Taste What You're Missing
Whether it’s a grilled cheese sandwich with tomato soup, maple-cured bacon sizzling hot from the pan, or a salted caramel coated in dark chocolate, you know when food tastes good to you. But you may not know the amazing story behind why you love some foods and can’t tolerate others.Whether it’s a grilled cheese sandwich with tomato soup, maple-cured bacon sizzling hot from the pan, or a salted caramel coated in dark chocolate, you know when food tastes good to you. But you may not know the amazing story behind why you love some foods and can’t tolerate others. Now, in Taste What You’re Missing, the first book that demystifies the science of taste, you’ll learn how your individual biology, genetics, and brain create a personal experience of everything you taste—and how you can make the most of it. A seasoned food developer to whom food companies turn for help in creating delicious new products, Barb Stuckey reveals that much of what we think we know about how taste works is wrong. And the truth is much more fascinating—for instance, your tongue is not divided into quadrants for sweet, sour, salt, and bitter and only a fraction of what you taste happens in your mouth. As Stuckey explains how our five senses work together to form “flavor perceptions,” she tells intriguing stories about people who have lost the sense of smell or taste and the unexpected ways their experience of food changes as a result. You’ll learn why kids (and some adults) turn up their noses at Brussels sprouts and broccoli, how salt makes grapefruit sweet, and why you drink your coffee black while your spouse loads it with cream and sugar. Stuckey also provides eye-opening experiments in which you can discover your unique “taster type” and learn why you react instinctively to certain foods, in particular why your response to bitterness is unique. You’ll find ways to improve your ability to discern flavors, detect ingredients, and devise taste combinations in your own kitchen for delectable results. Taste What You’re Missing gives curious eaters, Food Network watchers, kitchen tinkerers, and armchair Top Chefs the understanding and language to impress friends and families with insider knowledge about everything edible. What Harold McGee did for the science of cooking Barb Stuckey does for the science of taste in Taste What You’re Missing, a calorie-free way to get more pleasure from every bite.

Taste What You're Missing Details

TitleTaste What You're Missing
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 13th, 2012
PublisherSimon & Schuster
ISBN-139781439190739
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Food, Nonfiction, Science, Cooking, Food Writing, Culinary, Cookbooks

Taste What You're Missing Review

  • Orsolya
    January 1, 1970
    Whether you are a foodie, someone interested in the biology/science of food consumption, posses an inclination regarding brain perceptions of taste, or are simply seeking a unique read; “Taste You’re Missing” by food developer/marketer Barb Stuckey will satisfy your cravings (pun intended).“Taste” passionately dives into the science of taste. Stuckey clearly knows her thesis well and is excited to share it with the world. As early as the introduction, the reader is immersed in fun facts and scie Whether you are a foodie, someone interested in the biology/science of food consumption, posses an inclination regarding brain perceptions of taste, or are simply seeking a unique read; “Taste You’re Missing” by food developer/marketer Barb Stuckey will satisfy your cravings (pun intended).“Taste” passionately dives into the science of taste. Stuckey clearly knows her thesis well and is excited to share it with the world. As early as the introduction, the reader is immersed in fun facts and scientific information. By page 50, one will either be taking notes or enthusiastically sharing the knowledge gained with others. However, this wealth of information can be overwhelming. In fact, “Taste” is rather scholarly and academic overall (including scientific jargon although Stuckey describes these terms well and substitutes them with layman’s terms); and requires breaks in reading if one actually desires to retain the information. Although very interesting and compelling, “Taste” can be consuming (another pun!) and requires brain energy: not a light read.Stuckey does break up the heavy texture by including personal, lighter stories and insight, home experiments, and illustrations to help the reader along. These are easy to decipher and supplement the text quite well. “Taste” is divided into three sections with the first describing how other senses effect the flavor of foods (taste and flavor are two different things!). Not only is this a solid foundation for the book but the information is also simply amazing. Combining psychology with science, the reader will learn about aspects which never crossed his/her mind but yet, affects daily food consumption. There are several “Oh that explains my experience!” light bulb moments. Although I won’t spoil the information, it is enlightening. Upping the ante on interactivity, Stuckey also offers kits to be requested from her website for at-home experiments (which, off-topic, resulted in me thinking of terrific science fair experiments for children).Again, although Stuckey’s work can be overwhelming in the breadth discussed; the pace is faster and smoother than one would imagine. Stuckey keeps the ratio of science to accessibility in a perfect range allowing the average reader to understand the text with ease. However, there are moments when Stuckey repeats herself (which is obviously done so that the reader truly understands the material versus due to a lack of information on the topic). The second section of “Taste” focuses on each individual taste. These chapters are less scientific and slightly disorganized without a clear objective, but they are well-written and interesting, nonetheless. The third section is somewhat of a social sum-up of the topics discussed. Although equally fascinating and informative, some may be deterred by Stuckey’s overly familiar writing style using cuss words and even describing marijuana/food experiments she conducted which may, to some readers, be interpreted as unprofessional. “Taste” concludes with tips on how to better savor foods, enjoy meals, and introduce new foods to children, etc. It is a smooth and well-rounded finish (thinking in food terms, now!). For those readers who judge on the sources used (or lack thereof), Stuckey uses a sufficient amount of primary and secondary sources which satisfies the question of whether she speculates or not. Overall, “Taste” is unlike most books out there which the average reader will be concerned with but if you eat, and we all do; you MUST read this. Unique and creative, yet informative and scientific, Stuckey won’t let you down with “Taste What You're Missing”.
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  • Book Him Danno
    January 1, 1970
    For starters I want to tell you all that I am a test tester for a large food manufacturer where I live. Panels I have participated in are; salsa, bacon(fresh and microwave, refrigerator and shelf stable), shredded pork, pork ribs, macaroni and cheese, and thank heaven I missed out on the chicken broth panel. This is a very part-time job, a few weeks each year is all. We do not decide if we like a product, we tell them how much of any item we can taste in the product, ie: salt, sugar, smoke, toma For starters I want to tell you all that I am a test tester for a large food manufacturer where I live. Panels I have participated in are; salsa, bacon(fresh and microwave, refrigerator and shelf stable), shredded pork, pork ribs, macaroni and cheese, and thank heaven I missed out on the chicken broth panel. This is a very part-time job, a few weeks each year is all. We do not decide if we like a product, we tell them how much of any item we can taste in the product, ie: salt, sugar, smoke, tomato, onion, vinegar, etc. Each panel can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks and then is usually repeated a few times during the next few years. With that out of the way I have to say that this book is fantastic!!! It is interesting and thought provoking. Why do we eat what we eat? What do we really taste? Is it too salty or too sour or maybe even bitter? In panels we throw around words like, rancid, porky, piggy(sometimes not really sure what that tastes like), sweet, sour, rich, acidic…etc. This book talks about terms they use in food manufacturing and taste panels. I loved the exercise at the ends of the chapters. Without your nose you really can’t tell what you are tasting…amazing.Why do we over eat? Why are some kid’s better eaters than others? My kids are great eaters, they try anything and love most foods. We have one who doesn’t like beans, one who doesn’t like onions, one that doesn’t like hamburgers(he calls it ‘murder burger’ so I think it’s the vegetarian Aunt who he is following not the taste…he will eat meatloaf) and one who doesn’t like peas. Meals at our house are varied and strange at times and yet we all eat well. Eat well when you are pregnant and maybe your kids will eat like you. HUM….that is interesting.Anyone out there who eats….oh that’s everyone(that is the reason for the 5 stars everyone should read this book)…will love this informative, interesting, and fast to read book. Taste…what are you missing? You will be surprised!
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  • Rosalind M
    January 1, 1970
    3.95 stars. An enjoyable read with some interesting anecdotes but very repetitive. This is the first foodie book I've read that was written from a professional taster's point of view, and it does offer a slightly different perspective than the usual aficionado's or restaurant critic's voice.
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  • Jeannie
    January 1, 1970
    The author writes with much personal narrative to present some very interesting science in the area of sensory and perceptual psychology of taste. For the purely science-minded, it can be distracting to read so much personal sharing, but I found her approach to be engaging and enjoyable; it definitely avoided the dry and overly clinical approach to science for the general public.I appreciated her knowledgeable expertise and ability to discuss cross-modal influences in sensory information process The author writes with much personal narrative to present some very interesting science in the area of sensory and perceptual psychology of taste. For the purely science-minded, it can be distracting to read so much personal sharing, but I found her approach to be engaging and enjoyable; it definitely avoided the dry and overly clinical approach to science for the general public.I appreciated her knowledgeable expertise and ability to discuss cross-modal influences in sensory information processing and how they affect taste perception. Contrary to most people's thinking, taste experiences do not happen in a vacuum. No human sense does, whether it is aural, olfactory, tactile or visual. But so many people in culinary and food & drink businesses fail to see the big picture of how the brain works in sensory and perceptual information processing and its relationship to human behavior and decision making. Eventually, I do believe people will come to see the errors and misunderstandings they have in sensory and perceptual psychology, and they will eventually understand that when we talk about "taste," we should also be talking about other things, such as memory in the brain (limbic system), sound's ability to alter the perception of sweetness, environmental influences in tasting, and many other non-gustatory but relevant stimuli and events. It's my opinion that many followers who think that "taste happens in a vacuum" really have no science understanding in the area of psychology or neuroscience, and they are merely projecting a misinformed opinion or personal belief system that is not fact-based about real-world taste experiences.What Harold McGee did for the "science of cooking," Barb Stuckey has done for the "science of taste." Of course, there are more resources out there to delve into the science behind taste, but one will find Stuckey's book to be quite comprehensive and up-to-date. It is also digestible to read, regardless of one's background.I only wish there was more discussion about how memory and learning / re-learning in the brain works when one has a taste experience. I do believe that just as researchers have found therapeutic emotional benefits and neuroplasticity with sound, smell and touch stimuli, the same could possibly be obtained through taste stimuli. There could be more research into this area, and it will be exciting to see what the future holds in this area of study.
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  • Zach
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a fun guide to the interaction of taste (i.e. what your tongue detects - sweet, salty, sour) and flavor (a more complex sensation that includes your sense of smell and invokes shadowy terms such as "earthy"). It's a little complicated - the lady is a flavor scientist after all - but it hit me just right. As a bonus, there are experiments to "prove" the point of the previous chapter.While I enjoyed the explanations of reading an fMRI and the structure of neurons in Neurogastron I thought this was a fun guide to the interaction of taste (i.e. what your tongue detects - sweet, salty, sour) and flavor (a more complex sensation that includes your sense of smell and invokes shadowy terms such as "earthy"). It's a little complicated - the lady is a flavor scientist after all - but it hit me just right. As a bonus, there are experiments to "prove" the point of the previous chapter.While I enjoyed the explanations of reading an fMRI and the structure of neurons in Neurogastronomy, this is much more down to earth but it still has some substance. It has plenty of scientific merit, but it doesn't get stuck in details. The author works for a company who develops flavors for different companies, which is interesting: you can triangulate a flavor and a texture through endless lab experiments.More than anything, this book has helped me to slow down, try to identify the flavors present, and provide a vocabulary for those flavors. As a result, I'm better at creating meals with balanced flavors, which is pretty cool.
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  • Al
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a fascinating look into how both humans in general and individual personalities taste. I would have given it 5 stars, except the book's ending was somewhat anticlimactic. I think ending the book on a high note about taste increasing the enjoyment of food would have been a much more suitable ending than her speculations on how taste has affected obesity and how it can possibly stimulate weight loss. Overall, though, it was very well-researched, balanced and interesting.
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  • Juli-Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this informative yet intriguing book which contained my ideal dose of science - not too much, not too little. I am applying what I've learned and sharing it with others. It will enhance my cooking and eating!
  • William
    January 1, 1970
    For anyone interested in enjoying food, a thorough study of taste is in order. Stuckey does a fine job mixing research, personal experience (she IS a food taster, after all), and prescriptive advice to help the reader understand how he/she likes or dislikes whatever is put into the mouth.
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  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely worth reading for the very interesting and useful information but not very well written.
  • Larry Benfield
    January 1, 1970
    In reading this book, I more often felt as if I were sitting in a public health clinic or lecture hall rather than at a dinner table.
  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    Couldn't even get past the third chapter. While I find the subject matter interesting, I was actually quite bored. And I found the author incredibly self-absorbed and fascinated with herself...
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Great exercises to challenge your palate. Easy to navigate chapters based on your curiosity/time. Practical implementation of how to taste and why. Used it to learn more about my palate and the manufactured food industry's ultimate goal of tricking me into thinking it's real butter.
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  • Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing read. Learnt so much about the complexities about taste. Ready to put learnt knowledge to taste the world better!
  • yamiyoghurt
    January 1, 1970
    Easy, entertaining read. Happy to find a book on sensory that's written for the layperson.
  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Didn't really grab me.
  • Lauren Collins
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book more than I can express. It’s a great intersection of science and foodie and just an enjoyable, easy read.
  • Alyce
    January 1, 1970
    The title is the best thing about this poorly written, obscenely redundant book. The sentences were so dreadfully constructed that they elicited laughter when I read them to my family.
  • Alex Magpie
    January 1, 1970
    So by and large, I really enjoyed this book. It is a long hard look at exactly how flavor works, and works in combinations, and I LOVE THIS. I recommend it if you are into food on an intellectual level as well as, idk, a carnal level. However, THERE ARE SOME FAULTS.1) Stuckey is not a career writer and sometimes her attempts at accessibility degrade the scientific value of her book, or are just incredibly awkward.Examples of ruining her science cred with generalizations or subjectivity: American So by and large, I really enjoyed this book. It is a long hard look at exactly how flavor works, and works in combinations, and I LOVE THIS. I recommend it if you are into food on an intellectual level as well as, idk, a carnal level. However, THERE ARE SOME FAULTS.1) Stuckey is not a career writer and sometimes her attempts at accessibility degrade the scientific value of her book, or are just incredibly awkward.Examples of ruining her science cred with generalizations or subjectivity: Americans don’t encounter spoiled or poisonous food (164) "Bitter tastes are unpleasant." Gives examples of unsweetened espresso and tea. (203) One time I took the weed! /refers to all marijuana use as “abuse” (291)Example of being awkward: “Salt releases the desirable flavors from suppression by the bitter or sour tastes like Superman freeing Lois Lane from Lex Luthor." (181)I DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT THIS MEANS. Is Lois Lane a part of Lex Luthor???? Do you maybe mean like Superman raising Superboy up right despite him being half made of Lex Luthor?????? DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT SUPERMAN, BARB STUCKEY?2) The lack of prose editing worries me as far as how much I can trust the science.This all sort of comes to an AMAZING head at the front of chapter 19, where all she needs to say is in one line: "His goal was to creat an adult, wine-like beverage that someone could choose instead of wine: all the complexity and sophistication without the alcohol." (327) This line arrives at the end of THREE PARAGRAPHS of saying almost exactly the same thing over and over. She uses the word “sophistication” THREE TIMES. It’s like she just free-wrote until she got the sentence she wanted and then forgot to not print every thought in her head. It is perfect. It is a bad sign. Take all the food science with grain of salt.3) Stuckey has clearly never been poor and does not know any poor people.Aside from that incredible assumption up there that no one eats spoiled/dangerous food (?????? maybe not at her meticulously picked-at organic food co-ops and Michelin star restaurants), she: Assumes all Americans have access to food! I really wish I could find this one because it was like she had NEVER HEARD of food deserts or people starving in the good old US of A. Thinks maybe everyone looks at Zagat guides and stuff to pick restaurants?? IDK, she’s “eaten in dozens of venerable Michelin Restaurant Guide-starred restaurants” so probably Zagat, right (4)? Assumes everyone is American, eg, no one ever took their chocolate bitter before bitter chocolate bars were invented for WWII (196). As you know, America also invented cacao, so.4) Barb Stuckey loves food but fears fat [ed]. "Don’t be ashamed to add anything sweet." (204) Excuse me but why would I be ashamed? Literally unironically ends her book about food with—okay you know Ratatoille, the rat movie, there’s the skinny food critic called EGO? And he’s like, a caricature of the worst food snobbery? So, she—HAH. SHE. She literally gives an Ego quote as the last line in her entire book. The end of her book is literally, "If I don’t love it, I don’t swallow." (358) Taste what you’re missing INDEED.
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  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    I heard about this book when Barb Stuckey was interviewed on Science Friday on NPR. She expressed the same thing that she wrote in her introduction, which is that she went in search of a book detailing the information she was looking for, couldn't find it, and as a consequence researched and wrote it. It grabbed my attention right away. This book is an absolute must read if you have even a passing interest in food science. If you love Cooks Illustrated because it tells that it wants you to add a I heard about this book when Barb Stuckey was interviewed on Science Friday on NPR. She expressed the same thing that she wrote in her introduction, which is that she went in search of a book detailing the information she was looking for, couldn't find it, and as a consequence researched and wrote it. It grabbed my attention right away. This book is an absolute must read if you have even a passing interest in food science. If you love Cooks Illustrated because it tells that it wants you to add a splash of sherry vinegar into your winter greens because it balances out the flavors, but never really knew precisely why, this book explains it. Or why they want you to deglaze the fond off your pot with wine or chicken broth. Or why they want you to add reduced cremini mushrooms and beef marinated in soy sauce in your beef soup. SO. FASCINATING. Along with the scientific information Stuckey offers in this book, she also provides anecdotal examples (both her own anecdotes and anecdotes involving others) and injects her own humor into all of it. I honestly laughed out loud when she addressed the mythical dessert stomach that I frequently claim I have. Additionally, she has little food tasting experiments you can do on your own or with friends at the end of each chapter, plus a list of resources at the end including a fairly comprehensive list of smell and taste treatment centers (there's one in DC!).Foodies, read this book. Keep it handy for reference, especially when you have children. It'll go some way to explaining their crazy eating behavior.
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  • Arvin
    January 1, 1970
    A mildly interesting books about the human perception of taste. Like many of my quirky reads, there is not riveting narrative tying each piece of trivia together... but I learned a lot of interesting things from this book. Like Arya from GOT I will tell you of three things I learned from this book.I learned how just a tiny bit of something like a 1/4 tsp of sugar, salt, vinegar, or red pepper can noticeably change the overall flavor of the entire dish without the additive been noticeable itself A mildly interesting books about the human perception of taste. Like many of my quirky reads, there is not riveting narrative tying each piece of trivia together... but I learned a lot of interesting things from this book. Like Arya from GOT I will tell you of three things I learned from this book.I learned how just a tiny bit of something like a 1/4 tsp of sugar, salt, vinegar, or red pepper can noticeably change the overall flavor of the entire dish without the additive been noticeable itself (i.e. the dish might be more intense, more complex, less bitter... but not noticeably sweeter, saltier, sour, or spicier at all).I learned why artificial sweeteners rarely quiet taste right. The sweetness of sugar increases gradually, dips, and then rises again before tailing off quickly, while most artificial sweeteners are taste extremely sweet the moment it hits your tongue and then last much longer and leave a weird after taste. Coke Zero actually used two sweeteners together that come close to mimicking the sweetness profile of sugar (two distinct sweetness peaks).I also learned that picky eaters are often "Super Tasters"... in that they has more taste buds than regular "Tolerant Tasters" and so greens are much more bitter, peppers are much more spicier and fruits are much tarter... so don't always make fun of people who stick to meat and potatoes as you haven't walked a mile in their shoes... or tongue.Overall... unless you are like me and looking from something to read to fall asleep to at night... probably would not put this on top of your to-read list.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    I was looking for an introduction to the topic of taste in humans in order to understand how we develop preferences and why people develop different food preferences.The book fullfilled its mission. It's a very good introduction and overview of this scientific field. The author's style is entertaining but also precise. At start, I was bothered by the fact that the author described the difference between her own tasting abilities and her husband's... I almost gave up thinking 'Oh no please, not t I was looking for an introduction to the topic of taste in humans in order to understand how we develop preferences and why people develop different food preferences.The book fullfilled its mission. It's a very good introduction and overview of this scientific field. The author's style is entertaining but also precise. At start, I was bothered by the fact that the author described the difference between her own tasting abilities and her husband's... I almost gave up thinking 'Oh no please, not these anecdotes...." but fortunately I continued reading and was rewarded. The author takes this example along with other personal examples to illustrate her point very appropriately. A particular emphasis is given on the interactions between the different senses and the different tastes and flavours; this takes most of the book. I enjoyed the fact that the book can be read at different levels and for different purposes. In particular, at the end of each chapter, the author presents a set of simple experiments that are easy to carry at home or to a group of students. This is therefore also a good book to get some really good teaching materials! I am starting now John Prescott ('taste that matters') and it's interesting to compare both books. The content is very similar but Barb Stuckey's style is less scholastic, much more entertaining. On the other hand, John Prescott has a more exhaustive reference list with each experiment or citation having a precise reference with a number at the end of the book.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    MY THOUGHTSLOVED ITBarb Stuckey is a professional food developer and has studied the science behind why certain foods taste better than others and how some foods can enhance or detract for their taste as well. I had a friend in grade school that used to drink orange juice promptly after brushing his teeth which made him vomit. He did this any time he wanted to stay home from school. Although this is an extreme example, Barb Stuckey explains exactly why orange juice tastes terrible after brushing MY THOUGHTSLOVED ITBarb Stuckey is a professional food developer and has studied the science behind why certain foods taste better than others and how some foods can enhance or detract for their taste as well. I had a friend in grade school that used to drink orange juice promptly after brushing his teeth which made him vomit. He did this any time he wanted to stay home from school. Although this is an extreme example, Barb Stuckey explains exactly why orange juice tastes terrible after brushing your teeth. I found this whole book fascinating and full of really cool scientific facts about why some food tastes good and appealing while others completely miss the mark. She also emphasizes that our mouth and tongue only provide 20 percent of the experience of taste and that the other senses also come into play, especially smell.There are formulas throughout the book that go into great detail about how foods and spices combine to make the sum greater than the parts. Stuckey also provides experiments for you to try at home and help develop your own taste so you can actually learn how to increase your own potential taste. I never knew there was such science behind food development since on the surface we only tend to look at the packaging. I really enjoyed this whole read and the information included will have you thinking about this for years to come.
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  • Rogue Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Superb treatment of the sense of taste - what the tongue can detect. Organized by two five pointed stars, the first to describe food's sensory experience: taste - feel- see - hear - smell. This section covers the range of tasters, from supertasters to non-tasters and reasonably argues that the range and variability of taste sensation is difficult to classify. The majority of the work is given to the taste star: salt, bitter, umami, sweet, sour. Again, the individuality of taste characteristics a Superb treatment of the sense of taste - what the tongue can detect. Organized by two five pointed stars, the first to describe food's sensory experience: taste - feel- see - hear - smell. This section covers the range of tasters, from supertasters to non-tasters and reasonably argues that the range and variability of taste sensation is difficult to classify. The majority of the work is given to the taste star: salt, bitter, umami, sweet, sour. Again, the individuality of taste characteristics are remarkable, but the star makes it easy to understand how tastes can counter, balance and showcase each other and how to adjust one taste to make another more acceptable and even delightful.Exercises at the end of each chapter are excellent, perhaps part of formal sensory training, but very accessible and easy to conduct. Well written, entertaining, technical but not too and should be mandatory reading for all interested in the culinary experience or working in any aspect of the food industry as well as health professionals working with ent disorders.I read this at Aspen Food and Wine 2013, and Cochon555 masters. It really helped to focus my attention on and understanding of foods presented there. --Ashland Mystery
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a while to get through this book and I'm not entirely sure why. It's chock full of really interesting information about the physiology and science behind how we taste our food. And not only how we TASTE our food, but how are other sense are involved when it comes to eating. We smell, look, hear, and touch our food just as much as we taste it. Barb Stuckey has a fun style of writing and sense of humor that makes this book a little less drier than what it could've been. Her background i It took me a while to get through this book and I'm not entirely sure why. It's chock full of really interesting information about the physiology and science behind how we taste our food. And not only how we TASTE our food, but how are other sense are involved when it comes to eating. We smell, look, hear, and touch our food just as much as we taste it. Barb Stuckey has a fun style of writing and sense of humor that makes this book a little less drier than what it could've been. Her background in creating and manufacturing foods, from snacks to meals, provided a unique take on what it takes to make and eat something that appeals to all the senses. It was a little dry to read at times, but her final thoughts about how to be more mindful when we eat and really focus on cooking and eat food in a totally involved fashion were a wonderful conclusion. I took much of what she said to heart and I feel now that I am more aware of what I eat and how I eat it. I also loved the experiments that accompanied each of the sense of taste and other senses chapters. I think I might actually try a few and see what happens!
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  • Jeffrey
    January 1, 1970
    Cross modal sensory influences on taste perception! Bacon! Where's the crunch in my cornflakes?? How does sound influence taste? How does texture influence taste - and, the kicker - how does sight influence taste? The answer to all these, presented with style and humor through a set of personal anecdotes and popularized science is - quite a lot, definitely more than I'd imagined.This excellent exploration of the nature of taste mixes a fair bit of popularized - but solid - science with personal Cross modal sensory influences on taste perception! Bacon! Where's the crunch in my cornflakes?? How does sound influence taste? How does texture influence taste - and, the kicker - how does sight influence taste? The answer to all these, presented with style and humor through a set of personal anecdotes and popularized science is - quite a lot, definitely more than I'd imagined.This excellent exploration of the nature of taste mixes a fair bit of popularized - but solid - science with personal anecdotes from Barb Stuckey, EVP of Marketing at Mattson (world's largest new food concepting and research organization)and formerly a professional food developer / taster.As a home cook, I found her revelations about *how* she thought of taste to be remarkable and her sense of humor made the entire book more. . .palatable. . .Yes, I gave it 5 stars - if you're not that keen on food, you might find it more of a 3 or 4 star work, but if food is your thing, you will love it!
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  • Bear
    January 1, 1970
    This book goes through the various senses and how the relate to taste and it is very interesting, yet something nagged at me. Usually I soon for books filled with tests and experiments related to food and I liked this book fine but it didn't leave a real mark on me that makes me want to rave about it. Maybe it was the writing style, maybe it was jealousy of the place she got eat and taste maybe I as a foodie was annoyed that she seemed to work at some giant mega-corp that created tastes for junk This book goes through the various senses and how the relate to taste and it is very interesting, yet something nagged at me. Usually I soon for books filled with tests and experiments related to food and I liked this book fine but it didn't leave a real mark on me that makes me want to rave about it. Maybe it was the writing style, maybe it was jealousy of the place she got eat and taste maybe I as a foodie was annoyed that she seemed to work at some giant mega-corp that created tastes for junk food/fast food. At any rate it does cover plenty of ground and certainly educated me on aspects of taste I was not aware of.I recommend this book to anyone who wants a gateway or beginners look into taste, which is should noted IS NOT the same as flavor.
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  • Kim Heimbuch
    January 1, 1970
    WOW!!! I love food and I often am finding myself asking why I love some foods and not others. This book is everything you will need to answer every question about food you ever had. If you never questioned why you liked one type of cheese better than another, this book will open up your mind and senses and have you thinking in no time.The best part is Stuckey's actual experiments she puts into the book to reinforce it's not just a cover filled with mumbo-jumbo and that a lot of what we have been WOW!!! I love food and I often am finding myself asking why I love some foods and not others. This book is everything you will need to answer every question about food you ever had. If you never questioned why you liked one type of cheese better than another, this book will open up your mind and senses and have you thinking in no time.The best part is Stuckey's actual experiments she puts into the book to reinforce it's not just a cover filled with mumbo-jumbo and that a lot of what we have been taught and what we think we know is wrong. So before you turn your nose up to reading this book, give it two chapters and if she doesn't have you hooked by then, you truly don't know what you are missing out on.First Reads book.
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  • Carina
    January 1, 1970
    Ever wondered why you taste something differently than your family? Or why you hate coffee? Or if there are more than 5 basic tastes?Barb Stuckey takes the reader on an adventure of the mouth, wandering through the 5 tastes and wondering if there are more. Teaching you to concentrate on your food and savour it, instead of eating standing up over the kitchen sink. To slow down and feel the textures that bring pleasure instead of eating automatically in front of the tv, (then wondering, "where did Ever wondered why you taste something differently than your family? Or why you hate coffee? Or if there are more than 5 basic tastes?Barb Stuckey takes the reader on an adventure of the mouth, wandering through the 5 tastes and wondering if there are more. Teaching you to concentrate on your food and savour it, instead of eating standing up over the kitchen sink. To slow down and feel the textures that bring pleasure instead of eating automatically in front of the tv, (then wondering, "where did that bag of chips go???").Stuckey's book is a wonderful mix of science (she was a professional food taster) and entertaining anecdote, with a few recipes thrown in to practice the concepts she teaches.
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  • Charli Clark
    January 1, 1970
    What a fun book! I have always considered myself a foodie, but was utterly shocked at how much I didn't know about what I was eating, smelling, tasting, and touching all at the same time. This book gives you practice tests to help you hone your senses as well as information on why you taste what you do. I love Sauvignon Blanc however, Ms. Stuckey happen to mention that one of the key odors in Sauv Blanc is cat urine and I was dismayed until I happen to be cleaning my cat's litter box and realize What a fun book! I have always considered myself a foodie, but was utterly shocked at how much I didn't know about what I was eating, smelling, tasting, and touching all at the same time. This book gives you practice tests to help you hone your senses as well as information on why you taste what you do. I love Sauvignon Blanc however, Ms. Stuckey happen to mention that one of the key odors in Sauv Blanc is cat urine and I was dismayed until I happen to be cleaning my cat's litter box and realized she was right!
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  • Prettytaz83
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book, and it was interesting to learn more about food. I think I would have gotten more out of it had I done the "taste what you're missing" excersizes and if I had read the book in more of a "bite-sized snack at a time" form, rather than trying to read through it all at once.However, it was a slog to read through at times (although I couldn't tell you how/why), and I was happy to finish it up. I would like to go back and try all the excersizes at some point to increase my palate aw I liked this book, and it was interesting to learn more about food. I think I would have gotten more out of it had I done the "taste what you're missing" excersizes and if I had read the book in more of a "bite-sized snack at a time" form, rather than trying to read through it all at once.However, it was a slog to read through at times (although I couldn't tell you how/why), and I was happy to finish it up. I would like to go back and try all the excersizes at some point to increase my palate awareness.
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