In a Glass Grimmly (A Tale Dark & Grimm, #2)
More Grimm tales await in the harrowing, hilarious companion to a beloved new classicTake caution ahead—Oversize plant life, eerie amphibious royalty, and fear-inducing creatures abound.Lest you enter with dread.Follow Jack and Jill as they enter startling new landscapes that may (or may not) be scary, bloody, terrifying, and altogether true.Step lively, dear reader . . .Happily ever after isn’t cutting it anymore.In this companion novel to Adam Gidwitz’s widely acclaimed, award-winning debut, A Tale Dark & Grimm, Jack and Jill explore a new set of tales from the Brothers Grimm and others, including Jack and the Beanstalk and The Frog Prince.

In a Glass Grimmly (A Tale Dark & Grimm, #2) Details

TitleIn a Glass Grimmly (A Tale Dark & Grimm, #2)
Author
FormatKindle Edition
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 27th, 2012
PublisherDutton Children's Books
Number of pages192 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fairy Tales, Fiction, Young Adult, Childrens, Juvenile, Middle Grade, Magic, Adventure, Humor, Funny

In a Glass Grimmly (A Tale Dark & Grimm, #2) Review

  •  Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)
    May 1, 2012
    Once again, Adam Gidwitz has knocked my socks off. I was skeptical to see what he could do with Jack and Jill, but he more than pleasantly surprised me. I will be very honest. There are a couple of parts of this book that are in no way kid friendly. I mean, I admit I probably read stuff like that when I was twelve, but I would caution a parent to be careful with this book. You might want to read it first and then let your child read it. Or read it together. I'd say that any reader under twelve s Once again, Adam Gidwitz has knocked my socks off. I was skeptical to see what he could do with Jack and Jill, but he more than pleasantly surprised me. I will be very honest. There are a couple of parts of this book that are in no way kid friendly. I mean, I admit I probably read stuff like that when I was twelve, but I would caution a parent to be careful with this book. You might want to read it first and then let your child read it. Or read it together. I'd say that any reader under twelve should be under parental supervision, most definitely.I loved the narration. I strongly recommend getting the audiobook narrated by Johnnie Heller. His narration is perfect and really adds to this book. I challenge you to read this without talking out loud or even shouting or moaning on some parts.This kids wormed their way into my heart and I felt deeply for them. And also Frog, the Frog. My heart was broken for what happened to these three friends. I cheered for them when they accomplished incredible obstacles. I held my breath when they found themselves in some very tight and scary parts. And I was very happy when things worked out for a happy ending. Gidwitz is a person who loves folklore and fairy tales, and it's more than evident. He also has a sometimes twisted, but always funny sense of humor. He seems to stay in touch with the child inside himself. And deep down, there is a very important lesson that spoke to me and no doubt will give young readers something to think about, something very prevalent in this day, with bullying at an all time high. That combination makes him an irresistible writer.This book has just about everything, even a large, fire-breathing salamander named Eddie. If you are curious, you'll just have to read the book. That's no hardship, although I will warn you, don't start eating when you read the part where Jack and Jill enter the Giant's Cave. You will regret it!A love letter to young and grown up fans of fairytales, "In a Glass Grimmly" is a worthy follow up to the fantastic book A Tale Dark & Grimm, and I danced a jig when I saw my library had finally gotten this audiobook. It was definitely worth waiting for.
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  • Harper Averitt
    November 1, 2016
    Before I talk about much I like the book I must say that if you don't like gruesome, scary, at some point (around 10 or younger or sensitive people) the book my get night mere worthy, but if you have no problem with that, then go ahead and read it... all of them because there great.Also, (I learned this the hard way) don't read the scary parts at night and if you get to a scary part and its 10:00 at night and then please just stop, but if you just can't put the book down, then when your done I r Before I talk about much I like the book I must say that if you don't like gruesome, scary, at some point (around 10 or younger or sensitive people) the book my get night mere worthy, but if you have no problem with that, then go ahead and read it... all of them because there great.Also, (I learned this the hard way) don't read the scary parts at night and if you get to a scary part and its 10:00 at night and then please just stop, but if you just can't put the book down, then when your done I recommend getting a book that will get your mind off of it, or get a book thats made for 2nd gradersI loved this book, but I do like the 1st and 3rd book a little better, because the 1st one makes more since in way (not that this does't) and the 3rd has a little more humor in the book. I also think the 1st and second one run a little more smoothly, but this one I think was great in its own way, but i cant say much otherwise i might spoil some things. Another plus is that you don't have to read the books in order (even though I did) nothing connected, so you should be good.
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  • Cathy/The Crazy Bookworm
    November 10, 2012
    I absolutely adore Fairytale re-tellings. Sometimes there is nothing better than curling up and visiting an old, favourite tale with a new spin.This book was wonderful in so many different ways. Firstly, it was hilarious! The author's little interruptions throughout the story was a perfect touch. I couldn't help but imagine a British story teller living in a cottage, reading these stories and bringing them to life. The authors ability to make these tales come alive in such a unique and edgy way I absolutely adore Fairytale re-tellings. Sometimes there is nothing better than curling up and visiting an old, favourite tale with a new spin.This book was wonderful in so many different ways. Firstly, it was hilarious! The author's little interruptions throughout the story was a perfect touch. I couldn't help but imagine a British story teller living in a cottage, reading these stories and bringing them to life. The authors ability to make these tales come alive in such a unique and edgy way was so charming. Secondly, the spin on old classics. I am familiar with the grimm versions and the children versions of most fairy tales. There is now a great new category; The Adam Gitwitz version. He took each story and each character and gave them a little umph. He packaged the novel with a beautiful writing style that flowed so perfectly.I haven't read A Tale Dark and Grimm yet, but it won't be long before I do. I adored the author's presentation and twist on these classic tales. In A Glass Grimmly is perfect for those nights when all you want to do is curl up and indulge in a book. You will get lost with these mystical creatures and characters. In a Glass Grimmly is definitely a novel you don't want to miss out on!
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  • Mike (the Paladin)
    March 5, 2015
    This is the second in a series of books that takes it's cue from the fact that the "original" versions of fairy tales were in fact pretty dark and bloody. They were cautionary tales meant to warn children away from "risky" or "naughty" behavior. They were meant to encourage hard work and diligence as well as listening to one's elders.Thus we get match girls dying in the snow, snow queens snatching youngsters away, "Big Bad Wolves" wolfing down girls in red hoods, witches that eat children and so This is the second in a series of books that takes it's cue from the fact that the "original" versions of fairy tales were in fact pretty dark and bloody. They were cautionary tales meant to warn children away from "risky" or "naughty" behavior. They were meant to encourage hard work and diligence as well as listening to one's elders.Thus we get match girls dying in the snow, snow queens snatching youngsters away, "Big Bad Wolves" wolfing down girls in red hoods, witches that eat children and so on. These stories gathered or written by Anderson or the Grimms (along with others) were indeed..."cautionary" Thus for more modern children they have been cleaned up...made more palatable.Adam Gidwitz takes this, builds on it and adds a touch of humor...slightly dark humor...but humor.***Buy th3e way, yes I like to use 3 dots (...) I think it often expresses more. Just added that in case it bothers you...or in case the English teacher from Up the Down Staircase is reading this.***Anyway, I liked this book but I liked this one not so much as the first. It's not that there was anything really wrong with it. It just didn't draw me. Maybe the blush was off the rose. It just wasn't new to me any more??? I don't know. Any way not a bad book, even enjoyable. Maybe try it yourself i see a lot of people like all these. Maybe I'll drop back later and pick up others.
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  • Taylor
    November 2, 2015
    I didn't really like this book as much as A Tale Dark and Grimm. I thought it went fast at some points, slow and descriptive at others. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone who doesn't like gross stuff. If it was like a Tale Dark and Grimm I would recommend it, but it wasn't my favorite.
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  • Barbara
    November 12, 2012
    I liked the author's earlier title A Tale Dark & Grimm very much, and I also enjoyed this one although just a tad less. Maybe that was because I recognized the book's message about self-empowerment almost from the opening pages. The reminders to rely on ourselves and to look no further than ourselves for our self-esteem are important ones for anyone, but they simply seemed too obvious to me. As in its companion title, the book is filled with magic, violence, and descriptive passages intended I liked the author's earlier title A Tale Dark & Grimm very much, and I also enjoyed this one although just a tad less. Maybe that was because I recognized the book's message about self-empowerment almost from the opening pages. The reminders to rely on ourselves and to look no further than ourselves for our self-esteem are important ones for anyone, but they simply seemed too obvious to me. As in its companion title, the book is filled with magic, violence, and descriptive passages intended to curl the hair of many readers. I like how the stories of the Frog, Jack, and Jill all come together, and the humor provided by the Frog, who complains and nags during much of their travels. Drawing from the Brothers Grimm, Mother Goose, Hans Christian Andersen, and adding his own stories, the author skillfully navigates the literary landscape of folktales and fairy tales to craft a tale that ends happily ever after. Although some reviewers have complained about the intrusive narrator, I enjoyed the intrusion since it mirrors what good oral storytellers do, providing hints that keep listeners--and in this case, readers--hanging on to their every word and building tension. If the title prompts readers to seek out the original stories on which this one has been built, so much the better.
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  • NaomiRuth
    June 12, 2012
    I loved the first book, A Tale Dark and Grim, so, so much. I was at BEA and saw the poster for this companion novel (which I did not know was coming out) and started squealing and jumping and pointing and my sister was pretending NOT to know me.Later we went back to the Penguin booth to pick up an ARC and I immediately began reading it.It is funny, it is thought-provoking, it's a story well-told. I love how Gidwitz wraps together so many stories into one cohesive whole. And I loved the talking f I loved the first book, A Tale Dark and Grim, so, so much. I was at BEA and saw the poster for this companion novel (which I did not know was coming out) and started squealing and jumping and pointing and my sister was pretending NOT to know me.Later we went back to the Penguin booth to pick up an ARC and I immediately began reading it.It is funny, it is thought-provoking, it's a story well-told. I love how Gidwitz wraps together so many stories into one cohesive whole. And I loved the talking frog. It was a magical read and I can't wait to make sure all of my friends read him. I definitely recommend picking it up when it comes out in September. And in the meantime, if you haven't read his first book what are you waiting for? Go read it now! :D
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  • Dolly
    November 16, 2012
    We read A Tale Dark & Grimm almost two years ago and our oldest still refers to it as one of her favorites. So when we discovered that there was a sequel (or as it's described on the cover, a 'companion' book), we just had to read it.Instead of reading this book together, our oldest read it first and then I read it. We both read our favorite parts aloud and our youngest was intrigued, but not enough to read it on her own (at least not yet.) It's a quick, entertaining read.This book has much We read A Tale Dark & Grimm almost two years ago and our oldest still refers to it as one of her favorites. So when we discovered that there was a sequel (or as it's described on the cover, a 'companion' book), we just had to read it.Instead of reading this book together, our oldest read it first and then I read it. We both read our favorite parts aloud and our youngest was intrigued, but not enough to read it on her own (at least not yet.) It's a quick, entertaining read.This book has much of the charm of the first. It was a great book, filled with fantastic and action-filled stories that were gruesome, but exciting. I have read some about children's ability to detach the written story from reality and be relatively unaffected by gore (more so than with movies and other visual media.) And I believe it. I think the author's sporadic 'conversation' with the reader helps to break up the drama and adds some levity to the dark tale. Overall, these are fun books that are far more true to the original fairy tales than are the typical children's book fare. The gore and violence are there, but I love that the author emphasizes the fact that "buried in these rhymes and tales are true stories, of true children, who fought through the darkest of times, and came out the other end -- stronger, braver, and, usually, completely covered in blood." interesting quotes:"Perhaps you know that one of the greatest dangers in life is growing up very pretty." (p. 10)"I'd say that all mirrors are magic, or can be. They show you yourself, after all. Really seeing yourself, though -- that's the hard part." (p. 310)new words: imprecations, syncopation
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  • Brenda
    January 7, 2013
    Once upon a time, there were two cousins, and well a frog who has three-legs instead of four, because of well an unfortunate accident. You see these two cousins get themselves in a little predicament when they swear on their lives that they can retrieve a glass that has been lost for a very long time. It's a good thing that Frog comes along and they have some help from three ravens, otherwise things would be really grim. Their journey will take them through some famous fairy tales, nursery rhym Once upon a time, there were two cousins, and well a frog who has three-legs instead of four, because of well an unfortunate accident. You see these two cousins get themselves in a little predicament when they swear on their lives that they can retrieve a glass that has been lost for a very long time. It's a good thing that Frog comes along and they have some help from three ravens, otherwise things would be really grim. Their journey will take them through some famous fairy tales, nursery rhymes with some legends and poems weaved in as well. I loved the flow of the story with the plot moving along seamlessly. The overall messages weren't preachy but came in the form of words etched onto the Glass and in the three ravens message to Jack and Jill about being "con-fused." Another strength for me was the character development with Frog being one of my favorite. The narrator in the first story was more intrusive with all of his warnings about the gruesome things to come, and in this one was more subtle and well, absentminded at times and way more amusing when he forgot certain things that he wanted to warn about. The result, is a book that for me was remarkable, humorous and a 5/5 book. I also loved the authors notes at the end of the book telling the reader where the different stories came from in the book. Bonus it also introduced me to my new favorite word...the tunnel turned "precipitously." Plus the quote "I'd say that all mirrors are magic, or can be. They show you yourself, after all. Really seeing yourself, though -- that's the hard part." (p. 310)Just for the record, copy of the book provided by Penguin publishing and won at Charlotteslibrary.blogspot. A big thank you to both
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  • Cleo
    December 19, 2012
    In a Glass Grimmly is the companion to A Tale Dark and Grimm. It just came out this fall, and I loved it just as much. It follows Jack and Jill, two royal cousins, along with a talking three-legged frog, as they travel and experience (you guessed it) ever more bloody things. Adam Gidwitz's sharp humor is again apparent in this second book. The funny thing is, though in both books, he's always warning you about the bloody parts, they're not actually that bloody or disgusting. I'm sure in real lif In a Glass Grimmly is the companion to A Tale Dark and Grimm. It just came out this fall, and I loved it just as much. It follows Jack and Jill, two royal cousins, along with a talking three-legged frog, as they travel and experience (you guessed it) ever more bloody things. Adam Gidwitz's sharp humor is again apparent in this second book. The funny thing is, though in both books, he's always warning you about the bloody parts, they're not actually that bloody or disgusting. I'm sure in real life, they would be, but in the novel (at least for me), you just don't feel that disgusted.In a Glass Grimmly was slightly better, I think, than A Tale Dark and Grimm. There are less witty asides from the narrator of the book, which are perhaps the funniest things to read. There are still plenty of them, though, and the book is structured much the same way, with each new chapter beginning, "once upon a time", but the story itself is better.My favorite part of the book may just have been when Jill outwits the giants by having an eating contest and pouring the porridge into a blanket. The ruse is discovered, but she has more tricks up her sleeve. I won't give it ac\way, but it was pretty funny. But then Jack gets mad that she saved them from the mess he got them into and falls down and breaks his head. Oops. I probably shouldn't have told you that. But don't worry. He recovers. Overall, this book is less bloody and has more "life lessons", like telling you to love yourself, just the way you are. Whenever they get in trouble, either Jack saves them, or Jill, or the frog, or they all work together to save each other.In a Glass Grimmly is written in the same vein as A Tale Dark and Grimm, and I would highly recommend it.wwww.novareviews.blogspot.com
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  • Teresa
    July 23, 2012
    A satisfying follow-up to A Tale Dark & Grimm, which has a dedicated fan club of young boys (and girls, too, but the boys are especially avid) in our town, since one of our middle school teachers read it to all of his classes. ATD&G had a lot of recovering-from-REALLY-horrible-parenting (cutting-off- heads-horrible--remember, these are the GRIMM fairy tales we're talking about). In a Glass... goes on to the next logical issue--when your parents have failed you, how do you go on and find A satisfying follow-up to A Tale Dark & Grimm, which has a dedicated fan club of young boys (and girls, too, but the boys are especially avid) in our town, since one of our middle school teachers read it to all of his classes. ATD&G had a lot of recovering-from-REALLY-horrible-parenting (cutting-off- heads-horrible--remember, these are the GRIMM fairy tales we're talking about). In a Glass... goes on to the next logical issue--when your parents have failed you, how do you go on and find out who you really are? How do your choices bring you closer to whomever you are meant to be? As in ATD&G, Gidwitz weaves probably-(hopefully!) familiar tales together with his own new bits, and helpfully explains the origins of the pieces in an afterword. Some are folktales, some are literary (e.g. Hans Christian Andersen). The mostly-helpful narrator is back, warning of the particularly scary or gross bits, of which there are many; it's usually beforehand, but occasionally after ("Jeez! My bad! Sorry!"). These stories and images get into your head and stay there, in a good way.Young fans will be ecstatic.
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  • Mary Kate
    January 30, 2013
    I have to say this book was good but I do not think Adam will ever be able to top A Tale Dark and Grimm. So we have all heard that boring old nursery rhyme about jack and Jill going up a hill right?WRONGAdam tells us what really happened and I bet you've never heard the story with deadly mermaids, stupid giants, a giant salamander, a three legged frog , and the rest of the crazy characters in this story. While the story may be exciting and a bit gory and gross it is really teaching us a lesson. I have to say this book was good but I do not think Adam will ever be able to top A Tale Dark and Grimm. So we have all heard that boring old nursery rhyme about jack and Jill going up a hill right?WRONGAdam tells us what really happened and I bet you've never heard the story with deadly mermaids, stupid giants, a giant salamander, a three legged frog , and the rest of the crazy characters in this story. While the story may be exciting and a bit gory and gross it is really teaching us a lesson. Think about what you want, you may not really want it maybe you just want to fit in really badly but is that really what you want? Will that really make you happy? Look at the important things in life and what will make you happy not just get you approved or what you THINK will make you happyBravo yet again for another great novel!If you like some cheesy gross or creepy stuff here and there this may be the book for you but don't pick it up thinking its all out blood and gore. You may even want to pick this up if your not into all that stuff maybe your kind of just looking for a funny twisted fairy tale.thats what I was looking for and boy did this book deliver. :)
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  • Shelby
    May 30, 2016
    4 Stars! I enjoyed this one better than the frist one. I thought this one was a little a bit better then the first one. I thought there was more adventure to it then the first one.
  • Zander Cook
    November 20, 2015
    THIS BOOK WAS TERRIBLE! IT WASN'T EVEN SCARY OR FUNNY! TOTALLY NOT WORTH READING EVER AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!
  • Thomas K
    March 5, 2017
    In a Glass of Grimmly is a book about a boy and girl named Jack and Jill. Jill runs away from her mother's kingdom from embarrassment incident. Jill doesn't know where else to go to except her cousin Jack's house. Jack also wants to run away because his father beats him and curses at him. Jack and Jill start out on their journey. First, they meet an old man who gives them magic beans. Next, they meet an elderly women who tells them to find a legendary glass that will give them extraordinary powe In a Glass of Grimmly is a book about a boy and girl named Jack and Jill. Jill runs away from her mother's kingdom from embarrassment incident. Jill doesn't know where else to go to except her cousin Jack's house. Jack also wants to run away because his father beats him and curses at him. Jack and Jill start out on their journey. First, they meet an old man who gives them magic beans. Next, they meet an elderly women who tells them to find a legendary glass that will give them extraordinary powers. As Jack and Jill get closer to finding the glass they discover terrifying secrets. You maybe thinking that this is a usual fairytale with pretty little princess and happy endsings, but you're wrong. This is where princesses throw frogs; mermaids kill children, and a lot of deaths. So get ready for an action packed, skin crawling book. What I liked about this book was the characters. They were well thought out and had a lot of personalitys. Most of the time I felt a bit disgusted from the characters action. I would recommend this book to people who like odd stories and fairytales. I would not recommend this to people with weak stomachs. I would compare this book to the book The Hunger Games which is also full of suspense and violence.
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  • Eustacia Tan
    May 8, 2013
    Some time in the beginning of this year, I read (and really enjoyed), A Tale Dark and Grimm . So, I searched and found the second book - Through A Glass Grimmly. And it is as good as the first.Just a note for everyone: if you were expecting a sequel (like me), well, expect to be disappointed. True, the characters are named Jack and Jill again, and they're royal, but apart from that, the storyline is completely different.Again, the narrator takes us through various fairytales. And I'm super happy Some time in the beginning of this year, I read (and really enjoyed), A Tale Dark and Grimm . So, I searched and found the second book - Through A Glass Grimmly. And it is as good as the first.Just a note for everyone: if you were expecting a sequel (like me), well, expect to be disappointed. True, the characters are named Jack and Jill again, and they're royal, but apart from that, the storyline is completely different.Again, the narrator takes us through various fairytales. And I'm super happy to note that Christina Rosetti's (check spelling) Goblin Market (link leads to download page at Project Guternberg), which was an awesome poem. Yes, it's a poem (but it's accessible and awesome).To me, Jack and Jill undergo a lot more growth in this book compared to A Tale Dark and Grimm. In the previous book, Jack and Jill leave because they think they're parents don't love them (I...shalln't give you the spoilers), and so embark on their adventures. But in this book, true, Jack and Jill have issues with their parents (and Jack has issues with about every boy in the villange), but what prompts their adventures would be a quest. And I think because of the quest, there was much more character developement.There is also one more main character - the talking frog, who serves as the ignored voice of reason. He's an awesome and likable frog though, and in the end, he's the one that enables Jack and Jill to complete their quest successfully.Finally, the narrator. The narrator makes it very obvious that this isn't a saccharine sweet fairy-tale retelling. But, he also makes it obvious that this book is for kids. So it's not one of those "adult fairy-tale retellings" that seem to be the pre-requisite to turn anything dark, this book recognises that kids can handle dark and scary tales and gives it to them in spades.I cannot reccomend this book enough. It's awesome(:This review was first published at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile
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  • Jess
    October 19, 2013
    Dark and witty, just the way I like my authors. As a child, I ravenously consumed two volumes that I found on the family bookshelves: Andersen's Fairy Tales and Grimm's Fairy Tales. These were the original, gritty versions of the stories, not sanitized or princessified. Thus started my love of folk stories, in both their original forms and modern re-written (but not dumbed-down) forms. Gidwitz is clearly a kindred spirit. He has a wicked, sarcastic sense of humor that delights even as the charac Dark and witty, just the way I like my authors. As a child, I ravenously consumed two volumes that I found on the family bookshelves: Andersen's Fairy Tales and Grimm's Fairy Tales. These were the original, gritty versions of the stories, not sanitized or princessified. Thus started my love of folk stories, in both their original forms and modern re-written (but not dumbed-down) forms. Gidwitz is clearly a kindred spirit. He has a wicked, sarcastic sense of humor that delights even as the characters in his books meet hideous ends. While he writes for the juvenile fiction crowd, adults with twisted senses of humor and a love of authentic fairy tales will also enjoy his stories and appreciate the way he uses their common themes to bring them together into one story. In this, the second book, he pulls Andersen's tales into the mix. Highly recommended for kids and adults with wry senses of humor and some experience with the original tales. (While familiarity with the tales isn't necessary, it certainly makes the reading more fun.) My son read the first book at age 8 and continues to enjoy this series at almost-11.
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  • Kat Heckenbach
    March 23, 2014
    I have to say, this book did not wow me the way the first in the series (A Tale Dark and Grimm) did. It didn't seem to have nearly the level of dark nor the...personality. I know there were a lot of reviews out there for the first one that complained about the dark and gore, and the narrator intrusion, but those were the things that really appealed to me. They set the book apart. Anyway, this time I did enjoy the story, but I didn't have that "couldn't put it down" feeling I had with the first b I have to say, this book did not wow me the way the first in the series (A Tale Dark and Grimm) did. It didn't seem to have nearly the level of dark nor the...personality. I know there were a lot of reviews out there for the first one that complained about the dark and gore, and the narrator intrusion, but those were the things that really appealed to me. They set the book apart. Anyway, this time I did enjoy the story, but I didn't have that "couldn't put it down" feeling I had with the first book. I'll probably read the third one, just to round out the series, but I'll check it out from the library rather than buying it this time. My WebsiteFind me on FacebookMy YA fantasy series:book 1 book 2
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  • Holly
    April 17, 2012
    3.5 stars. I didn't listen to the audio version of this one, but I still heard the voice of the audio version of A Tale Dark and Grimm in my head. This one still has the humorous narrator popping in to warn the reader of the upcoming violence and mayhem. I laughed aloud just like I did while listening to the first one. However, I think this one might have gone a bit overboard with the gross factor. My students (especially boys) liked it just as much, though, and they are the ultimate judges of c 3.5 stars. I didn't listen to the audio version of this one, but I still heard the voice of the audio version of A Tale Dark and Grimm in my head. This one still has the humorous narrator popping in to warn the reader of the upcoming violence and mayhem. I laughed aloud just like I did while listening to the first one. However, I think this one might have gone a bit overboard with the gross factor. My students (especially boys) liked it just as much, though, and they are the ultimate judges of children's literature. This one features Jack and Jill and alludes to well known tales such as "The Emperor's New Clothes," "Snow White," and Mother Goose rhymes. But there are more obscure references, too, which Gidwitz explains at the end. I loved that he even used a Car Talk story as a source. The title and story structure reflects a scripture verse! So if you want to teach your students to pay attention to allusions and have fun with fractured tales, Gidwitz's books are for you (and all the boys in your class)!
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  • Talabrsn
    October 30, 2013
    After making a deal with a old lady, Jack and Jill set off on a journey that makes them go to many different places. They go to the clouds where they meet a group of giants that must be out smarted with upchuck. From there they journey to the sea only to find a very pretty cruel mermaid and then on to the goblin market where truth is not appreciated and also life. Lastly they find themselves underground where they befriend an very big salamander who smells absolutely terrible and that is on the After making a deal with a old lady, Jack and Jill set off on a journey that makes them go to many different places. They go to the clouds where they meet a group of giants that must be out smarted with upchuck. From there they journey to the sea only to find a very pretty cruel mermaid and then on to the goblin market where truth is not appreciated and also life. Lastly they find themselves underground where they befriend an very big salamander who smells absolutely terrible and that is on the outside before they go in his stomach to get back a lost treasure. The first book is about Hansel and Gretel through multiple Grimm fairytales this book is about cousins Jack and Jill through more story's of Grimm and Anderson tales and Mother goose story's I think that this book was not as good as its first one but is still very thrill-seeking. One of the reasons this is one of my favorite books of all time is because of the fantasy and thrilling book. I recommend this book to people that like fantasy and thrillers.
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  • Meredith
    October 8, 2012
    I met Adam Gidwitz. Yes, I'm bragging, yes, he was great. Super cute (which never hurts), very funny, and an engaging speaker who was both entertaining for adults and perfect for kids. I think that Adam Gidwitz must be the perfect mix of grownup and child. I'm not explaining it well, but when you read his books, you know what I mean. His books are wonderful stories about childhood, with enough gore and horror to satisfy even the most bloody-minded of us, and enough truth to make me cry. When he I met Adam Gidwitz. Yes, I'm bragging, yes, he was great. Super cute (which never hurts), very funny, and an engaging speaker who was both entertaining for adults and perfect for kids. I think that Adam Gidwitz must be the perfect mix of grownup and child. I'm not explaining it well, but when you read his books, you know what I mean. His books are wonderful stories about childhood, with enough gore and horror to satisfy even the most bloody-minded of us, and enough truth to make me cry. When he signed my copy of this book after a nice chat about how his first book made me cry, he wrote that he hoped this book made me cry too. He succeeded. I laughed, I cried, I was grossed out, I was nervous, I loved the whole thing. I'm so glad that Adam Gidwitz started writing books.
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  • Yapha
    July 5, 2012
    If you loved a Tale Dark and Grimm, then you must read this companion book. Not a sequel, it explores a different set of fairy tales through different characters, this time Jack and Jill. And while there is a hill and a broken crown, there is much, much more. The complex layers of this story are as rich as the original works that they are based on. It is a must read.
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  • Monica Edinger
    April 16, 2012
    Fairytales, traditional and literary as only Adam Gidwitz can tell them, are awesome. Same sort of structure as A TALE DARK AND GRIMM, but different central characters and different tales, more that are original, I believe. Plenty of gore and vomit... you are warned (by me and the narrator).
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  • Noelia
    July 13, 2016
    I prefer this one over the first book in the series only because it wasn't as corny. I hope the third one is just as good.
  • Kelsey Preston
    November 11, 2014
    Do you like scary, but not so scary books? Well this may be just the book your looking for! The genre of this book is fantasy. I really loved this book and liked it better than the first, A Tale, Dark& Grimm book. I give this book 5 out of 5 stars but will later explain why. The setting of this book takes place in many different places like: Märchen, Goblin Market, Goblin Kingdom, Eddie's Cave, Giants Cave, and a tavern. So mainly I can't put a main seeking because the characters travel to Do you like scary, but not so scary books? Well this may be just the book your looking for! The genre of this book is fantasy. I really loved this book and liked it better than the first, A Tale, Dark& Grimm book. I give this book 5 out of 5 stars but will later explain why. The setting of this book takes place in many different places like: Märchen, Goblin Market, Goblin Kingdom, Eddie's Cave, Giants Cave, and a tavern. So mainly I can't put a main seeking because the characters travel to many, many place throughout this story. In a kingdom called Märchen there was a beautiful queen and a pretty princess named Jill. A royal procession comes up and Jill has to wear a dress, but when the merchant shows it to her she can't see it, but when she puts it on then she can see it and it is beautiful. Although the dress is beautiful, when she stands on a very high balcony with her mom, a kid cries out that she is naked. Everyone laughs and her mother is abhorred! Jill, being embarrassed, runs away crying and finds her cousin's house. Her cousin is Jack. Jack likes to follow this boy Marie, but Marie taunts him and the other villager boys do too. He trades his cow for a 'magic bean'. He finds that it does indeed grow into a beanstalk and Jill finds his house and then after deciding awhile they climb it because this old woman says they have to look for The Seeing Glass. *By the way Jill meets Frog and then goes to Jack's house.* as they climb up and up and up they eventually find a Giants cave or something like that and Jack goes in and then Jill and Frog follow him. Jack had to prove himself that he was brave and strong so these giants make him throw rocks, which are huge boulders but her can't throw them so he pleads with them and they tell him that he has to break 3 sticks, but they are tree trunks! Jack couldn't break them so the Giants say the have to eat him and Jill. Before they are going to eat Jack the Giants hold a challenge and surprisingly Jill enters too. ***Spoiler Alert*** Jill wins the food challenge and tricks the Giants by showing all the food in her 'stomach'(used a blanket) and then they have to too so all the Giants use knives and end up killing themselves. ***end Spoiler Alert*** Jack and Jill and Frog runs out of the Giants cave and Jack is ashamed so he ends up falling out of the sky and tumbling towards a hill and broke his head going down, Jill and Frog are okay though. Jill finds a woman who takes care of Jack and Jill. One night Jill heard a song and a mermaid is singing it. This mermaid sings her song so she can kill a unsuspecting girl because only little girls can hear it. The mermaid tells Jill about what happened to her family and every night Jill finds the mermaid and then one night the mermaid catches Jill and Jill figures out that the mermaid had lied. Jill thankfully gets rescued and Jack is better so they leave the tavern that they had stayed in. They reached a gray valley and they were so thirsty and hungry. Then three Ravens flew towards the and talked to them. The Ravens flew away afterwards, but Jack and Jill were confused by what the advice the Ravens had given them. They told Jack and Jill that they were con-fused. They told them " when you do what you want, not what you wish… "Said the first Raven. "when you no longer seek your reflection in others eyes… "Said the second. "when you see yourselves face-to-face… "Said the third. "Then, the ravens intoned in unison, " you will have found what you truly seek." After awhile of stumbling they finally found a great and humongous market filled with tons of fruit and weapons and...goblins? Jill heads towards the fruit stands and all the goblins selling fruit say she is beautiful and pretty, but she feels wrong and tries to shove away the goblins but they just keep coming back for her and pushing her and holding her. Finally a goblin shoves and apple into her mouth and it barely touches her teeth and she collapses. Jack heads towards a ramp but hears Jill calling for him and tries to shove the goblins away but they carry Jill off to a palace. Jack follows him but is it off when he sees a sword that he loves and a goblin says it will only cost him his left hand. Jack doesn't do it and races off to find Jill. He finds her and then they meet a great big and smelly fire-breathing salamander and become friends and they also find the seeing glass in his stomach. Eddie is the salamanders name and he kills all the goblins. Then Jack and Jill go back to the village and give the glass to the old woman, but then Jack and Jill tell the woman and two others with her to turn them selves in. Then Jack and Jill find their parents but then they leave because they end up not liking their parents. Jack and Jill make a living outside of town and many kids come by them to play and hear stories. At the end Jack and Jill like and are reunited with their parents. The type of conflict is character(s) vs. Society. It's that type of conflict because both Jack and Jill go on this huge adventure and have to overcome obstacles. They have to fight and be reunited sometimes, but they came together in the end. I was surprised when Jack and Jill actually decided to go in Eddie's mouth and get the Seeing Glass! If I were them I would have not gone in his mouth because that is just plain Gross. In the story it says, "Jill turned back toward Eddie, closed her eyes, did not take a deep breath, and grabbed Jack's left hand. But Jack said, "wait." He ran back into the corridor and got his discarded spear. The children stepped over Eddie's lip and into his mouth." When I read this I was kinda grossed out because they are going INTO someone else's mouth to get a seeing glass in Eddie's intestines. I had predicted that the Seeing Glass was magic and would grant wishes, but it turned out that it was just a mirror. In the story it says, "Jack smiled, and answered, "it means that it took a crazy quest, and almost done lots of times, and more pain than anyone should ever have to go through-but we finally figured out what we'd been looking for all along. ""And, "said Jill, "at that very moment, we found it. ""What was it?" a big boy he shouted. "It was right there in the glass, "Jack replied. "What? "Said Elsie. "What did you see? "Jack smiled. "What did you think we saw? It's a mirror. We saw ourselves. " I couldn't understand why Jill shattered her mother's looking glass. I know she was mad and all, but to shatter the mirror seems quite unpredictable if you ask me. In the story it states, "Jill felt the familiar twisting in her stomach that she was growing used to living at home. That she swallowed it down. She took a deep breath. She tried a new approach. "It's just the two of us here, mommy. And I don't really care about my skin." "Well, I do! It looks dreadful! You look Dreadful! "And the queen went back to testing eyeshadow. Jill said it is her beautiful mother. And then, very slowly, she reached for a heavy silver her hairbrush that sat on a side table.clean was too busy admiring a new shade of blue to notice. Nor did she noticed Joel pulled her brushback behind her head. But she certainly did notice the brush crash into the large silver mirror and send it shivering, shattering, into a million pieces. "I DON'T CARE!" Jill screamed. Jill's mother turned around, mouth agape, I was as wide as moons. And anger and hurt so deep, so old, excluded from the little girl. "I DON'T CARE WHAT YOU THINK! I DON'T CARE! You stare in that mirror all day long and you don't even see! You don't even see!" And then Jill spun and ran. The queen was frozen. At last, she shook herself, stood, and hurried to her chamber door. She looked down the hall. Empty. She looked back in her room. Her mirror was shattered. And yet, in that moment, the queen was not concerned with the mirror. Not at all. She was much more concerned about something else. Someone else. When she found very, very surprising. "Jill! "She cried out. "JILL! " But it was too late. Jill was gone. I thought the ending was a little unpredictable, but very considerable. At the end of the story it says, perched to far up above in a pine tree, the ravens looked down upon the scene. The third Raven said, "okay, I have a question. What happens that next? To Jack and Jill?" "Don't you know? "Scoffed the second. "You see the future as well as we do. ""Yes, "said the third. "But the future is very large, and it's hard to keep track of everything. ""When they grow up, they will share the throne of Märchen, "said the second maven "but they'll marry other people, "the first interjected. "Right. And Eddie will lead their armies. ""Not that that they ever fight a war, "said the purse. "Who would want to fight any? ""True. And they were governed by the light of the scene glass. "Coat which just means, "explain the first, "but they'll read the inscription from time to time to remind themselves. ""Exactly. And they will be the greatest and wises rulers in the history of the kingdom of Märchen." And, "and of the first Raven, "they will live happily ever after. "The three ravens sat in silence for a while, watching Jack and Jill-who were stronger than Giants, more beautiful than mermaids, cleverer than goblins, and fast-friends with a giant, fire-breathing salamander. Finally, the third Raven asked, "the end? "And the second raven said, "the end. "And the first Raven said, "the end." And that my friends was THE END. In conclusion, I give In A glass Grimmly 5 out of 5 stars. I give it that rating because this may have been one of my favorite Grimm books that I have read so far. I liked it better than A Tale, Dark & Grimm. The author didn't much interrupt or spoil things through the story, unlike A Tale, Dark & Grimm. I recommend this book to people who don't mind some grotesque and a little scary parts in books. I want to mainly recommend this book to Emily Erazo because she has read all, but three of the Grimm books and I would like to see if she can read this one too. So that is my book review and keep on reading people!
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  • TheBookSmugglers
    September 14, 2012
    Originally reviewed on The Book Smugglers REVIEW Ana’s Take: In a Glass Grimmly is a companion novel to Adam Gidwitz’s 2011 book A Tale Dark and Grimm and is as delightful and smart as its predecessor. In it, we have main characters the cousins Jack and Jill who undertake a journey through the landscape of several different fairytales – a journey that is a Quest (to find a Looking Glass) but which like most Quests often do, turns out to be a Coming of Age story (this one is about identity and f Originally reviewed on The Book Smugglers REVIEW Ana’s Take: In a Glass Grimmly is a companion novel to Adam Gidwitz’s 2011 book A Tale Dark and Grimm and is as delightful and smart as its predecessor. In it, we have main characters the cousins Jack and Jill who undertake a journey through the landscape of several different fairytales – a journey that is a Quest (to find a Looking Glass) but which like most Quests often do, turns out to be a Coming of Age story (this one is about identity and finding one’s true self). Unlike the first book which was a retelling of a series of Grimm tales with Hansel and Gretel at the centre of them, In a Glass Grimmly is a patchwork of retellings from different sources ranging from Grimm Tales to nursery rhymes, Jack and the Beanstalk, The Frog Prince and many others. I say patchwork in the best possible way because this is a collection that works really well when put together. I have been thinking a lot about fairytales at the moment – especially their structure and motifs - so this book came at the right time. I recently saw a talk by Philip Pullman’s on his recent book Tales From the Brothers Grimm (which Thea recently reviewed) and I think one of the most interesting things he has said is how often fairytales in their original format are more about plot and story (as well as lessons) than character development. This can be glimpsed in the way that fairytales move from plot point to plot point without a lot of description which results in lack of characterisation. This is, one thinks, what gives fairytales such lasting life because they are meant to be rearranged and retold and elaborated upon according to each storyteller’s gifts. And this is exactly what Mr Gidwitz’s does and the greatest strength of his books is his gift for the storytelling via his choice of narrator – an omniscient narrator who constantly interrupts the story with asides. Those are often funny but most of the time they also offer critical insight and they carry the story through. Although I wouldn’t go as far as to say that the characters have been imbued with a super deep emotional background, there is enough here to make these characters come to life. My point is: it is very easy to imagine this narrator sitting around a fire telling these stories to those who care to listen to them. This is a humorous-yet-bloody story full of adventures that I feel, would be greatly appreciated by kids and adults alike. I loved it. Thea’s Take: Once upon a time, there were two Book Smugglers who loved fairy tales more than you can possibly imagine. Go ahead, picture two girls who love fairy tales. Got them in your head? Good.Together these two girls embarked on a reading adventure, fraught with peril, blood, vomit, and all sorts of other disgusting goodies. And you know what? They loved every last bloody bit of it.In A Glass Grimmly is, as Ana said, the companion novel to Adam Gidwitz's wonderful debut middle grade book A Tale Dark and Grimm (which I loved wholeheartedly). I was eager to read this second book, but a little nervous, too - frightened that Gidwitz wouldn't be able to capture the same magic as the first book, since this companion novel follows completely different characters. Long story short: I needn't have worried. In A Glass Grimmly is every bit as fantastic as its older sibling. But I'm getting ahead of myself:Instead of following Hansel and Gretel, Grimmly follows cousins Jack and his unlikely princess sibling Jill. Yes, Jack falls down (from atop a beanstalk) and breaks his crown, with Jill tumbling after (also from atop the beanstalk)...with a three-legged frog named Frog to keep them company. Jack and Jill have rough starts and find themselves searching for different things - Jack wants to be respected and adored, Jill to be beautiful like her beautiful mother (who is connected to Frog in a terrible way). Along their many journeys - to the clouds where they meet a murderous group of giants, to the sea where they meet a beautifully cruel mermaid, to the goblin market, to beneath the earth where they befriend an unlikely salamander. Unlike its predecessor, In A Glass Grimmly blends the work of the Brothers Grimm with other iconic fairy tales and nursery rhymes - including Hans Christian Anderson, and Mother Goose (both of whom make appearances in this book). The result is refreshing, charming, and utterly memorable. Of course, the message of the book - to understand what one really wants, separate from the con-fusion of what other people see - is also fantastic.As with A Tale Dark and Grimm, this book is beautifully written, blending earnest fairy tale telling with a somewhat snarky narrator (who interjects and warns when things are about to get scary/disgusting - or apologizes after the fact), making this a perfect book for reading aloud (of course, it's also perfect to be read alone in silence). This blend of humor and charm - without pandering or dumbing down content - is what makes this book so memorable. In short, I loved In A Glass Grimmly. Truly. I cannot wait to read more from the talented Adam Gidwitz and wholeheartedly recommend this book.
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  • Mason W.
    December 3, 2016
    This story is about Jack and Jill. Jack had problems following directions and letting other people tell him what to do. Jill was embarrassed because she was nude in front of the whole kingdom. Jack needed to sell his cow for money his dad told him to sell the cow for five pounds. Jack went to the market and sold his cow for three beans. When he came home his father was furious. Since Jack and Jill are cousins, Jill decided to run away and went to Jack's house. Jack and Jill talked to this old la This story is about Jack and Jill. Jack had problems following directions and letting other people tell him what to do. Jill was embarrassed because she was nude in front of the whole kingdom. Jack needed to sell his cow for money his dad told him to sell the cow for five pounds. Jack went to the market and sold his cow for three beans. When he came home his father was furious. Since Jack and Jill are cousins, Jill decided to run away and went to Jack's house. Jack and Jill talked to this old lady while his father was in the house. The old lady said you will get whatever you wish for if you find a special looking glass. She said to plant the three beans and climb the plant. At the top of the plant is where they were to find the looking glass.When Jack and Jill got up there, they saw big green giants wrestling each other. The big green giants went inside this cave called the Hall Of Heros. There was a guard giant at the entrance. Jack and Jill talked to him and they got inside the cave. The giants were sitting at a round table. Jack asked can I be in your club and the giants said yes but you have to prove yourself. The giants challenged Jack and Jack can't do any of the challenges so Jill jumped in and does a challenge and she won the challenge. Jack and Jill left and asked the guard where to find a looking glass and the giant said it is not in the sky, it is in your land. Jack and Jill went to the edge of the island and jumped off. When they landed Jack and Jill landed on a green hill and when Jill saw Jack his head was split open. Jill went to go look for help.That night she was at the bar and a man was talking about mermaids that drowned his daughter. Later that night she heard singing, so she gets out of bed and follows the sound. She walked down all the way to the harbor and she saw a beautiful mermaid. The mermaid says come back tomorrow. Jill waited until that night and went down to the harbor and saw the mermaid again. The mermaid told her that the guy at the bar killed all of her sisters and he was going to kill her. One night she went down to the mermaid and then the mermaid tried to drown her, all of the mermaids sisters were there. All of a sudden a net caught her and the guy at the bar saved her. Jack was with him. The guy at the bar took Jack and Jill to his house and they asked him where is the goblin kingdom. He pointed the way and off they went.When they arrived they heard all of the goblins calling out what they had to sell. Soon Jill was being crowded by goblins. Jack wondered off and went to a booth filled with swords. The goblin came up and said a swords cost was for one hand. Jack was about to say yes when he realized that it was an awful idea. He also realized that he wasn't with Jill anymore. Jack saw this big line of goblins so he got in line too. Jill was in a throne and she couldn't escape. Goblins were going to be Jill's husband. All the goblins in line got killed, it was Jack's turn and he won. So Jack and Jill basically got married even though they were cousins. One of the main Goblins asked what do you want for a wedding gift and they both said the looking glass. Will Jack and Jill get the looking glass? You have to read this book to find out.I liked this book because there were some very suspenseful parts. I disliked this book because it was very scary. This book made me feel scared and sad. I reccmend this book to my friend Thomas Komerak because he likes scary and gory books like this. This book reminded me of The Haunting of Sunshine Girl because they were both really scary.
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  • Nathan Pruzan
    February 23, 2017
    Here is a quote from a Glass of Grimly in the second book Jill is more of a risk taker as the story go's on. "I swear on my life said, Jill." If she doesn't find the seeing glass she will die. That proves she is more adventurous. and the seeing glass is the greatest treasure and they go to the craziest place to find the treasure for an example they go into a giant salamander mouth that breathes fire it is one of the best books I have ever read and I recommend it.
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  • Sharon Tyler
    November 7, 2013
    In a Glass Grimmly by Adam Gidwitz, Read by Johnny Heller, is a companion book to A Tale Dark & Grimm. In this book, a talking frog joins cousins Jack and Jill in leaving their own stories to seek a magic mirror, encountering such creatures as giants, mermaids, and goblins along the way. Based in part on fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen. Like in A Tale Dark & Grimm, there is horror, blood, and some scary moments along with dark humor to make for an entertai In a Glass Grimmly by Adam Gidwitz, Read by Johnny Heller, is a companion book to A Tale Dark & Grimm. In this book, a talking frog joins cousins Jack and Jill in leaving their own stories to seek a magic mirror, encountering such creatures as giants, mermaids, and goblins along the way. Based in part on fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen. Like in A Tale Dark & Grimm, there is horror, blood, and some scary moments along with dark humor to make for an entertaining read for everyone around age nine and older.In a Glass Grimmly takes stories that you might recognize; Jack and Jill, The Frog Prince, The Goblin Market, Jack and the Beanstalk, and many more and offers them up a new- freshly twisted and re-imagined. I really like the style of Gidwitz's writing, with the narrator that speaks directly to the reader (or listener) which reminds me of my much loved The Princess Bride. The narrator gives warnings about and scary or bloody parts, for the most part, in order to prepare anyone willing to keep going. Even when there are parts of the story that are bloody or might normally put me off my lunch, the humor of the warnings and the matter of fact way the less than pleasant moments are described lessen their effect. Jack, Jill, and the frog are all dynamic characters that grow and change as the story progresses, and I liked the lessons that they learned. Rather than luck or strength, it was their wits and honest natures that got the group through some very difficult spots. Readers of A Tale Dark a& Grimm might recognize a few players, but this is very much a companion book and the books can be read in any order. I am already looking forward to reading The Grimm Conclusion, which was released this week.I would recommend In a Glass Grimmly to everyone from around age 8 on up through adults. Even with the warnings, the scary and bloody moments might be too much from some of the youngest readers, so I recommend taking a read through or listen and judging weather your child is ready for it based on your knowledge of the child. There is adventure and puzzles, humor and a larger moral that all of us would do to remember- that it is better to do as we want rather than as we wish.
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  • Irina
    February 20, 2014
    A little backstory - I originally picked up the first book in this series, "A Tale Dark & Grimm", from the library to read with my 7 year old nephew. I thought he would get a kick out of reading familiar tales with a twist. However, the first book, like the second, had this "cautionary" prologue that warns too sensitive readers to back away. Something about if you don't like blood and decapitation, this isn't the book for you. Well, we never made it past the prologue because big, fat tears s A little backstory - I originally picked up the first book in this series, "A Tale Dark & Grimm", from the library to read with my 7 year old nephew. I thought he would get a kick out of reading familiar tales with a twist. However, the first book, like the second, had this "cautionary" prologue that warns too sensitive readers to back away. Something about if you don't like blood and decapitation, this isn't the book for you. Well, we never made it past the prologue because big, fat tears started rolling out of the kid's face and I not only had to put the book away, I had to take it back home with me. I returned it to the library unread.Fast forward a month or two, and I am once again at the library picking up books I think he might enjoy. I came across this, the second book and decided I wanted to read it. Forget about my nephew.For some reason (probably because I didn't make it past the prologue in the first book), I thought the main characters (here, Jack and Jill) would star in separate fairy tales. But that isn't the case. There are a number of fairy tales referenced but they are all connected in one big story. A story, which I have to say, blew me away. It is fantastic! I loved trying to tie the stories back to the familiar versions I had heard. But that is just scratching the surface. The story the author weaves about Jack and Jill (and the frog) had me rooting for them from the beginning. The story also has a wonderful lesson for kids and adults alike. I've already informed my nephew of the greatness of the book, and also informed him that this was next on his reading list.In terms of appropriateness for kids: All the warnings the narrator lays out in the prologue are true. But overall the book isn't some grotesque thing with a little lesson at the end. It's a beautiful story with wonderful lesson and a few grotesque points here and there.
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