxieties and worry. The best news of all the advice/small changes he suggests are actually doable. I highly reccommend Paul Mcghee's books.
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  • Joey Doughty
    January 1, 1970
    How Not to Worry is a relatively short and interesting read. It makes a few interesting points about why we worry, but I didn't put the book down feeling like I came away with any new knowledge about...how not to worry. It's worth reading, just don't expect much.
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  • rachel whitelaw
    January 1, 1970
    From a worry wart......Some very sound and sensible advice within. I'm a constant worry wart and relish books like this that make me feel entirely normal and sane! All positive and encouraging. A must read if your stressed anxious or just in need of a cuddle from a book! Perfect
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  • Synthia Salomon
    January 1, 1970
    Tackle your problems head on. Read this book!
  • Richard Bowman
    January 1, 1970
    Useful information, glad I read it...but a bit too simplistic an approach.
  • Sheryl Faith
    January 1, 1970
    stress less, worry less...
  • Aditya Jain
    January 1, 1970
    The book presents the points that we already know but in a more convincing manner which makes it easy to act upon worry.
  • Zackr
    January 1, 1970
    An absolutely amazing book for people who worry a lot or who want to know why we worry and how to quit a lot of unhealthy worrying.
  • Emmanuel Ayeni
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting book about analysing your worries and taking care of it once and for all
  • Carina Herrmann
    January 1, 1970
    Very superficial tipps and recommendations. No deeper insights for me unfortunately. If this is the very first time you read about worries and anxiety, this might help you as stepping stone to go deeper afterwards.
  • Efua Ok
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty good book. I didn’t take any new knowledge out of this book but it was great at reminding me on what I already knew.To beat anxiety picture yourself as one of your heros.
  • Damaskcat
    January 1, 1970
    Divided into two sections – Section One – Understand and Section Two – Move on – this is an interesting book for those of us who find we dwell on things far too much. Some people worry about what might happen and others worry about what has happened. A certain amount of worry could be necessary but too much can spoil your enjoyment in life and wear you down so that you feel stressed all the time which is not good for you either mentally or physically.Understanding why we worry can help us along Divided into two sections – Section One – Understand and Section Two – Move on – this is an interesting book for those of us who find we dwell on things far too much. Some people worry about what might happen and others worry about what has happened. A certain amount of worry could be necessary but too much can spoil your enjoyment in life and wear you down so that you feel stressed all the time which is not good for you either mentally or physically.Understanding why we worry can help us along the path of reducing or even eliminating our worries. Making a concerted effort to stop ourselves worrying where worry will serve no useful purpose using the techniques described in this book may well help us to enjoy life again instead of being weighed down by our worries. The book describes how we use the three ‘As’ to tackle our worries – Awareness of what exactly we’re worrying about; Analysis of our worries – where we look at the subject of our worries in a rational way. This could include looking back at events form our past which may be over-influencing the present worry. The third ‘A’ is action – and helps us look at what actions we can take to address our worry and maybe eliminate it entirely.I found the book interesting and informative and if you are a worrier – or think you are a worrier – then this book can probably help you reduce the worry you feel on a regular basis. Even though I don’t consider myself to be a worrier I found the book gave me food for thought. There is a list of further reading for those interested in the subject and various books and websites are mentioned in the text.
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  • Dorthe
    January 1, 1970
    I am certain this book can be very helpful to people who have never thought about how they think, and I admit to a smile or two over some of the sillier examples. But ...Here's The Real Truth: you can flog a phrase to death and make the reader (or listener) in turn want to beat you with a stick the hundred-and-third time you use it.
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  • Sian Powell
    January 1, 1970
    A good book explaining why we worry, what effect it has on us and examines some of the things we worry about. It then gives some good advice on how to stop worrying. Some is common sense but I think it helps to have these things reinforced. I listened to this on audio - it might be better to have as a book you can flick through when you need it.
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  • Lynette
    January 1, 1970
    Simple, straight to the point no nonsense advice. Loved it.
  • Jennifer Davy
    January 1, 1970
    If you are stressed, you worry and have anxiety issues...this book is actually AMAZING. I found it so helpful.
  • Samantha Grigg
    January 1, 1970
    Starts off promising but I lost interest after the middle, and I was hoping it would help me.
  • Felice
    January 1, 1970
    Helpfull if you're open-minded, good writing
  • Bruce
    January 1, 1970
    Stick with it until halfway. Very conversational, speaker-oriented.
  • GM
    January 1, 1970
    The key message in these blinks:Worry, stress and anxiety are part of a cycle that’s bad for your health and happiness. The best way to get out of this feedback loop is to analyze the source and nature of your worries. Once you begin categorizing them, you can sort out baseless and unhelpful worries and start doing something about the things you can actually influence.Actionable advice:Hit the gym or take a hike to beat your worries.There’s nothing like exercise as a remedy for anxiety. Getting The key message in these blinks:Worry, stress and anxiety are part of a cycle that’s bad for your health and happiness. The best way to get out of this feedback loop is to analyze the source and nature of your worries. Once you begin categorizing them, you can sort out baseless and unhelpful worries and start doing something about the things you can actually influence.Actionable advice:Hit the gym or take a hike to beat your worries.There’s nothing like exercise as a remedy for anxiety. Getting your blood pumping improves your circulation and releases natural opiates called endorphins, leaving you feeling cooler, calmer and – most importantly ­– happier. And once you’re in that state, you’re ready to start tackling your problems head-on rather than simply fretting away at them.
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