The Thief Who Spat In Luck's Good Eye (Amra Thetys, #1.5)
The Thief Who Spat In Luck's Good Eye is a stand-alone novella that introduces readers to the characters and the world of THAGOTH, the Del Rey Digital first novel competition winner published by Random House:In the proud tradition of Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser comes a new team of daring, quick-witted heroes in a swashbuckling sword and sorcery adventure. . . .Amra is a thief with morals—she won’t steal from anyone poorer than she is. Fortunately, anybody that poor generally doesn’t have much worth stealing! Holgren is a mage with a distaste for magic and a soul bartered away to dark powers who will transport him to an eternity of torment on the instant of his death. Together they embark on a quest for the fabled city of Thagoth, where the secret of immortality is rumored to be hidden.But Amra and Holgren aren’t the only ones after the secret. Many others seek to utilize the hidden magic for their own twisted ends. And waiting in the ruined city with dark plans for the world are the twin gods Tha-Agoth and Athagos, a brother and sister whose illicit passion is as destructive and vengeful as they are. Now, as potent sorceries clash in a violent struggle for dominion over all that lives, Amra and Holgren face a choice between the unthinkable and the unbearable—with the fate of the world hanging in the balance. . . .

The Thief Who Spat In Luck's Good Eye (Amra Thetys, #1.5) Details

TitleThe Thief Who Spat In Luck's Good Eye (Amra Thetys, #1.5)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 28th, 2011
PublisherMichael McClung, via Smashwords
Rating
GenreFantasy, Science Fiction Fantasy

The Thief Who Spat In Luck's Good Eye (Amra Thetys, #1.5) Review

  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    A brief glimpse into the world of the feisty thief Amra and that of her secretive mage/partner Holgren. McClung's writing has a wonderfully solid, lyrical style and the narrative flows smoothly and feels quite rooted in the classic swashbuckling sense. But, as a standalone, the characters here lack much definition and the plot runs a bit too hurriedly, seemingly fleshing out ideas for the finished novel. All things considered, it indeed kept my interest, and I'm looking forward to reading the fu A brief glimpse into the world of the feisty thief Amra and that of her secretive mage/partner Holgren. McClung's writing has a wonderfully solid, lyrical style and the narrative flows smoothly and feels quite rooted in the classic swashbuckling sense. But, as a standalone, the characters here lack much definition and the plot runs a bit too hurriedly, seemingly fleshing out ideas for the finished novel. All things considered, it indeed kept my interest, and I'm looking forward to reading the full story and that of his other works as well.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun read that just draws you right in. A great cast of characters-Gods, a thief, a mage and an evil Shadow King-what more could you ask for? The humor is wry, the adventure is fascinating and the action is well written. The only drawback (minor as it is), is that I felt the final chapter unnecessary and a trifle dull after such an thrilling adventure. I will be reading the others in this series for certain!
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  • Michelle Alamdari
    January 1, 1970
    It wasn't necessarily bad, but neither was it something to write home about. It was a pretty basic becoming-a-hero tale, like a Greek myth. Lots of seemingly indestructable monsters, life-threatening situations, and hopeless odds that are miraculously overcome by pure luck, it would seem. Everything happened too quickly, none of the characters were particularly memorable, and the end was a rather disappointing happily-ever-after deal. That being said, I did enjoy Amra's (the main character's) sn It wasn't necessarily bad, but neither was it something to write home about. It was a pretty basic becoming-a-hero tale, like a Greek myth. Lots of seemingly indestructable monsters, life-threatening situations, and hopeless odds that are miraculously overcome by pure luck, it would seem. Everything happened too quickly, none of the characters were particularly memorable, and the end was a rather disappointing happily-ever-after deal. That being said, I did enjoy Amra's (the main character's) snarkiness and the simplistic writing style. Sometimes it's nice to read something that doesn't require you to read into every little detail of everything to squeeze out some symbolic meaning. It was a hero's tale, nothing more and nothing less. It was worth the couple dollars I spent on it:)
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  • Antonis
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this short story 4 stars but for me it definitely deserves a bit more, so let's just say it's 4,5 stars out of five. The story is very interesting and the characters are both realistic and uncommon but what sets this short story appart is the writing. I found McClung's style to be exactly what I've been looking for in a fantasy book. It's smooth, clear and fast while being descriptive, atmospheric and very beautiful. After reading many books lately with clunky writing that usually felt of I gave this short story 4 stars but for me it definitely deserves a bit more, so let's just say it's 4,5 stars out of five. The story is very interesting and the characters are both realistic and uncommon but what sets this short story appart is the writing. I found McClung's style to be exactly what I've been looking for in a fantasy book. It's smooth, clear and fast while being descriptive, atmospheric and very beautiful. After reading many books lately with clunky writing that usually felt off-target, this short story was a much welcomed change! I will definitely check his fantasy book "Thagoth" when I get the chance!
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  • Charles
    January 1, 1970
    What a wild ride. Four weeks ago I had a heart attack. I tried to pick up my read of Far Tortuga but I had lost some brain power and I haven't been able to put sentence sense, dialect and a classic foundation together since August ?? I tried something simpler, defending Jacob, but it was too much too. So I got the second of the Pulled, Spit, ... Set. I got through it, which shows you what a half brain dead reader can pull off. I wasn't the least interested. Too many threats to be scary. I thin What a wild ride. Four weeks ago I had a heart attack. I tried to pick up my read of Far Tortuga but I had lost some brain power and I haven't been able to put sentence sense, dialect and a classic foundation together since August ?? I tried something simpler, defending Jacob, but it was too much too. So I got the second of the Pulled, Spit, ... Set. I got through it, which shows you what a half brain dead reader can pull off. I wasn't the least interested. Too many threats to be scary. I think my mind wandered as I read, so I missed stuff. I can't imagine it was important. But I'm happy at some level I can put a book together.
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  • Jenny T.
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fantasy short story that introduces a thief named Amra who is partnered with a mage, Holgren. The pair devise a way to travel to the land of Thagoth and are faced with life and death decisions. I think the author did a good job developing a new land and populating it with a feisty heroine.
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  • Michael Kotsarinis
    January 1, 1970
    It was nice for a short piece but it left me with more questions than I would have liked. The idea and the setting are OK but some things in the story I found "too much" for my tastes. Maybe they are in context in the complete story. It's definitively fun to read but you then have to decide whether to go for the whole thing or not and that may prove difficult.
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  • Steve Young
    January 1, 1970
    Fun
  • Aline
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it . Go Amra!
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