A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, #4)
Alternate covers can be found here.With A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth volume of the landmark series that has redefined imaginative fiction and stands as a modern masterpiece in the making.After centuries of bitter strife, the seven powers dividing the land have beaten one another into an uneasy truce. But it's not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters of the Seven Kingdoms gather. Now, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed while surprising faces—some familiar, others only just appearing—emerge from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges of the terrible times ahead. Nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages, are coming together to stake their fortunes...and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests—but only a few are the survivors.

A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, #4) Details

TitleA Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, #4)
Author
FormatMass Market Paperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 28th, 2017
PublisherBantam Books
ISBN055358202X
ISBN-139780553582024
Number of pages1,061 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, Epic Fantasy, Science Fiction Fantasy

A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, #4) Review

  • j
    November 24, 2009
    A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. (A highborn maid of thre A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. (A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair?) A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair.A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair? A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair -- A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair.A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair. A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair.A highborn maid of three-and-ten, with a fair face and auburn hair!
    more
  • mark monday
    September 13, 2011
    Behold: the Ugly Stepchild of A Song of Ice and Fire! Behold: the Readers of A Feast for Crows: Angry, Sullen, Vengeful! silly readers. i'm not sure i've ever read such a collection of resentful reviews for one book. one reviewer just decided to repeat the same phrase over and over and over again (sorry Joel, had to say it). another decided to note that "...kids are inherently boring. Kids aren’t clever..." er, wtf? sigh. i suppose i can understand the backlash. Martin took a long-assed time to Behold: the Ugly Stepchild of A Song of Ice and Fire! Behold: the Readers of A Feast for Crows: Angry, Sullen, Vengeful! silly readers. i'm not sure i've ever read such a collection of resentful reviews for one book. one reviewer just decided to repeat the same phrase over and over and over again (sorry Joel, had to say it). another decided to note that "...kids are inherently boring. Kids aren’t clever..." er, wtf? sigh. i suppose i can understand the backlash. Martin took a long-assed time to put this out into the world and then - WHAT THE HELL - reader favorites Tyrion & Jon Snow & Daenerys have dropped off of this book's radar. but i am also perplexed - despite the loss of these wonderful creations, this is an excellent and challenging novel. come on readers, grow a pair! personally, i savored this book from beginning to end. the intricate plot, the propulsive narrative, the intelligent world-building, and most importantly the depth of characterization that were all hallmarks of prior volumes are still in place and undiminished in this installment. one of the things that is often overlooked about Martin is that he is a brilliant writer of quality prose. his descriptions are not just lavish, they are often quite beautiful. he has an expert grasp of language; the man knows how to create imagery that is by turns stark, subtly threatening, strangely enchanting, morbid, nostalgic, and ambiguous. the only reason the novel does not earn a top rating from me (but really, who cares anyway) is because of an unfortunately heavy reliance on repetition - mainly of key phrases and dream imagery. still, this novel should stand tall as an excellent continuation of this amazing series.first and foremost, A Feast for Crows is A Story of the Women of Westeros. because this is set in a medieval land that has very little wish fulfillment in terms of rectifying gender imbalance, it is fated by its own nature to be an unsettling and unfufilling narrative.CONSTANT SPOILERS FOLLOWThe Queen Regent. Cersei Lannister is this series' chief villain and so it was with much anticipation that i approached her POV chapters. they did not disappoint. quite unlike the POV chapters from her formerly villainous twin Jaime, there is not much redemption coming Cersei's way. she's such a fuckin bitch, as the saying goes. she remains cold, grasping, machiavellian, murderous, and extremely petty. she is also incredibly entertaining: a villain in the Grand Old Style, full of swallowed rage and sweetly-uttered put-downs and viciously cruel schemes. she takes to drink and she lets a fellow viper into her bed (which also allows Martin to indulge in an enjoyably laugh out-loud lesbionic interlude). she makes a classic mistake in allowing fanatics to arm themselves. in the end, she literally outsmarts herself, and is the victim of her own foul trap. best of all, she is going crazy! her dreams haunt her, dreams of her death and the deaths of her children. much of her villainous nature is explained by these dreams...what mother wouldn't stop at anything to protect her children? and so Cersei doesn't stop at anything.but what i mainly took away from her chapters were two important lessons that i learned, oh, years ago, probably in my various college Gender Studies classes. first: a woman in power within a patriarchal structure is a woman in constant battle with her peers. she will not receive the automatic respect granted to men; she will have to "earn it", whatever that even means. she will be constantly reminded that her job is actually to marry and to bear children, and that her position of authority is somehow unnatural, against the natural order of things. i despised Cersei, but i also despised those around her who did not give her the automatic respect a man would have in her position. i appreciate that Martin made this inequity crystal clear: he is against Cersei (of course he is - she's the villain) but he also gives the challenges she faces in her new position a rather timeless quality. gender inequity is timeless.and the second lesson: a woman who gains power within a patriarchal system by mirroring the gender essentialism that supports that system has, sadly, sublimated that structure as natural and right - and will therefore enact that chauvinism. Women's Studies 101, folks. Cersei does not "challenge gender imbalance" - she supports it. her interior monologues are full of the same bullshit as any sexist dumbass. she despises "weakness" in men. she condemns "slutty" behavior while indulging in it herself. she uses classic chauvinistic tactics to bring down a rival and even-more-classic male brutality to destroy men and women alike. as i mentioned...she's a fuckin bitch! but her character is a fascinating one to contemplate.The Sand Snakes and The Dorne Princess. i suppose the chapters set in Dorne could contribute to many readers' disengagement with this novel. oh, whatever. i love Dorne! Dorne is the ugly stepchild of Westeros: matrilineal and distantly threatening, with a great big chip on its shoulder. but what a place it is: aggressive and volatile, sure, but also a land where women are automatically given the same respect as men, where a princess is the natural heir to the throne, where bastards are not automatically disrespected. the brief glimpses of the Sand Snakes, despite their inability to start the war they craved, were compelling in how differentiated they were in their various proposals to begin battle. and i also appreciated how fallible Arianne Martell turned out to be: a girl unused to schemes but still scheming away, a seductress who fell in love, a woman loyal to her friends and disinterested in cruelty, an heiress and misguided leader-to-be, one whose time in the limelight approaches.Sansa/Alayne and Arya/Cat. sometimes a girl has to literally convince herself that she is someone else, simply to survive. sometimes a girl has to forget the parts of her that make her herself, in order to achieve her goals. of course in one case, this is a girl who has lived her life as a pathos-ridden pawn. in the other case, we have a girl who is slowly losing her humanity as she becomes a kind of living weapon. eh, so what? they both have my full support. go Sansa & Arya, go! survive this series, you can do it!Catelyn/Stoneheart. and sometimes a woman fails. to accomplish her goals, to protect her loved ones, to save her children. i imagine that some women can get past this and can go on to define themselves anew. and other women cannot, or do not. they swallow their bitterness but do not forget: it becomes their fuel, their purpose for being. it can turn a heart to stone. and, um, it probably doesn't help having your throat slashed at your brother's wedding and then being revived as a monstrous quasi-zombie. and so Catelyn becomes a dread avenger, and not a pretty one. she is a killer without regard to reason or even justice, and she turns Dondarrion's Merry Men into a grim and bloodthirsty cabal. i never thought i'd see Thoros be so sad, so lost. i never thought Lemoncloak could be such an uncaring asshole. i never thought Catelyn would hang an innocent woman or a mere lad. well, i suppose that's what can happen. so i know that Brienne survives, that's obvious. but if Podric Payne dies, i'm coming after you, George Martin!The Maid of Tarth. i saved one of my favorite characters of the series for last. i don't think Brienne is a lot of readers' favorite; i assume they find her constant integrity and her equally constant naivete, repetitiousness, and lack of imagination to be tedious. but that's not how i feel! i loved her from beginning to (probably not her) end. there is such genuine realism to her loyal, awkward, lovelorn character. she is a warrior woman, but this means nothing in male-dominated Westeros except constant and automatic disrespect. she is, i suppose, "physically unattractive" and is constantly reminded of that by nearly every person she meets. she is always Doing The Right Thing; that integrity causes her to be disrespected even more, and it often means nothing to the people around her. well it means a lot to me! her quest may have been aimless, but it was also useful in illustrating the true and awful tragedy of war: the lives lost, the tormented survivors, the bleak landscapes, the sense of a world turned dark and bloody and soulless - a world without meaning. seeing such a brave person travel through this blighted landscape and continuously, stubbornly, mulishly trying to do good was hard to read - but it was also what i really needed in order to truly connect with this novel: a hero, tried and true. her two fight scenes, vanquishing members of the appalling Brave Companions, were awesome. what a brave lady and what a unique addition to the fantasy genre's Hero Archetype. i love her. as i loved this book.now on to the next one!
    more
  • Matt
    July 2, 2011
    The context here is everything. A Song of Ice and Fire began with the publication of A Game of Thrones in 1996. Thrones introduced us to the land of Westeros, a continent the size of South America but suspiciously similar to medieval England. We followed a handful of characters representing various factions of the Seven Kingdoms, squabbling for the right to sit upon the Iron Throne. Its grittiness, tactility, fully-realized characters, and high stakes (a major character loses a head) gave it a c The context here is everything. A Song of Ice and Fire began with the publication of A Game of Thrones in 1996. Thrones introduced us to the land of Westeros, a continent the size of South America but suspiciously similar to medieval England. We followed a handful of characters representing various factions of the Seven Kingdoms, squabbling for the right to sit upon the Iron Throne. Its grittiness, tactility, fully-realized characters, and high stakes (a major character loses a head) gave it a cult following. Two years after Thrones, A Clash of Kings was published. It told the story of “the War of the Five Kings.” Though it started slowly, it built to a fine ending, which included the shocking loss of Winterfell (home to many of our main characters) and the epic Battle of the Blackwater. A phenomenon had started. Like clockwork, the third novel in the cycle, A Storm of Swords came two years after Kings. It was the biggest book so far, and easily the best. It featured all the hallmarks we’d come to expect from author George R.R. Martin – swordfights, detailed descriptions of food, casual misogyny, laughably crude sex scenes, shocking twists, major character deaths, and a humdinger of a cliffhanger – but those elements were heightened. There are set pieces in Swords that are simply classic (see, e.g., “the Red Wedding”). At the end of Swords, the fate of several major characters – beloved characters – dangled in the wind. Readers thirsted for the next installment. They began their wait. And then crickets. Nothing for five years. After five years, we were given the present installment: A Feast for Crows. By this time, it was nearly impossible for any book to live up to the expectations of Swords. On this level, at least, Crows did not disappoint. It certainly met the expectation that it could not meet expectations. As the old saying goes, the only thing worse than a bad meal is a small bad meal. Not only did Crows fail to meet the challenge of Swords, it was over too quickly. When readers got to the last page, they were left to wonder, this is it?. Martin, you see, had allowed the manuscript for Crows to get so long, he decided to cut the thing in half. As he explained in a now-infamous postscript, Martin decided to split the book geographically, rather than chronologically. That meant that many of the best characters did not appear; none of the cliffhangers from Swords were resolved; and we were left to follow the dubious quests of various secondary personages. To make matters worse, Martin tentatively promised the next volume, A Dance With Dragons, would be published the next year. That postscript was written in 2005. Six years later, A Dance With Dragons was finally released. Thus, it is a fortuitous time to review Crows. It is a much-maligned book, buffeted by two competing elements: the long wait before the book was published, and the longer wait after. In other words, the book has suffered critically because it took so long to come out and did not satisfy the pent-up demand. It also suffered because it did nothing to alleviate the long wait for Dragons. Almost all agree that Crows is the weakest volume in A Song of Ice and Fire. Beyond that, opinions are split. Some people hate it with the light of a thousand suns. Some people love it like a pug dressed in a tuxedo. Others acknowledge its weakness while admitting that a subpar steak is still a steak. The length of time it takes Martin to churn out his opuses creates some high passion amongst his fans. That passion, combined with the internet and thousands of basements belonging to thousands of moms has created a great deal of hyperbolic ire directed towards Martin. While this criticism is a minority report, it is loud, and has colored the merits of Crows. I am immune to this misplaced anger. I am a latecomer to Martin’s work; accordingly, when I started reading Thrones, four books had already been published, with a confirmed release date for the fifth. I’ve never suffered the long withdrawals between books that the early adopters have had to overcome. Due to this tardiness, I feel like I can judge Crows based on its literary qualities, rather than its late arrival onto the Ice and Fire firmament. Unfortunately, the literary qualities of Crows are in short supply. Most of Crows’ problems stem from Martin’s decision to divide the story by geography, and focus mainly on the action in Westeros that takes place south of the Wall. That means that the dwarf, Tyrion Lannister, Martin’s greatest creation, is missing. So are Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen. Not only are you losing fantastic, multidimensional characters with whom we’ve traveled for hundreds and thousands of pages, you lose the heart of the story. As far as I can tell (and I’m sure I’ll be wrong), Martin’s endgame seems to point towards two events: the struggle at the Wall against the onslaught of the walking dead (the song of Ice); and Daenerys’ struggle to reclaim the Iron Throne with the help of her dragons (the song of Fire). Neither of those crucial points get any play in Crows. Instead, it’s 700 pages of B-side.The viewpoint characters in Crows (Martin’s story is told in the third-person limited, with chapters that alternate points-of-view among various characters) are mostly new to the spotlight. Jaime Lannister, Samwell Tarly, Arya Stark and Sansa Stark are the only returning viewpoint characters. The other viewpoints go to Queen Cersei, Aeron, Asha, and Victarion Greyjoy, Areo Hotah, Brienne of Tarth, Aerys Oakheart, and Arianne Martell. Some of these characters are brand new. Some have been barely mentioned. Most of them are confusingly named (it gets a bit tough keeping Arya, Areo, Aeron, Aerys and Arianne apart, at least for me; unfortunately, I’m not able to devote my entire life to these books). With some exceptions, their stories do not rise to the level of interest or intensity as the plotlines of Martin’s earlier books. The bulk of this book, nearly a quarter of the pages, belongs to Cersei. Given space to develop her character, Martin is his usual strong self. Earlier in the series, Cersei was a terrifying, enigmatic peripheral character. In Thrones, she showed her smarts, and her cruelty, by getting the drop on Eddard Stark (admittedly not the sharpest tool in the shed). After the death of her son, King Joffrey, in Swords, Cersei’s transformation began. She became more guarded, paranoid, and megalomaniacal. Her descent into madness is marked by her growing certainty that all her decisions are correct. The most interesting aspect of Crows is Cersei’s long fall contrasted with the rise of a fanatical religious movement called the Faith. Cersei is also beneficiary of one of Martin's weird peripheral-characters, the the fallen maester Lord Qyburn. Like Dr. Frankenstein, Qyburn toils away in the dungeons, doing odd experiments on living subjects, the result of which, it is obvious to see, will be half-human, half-monster. (Unfortuntately, Cersei's chapters are disadvantaged by a subplot concerning Westeros' outstanding loans to the Bank of Braavos. All the talk of high finance and trade federations harkened uncomfortably to another famous fantasy/sci-fi epic that lost its way). Cersei’s brother/lover, Jaime, has the second most page-time. His evolution from villain to hero takes a big leap forward, as we see him go from murderous sister-humper to a canny leader pushing back against the excesses of King’s Landing. With Jaime’s chapters, Martin is able to tie up a few loose ends still dangling after the War of the Five Kings (for example, the dragging siege at Riverrun is finally concluded). The balance of Crows is told in scattershot style through the ten remaining viewpoint characters. We barely hear from Sansa, which is fine with me. Still, it is nice to see that she is developing at least a semblance of wit. I have a major problem with her character, mainly because Martin portrays Sansa as a real child; that is, as someone who is uninteresting and dumb. The problem with kids as characters is that kids are inherently boring. Kids aren’t clever, no matter what I see posted on Facebook. Only in a book or movie is a kid who can’t tie his shoes crafty enough to turn his house into a living version of Mousetrap to foil a pair of robbers. So far, Sansa is realistic in the sense that she is dull, frightened, mistake-prone, and hollow. This also means she is a weak protagonist. In Crows, despite a limited appearance, she finally starts to learn some of the finer points of deception. Arya Stark is a more traditional fictional child. Despite her tender years, she performs great heroic feats. Her ever-growing darkness, however, makes her a joy to follow (I wouldn’t be surprised if, at the end of A Song of Ice and Fire, we counted her among the bad guys). In Crows, Arya is exiled to Braavos. She doesn’t do much of anything, and her chapters seem meant only to explore the islands of Braavos. This would’ve been fine if Braavos was interesting. Instead, it’s just Venice, right down to the swaggering, arrogant, hand-talking men-folk. Three characters, Areo, Arienne and Aerys, serve to give us entrée into Dorne. The set up here – the machinations of Dorne against King’s Landing – is obviously important. However, these chapters are rushed (and the Aerys chapters are so short and abrupt I have a hard time understanding their inclusion). The same goes for the chapters with the three Ironborn characters: Aeron, Asha, and Victarion. In perfunctory style, they are moved like chess pieces, put in place for further development down the road. The chapters following Brienne are like walking on a treadmill. She’s given a lot of space to do things, but she never gets anywhere. Martin has her crisscrossing the ruins of a war-torn Westeros, searching for Sansa Stark. Of course, we know exactly where Sansa is; therefore, we know that Brienne is never going to find her. Also, for all her abilities, she is portrayed as a slow-thinker, a female Forrest Gump who’s handy with a sword. Even if we didn't know where Sansa was hiding, we’d have a pretty good idea that Brienne’s plan to find her would fail (it literally consists of her wandering around, asking where Sansa has gone). These are structural problems. And forgivable, as long as the book’s quality had been consistent. It’s not. This is a poorly written book by Martin’s standards. His descriptions seem tired. His writer’s tics are more pronounced. The dialogue, which had been whip-smart and eminently quotable, is execrable. It is flat, repetitive (Jaime’s “I love you too, sweet sister” is repeated on a loop), and filled with odd, obtrusive, never-before-used idioms. For some reason, the characters start referring to their uncles as nuncles, even though uncle had served just fine before. In one chapter, the insult “stoatish” is used two or three times (as far as I can tell, it means weasel-like) and then dropped like a bag of flaming poo.Despite taking five years to write, Crows feels like a first draft. There are brief glimmers displaying Martin’s mastery of both his world and his writing. For instance, even though Brienne’s dead-end quest is inert as a narrative, Martin’s evocation of a war-weary Westeros is captivating, with its fresh graves, burnt-out homes, and outlaw-infested roads. Subpar writing can be saved by a propulsive plot or a great set piece. As I noted before, the plot grinds forward. Moreover, nothing exciting happens. Swordplay is kept to a minimum. There isn’t a battle to be found (in a way, Martin’s exhausted effort mirrors the tiredness of war-blasted Westeros). With the exception of Moby Dick, I try not to use the word “boring” in my reviews. Here, though, things get awfully close to the b-word. To be sure, there are a few saving graces. The first is the sex scenes. They are just awful, and bound to put a smile on your face. The high/lowlight is a lesbian sex scene between Cersei and Lady Taena that involves an unfortunate comparison of a women’s nether regions to a swamp. It had me laughing my ass off. Martin is also able to add a few twists at the end, including a cliffhanger that leaves one character dangling by the neck. Here, unlike in Kings, a strong ending isn’t enough to save the rest of the book. To the contrary, Martin should take lessons from M. Night Shyamalan: you can’t rely so much on 11th hour shocks or uncertain character fates. At some point, A Song of Ice and Fire will be finished. Either Martin will complete the saga, or it will linger forever as a partially-completed near-great thing. When that time comes, it is very likely that the esteem for Crows will rise. It’s faults will be less glaring; its virtues will seem more virtuous. Right now, though, I just want to move on to A Dance With Dragons and pretend Crows wasn’t half as bad as I know it was.
    more
  • Justin
    May 27, 2008
    I'm not quite sure what happened, here.As others have mentioned, Martin slows the pace of the story down considerably in this fourth installment of A Song of Ice and Fire, ostensibly writing this as the first half of a two-book volume, with a 3-5 year production time on each. As such, the book is by necessity filled with unresolved storylines, AWOL main characters, and lengthy travelogues where nothing of importance happens. Of course, this draws the inevitable comparisons to another famous fant I'm not quite sure what happened, here.As others have mentioned, Martin slows the pace of the story down considerably in this fourth installment of A Song of Ice and Fire, ostensibly writing this as the first half of a two-book volume, with a 3-5 year production time on each. As such, the book is by necessity filled with unresolved storylines, AWOL main characters, and lengthy travelogues where nothing of importance happens. Of course, this draws the inevitable comparisons to another famous fantasy series that started strong and became a sluggish, irritating morass (something to do with wheels and time, as I recall). The pace isn't really the problem, here, though, as the story still stands on its own two legs. The problem is the writing.Though the first three books were extraordinarily well-written as a whole, one could never classify Martin's prose as elegant. In this book, he takes three steps backward for some reason, and sounds almost amateurish in some chapters. The book is filled with phrases and sentences that are awkward, clichéd, and sometimes downright hackneyed. Martin's prose may typically be spare and to the point, but I never audibly groaned while reading the first three books.One of the biggest problems with this is Martin's sudden inclusion of colloquialisms that, so far as I can tell, never existed in the books before this one. Coz's, nuncles, and valonqars abound, even though we've never read any character use these turns of phrase before, and be prepared to hear "groats" referenced multiple times in a single chapter. This doesn't only present a continuity problem, for those of us wondering why these dialect oddities are so suddenly commonplace... Martin seems to have run out of patience for phrasing things differently, so the exact same idiom often gets used ad nauseum. I was weary of these invented clichés before I even truly understood what they meant.By now, fans of the series thus far are used to the disturbing ubiquity of rape in Martin's world, but even that loses what little subtlety it had in this book, with at least two characters being described as "needing a hard raping" (another example of redundancy in Martin's writing... did that expression really need to be used twice in one book?). The consensual sexuality devolves in this book, as well; Martin uses strange fixations and blunt-force descriptions (the comparison of female private parts to a "swamp" was the high point for me, as it were) which make them seem almost bizarre, and therefore a lot more gratuitous than they were in the first three books.I gave it two stars instead of one because the standout elements of this series are still evident in A Feast For Crows, despite Martin's apparent attempt to sabotage them with clumsy writing. The characters are multidimensional, unpredictable, and well-developed, and the overarching story is fascinating enough to keep me turning pages. However, I am genuinely concerned about the direction of this series, which has heretofore been my favorite fantasy series and often recommended to friends. I don't know what's going on with Martin's writing, but I truly hope the next book returns to the caliber of the first three. I would hate to have to do with this series what I do with Jordan's: recommend that people stop at Book 3 and pretend it's an open-ended trilogy. I'd much rather dismiss this one as "the mediocre volume" and go back to enjoying the series. Here's hoping.
    more
  • Madeline
    June 15, 2012
    Hey everyone, George RR Martin here. I thought I'd take some time off from planning my intricate and complex storylines (spoiler alert: everyone has sex with everyone and then kills each other) to introduce A Feast for Crows, the long-awaited fourth installment in my epic fantasy series! You guys are in for a treat, this one is awesome.So the last book was quite a ride, huh? There was that craziness that was the Weddings of Death, Tyrion killed his father, , Jon Snow finally got cool and is now Hey everyone, George RR Martin here. I thought I'd take some time off from planning my intricate and complex storylines (spoiler alert: everyone has sex with everyone and then kills each other) to introduce A Feast for Crows, the long-awaited fourth installment in my epic fantasy series! You guys are in for a treat, this one is awesome.So the last book was quite a ride, huh? There was that craziness that was the Weddings of Death, Tyrion killed his father, , Jon Snow finally got cool and is now Lord Commander of the Night's Watch, Arya continued to be a tiny BAMF, Bran looked like he was finally moving towards a real plot, and Daenerys decided to temporarily shelve her whole unleash-the-dogs-of-war plan and be a queen for a while. Also I made Christmas come early for Madeline when I killed off Catelyn Stark, only to bring all her hopes and dreams crashing down when it turned out that Catelyn is a zombie now and will never die. Hee hee hee. Anyway, with all that cool stuff, you probably thought that this book was going to be made of awesome, what with all the fallout from the stuff I described above. And it will be, but unfortunately my attention to detail and complex storylines finally came back to bite me in the ass, and it turns out I couldn't devote an entire book to all the plots I started in the last book. So I divided them into two volumes, and saved all the cool people for Book Five. Want to read about Jon Snow, Daenerys, and Tyrion? Too fucking bad.Don't worry though, this means we get to meet lots of fun new characters, like Theon's crazy uncles and a lot of random people from Dorne. They each get just one chapter, of course, because they only exist so I can have a perspective to show all these events from (my changing single-character viewpoint structure has also begun to bite me in the ass, unfortunately) and you'll probably never see them again, but that's what makes it fun! It's not all bad, at least - Arya's still here, even though she's not doing much murdering or really much of anything. This is where Arya learns how to be more awesome, so she can wreck everyone's shit later - or maybe not, because in the last chapter we see her in, she's just gone blind. Is it temporary, or permanent? You'll just have to buy the next book and find out (maybe)! And hey, I gave you guys some Cersei chapters, finally. And yes, she's just as much of a psycho bitch as you always suspected. You're welcome. Also Jaime chapters - bet you didn't think he would turn out to be one of the only decent characters in the series, huh? (of course, if he's becoming one of the good guys, that means I'll probably murder him soon) And there are more Samwell Tarly chapters! Everyone loves reading about Sam, right? Guys? Guys? Where are you going? Don't worry, the next book will be all about Tyrion and Daenerys and Bran (look, it's going to pay off soon, I swear. Really guys, he's going to be interesting eventually.) and all the other cool characters that I totally ignored in this book and that you really wanted to read about. As for all the character-based cliffhangers I established in this book, will they be resolved in the next volume? Probably not! I am George RR Martin, and I demand your money and your tears!PS: Quit bitching at me to write faster. You'll get your books when I say you get them, and not a day sooner. Don't push me, or the next volume published will be titled A Siege of Tears and it'll be nothing but Jon Snow, Bran Stark, and Samwell Tarly sitting around and thinking about how inadequate they are. Do not test me on this, nerds.
    more
  • Kelly
    May 9, 2008
    Dear George,How do you do this lovely May morning? I'm terribly sorry to bother you, but I really did think that I must in good conscience warn you of this problem I have. You see, I know many people who read these books and absolutely adore them. Legions of fans. I'm sure you know that. Really, the books are quite high quality and quite enjoyable and whatever you need to do to get them to stay at that quality, please do it.... within reason. It has come to our (the masses') attention that perha Dear George,How do you do this lovely May morning? I'm terribly sorry to bother you, but I really did think that I must in good conscience warn you of this problem I have. You see, I know many people who read these books and absolutely adore them. Legions of fans. I'm sure you know that. Really, the books are quite high quality and quite enjoyable and whatever you need to do to get them to stay at that quality, please do it.... within reason. It has come to our (the masses') attention that perhaps waiting three to four years between books is a bit excessive. Don't you think so?Now, more importantly than the principle of the thing... I've noticed some very unhealthy side effects from these gaps in between the books. Namely, some severe mental complexes that are resulting in a personal hostility towards you. I thought I had an obligation to warn you that I have heard of several imaginative plots that many of my fellow readers have dreamed up to get you to finish these books. All of them involve house arrest, most of them involve chaining you to your computer, a few involve terribly cruel things with assorted war instruments like those you brutally describe in your novels. I've heard a few terribly distressing things along the lines of, "shoving a broadsword up his ass." I'm sure you can imagine the rest.Now while I don't think that people would employ such plans now, I do notice that these mental complexes seem to get worse over time. So... who knows in the future?Just thought you should know!So, toodle pip, hope that put you in the mood for writing. (These people apparently think that such things will.)A sincere fan.
    more
  • Candace
    May 17, 2016
    Although this epic fantasy has me captivated, I have to say that 'A Feast for Crows' didn't hold as much appeal for me as the earlier books. That being said, it is still an extremely well-written story. I have no doubt that the new characters, places and events will serve to further the plot.While hearing Cersei's viewpoint was somewhat enlightening, it got tiresome. Cersei is as cold and cruel as Joffrey was. Being "stuck" in her mind was torture. She was constantly scheming and manipulating. H Although this epic fantasy has me captivated, I have to say that 'A Feast for Crows' didn't hold as much appeal for me as the earlier books. That being said, it is still an extremely well-written story. I have no doubt that the new characters, places and events will serve to further the plot.While hearing Cersei's viewpoint was somewhat enlightening, it got tiresome. Cersei is as cold and cruel as Joffrey was. Being "stuck" in her mind was torture. She was constantly scheming and manipulating. Honestly, does this woman never stop? Just hearing it was exhausting.Arya and Sansa continue to do what they have to in order to survive. It is interesting to see how they evolve as their circumstances change. I would've liked to hear more about the Stark girls, but maybe next time.This book also introduced some new characters...and brought back some old ones. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around the back from the dead Catelyn Stark. She's definitely changed in more ways than one. Sometimes, things are better left alone. I'm struggling to accept this particular twist.Mostly, I was disappointed to find many of my favorite characters noticeably absent in this book. Daenerys is my favorite. I longed to hear about what was going on with her and her dragons. How is their journey going? Unfortunately, I didn't get that information.Similarly, Tyrion Lannister was nowhere to be found. As a character, he really grew on me. His disappearing act left me feeling a bit bereft. Like Daenerys, information on Tyrion was noticeably absent. I'm dying here!Like the last one, this one ends with a bit of an upheaval. Cersei finds herself in a bind and calls upon her knight in shining armor to save her. I'm hoping that she finally gets what she has coming, but I'll have to wait and see.Overall, I'm still very much addicted to this series. The writing is spectacular, as is the narration. I'm on to the next book. Based upon the title, I'm expecting to hear more from Daenerys and the dragons. This may have been my least favorite of the books so far, but it still blows most other books away.
    more
  • StoryTellerShannon
    November 17, 2011
    Whew, this is a tough book to review simply because it doesn't follow on the expectations of the readers after A STORM OF SWORDS. Now some people are already saying that the book is horrible and a great letdown and others go to the other extreme and hold faithfully that it's just as good as the previous books. I don't feel either take is fair or accurate. To be fair, yes, the book doesn't move like the previous books, especially a STORM OF SWORDS. There are simply not the same level of WHAM BAM Whew, this is a tough book to review simply because it doesn't follow on the expectations of the readers after A STORM OF SWORDS. Now some people are already saying that the book is horrible and a great letdown and others go to the other extreme and hold faithfully that it's just as good as the previous books. I don't feel either take is fair or accurate. To be fair, yes, the book doesn't move like the previous books, especially a STORM OF SWORDS. There are simply not the same level of WHAM BAM big moments nor shocking realizations (i.e. who killed Jon Arryn?). Additionally, some of the favorite characters of readers, like Jon, Dany and Tyrion, are not in this novel. Lastly, there are two new main POVs so we need to adjust to those. BTW, since other readers are spoiling the mystery POVs, did most of you notice that Brienne is apparently a descendant of Dunk from THE HEDGE KNIGHT. Pretty kewl. :) Getting back to the debate, remember that: (1) This is only half of a mega-sized book. GRRM is putting out only half of it and the other half is going to be in the next book. So, in essence, for those complaining he's taking too long, this is like four books as the average novel is 400 pages. Additionally, remember the guy has been writing for something like 30 + years and he's finally getting national acclaim. He has been asked to write scripts to some of his old novels, there's a game based on his series that he looked over, he's also gone over the HEDGE KNIGHT comic strip, he's written two novelettes on the hedge knight, hes been asked to attend dozens upon dozens of readings at various book/convention events (and, most recently, the prestigious one in D.C. where he was asked to give a long speech), he tends to answer the emails he gets from everyone which is in the thousands, he taught at the Odyssey program for about six weeks back east, etc. Most of these in the last two years. So, bully for him as he's getting more acknowledgements but keep in mind the guy has said he can't write except back in New Mexico. Things are going to go slower; and (2) While several of the POVs don't have resolutions, also keep in mind that they may show up in the next book with all those WHAM BAM moments everyone is seeking. Additionally, it probably isn't fair to view this as a stand alone simply because book four and five are like one book. The reason he broke it up, per his webpage at [...], is that his publishers demanded he get it out. For all we know, book four may be the midpoint of the story and book five is going to have a lot of climaxes. AFFC is really a come down from several climaxes. As the dust settles, lots of information is shared. There's a great deal of focus on characters. Lots and lots of characters, even if fleeting. As a result, not as much seems to happen. To some, this might be seen as meanderings, and, well, yes, some of it probably is. lol For those who want to know more about the world, here's your chance. Just don't expect it to be like ASOS. I remember several complaints by earlier reviewers of previous books that there wasn't enough about context and almost nothing about the religion of the times. People complained that one would think the religion would have a greater impact and political power base than shown in the last three books. Well, you get it in this book. Big time. Another thing to keep in mind: there are probably about 35-50% more character POVs simply because there are several small focuses on various characters all over the globe. We get a lot of focus on Dorne and the Iron Isles as well as King's Landing. There are sprinklings in other areas, too, like Oldtown and where Brienne travels (i.e. don't want to spoil it so I won't say where). As result, these characters slows the story down from having big moments because there's more to tell. While I get this is probably the least popular book of the four, assuming we were to take a tally, I still feel GRRM is the best living fantasy author out there if you want tales that don't overuse archetypes and have complex characters and plots. I challenge anyone to email me to suggest a better author. On that note, for people who haven't read the previous books, here's why GRRM is a superb writer from my previous review on ASOS: First off, I'm a heavy duty fan of GRRM. I've read over a 100 different fantasy authors in my time. Took about 5 years off from the genre b/c I felt it was all getting too formulaic and cliched. Typical archetype character who turns out to be the missing heir or boy wonder who saves the world against the Dark Lord. So, when I came back to fantasy at the end of 1999, I read the usual: Goodkind, Jordan, etc. and then someone told me about GRRM and man, that was the kicker! Here are the reasons to choose GRRM. I've also listed the reasons not to choose him to make it fair b/c I know their are certain personalities who won't like this series: WHY TO READ GRRM (1) YOU ARE TIRED OF FORMULAIC FANTASY: good lad beats the dark lord against impossible odds; boy is the epitome of good; he and all his friends never die even though they go through great dangers . . . the good and noble king; the beautiful princess who falls in love with the commoner boy even though their stations are drastically different . . . the dark lord is very evil and almost one sided at times . . . you get the idea. After reading this over and over, it gets old. (2) YOU ARE TIRED OF ALL THE HEROES STAYING ALIVE EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE UNDER CONSTANT DANGER: this gets even worse where the author kills a main hero off but that person comes back later in the story. Or, a hero does die but magic brings him back. This sometimes carries to minor characters where even they may not die, but most fantasy authors like to kill them off to show that some risked the adventure and perished. (3) YOU ARE A MEDIEVAL HISTORY BUFF: this story was influenced by the WARS OF THE ROSES and THE HUNDRED YEARS WAR. (4) YOU LOVE SERIOUS INTRIGUE WITHOUT STUPID OPPONENTS: lots of layering; lots of intrigue; lots of clever players in the game of thrones. Unlike other fantasy novels, one side, usually the villain, is stupid or not too bright. (5) YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BIASED OPINIONS AND DIFFERENT TRUTHS: GRRM has set this up where each chapter has the title of one character and the whole chapter is through their viewpoint. Interesting tidbit is that you get their perception of events or truths. But, if you pay attention, someone else will mention a different angle of truth in the story that we rarely see in other novels. Lastly and most importantly, GRRM doesn't try to tell us which person is right in their perception. He purposefully leaves it vague so that we are kept guessing. (6) LEGENDS: some of the most interesting characters are those who are long gone or dead. We never get the entire story but only bits and pieces; something that other fantasy authors could learn from to heighten suspense. Additionally, b/c the points of views are not congruent, we sometimes get different opinions. (7) WORDPLAY: if you're big on metaphors and description, GRRM is your guy. Almost flawless flow. (8) LOTS OF CONFLICT: all types, too; not just fighting but between characters through threats and intrigue. (9) MULTILAYERED PLOTTING; SUB PLOTS GALORE: each character has their own separate storyline; especially as the story continues and everyone gets scattered. This is one of the reasons why each novel is between 700-900 pages. (10) SUPERLATIVE VARIED CHARACTERS: not the typical archetypes that we are used to in most fantasy; some are gritty; few are totally evil or good; GRRM does a great job of changing our opinions of characters as the series progress. This is especially true of Jaime in book three. (11) REALISTIC MEDIEVAL DIALOGUE: not to the point that we can't understand it but well done. (12) HEAPS OF SYMBOLISM AND PROPHECY: if you're big on that. (13) EXCELLENT MYSTERIES: very hard to figure out the culprits; GRRM must have read a lot of mystery novels. (14) RICHLY TEXTURED FEMALE CHARACTERS: best male fantasy author on female characters I have read; realistic on how women think, too. (15) LOW MAGIC WORLD: magic is low key; not over the top so heroes can't get out of jams with it. REASON TO NOT READ GRRM (1) YOU LIKE YOUR MAIN CHARACTERS: GRRM does a good job of creating more likeable characters after a few die. But, if that isn't your style, you shouldn't be reading it. He kills off several, not just one, so be warned. (2) DO NOT CARE FOR GRITTY GRAY CHARACTERS: if you like more white and gray characters, this may unsettle you. I suggest Feist or Goodkind or Dragonlance if you want a more straight forward story with strong archetypes. (3) MULTIPLE POINTS OF VIEWS TURN YOU OFF: if you prefer that the POVS only go to a few characters, this might be confusing for you. (4) SWEARING, SEX: there's a lot of it in this book just as there is in real life. If you have delicate ears, this book may upset you. (5) YOU DEMAND CLOSURE AT THE END OF EVERY BOOK: this isn't the case for all stories in the series. Some are still going on; some have been resolved; others have been created and are moving on. (6) IF YOU WANT A TARGET OR SOMEONE TO BLAME: this can be done to some extent but not as much. This is b/c he doesn't try to make anyone necessarily good or evil. (7) ARCHETYPES: some readers like archetypal characters because it's comfortable; we like the good young hero (sort of like Pug in Feist's THE RIFTWAR SAGA); it's familiar and we sometimes like to pretend we're this upcoming, great hero. You wont' get much of this in GRRM with the exception of one or two characters. There really aren't any super heroes compared to all the other characters as it's more grittier and no one is shooting fireballs every millisecond or carrying around some super powerful sword. (8) LENGTH: you don't want to get into a long fantasy epic series. In that case, look for shorter works as this is biiiiiig. (9) PATRIARCHY: men are most of the main characters with lots of power (one female exception). While this is realistic of the medieval era, some readers may not prefer this if they want more girl power, so to speak. By the way, if you don't want to commit to a big book until you know the author better, check out his short story, THE HEDGE KNIGHT, in LEGENDS.
    more
  • Kim
    February 9, 2008
    George R. R. Martin is a blowhard.I mean that with respect, I suppose. I guess any author that got me to read over 2400 pages of his writing garners some respect, right? A smattering, maybe? I don’t know, maybe it’s because I was raised Catholic, or maybe it’s my sense of follow through or maybe just the fact that I’ve invested so much time in this damn series… whatever. I’m here, I’ve finished book #4. Yay.Okay, so the reason I’m grumpy is that it took me 480 pages to get into this. Which left George R. R. Martin is a blowhard.I mean that with respect, I suppose. I guess any author that got me to read over 2400 pages of his writing garners some respect, right? A smattering, maybe? I don’t know, maybe it’s because I was raised Catholic, or maybe it’s my sense of follow through or maybe just the fact that I’ve invested so much time in this damn series… whatever. I’m here, I’ve finished book #4. Yay.Okay, so the reason I’m grumpy is that it took me 480 pages to get into this. Which left me 200 pages to actually enjoy. That’s not fair. And this isn’t the first time, this is a pattern with this guy. I spend all this time trying to remember who is who and why I care that I’m either confused or bored silly. Okay, for example: We have Elys who is married to Alys and we have Belwas and Boros and Balon . And Pate, Pod and Peck (don’t ask me to explain who is who, please) and then we have Sansa who is now Alayne ---not Arianne, she’s someone else--- and we have Arya who was Weasel and then was Arry and then became ‘no one’ and then became Cat of the Canals, who shouldn’t be confused with Cat who was Caitlyn who became ‘The Hooded Woman’ and then later ‘Lady Stoneheart’. Do you see what I mean? This is worse than Days of Our Lives because then you really only need to watch maybe a day or so to catch up. Oh, and if Jaime and Brienne don’t hook up, there will be hell to pay, Mr. R.R. Martin. HELL. And, thank you for having Sam lose his virginity; that gave me hope. (oh, come on, are you going to get on me for spoilers?? If you’re even reading this review, it’s because you’ve invested as much time in this series as I have.)Then… THEN I come across this little gem: ‘”Hey, wait a minute!” some of you may be saying about now. “Wait a minute, wait a minute! Where’s Dany and the dragons? Where’s Tyrion? We hardly saw Jon Snow. That can’t be all of it…”Well, no. There’s more to come. Another book as big as this one.Bastard.Okay, so I’m whining. I know. Of course, I’ll read ‘A Dance with Dragons’ (oh, and another thing, George? Can we get you to work on better titles? Because when I’m sitting there reading these tomes and someone comes up to me and says ‘Whatcha readin’?’ I’m a bit hesitant to say ‘A Feast for Crows’ or ‘A Game of Thrones’ without rolling my eyes and explaining that I’m NOT into D&D, just a suggestion. Thanks) but I will do so reluctantly.
    more
  • Netts
    July 11, 2011
    Are you kidding me? This volume should have been called A Test of Patience. Where do I even start? First, there is a conspicuous dearth of crows (as in Nightwatch or anything at or beyond the Wall). There is also little feasting but by now I've grown beyond tired of Martin's medieval menu descriptions so that's a relief. Curious about Jon Snow and The Others? Bran and that three-eyed crow? Tyrion's escape? The dragons!? Well, forget it. They don't make a single appearance. Instead we get to trud Are you kidding me? This volume should have been called A Test of Patience. Where do I even start? First, there is a conspicuous dearth of crows (as in Nightwatch or anything at or beyond the Wall). There is also little feasting but by now I've grown beyond tired of Martin's medieval menu descriptions so that's a relief. Curious about Jon Snow and The Others? Bran and that three-eyed crow? Tyrion's escape? The dragons!? Well, forget it. They don't make a single appearance. Instead we get to trudge along up a hill and down a river and up a tower and down a forest with Brienne who is as boring as she is ugly (remember how ugly she is? It's ok, you'll be reminded again. And again. And again. Just in case you have severe amnesia.) There are a few other people who are also on their tedious way somewhere but can't get there slow enough. And Cersei being evil and suddenly dimwitted. A couple of interesting chapters in Dorne. And some pointless ones about the Iron Islands (which are bleak. You'll be reminded of that too, ad nauseam.) Did I mention the abysmal quality of the writing? It was easier to turn a blind eye to it in volumes where the action and characters were interesting but good luck with this one...At the end of the book one finds a note from the author excusing himself for having served up A Cauldron of Crap. He insists he wrote more but his dog ate all the interesting chapters. Actually, he maintains he wrote "pages and pages and pages" (oh my!). So many he had to cut the volume in half and keep the good stuff for a second installment. That was in 2005 and we're now in 2011 and so he was obviously too busy wanking off to rape porn for the past six years to walk down to the post office and mail those pages to his publisher...
    more
  • Bookdragon Sean
    January 17, 2014
    There’s only one problem with this book, and that’s the point of view characters. As a reader I’ve grown somewhat used to things like this:So, when I'm just given things like this instead it’s bound to disappoint: There are massive pacing issues with the most recent (ha! that’s a joke) two books of the series, and I mean massive. There’s a whole lot of nothing in this one. Cersei’s chapters are excruciating to read. That’s not surprising considering she is probably the least likable of character There’s only one problem with this book, and that’s the point of view characters. As a reader I’ve grown somewhat used to things like this:So, when I'm just given things like this instead it’s bound to disappoint: There are massive pacing issues with the most recent (ha! that’s a joke) two books of the series, and I mean massive. There’s a whole lot of nothing in this one. Cersei’s chapters are excruciating to read. That’s not surprising considering she is probably the least likable of characters within this series. This doesn’t make the book bad because of this. I think she needed some point of view chapters, but what she didn’t need was a never-ending amount of them; it was just too many. By doing this it meant that there were very few chapters that were enjoyable to read; there was no Tyrion, Dany, Jon Snow or Bran in the book.I think George. R. R Martin made a massive mistake when he decided to have this and A Dance with Dragons occur at the same time. The story clearly got away from him and became a little convoluted. The pacing is terrible; there is no real payoff in either book (unlike its predecessors). The book comes to an end at a random point of the story, which just didn’t feel quite right. Personally, I think he should have continued the trend he set with his the previous books in the series. It just needed one straightforward time arc. We don’t need events happening at the same time across books; it didn’t need to become that complex; it’s already perfectly complex. He’s clearly wrote himself into a corner with it. Hence the time it’s taken him to get the next book out. Well, that being said, there is still a lot to take from this book. The story does, of course, develop and become even more engaging. If anything this book made me count down the days to the release of A Dance with Dragons. But, that’s not really a good thing. I think most people tend to forgive Martin for his slip into convolutedness because the previous books were so damn good. I just hope he has tamed the amount of new point of view characters in the much anticipated six book. I think it’s far too late to add so many point of views into the series. One or two is understandable in a book of this type, but when it’s like six or seven it becomes a little bit of a joke. It takes away from the central stories. I’m moaning again here. I began to lay down the positives which just developed into another rant! Redeeming features This books not all bad, far from it. Arya’s story takes a most interesting turn, and Jaime begins to search for his lost honour. These are amongst interesting characters of the entire series, so there points of view saved the book. And then Sam gets his moment in the light. Things do develop and go forward; we see the politics from a different angle. But, I still think it should have been all along one time arc; it would have been a lot easier. See what I mean? I just can’t focus on the positives, so I’m going to leave it here. I may complain about this book, but in reality it’s only because I love this series so much. There are obvious problems with it, though it doesn’t stop me from reading on or re-reading previous books. I may grit my teeth and cringe when I read certain chapters, but I’ll read them again and complain about them again. This series is what got me into reading in the first place, so I do owe a lot to it even if this book fell below the benchmark Martin set himself. A Song of Ice and Fire 1. A Game of Thrones- A life chnaging five stars2.A Clash of Kings- An Impish five stars3. A Storm of Swords - A Lannister loving five stars 4. A Feast for Crows - A flat 3.5 stars
    more
  • Rohisa
    June 20, 2016
    Abandoning at 80% and here's the reason why...Because NOTHING HAPPENS*****SPOILER ALERT*****: Nothing happens. And then nothing else happens, and then some more nothing, and WAIT HERE'S A TWIST: it's nothing.I can't even give you a spoiler alert, because there's nothing to spoil. NOTHING HAPPENS. Character go on quests...that they never complete, get close to completing, and are in no way ever even close to the right path. Characters train and prepare for trials that never happen. Plots are hatc Abandoning at 80% and here's the reason why...Because NOTHING HAPPENS*****SPOILER ALERT*****: Nothing happens. And then nothing else happens, and then some more nothing, and WAIT HERE'S A TWIST: it's nothing.I can't even give you a spoiler alert, because there's nothing to spoil. NOTHING HAPPENS. Character go on quests...that they never complete, get close to completing, and are in no way ever even close to the right path. Characters train and prepare for trials that never happen. Plots are hatched and then forgotten. Nothing happens.The first three books were really phenomenal and engaging and I can't recommend them highly enough. But skip this one. Here, I'll spoil the plotlines for each of the characters followed in this book: Brienne: Nothing happens. She goes on a quest to find and protect Sansa (or maybe Arya, too) and is never within 1000 miles of them. And since you as the reader know exactly where Sansa and Arya are, you know she's spending 3 chapters traveling to the wrong place. Jaime: Nothing happens. He's mulling over his tarnished honor and lost hand, but also trying to train to use his left hand to sword fight, so you're kind of thinking maybe at the end he's going to be in some morally ambiguous situation where he tries to regain some of his lost honor by standing up for some injustice, even though he knows he'll likely lose left-handed...but no. He's training and preparing for a conflict that never occurs. Nothing happens. Arya: Nothing happens. "Hey check out this temple where they train badass assassins. I guess I'll do that or maybe I won't but I'll hang out for awhile and maybe get a little better at being kinda zen, but maybe not." Sansa: Nothing happens. "Hey I'm all hanging out at the Eyrie and no conflicts occur except for one slight annoyance quickly handled by somebody else. Oops, it's snowing, guess we'll go down the mountain for a bit." Sam: Nothing happens. "I'M ON A BOAT. That never gets attacked. And nothing really happens except for a love interest against my vows exactly like what Jon did in the last book. But then it's all okay and nothing happens." Asha: Nothing happens. "Hey I'm kind of a cool sexy pirate chick although you never actually get to see me fighting anything and I'm tough and I want to lead the Ironmen but they say I can't because I'm girl and oh look they're right they want some other dude as king and he says they're gonna take over the world but then they don't do anything except raid a couple of islands." Arianne: "I've got a plot to start a war but it doesn't work and then nothing happens." Cersei: Okay, this is the ONLY character where anything is different at the end of the book than at the start, so I won't spoil this one...but really only read the last 3-4 Cersei chapters and you'll get the whole picture. Even then it's not that surprising, and you don't get to see the ultimate conclusion anyway.On top of the fact that nothing happens...none of the stories have ANYTHING to do with each other. Except for Jaime and Cersei (and even then it's only in the first few chapters), none of the characters ever meet any of the other characters, or impact each other in any way. It'd be like watching Star Trek, except for the entire series Picard is on one starship and Riker's on another and every other character is on their own ship with different crews in different parts of the galaxy and none of them know each other or ever meet or interact in any way and they don't do anything anyway. Why are they in the same story? They have nothing to do with each other!The reason I couldn't get through the entire book because I knew it's going to be giant snooze fest like the rest of the book where absolutely NOTHING HAPPENS.
    more
  • Collin
    August 1, 2007
    I feel like giving this book 3 stars is being harsh to my man, George Martin, but I'm trying to separate the truly great books in this series from the merely good ones.Bottom line: fans of the series waited too long for this and therefore were in a position of being impossible to please once this finally came out. This coupled with the facts that numerous spoiler chapters had been available online for years and that George cut his original manuscript in 2 to produce this and the subsequent (as o I feel like giving this book 3 stars is being harsh to my man, George Martin, but I'm trying to separate the truly great books in this series from the merely good ones.Bottom line: fans of the series waited too long for this and therefore were in a position of being impossible to please once this finally came out. This coupled with the facts that numerous spoiler chapters had been available online for years and that George cut his original manuscript in 2 to produce this and the subsequent (as of now, published) volume serves to diminish the stature of "A Feast For Crows" in the context of the whole series.Still, as its been said elsewhere, Bad George is still better than Excellent Crap. Since I am a completist I was going to love this book no matter what, and I do, but to the more casual fan this will definitely seem like a weak effort, and I think there's justice to this point of view. The writing here feels uneven to me -- so much time in the real world has passed that I feel like George's writing style has actually changed here. His characters begin using terms that they never used before in the preceeding books ("nuncle" and "coz", in particular). There's also an egregious amount of "not giving a groat" here. I'd hate to be a groat merchant in Westeros at this point. What the hell IS a groat?The interesting point of view structure of the previous books has been salted with an overabundance of "prologue" chapters that break with the structural traditions that George has already established. Enough with the Prologues! We're under siege here! Just give us one and hold on to some of that story telling goodness -- we already know you rule.For fans, I think the Brienne chapters feel like wasted time, though Martin tells us that there were stories that needed to be told in "Feast" lest the whole tale would suffer (and I can only presume he includes the 'Brienne' bits in that proclamation). I will reserve judgment here and wait to see.Also, the fact that only half the POVs (points of view) are represented in "Feast" leaves many fans cold. For myself, I needed me some more Tyrion and I didn't get it here. I believe once the remaining books are published, the profile of this book may improve. But this is clearly well-seasoned asparagus next to "A Storm of Swords'" filet mignon.
    more
  • Laz
    December 20, 2013
    “History is a wheel, for the nature of man is fundamentally unchanging. What has happened before will perforce happen again.” I think this may be my favorite novel in the series. Not because it was the best but because I felt so connected to the story, more than I have ever felt before while reading this series. And while I can admit that the plot was poorer in comparison with its predecessors and there weren't all of the characters we've grown accustomed to reading about, I still feel like Mr. “History is a wheel, for the nature of man is fundamentally unchanging. What has happened before will perforce happen again.” I think this may be my favorite novel in the series. Not because it was the best but because I felt so connected to the story, more than I have ever felt before while reading this series. And while I can admit that the plot was poorer in comparison with its predecessors and there weren't all of the characters we've grown accustomed to reading about, I still feel like Mr. Martin is one of a kind and his writing is one of the best I've ever had the luck of reading and I could never ever give this book anything less than 5 stars for the simple reason that with this book, the series has finally found a place in my heart.This book, as many of you may already know, is mainly focused upon King's Landing and some might say the South but I'm not so sure about that. In this book we read for the first time from Cersei's perspective and I have to admit that getting inside her head and seeing firsthand how her brain works, well, it was truly amazing. We see every single bit of malice the lovely Queen Regent has and how far she's willing to go to ensure that Tommen remains safe and sound from whoever tries to do him harm. The story, despite the absence of some of the characters, such as Tyrion, Daenerys & Jon, was still just as riveting and I think that was principally because of the fact that the plot twists and revelations were scattered throughout the book so it actually kept me on the edge and had me intrigued the entire time.In addition to Cersei, there's also quite lots of Jaime and I clearly saw him changing throughout the entire novel, from the tiny bits of details regarding how his brain works to the fact that he finally distances himself from Cersei and sees her for what she really is. He's sent to do Cersei's bidding and his last chapter in the novel, left my brain whirring.Apart from Cersei & Jaime's perspectives, there are bits and pieces of the Iron Islands, told from the point of view of Asha, Victarion & such. Balon Greyjoy is dead and someone has to succeed him.In the South, Oberyn's daughters, the Sand Snakes, want to avenge their father, so Doran is forced to prison them before they do something that will jeopardize everything. There's also a little bit of plotting from Arianne's side, who's Doran's daughter and his rightful heir. I never thought I'd like Arianne that much. She's quite bold and she has the guts to do what her father refuses to.This book was big enough and I understand why Mr. Martin divided the story into two parts. It would just be too huge if he had tried to write about all of the characters in one book and I understand he has a lot to write and a lot to give to us through his stories so honestly I'm not disappointed, if anything, I'm happy that he did that. The more the books, the merrier I'll be.The fact, that a person can build such an amazing world, with the tiniest of details, it's truly amazing and inspirational. I don't get how he does it and honestly I get why his books take so long to come out, I mean they're huge, they're full of made-up history. I mean I wouldn't even be able to remember the names if I were him. I admire his talent and I hope there are more amazing books to come. I cannot wait to get my hands on the next book, I'm anxious and ready for Jon, Dany & Tyrion's stories in the next book.
    more
  • Ryan
    March 31, 2008
    I was fully prepared to be disappointed by this book, for several reasons. First of all, the last book, A Storm Of Swords, ended with a very large cliffhanger and I knew that it was a cliffhanger that wasn't going to be fully explained/explored in this volume.Additionally, I knew that in general the story was not going to feature the characters that I was most interested in (namely Daenerys, Theon, Tyrion, and especially the whole issue of Jon and the Night Watch). That being said, the volume wa I was fully prepared to be disappointed by this book, for several reasons. First of all, the last book, A Storm Of Swords, ended with a very large cliffhanger and I knew that it was a cliffhanger that wasn't going to be fully explained/explored in this volume.Additionally, I knew that in general the story was not going to feature the characters that I was most interested in (namely Daenerys, Theon, Tyrion, and especially the whole issue of Jon and the Night Watch). That being said, the volume was surprisely enjoyable, and helped to better explore the entirety of the Seven Kingdoms. There was tons of action in the first three volumes - I was actually a little set back by the amount of violence that was featured in the series altogether. This volume takes a somewhat quieter approach - characters die, but most of the death takes place off-page. Perhaps this means that A Dance With Dragons is going to feature much higher levels of action.Plot-wise, only certain amounts of progress are made of advancing the plot. We learn nothing more about the advancement of the Others, and no word is made of Daenerys' flight towards the west. Instead we get political maneuverings in King's Landing, and Sam's travel from The Wall to Oldtown. What we do get is quality material, though - I was on the bus when I got to the part of the story that featured Cersei's downfall, and I almost started cackling with joy to see her get her final comeuppance. Also of interest was the expanding story of the Seven Kingdoms, as we learn more about the cultures of both the Iron Islands and of Dorne. Interesting material, definitely, but material that feels much like it is build-up for the eventual landfall of Dany from the east, rather than material in its own right.[return:][return:]One of the benefits of the multiple-POV perspective that Martin employs is that it allows the reader to learn about characters not only from how they see themselves, but how they are viewed by those around them. Cersei Lannister, the most prominent character in AFFC, is the most obvious example of this - when she was presented mostly as a scheming mastermind, but in her POV chapters, she's seen as someone almost paralyzed by paranoia. Similarly, we see Jaime as either a sterling knight (from Brienne's perspective) or a craven weakling (from Cersei's perspective). When we see Jaime's one POV, though, we see that he thinks he is how Cersei sees him, but he hopes to become what Brienne believes him to be. It's a very effective literary technique, and easily builds suspense and complexity to a story of this size.
    more
  • April
    November 26, 2016
    "I have a hole where my heart should be, she thought, and nowhere else to go."// God, this book. George R.R Martin writes so beautifully. Beginning this I did miss Tyrion's, Daenery's, and Jon's POVs, but this book was exceptional even without them. Cersi despite not liking her in the show I actually grew to love her parts. Especially her writing to Jaime for help and reading his response in turn had to be my favorite.
    more
  • Kai
    April 3, 2015
    “Words are like arrows. Once loosed, you cannot call them back.”This took me - compared to it's prequels - "only" a month to read. As always, there were chapters that I enjoyed more than others. Sometimes so intruiging I did not want to stop reading, other times I wondered why in seven hells someone would bother wasting their time writing such pointless words.Here's the list of POV's from most to least liked:CerseiSansaAryaJamieSamwellArianne MartellAeron GreyjoyAsha GreyjoyAreo HotahArys Oakhea “Words are like arrows. Once loosed, you cannot call them back.”This took me - compared to it's prequels - "only" a month to read. As always, there were chapters that I enjoyed more than others. Sometimes so intruiging I did not want to stop reading, other times I wondered why in seven hells someone would bother wasting their time writing such pointless words.Here's the list of POV's from most to least liked:CerseiSansaAryaJamieSamwellArianne MartellAeron GreyjoyAsha GreyjoyAreo HotahArys OakheartVictarion GreyjoyBrienne of TarthArya:I've never been a big fan of Arya's chapters. They bored me in the same way Brienne's do now: lots of aimless wandering around Westeros, from one disaster to the other. I'm glad she arrived in Bravos and can't wait to find out more about her life under the eyes the Many-Faced God.Brienne:Why. Why bother. We all know she won't find Sansa in the Riverlands. We all know exactly where Sansa is. To me there was nothing more pointless in the whole series than her chapters. Luckily her plotline got more exciting towards the end of the book.The Greyjoys:It was interesting to read about the Iron Islands, especially about the Kingsmoat. But I could live happily ever after without those Ironborn, who only stir up more trouble. It's not like there's not enough misery already.The Martells:While I always wanted to know more about Dorne, the chapters did not really add much to the big plot. Again, it seemed a little pointless to me, but yes, I loved finding out about Dorne's secret plans and affairs.
    more
  • Melanie
    June 24, 2014
    1.) A Game of Thrones ★★★★★2.) A Clash of Kings ★★★★★3.) A Storm of Swords ★★★★★#readASOIAF Read-Along - Hosted by Riley from Riley Marie, Elizabeth from Liz Loves Literature, and Kayla from BOOKadoodles. ♥ “In the game of thrones, even the humblest pieces can have wills of their own. Sometimes they refuse to make the moves you've planned for them.” A Feast for Crows is my least favorite in this series, but this prologue and ending chapter give me life, I swear. GRRM is such a genius and if yo 1.) A Game of Thrones ★★★★★2.) A Clash of Kings ★★★★★3.) A Storm of Swords ★★★★★#readASOIAF Read-Along - Hosted by Riley from Riley Marie, Elizabeth from Liz Loves Literature, and Kayla from BOOKadoodles. ♥ “In the game of thrones, even the humblest pieces can have wills of their own. Sometimes they refuse to make the moves you've planned for them.” A Feast for Crows is my least favorite in this series, but this prologue and ending chapter give me life, I swear. GRRM is such a genius and if you have twenty minutes, I can't recommend this video, by Alt Shift X, enough. Seriously, these two plot points, that don't even seem to make sense, are going to play such a HUGE part in this world, and I'm still in awe over the genius.I kept debating if I wanted to give this book four or five stars, but this plot point brings me so much joy that I couldn't resist and ended up just giving this five stars, too. “I don't want to have a dozen sons," she had told him, appalled. "I want to have adventures” I, also, absolutely loved all the feministic themes in this book. I know GRRM gets hate for all the violence against women in his books, but he writes some really empowering women, who I love to root for and read about: -Asha's whole story line, with her right to rule, but a bunch of men are telling her she can't solely because she is a girl. -Cersei finally ruling and acknowledging that everyone in her life has treated her like a piece of meat, only worthy of being married off to reproduce royal children, because she was born a woman, while seeing the male version of her (Jaime) thrive and live his dreams. -Brienne smashing the patriarchy and gender roles left and right, all while making me her biggest fan. Like, all of these themes make ASOIAF an even more enjoyable story to read. These are important themes that are very predominant in A Feast for Crows, and GRRM gives them the light they deserve. ASOIAF is truly an epic fantasy series above the rest. I love this book, I love being a part of this reread, and I really love being back in this world. ASOIAF is such an immersive and all-encompassing experience, I can't really put it into words. I will always recommend this series to anyone who will listen.The rest of this review will have spoilers from all the previous books and also spoilers for this book! If you have not read the first four books in this series, and do not want to get spoiled, please do not read this portion of my review!At this point in the story, so much is happening, I think I'm just going to break down the major plot lines and how I, personally, feel about them:Arya and the Many-Faced God - Again, I can't emphasize enough how amazing Alt Shift X's video is, and how informative it was for me during this reread. Arya has been through so much so far in this series. My heart always breaks for Arya. In A Feast for Crows, she finally finds a path with the God of Death's religion, where they literally take the faces of other people to kill others for their clients. Sansa/Alayne, Robert, and Littlefinger - This whole story line is just so creepy; Littlefinger is the epitome of gross. Robert was weak before his mother's death, and now even weaker. I'm just waiting for his death to come, at this point. Sansa pretending to be Littlefinger's daughter, Alayne, is pretty heartbreaking to read. Sansa has, also, lost so much and watching her get stronger and stronger is really rewarding. Asha, Euron, and Victarion - As much as I love Asha and watching her not back down over her right to the Iron Throne, Euron is probably the character I hate the most in this world. The juxtaposition is actually insane. The scene in Oakenshield Castle, with Euron, was very hard for me to read. Even though Euron wins the kingsmoot against Asha and Victarion, Victarion still agrees to bring Dany Euron's marriage proposal, yet, he has an ulterior motive that we will see in A Dance with Dragons.Cersei, Margaery, and Maggy the Frog - Let me preface this portion by saying: I think Cersei is one of the best villains I've ever read. All of her actions make sense, and you can't help but somewhat root for her. She is constantly being plagued by a vision a witch gave her at a young age, in which she predicted Cersei to become Queen, have three children that will all die, be overthrown by a younger and more beautiful girl, and to eventually die at the hands of her younger brother (who she thinks is 100% Tyrion, but I 100% think it will be Jaime - especially if books take the show's route). “Men have scars, women mysteries.” Cersei thinks, by getting Margaery (who is now Queen, married to Tommen) out of the picture, she will ensure that Maggy the Frog's prophecy doesn't come true. You know, because she has no idea what Daenerys Targaryen is up to. Which brings us to...The High Sparrow - ...who is heavily foreshadowed to be an evil bastard from the start. Not only does he agree to doing to Gods' work with Margaery, but he then takes it upon himself to do it with Cersei, as well! I know most of us know how the show's version of this story-arc went down, but I cannot wait to actually read GRRM's book version, that will have major differences (like Loras Tyrell's storyline.)Jaime - The last thing Jaime does in this book, is receives the letter from Cersei letting him know all the shit that is going down in King's Landing. You know, because she sent him away for reasons. Oh, Jaime, you try so very hard to do what is right, but it always falls apart anyways. He is also harboring the secret of being the one that actually released Tyrion in A Storm of Swords, while being haunted with Tyrion's information of who is warming Cersei's bed. If I could ask for one happy ending for any of the characters in ASOIAF, I would ask for it to be Jaime's. His story-line is seriously one of the most compelling things I've ever read, and I have so much empathy for him. Brienne - Oh, and of course I ship Jaime with Brienne! Is it just me, or is their sexual tension out of this freakin' world? Like, I need this; I need this to happen very badly. Brienne is one of my favorite characters, and such an honorable soul, how could you not love her? She is still in search of Sansa, with Podrick Payne, Tyrion's old squire, in tow. On this journey she is constantly belittled for being a woman that is a knight, but never loses focus on her promise to Cat. Lady Stoneheart - AKA: Resurrected Cat, is on a killing spree for vengeance. Even though she can't really speak, because she died getting her throat slit, she and her group are seeking retribution for the Red Wedding in A Storm of Swords. In this book, she gives Brienne an ultimatum to either kill Jaime or die herself, and Brienne, being all that is right in this world, chooses death, but on a cliffhanger, of course! Sam, Gilly, the babe, and Maester Aemon - I'm not going to lie, Sam's chapters were a little unbearable for me. He, Gilly, the babe and Maester Aemon are on their way to the Citadel, where Sam is going to try to find something that will help them win the impending war that is looming with the White Walkers. My heart breaks for Gilly, because (unlike the show) it is stated that her and King-Beyond-the-Wall, Mance Rayder, switched children, because Melisandre wants to sacrifice a child of royal blood. I mean, this might be the saddest thing in this book. I can't even imagine Gilly's pain, and my empathy is off the charts for her. “There is no shame in loving. If your septons say there is, your seven gods must be demons. In the isles we know better. Our gods gave us legs to run with, noses to smell with, hands to touch and feel. What mad cruel god would give a man eyes and tell him he must forever keep them shut, and never look at all the beauty in the world? Only a monster god, a demon of the darkness.” Aemon accompanies them on this journey to the Citadel, because Jon, too, thinks that Melisandre would want to sacrifice him for his royal Targaryen blood, so he sends him away, as well. Sadly, he is dying as their boat makes it to Braavos, but not before realizing that Dany and her dragons are going to change the world.This series is so very close to my heart and I can't express enough how much I truly love it. I could triple my word count by gushing and fangirling about theories, but I'll save that for my A Dance with Dragons review! “One more book, he had told himself, then I'll stop. One more folio, just one more. One more page, then I'll go up and rest and get a bite to eat. But there was always another page after that one, and another after that, and another book waiting underneath the pile. I'll just take a quick peek to see what this one is about, he'd think, and before he knew he would be halfway through it.” Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch
    more
  • Jason Koivu
    May 14, 2015
    I know "winter is coming," but this book honestly felt more like a Spring clean.A story of such lengths as the epic A Song of Ice and Fire has to have down time and much of A Feast for Crows is down time. George R.R. Martin ties up loose ends, sets up new story lines and essentially does administrative style organization in an attempt to keep his mammoth machine rolling. He does it admirably, and yet it can't help but lack the pep, surprise and all around thrill of his previous three books. In h I know "winter is coming," but this book honestly felt more like a Spring clean.A story of such lengths as the epic A Song of Ice and Fire has to have down time and much of A Feast for Crows is down time. George R.R. Martin ties up loose ends, sets up new story lines and essentially does administrative style organization in an attempt to keep his mammoth machine rolling. He does it admirably, and yet it can't help but lack the pep, surprise and all around thrill of his previous three books. In his defense, this book is only half a book. The one after it should have been its second half. The first half of books usually include a lot of house keeping. This definitely feels like a first half. It's a little dull.*HOWEVER, if you're already a Game of Thrones fan, I don't see how you could not enjoy this book. It's got most of your favorite characters. Cersei is still the same old lovable bat-crazy bitch. Arya and Brienne have never wandered more aimlessly. Jaime is still phantom masturbating. Granted, Jon Snow has little to do or say (then again, it's best to keep your mouth shut when you know nothing) and Daenerys seems to have sprouted dragon wings and flown off. Even so, new characters are introduced who should add a whole other layer of intrigue to the festivities. The aforementioned house keeping does drag on in the form of long council meetings and generally boring exposition. There are a lot of scenes written just to keep the story moving forward. The action and excitement come in short spurts, and the one big reveal had unfortunately already been revealed to me. Even so, I marched through this book with a will, happily following along even through the slow parts.As regards my rating, those 3 stars are a very strong three stars. For my overall enjoyment level, it should be four. However, I gave the previous three books in the series four stars each and since I didn't like this one quite as much as them, I had to show it somehow. And yet, I did enjoy this more than many other three star books I've read.* In an aside that I found humorous, at the end of A Feast for Crows Martin explains how this was meant to be the first half of a much larger book, but that the book became soooo unwieldy it had to be broken up into two books. And now here's the part I found funny...Martin said he hoped for the next book after this one to be published in about a year. Hahahahah! It turned out to be more like six years before A Dance with Dragons would appear. A year indeed. I guffaw in your general direction, sir!
    more
  • Dan Schwent
    January 29, 2013
    The throne of the Iron Isles is contested. Queen Cercei conspires to keep King Tommen's young queen from influencing him. Jaime Lannister adjusts to having only one hand. Sam Tarly and Gilly head south. Brienne quests for the missing Stark daughters. Littlefinger holds the Vale. A lot of stuff happens in Dorne. Arya Stark continues being one of the more interesting characters in fantasy...After a years-long void, the Song of Ice and Fire returns. Well, they can't all be home runs. Sometimes you The throne of the Iron Isles is contested. Queen Cercei conspires to keep King Tommen's young queen from influencing him. Jaime Lannister adjusts to having only one hand. Sam Tarly and Gilly head south. Brienne quests for the missing Stark daughters. Littlefinger holds the Vale. A lot of stuff happens in Dorne. Arya Stark continues being one of the more interesting characters in fantasy...After a years-long void, the Song of Ice and Fire returns. Well, they can't all be home runs. Sometimes you have to settle for a triple. Aside from the lack of Jon Snow, Dany and the dragons, and one Tyrion Lannister, I enjoyed A Feast for Crows as much as the previous volumes. At this point, Jaime Lannister is hot on the heels of Arya, Jon Snow, and Tyrion as my favorite character. I could read a few hundred pages of Jaime Lannister walking around being an asshole. Sam got some time to shine and I think he'll do big things before the series is over. I love what's going on with Arya. I still don't care about Sansa or Catelyn Stark.The bits with the Iron Isles and Dorne got a little wearisome, feeling like Martin might have wanted to keep the biscuit wheels on his gravy train for a little while longer. Still, I liked where things went despite not involving any of my favorite characters.It's a testament to Martin's skill that he has made me care about the Lannister twins, first Jaime and now Cercei. I'm chomping at the bit to find out Cercei's fate and to see if Brienne is really dead.On a final note, there were way too many characters whose names started with the letter E in the same chapter. Mix it up a little, George.Four stars, although I'd probably give it a high three if I'd been one of the people who had to wait years between books.
    more
  • Becky
    January 9, 2011
    This book was fantastic. These books are so amazingly good. I love them. I can't wait until after I read A Dance with Dragons. Then I can join the hordes of people standing outside GRRM's house, looking at their watches and tapping their feet impatiently while they wait for the 6th book in the series. I haven't experienced that wait yet. I will be one of you soon... Squeee! Anyway... so, A Feast for Crows. I was talking about the awesomeness. So here are some things, in random order, that I foun This book was fantastic. These books are so amazingly good. I love them. I can't wait until after I read A Dance with Dragons. Then I can join the hordes of people standing outside GRRM's house, looking at their watches and tapping their feet impatiently while they wait for the 6th book in the series. I haven't experienced that wait yet. I will be one of you soon... Squeee! Anyway... so, A Feast for Crows. I was talking about the awesomeness. So here are some things, in random order, that I found awesome: New characters introducedNew character POVsThe sheer brutality and badassity of some of the charactersThe changes in some of the charactersThe unexpectedness of the strange twists that come aboutThe plotThe historyThe everything. Crap, just read these already! :D
    more
  • Evan Leach
    February 12, 2012
    A Feast for Crows, book four of the stellar Song of Ice and Fire saga, is widely maligned as the runt of the series to date:This is partly because of the strange circumstances surrounding the book’s publication. Martin cranked out books two and three in just under two years, from February, 1999 to November, 2000. But then trouble arose. Book four grew bigger and bigger. Years passed. As the book approached 2,000 pages, Martin realized the book had to split in two. But how to do so? Instead of ju A Feast for Crows, book four of the stellar Song of Ice and Fire saga, is widely maligned as the runt of the series to date:This is partly because of the strange circumstances surrounding the book’s publication. Martin cranked out books two and three in just under two years, from February, 1999 to November, 2000. But then trouble arose. Book four grew bigger and bigger. Years passed. As the book approached 2,000 pages, Martin realized the book had to split in two. But how to do so? Instead of just dividing the narrative chronologically, Martin solved this Gordian Knot by simply removing certain point of view characters entirely, and saving their stories for book five. This meant that when the book finally arrived five years after A Storm of Swords, many of the series’ best characters barely appeared or did not appear at all. As it turned out, readers of the series would have to wait another five and a half years to read about them. People were pissed. I read Storm of Swords shortly after it was released, so I remember that long wait and the feelings of frustration that surrounded A Feast for Crows when it first came out. And I think some of those frustrations have actually hurt the perception of this book, at least for some readers. A Feast for Crows is mostly focused on events in southern Westeros and the repercussions of the way Storm of Swords ended. The book features an excellent Jaime storyline, some very interesting developments surrounding Cersei in King’s Landing, and an intriguing story involving Sansa Stark. The Jaime POV chapters really stood out for me; by the end of this book Jaime Lannister was officially my favorite character in the series (in a wow this is an interesting & well-written character way, not wow it would be a good idea to hire him as a babysitter sort of way). In addition, there is an Arya storyline that’s fascinating and I couldn’t wait to read more about it (turns out I could wait. For five years). Martin continues to add new point of view characters, a decision that frustrated some readers who would have rather seen what the hell Tyrion was up to. But the Greyjoy POV chapters were excellent in my opinion, and led to one of my favorite scenes in the entire series, (view spoiler)[the Kingsmoot (hide spoiler)]. On the other hand, some of the other storylines fell a bit flat. We spend an awful lot of time mucking around in Dorne, which seems to be setting up some important developments for the future but is less interesting to read about than the events up north. I wasn’t in love with many of Brienne’s POV chapters either, which seemed to cover a lot of the same ground that Arya’s POV chapters already tackled in A Storm of Swords. Also, while I enjoyed Cersei’s storyline, I thought that her characterization in this book was a bit off. This is the first book that Cersei appears as a POV character, and the shrill, maniacal way she behaves throughout much of this book threw me a bit. It seems silly to question Martin’s characterization of her in one sense (he invented her after all, and this is the first time we get inside her head), but at times it was hard to connect the woman appearing in Cersei’s POV chapters to the queen from the first three books.That said, this book’s greatest sin is that it simply isn’t as monumentally awesome as A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords. Reading through it a second time, when I knew I would be able to pick up book five right after I finished, I enjoyed it much more than when I read it the first time (when the lack of so many of my favorite characters, and the thought of another five year wait, left a slightly bitter aftertaste). This is my least favorite of the five books to date, but that's a little like saying it's my least favorite rainbow or puppy. If you enjoyed the first three books in the series, you’ll find a lot to love here. 4 stars.Reread in July, 2011.
    more
  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)
    June 21, 2014
    By now you all know I’m reading the box set and not giving a real review until I’m done with the hole batch and yada, yada, yada. That being restated, in place of a review (which would be all: “Why do people not like this one? I mean, yeah, book 3 was nearly impossible to beat, but this one was damn solid writing. Not to mention, how many authors can start a freaking remodel of a series and make it work like this? Also, who would have ever thought I would love a Lannister? And rantrantrantrantr By now you all know I’m reading the box set and not giving a real review until I’m done with the hole batch and yada, yada, yada. That being restated, in place of a review (which would be all: “Why do people not like this one? I mean, yeah, book 3 was nearly impossible to beat, but this one was damn solid writing. Not to mention, how many authors can start a freaking remodel of a series and make it work like this? Also, who would have ever thought I would love a Lannister? And rantrantrantrantrantrant . . .”) I’m going to teach you how to make an awesome Pinterest craft that was inspired by alcohol my Goodreads buddies JennyJen and Andrea Ninja Bunneh :The idea is to take a page from your favorite book and turn it into cheap/free art in your reading room. First, pick a page (duh).Second, blow up said picture to the size of your choice (mine is 11x17 because that’s as big as the copy service at my office can make it - a/k/a I’m too damn cheap/lazy to go to Kinkos): Third, brew a cup of tea: (Tardis mug not necessary, but strongly encouraged)Fourth, put the paper on a cookie sheet (another reason why 11x17 is a good choice) and cover with tea: Let soak for 5 minutes while warming your oven to 200 degrees. After the paper has soaked, you can manipulate it by tearing, wrinkling, etc. to give it an “aged” look.Fifth, drain off excess liquid and bake in the oven for 7-10 minutes. If you’re a pyromaniac you desire, you can burn the edges of the paper for an even more weathered appearance after it is completely dry. All that’s left is sticking it in a frame: And there you have it. A nearly free art project that will have all your friends asking “what the fuck does Hodor, hodor, hodor mean??????” A craft so simple even Mitchell could do it. Well, he could if he were more than just a head. (He says we should hang a page from Everyone Poops above the dumper. That Mitchell - he always keeps it classy.)
    more
  • Mohammed Arabey
    May 10, 2015
    طيب ,خلصت الجزء الثالث 10 مايو 2015وقبله الأولو الثانيوفي ليلة 10 مايو 2014 كنت قررت أبدأ في الرابع الجو كان به رياح وغائما بعض الأيام منذ أعياد الربيع أثناء قراءتي للأجزاء الماضية حتي شعرت وكأنها لعنة "أغنية الجليد والنار" والشتاء الطويل ,تلك الظاهرة بهذا العالم الغريبأما أن تصيب الأسكندرية فجر 11 مايو 2015 عاصفة رعدية وبرق في سماءها لأول مرة في هذا الوقت تقريبا منذ عشر سنوات..وهذا بمجرد كتابتي تعليق اني قررت البدء في الجزء الرابع غدا بعد أن كنت مقررا قراءته لاحقا في الخريف ان شاء اللهحسنا..الش طيب ,خلصت الجزء الثالث 10 مايو 2015وقبله الأولو الثانيوفي ليلة 10 مايو 2014 كنت قررت أبدأ في الرابع الجو كان به رياح وغائما بعض الأيام منذ أعياد الربيع أثناء قراءتي للأجزاء الماضية حتي شعرت وكأنها لعنة "أغنية الجليد والنار" والشتاء الطويل ,تلك الظاهرة بهذا العالم الغريبأما أن تصيب الأسكندرية فجر 11 مايو 2015 عاصفة رعدية وبرق في سماءها لأول مرة في هذا الوقت تقريبا منذ عشر سنوات..وهذا بمجرد كتابتي تعليق اني قررت البدء في الجزء الرابع غدا بعد أن كنت مقررا قراءته لاحقا في الخريف ان شاء اللهحسنا..الشتاء الطويل قد خرج من الرواية لعالمنا:)عاما انا سعيد لعشقي لهذا الجو :)محمد العربيفجر 11 مايو 2015
    more
  • Roya
    December 22, 2014
    (Bitching rant below. Avoid if you hate that sort of thing I guess. Do what you want though. I'm not your mom.)When I began this book last month, I was surprised to see that none of the chapters focused on my favourite characters. Most of the POV characters were secondary characters or I hadn't heard of them before. It still seemed exciting, so I tried to look forward to the change. The previous book was the best in the series for me. Why couldn't this one be better?I'll start off by saying that (Bitching rant below. Avoid if you hate that sort of thing I guess. Do what you want though. I'm not your mom.)When I began this book last month, I was surprised to see that none of the chapters focused on my favourite characters. Most of the POV characters were secondary characters or I hadn't heard of them before. It still seemed exciting, so I tried to look forward to the change. The previous book was the best in the series for me. Why couldn't this one be better?I'll start off by saying that the title of this book is inaccurate. A Folly for Crows is more honest. I have never invested so much time in a book to be left with so little. Nothing happened. A bit did near the end, but I have a hunch that everything that was in this book could have slimly fit into the next. What a drag. I probably do more in a day than most of those characters did in two chapters. If you're not going to do anything, don't be a POV character. It's really quite simple. Half the time I felt like jumping into the book and poking the characters with a stick to make them move.Current Care Levels:When the characters weren't sitting on their butts, they were being pains in the butt. Whatever good I have ever said about Jaime and Cersei, I take it back. I take it all back. Save the Queen of Bitches, Cersei Lannister is the second most despicable, power-hungry fictional character I've had the misfortune of coming across. I quote Margaery Tyrell when I say that she's a "vile, scheming, evil bitch." Whatever sympathy I had is lost. Words are wind (more on this shortly). Perhaps her only redeeming quality is the love she holds for her children. But if that's her way of doing it, she might as well not bother at all.This is all just the bare bones of my annoyance. Another thing I didn't like, although it's minor, was enough to make me want to throw my Kindle out of the window Silver Linings Playbook-style was the over-usage of some phrases. For example, "Words are wind." I looked it up and this was used six times in the book. Six times. It was very quotable at first, but then it got monotonous. There's another line which was used nine times. I hope this won't be a trend in the next book.Usually I have to pass the 50% mark for things to get really interesting in these books, but that didn't happen here until nearly the end. Suffice to say, whatever little patience I have when I start a book was lost in this instance.A sure sign (especially with this series it seems) that I'm enjoying a book, is how many updates I post or quotes I like and share. (Both of which were insufficient in this case obviously.) For the most part, I didn't feel like there was much worth sharing.I stopped watching the show between the time that I started and finished this book. This little incident sealed the deal. Props to the producers for that.Aside from that, the plot of the show has diverged starkly (pun intended) from that of the books. And with good reason in many aspects. I'm not quite sure what Martin is doing, but I know I'm not enjoying it. "Let's get this over with," has been the mentality for quite some time. Maybe I just miss Daenerys. Or maybe I just think this is getting ridiculous.
    more
  • Cait (Paper Fury)
    August 7, 2015
    AGH I'M SO TORN WHAT TO RATE THIS. Honestly it's probably 3.5. There was so much boredom and annoyance and grinding of teeth and I felt, as a whole, the book didn't feel complete. Apparently this and A Dance with Dragons were all ONE book? But it got split into two? (Thank the bookish gods.) But I still firmly believe that every and any book should feel like a completely book in itself. A Feast of Crows felt like a filler. Also it ditched ALL my favourite narrators!! THEY'RE NOT DEAD just...not AGH I'M SO TORN WHAT TO RATE THIS. Honestly it's probably 3.5. There was so much boredom and annoyance and grinding of teeth and I felt, as a whole, the book didn't feel complete. Apparently this and A Dance with Dragons were all ONE book? But it got split into two? (Thank the bookish gods.) But I still firmly believe that every and any book should feel like a completely book in itself. A Feast of Crows felt like a filler. Also it ditched ALL my favourite narrators!! THEY'RE NOT DEAD just...not in this book?!? Like. what. I missed Daenerys and Jon and Tyrion SO SO MUCH. I didn't miss Bran as much but I still would've liked to know what he was up to. But basically Dani, Jon, and Tyrion are my favourites...so consider me sobbing. Althooooough, we did get plenty of Brienne. And that makes me happy. All of Brienne's chapters are like 5-stars. I LOVE HER SO MUCH. *hyperventilates* I also have a theory that she's on the Autistic/Aspergic spectrum, from some of her behaviours. It makes me love her mooooore.THINGS I DIDN'T LIKE AND MADE ME GRIMACE:+ All the excess narrators. Excuse me but I don't CARE what's going on in the Iron Islands. I. don't. CARE. I think Asha is awesome but she didn't even have barely any POV time and omg, every time I had to sit through a Priest chapter, I wanted to STAB MYSELF WITH DRIFT WOOD OR SOMETHING AGH. SHUT UP DUDE. + Also the Dorne stuff was uber boring. It could've been cool...but it just wasn't. All the POV characters (like the captain of the guard and Marcella's guard) were SO BORING. No Sand Snake POV and they're actually the interesting ones. So far I feel like the Dornish are ridiculously boring even though they seem so cool. + Elena. UGHHHHHH. Okay, I don't get it. Her name is SANSA. I know she was hiding her identity, but did she really change that much inside so she fully could be Elena?!?!? It was absolutely DISGUSTING how Petyr was treating her. Like "hey you're my daughter, but now we gotta kiss on the lips". I'm so revolted. HE'S SUCH A PERVERT. I would happily see a dragon eat Petyr.+ No Varys. I miss you Varyssssss. + DID I MENTION THERE WAS NO DANI OR TYRION OR JON CHAPTERS?!???+ I don't even understand what Arya's trying to achieve. I think she's an idiot for giving everything up to this random death cult. I wish she was learning to be an assassin or something.+ Also, what little glimpse of Lord Commander Snow we did see, through Samwell's eyes was...awful. Jon is like awful. He used to be THE epicest character for me but. he. is. awful. How dare he send Aemon to see. Even if the Red Woman wanted to sacrifice him...HOW DARE JON DO THAT. Can't he just grow a beard and stand up to the red witch?! SERIOUSLY?!?! Anyway, Aemon (view spoiler)[died (hide spoiler)] anyway, so the entire thing was pointless and he could've lived his in his home and been happy. Boo Jon. BOO.....okay, but I did love SO MANY THINGS! Normally I go through the characters, but this time I'm just going to make a list of things I loved!STUFF I AM SQUEEING OVER BECAUSE IT EXCITES ME SO MUCH:+ THE SERIES IN GENERAL!! This can't be overlooked. I seriously adore every second I snatch to listen to another audio chapter. I. adore. it. It's fast become one of my favourite series OF ALL TIME and I can't get enough, seriously. Even though some parts are boring, I still want to know moooore about the world. I love all the things. Omg. This series. + Brienne and Jaime: I SHIP THEM SO SO SOSOOOOO HARD. Sure they had like 1 chapter together, but omg, if they'd just get over each other and perhaps rent a boat, sail to the Summer Isle's, adopt Pod, and live happily ever after? I would be okay with that. He gave her his super special sword. And when she was dying, she was calling out for him. :')+ Bronn. He's totally not in the book at all because he's married some girl and settled down in a castle...BUT. He's sassy by default and named his wife's bastard Tyrion and totally stomped on the plots to kill him. OMG. GO BRONN.+ Cersei...omg, is she supposed to be on the good list?! Cersei has LOST THE PLOT. She's a mess. She's drunk 99% of the time and just makes the dumbest decisions and arghhhhhh. She's fooling herself into thinking "its all for Tommon" BAH. Rubbish. It's all for you. I do feel bad though that no one thinks she's epic. But, to be honest...she isn't as smart as she thinks she is.+ JAIMEEEEEEEEE. He lost a lot of his sass. But I still love him so much. + SAMMMMMM. I love Samwell Tarley! He's off to be a Maester and I love how he and Gilly get closer and, zomg, ship them too. I wish he could settle down and marry Gilly and raise her son and Mance's son. So cute. (Whyyyy am I trying to match everyone up and give them HEA's and babies?!?! I DON'T KNOW. I'M NOT USUALLY THIS EMOTIONAL.)+ I loved all the King's Landing scenes! I LOVE the politics half and the backstabbing and the schemes and plots.+ The cliffhangers were INSANE. OH WOW. Like I am literally on the edge of my chair letting out random screeches of horror and pain and JUST WOW. I HATE THIS BUT I LOVE IT TOO. #itscomplicated+ The time someone said TYRION is Twyin's son and fajsdklfads yes and yes, why couldn't Twyin look past the deformities and see that?! Tyrion is EVERY SINGLE INCH his son. + That time Jaime PUNCHED someone for dissing Brienne. :')OH OH. But I need to warn you about the audio book! The narrator deserves 1-star. This was the WORST audio book ever. Now I downloaded it, so I don't get how this happened or if it's like this for ALL...but the tracks are often out of sync. They'll bounce around and then repeat themselves. And the narrator (I checked 5 million times that it's the same guy as the first 4 books...and it is) did NOT remember how to read. He mixed up the accents. HE MISPRONOUNCED ALL THE NAMES. OMG. I HATE THIS SO MUCH. Like in the first 4 books he said "Pet-tire" and now it's "Peter" and then it was "Cat-lynn" and now it's "Caitlin" and it should be "Gilly" but he's going "Jilly". AGHHH DUDE WHAT ARE YOU DOING YOU'RE RUINING EVERYTHING. Couldn't he have taken 2 seconds to check how he pronounced things in the other books?????? Plus he dropped Jaime's accent and gave Arya an old witchy wildling accent. And then he'd change the characters accents within one chapter. It was awful, okay? And for someone who has 100% listened to this series on audio, it was super disorientating to have the accents be switched and swatched and the names to be mispronounced. I nearly cried because it was so hard to listen to. I hope Dance with Dragons is better!?!?BASICALLY: I HAVE A LOT OF FEELINGS. Mostly good, but a LOT bad this time. Mostly I'm annoyed at the excess of boring and annoying POVs that I cared 2% about. I wanted the characters I loved instead of the dumb iron islanders or whatever. I was annoyed at the amount of filler. BUT THENNNNN. Any book with plenty of Brienne and Jaime has me hooked, and zomg so many cliffhangers!! I NEED TO READ ON SO BADDDDD. (Also no severely scary deaths?!? What is this. I imagine ADwD is going to be terror then.)I'M SO OBSESSED WITH THIS SERIES THOUGH. OMG. NO ONE SAVE ME.
    more
  • Selene
    May 23, 2016
    I've decided to read the fourth book A Feast for Crows and the fifth book A Dance with Dragons chronologically rather than in publication order.
  • Andrea ❤Ninja Bunneh❤
    March 28, 2014
    I know, I know....this is the ugly stepchild of the whole series. I get it, I do. Many of our beloved characters simply aren't featured much in this book. Before we get our panties in a bunch let's think about that for a second. If they weren't in the book that means..........................Mr. Martin couldn't kill them off!!! See? There is always an up side to everything. To be completely fair, however, at this point Mr. Martin could write Hodor and words are wind 100,000 times on a piece of t I know, I know....this is the ugly stepchild of the whole series. I get it, I do. Many of our beloved characters simply aren't featured much in this book. Before we get our panties in a bunch let's think about that for a second. If they weren't in the book that means..........................Mr. Martin couldn't kill them off!!! See? There is always an up side to everything. To be completely fair, however, at this point Mr. Martin could write Hodor and words are wind 100,000 times on a piece of toilet paper and I would probably give that 5 ninja bunnehs as well.Because I am this cat. (Metaphorically speaking, of course.)There are two of my favorite people in this book. I ship that shit like FedEx. And so, my dear Mr. Martin, once again you have earned unicorn rainbow farts and my complete continued addiction to your series. 5 Ninja-Bunnehs-Sitting-On-The-Wall
    more
  • Karen
    July 24, 2014
    5 STARSI'm not going to write a long review on this one. Just know that I am deeply involved in the story. Fabulously creative writing. Happy about a few turn of events, deeply troubled by others, and utterly shocked by a few as well. Needless to say I must finish the series. I do love the fact that the books differ from the HBO series. Can't even imaging what's coming...Well, other than winter. On to book 5!
    more
  • Melissa Rudder
    June 6, 2008
    George R. R. Martin's A Feast for Crows (of the Song of Fire and Ice series) suffers from MBSS, or Middle Book in a Series Syndrome. It lacks the addictive excitement and intrigue necessary for early books and the catastrophes and closures I'm looking forward to from later books. It's just a link in the chain. My initial response to it reminds me of my initial response to J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix . I trust in the vision of the author and am certain the book is es George R. R. Martin's A Feast for Crows (of the Song of Fire and Ice series) suffers from MBSS, or Middle Book in a Series Syndrome. It lacks the addictive excitement and intrigue necessary for early books and the catastrophes and closures I'm looking forward to from later books. It's just a link in the chain. My initial response to it reminds me of my initial response to J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix . I trust in the vision of the author and am certain the book is essential to the ongoing series, but, without those remaining books at my disposal, I am rather unenthused. (On a side note, Order of the Phoenix has become one of my favorite Harry Potter books--perhaps in time A Feast for Crows will have a similar ascent.) Compounding the issues of MBSS, A Feast for Crows introduces a parade of new characters that help both to continue expanding the borders of Martin's extremely impressive fictional world and, just as importantly, to fill the character gaps left by his earlier stories' bloodbaths. While I know some of these new characters will grow on me, I fear that I have a limited amount of room in my head for more names and a limited amount of affection in my heart for more characters. Speaking of my affection for characters, I was irritated to discover that A Feast for Crows is only half of Martin's intended fourth book and stars only half of his (remaining) main characters. An entire book without my favorite--perhaps that's why this review is leaning toward negative.I should get to the positive, because, whine as I do, I know there is much more positive in A Feast for Crows than negative. As someone who reads for patterns, for instance, I loved the recurring presence of the novel's title throughout the text. Each time it was both clever and alarming. I say this with every new Song of Fire and Ice book, but I can't help noticing and admiring Martin's character development. Met with the unexpected struggles of war, his characters grow and change. It is a true sign of Martin's artistry that while, at book one, I could never have predicted the shifting attitudes and actions of his characters in book four, upon reading through book four, I can look back and clearly understand why his characters now act the way they do. And while his story doesn't always develop in the way I would like it to, it seems to develop organically as the natural product of a chaotic world peopled with complex individuals. Which in my opinion testifies to the strength of Martin's plot structuring, the skill of his storytelling, and the integrity of his vision. (Nota bene, Stephanie Meyer.)I can't wait for the next book. So much so that I'm going to have to buy it in hardcover. Ew.Note:Upon reading Feast a second time, I'm adding a star to my rating. Once I coped with the overwhelming disappointment of Tyrion's absence and prepared myself for the onslaught of new characters, I could really appreciate the plot twists and character development in this book. As I wait for the fifth installment (in July!), I have two thoughts: sadness upon reading Martin's prediction that Dance would be out in 2006 and anxious anticipation for the sixth book in the series, because news on all of Feast's cliffhangers will have to wait until then. CAN'T I JUST DEVOUR THE WHOLE SERIES NOW?!Quotes!"Words are like arrows... Once loosed, you cannot call them back." "Knowledge is a weapon... Arm yourself well before you ride forth to battle.""Men of honor will do things for their children that they would never consider doing for themselves.""History is a wheel, for the nature of man is fundamentally unchanging.""No fight is hopeless till it has been fought.""Every man should lose a battle in his youth, so he does not lose a war when he is old.""I prefer my history dead. Dead history is writ in ink, the living sort in blood.""A king who does not protect his people is no king at all.""Valor is a poor substitute for numbers."
    more
Write a review