Jane Austen Made Me Do It
Stories by: Lauren Willig • Adriana Trigiani • Jo Beverley • Alexandra Potter • Laurie Viera Rigler • Frank Delaney & Diane Meier • Syrie James • Stephanie Barron • Amanda Grange • Pamela Aidan • Elizabeth Aston • Carrie Bebris • Diana Birchall • Monica Fairview • Janet Mullany • Jane Odiwe • Beth Pattillo • Myretta Robens • Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway • Maya Slater • Margaret C. Sullivan • and Brenna Aubrey, the winner of a story contest hosted by the Republic of Pemberley “My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.” If you just heaved a contented sigh at Mr. Darcy’s heartfelt words, then you, dear reader, are in good company. Here is a delightful collection of never-before-published stories inspired by Jane Austen—her novels, her life, her wit, her world. In Lauren Willig’s “A Night at Northanger,” a young woman who doesn’t believe in ghosts meets a familiar specter at the infamous abbey; Jane Odiwe’s “Waiting” captures the exquisite uncertainty of Persuasion’s Wentworth and Anne as they await her family’s approval of their betrothal; Adriana Trigiani’s “Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane” imagines a modern-day Austen giving her niece advice upon her engagement; in Diana Birchall’s “Jane Austen’s Cat,” our beloved Jane tells her nieces “cat tales” based on her novels; Laurie Viera Rigler’s “Intolerable Stupidity” finds Mr. Darcy bringing charges against all the writers of Pride and Prejudice sequels, spin-offs, and retellings; in Janet Mullany’s “Jane Austen, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah!” a teacher at an all-girls school invokes the Beatles to help her students understand Sense and Sensibility; and in Jo Beverley’s “Jane and the Mistletoe Kiss,” a widow doesn’t believe she’ll have a second chance at love . . . until a Miss Austen suggests otherwise.Regency or contemporary, romantic or fantastical, each of these marvelous stories reaffirms the incomparable influence of one of history’s most cherished authors.Look for special features inside.Join the Circle for author chats and more.RandomHouseReadersCircle.comFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

Jane Austen Made Me Do It Details

TitleJane Austen Made Me Do It
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Romance, Anthologies, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

Jane Austen Made Me Do It Review

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, rounding up. An anthology of 22 Jane Austen-inspired short stories, an eclectic mix of straight sequels/epilogues to JA novels, ghost stories featuring JA or her characters, modern stories with a JA connection, and a few other types of stories tossed into the mix. This was on a $1.99 Kindle sale, and I'm kind of a sucker for Jane Austen fanfic even though I usually end up being underwhelmed in the end. But this one has the fact that it's published by a traditional publisher going for 3.5 stars, rounding up. An anthology of 22 Jane Austen-inspired short stories, an eclectic mix of straight sequels/epilogues to JA novels, ghost stories featuring JA or her characters, modern stories with a JA connection, and a few other types of stories tossed into the mix. This was on a $1.99 Kindle sale, and I'm kind of a sucker for Jane Austen fanfic even though I usually end up being underwhelmed in the end. But this one has the fact that it's published by a traditional publisher going for it, the stories are written by some authors with chops, and the GR ratings (at least from the Austen fans) are mostly thumbs up. So I bit on it, and in the end I thought it was well worth my time and money.The intro, quite humorously (at least for me) mentions that before the 1995 P&P miniseries (in which Darcy so famously appears in a wet shirt, giving thousands of fans heart palpitations even though that scene isn't in the original book) there was very little Austen fanfic. Since then, helped along by the Internet and the rise of self-publishing, the genre has exploded, for good or bad.Off we go! **Spoiler alert for pretty much every Jane Austen novel** 4 stars for "Jane Austen's Nightmare": Jane records in her diary a distressing dream in which she is wandering the streets of Bath, repeatedly accosted by various characters from the novels she's written, beginning with Marianne from Sense and Sensibility. Marianne has a bone to pick with Jane:"All the other heroines in every one of your novels end up with the man they love, except me. You marry me off to a man nearly twice my age! How could you do it?"In fact, nearly every character she runs into has a bone to pick with Jane, even the ones, like Emma and Elinor, that she thought she treated well. Then Jane gets stalked by a gang, including Mr. and Mrs. Elton, General Tilney, Lucy Steele and other villains and buffoons, with pitchforks and torches in hand ... It's quite amusing if you're familiar with Austen's various novels and their characters.2.5 stars for "Waiting": This one is an epilogue to Persuasion, as Captain Wentworth takes on the chore of asking Anne's father for her hand in marriage, and other post-engagement events occur. The writing is fine, but I just didn't really see much point to this meandering tale.3 stars for "A Night at Northanger": A modern investigative reporting crew for the TV show Ghost Trekkers arrives at Northanger Abbey to see if they can spot any ghosts or supernatural activities. While they interview Mr. Tilney-Tilney on camera, strange things start to happen. Then crew member Cate meets an apparition in her bedroom, where there's an old cedar chest, and they have a rather amusing chat.4 stars for "Jane and the Gentleman Rogue": Jane Austen tangles with Lord Harold Trowbridge, noted Corinthian and despoiler of maiden hearts, a lovely French lady, and a fashionable nobleman who may be spying for Villeneuve.5 stars for "Faux Jane": A very amusing and well-written story about a modern couple, Charles and Nicola Scott, and their run-in with an actress who's being taken by some con artists. Charles knows there's no such thing as a first edition of Pride and Prejudice signed by Jane Austen (or worse yet, a signed first edition of Persuasion, which was published posthumously) ... but Charles really has no intention of getting involved in something that's not his problem. Nicola, though, has other ideas. This one really tickled my funny bone, and tied in nicely to the theme of P&P in the end.3.25 stars for "Nothing Less than Fairy-Land": Another epilogue type of story, this one for Emma. Mr. Knightley is moving into Hartfield, the Woodhouse home, but Emma's father, old Mr. Woodhouse, is having more trouble with it than either she or Knightley expected.Mr. Woodhouse sat huddled next to the fire, his knees and shoulders wrapped in blankets. Anyone who set eyes on him could be forgiven for thinking that Mr. Knightley was forcing himself abominably on them in Hartfield, rather than performing an extraordinary sacrifice.Emma finds herself torn between father and husband - but Emma, characteristically, manages to come up with an idea. The author isn't afraid of showing the shortcomings of Emma and Knightley as well as Emma's father, which messed with my HEA expectations a little (and made me want to knock a little more sense into Emma, who takes her duty as a daughter much too seriously).2 stars for "Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane": A letter written by Jane Austen to her niece ... as if Jane were living in our day. Some nice advice, but the magical transportation of Jane to modern times seems to be for the sole purpose of giving her the chance to lament how tweets, emails and texts have replaced the fine art of handwritten letters.3.5 stars for "Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss": Elinor Carsholt, a 35 year old widow, has been left in dire financial circumstances by the accidental death of her financially careless husband a year ago. Now she and her daughters live in a cottage on the handsome, 31 year old Sir Nicholas's estate. Perhaps Sir Nicholas is interested in Elinor's 16 year old daughter Amy? Elinor has mixed feelings about this, and hates accepting charity from him or anyone else. Jane Austen herself makes a brief guest appearance in this charming story.3.75 stars for "When only a Darcy Will Do": Elizabeth, a modern American young woman living in London and attending university, is trying to earn some money by dressing up as a Regency-era lady and offering Jane Austen-themed walking tours. It's not working very well ... until a man dressed as a Regency gentleman shows up, introduces himself as Fitzwilliam Darcy, and asks for her tour. We learn a little bit about Jane Austen's life in this meet-cute story.4 stars for "Heard of You": In another epilogue to Persuasion, Anne and Captain Wentworth are visiting with Admiral Croft and his wife Sophy, Wentworth's sister. Wentworth is persuaded to tell the story of how he helped Croft and Sophy come together, back when Wentworth served as a young midshipman under Captain Croft on the ship Viper. This story mostly focuses on Wentworth's life as a 15 year old midshipman, with just a touch of romance, but it's an interesting and well-researched story (they talk about eating rats at sea!! o.O).3.5 stars for "The Ghostwriter": Sara, an aspiring author, is distraught when her live-in boyfriend Charles suddenly disappears from her life, leaving behind only a letter that says he can't compete with her love for Darcy. Perhaps the ghost of Jane Austen can help? Jane the Ghost's personality is rather abrasive and no-nonsense, actually, but intelligent and insightful, and it's rather funny seeing her take Sara to task for idolizing Darcy. The plot element relating to Sara adapting a lost book for publication was off, though (it's still plagiarism even if Jane's ghost didn't think so, unless credit is given. Humph.) But the ending was funny.2.75 stars for "Mr. Bennet Meets His Match": Basically this is the story of how Elizabeth Bennet's father met and romanced the girl who would become Mrs Bennet. A nice-enough story, but knowing their relationship and characters later in life from P&P sucked all the joy out of this story for me. I did appreciate the discussion of entailment:... when the inheritance would leap over wives and daughters like a capricious frog and pass to the nearest male relative. This admirable arrangement was devised by men, who reasoned sagaciously that women had no need of a roof over their heads as they were protected from the elements by their charming bonnets.Also worth the read for meeting Mr Collins' avaricious parents.5 stars for "Jane Austen, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah": This hilarious story is about Julie, a young teacher in 1960s England, who has to supervise three Beatles-crazy high school girls during after-school detention. They get into a crazy discussion comparing characters in Sense and Sensibility to the Beatles, debating, for example, whether George Harrison is Edward Ferrars or Colonel Brandon. Julie learns something about her own life and romantic relationship as well from their discussion. Insightful as well as funny.4.5 stars for "Letters to Lydia": Charlotte's younger sister Maria writes letters to her friend Lydia from Hunsford Parsonage, where she and Elizabeth Bennet are visiting with Charlotte and Mr Collins, and are occasionally graced with an invitation to Lady Catherine's mansion. SO FUNNY seeing Elizabeth and Darcy from Maria's point of view! And this story has a few interesting twists to offer to P&P, shedding a possible new light on some of the events in P&P.I narrowly observ'd Lizzy's Face during dinner. Aware of our Scrutiny, she forc'd herself to partake of a hearty Meal. If I had but lately renewed my Tyes with my Lover, I could never have taken two Helps of Black Pudding. She is a magnificent Actress.Or maybe it's all just Maria's vivid imagination.2.5 stars for "The Mysterious Closet: A Tale": A quirky modern-day story in which Henry from Northanger Abbey shows up as a sexy ghost. The ending is so illogical that it deflated the whole story for me, like a collapsed souffle. 2.5 stars for "Jane Austen's Cat": Auntie Jane amuses her nieces by retelling some of her stories with the characters turned into cats. It had some amusing moment but didn't amount to much overall.2.75 stars for "Me and Mr. Darcy, Again": So this appears to be a 4-years-later sequel to Me and Mr. Darcy. It probably would work better for someone who's read that novel. Darcy shows up as a ghost, helping Emily with her love life problems (another relationship that's having major issues).4.5 stars for "What Would Austen Do?": Told from the point of view of high school aged James Austen, who's trying to find out who he is while surrounded by other students that he calls zombies (those who wear Kabuki makeup and black lipstick), vampires ("two kids with their incisors capped with fangs"), and werewolves. When James decides, as a result of a English country dancing class he took during the summer, that proper dressing and manners is his real persona, the principal and guidance counselor at his school are actually alarmed, thinking he must be on drugs or something because he's deviating so far from the norm.So I get perp-walked to my locker, past the zombs and the vampires and the werewolves, and they all sort of orbit in, and Mr. Oakes goes, "Don't you have somewhere you should be?" so they lurch and waft and lope off.A solid story that has both humor and insight into human behavior, and some great comments on Austen's novels from a high school boy's POV.3.5 stars for "The Riding Habit": A P&P epilogue, in which Darcy and Elizabeth, now married, are in London for the season, planning Georgiana's coming out ball. Darcy decides it's time for Elizabeth to learn how to ride a horse. Elizabeth is highly dubious, not to mention she's beginning to wonder - based on London society's snootiness - if Lady Catherine was right in saying that Elizabeth would never be accepted by society.4 stars for "The Love Letter": In this modern take on Persuasion, Mark is a new doctor about to finish his residency, when a page from an old novel is mailed to him in one of his own self-addressed stamped envelopes that he had used to hunt for a job in his specialty. The page contains a certain love letter written by a man to the woman he had loved and lost years ago and resented for many years. As Mark tracks down the novel and reads it for the first time, he sees many parallels to his own life and a past relationship. A very good story; I just felt like it needed to be a little longer and more in-depth.3 stars for "The Chase": For a real change of pace, we have this nautical adventure of Captain Francis Austen, Jane's brother. The author comments in an end note that this story is based on historical fact. If I didn't know it was true, I'd say it's a far-fetched story! Somewhat interesting, but with all the naval battle details and no whiff of romance, it just wasn't quite my cuppa tea.3 stars for "Intolerable Stupidity": In this sort of screwball fantasy, there is a mysterious court of law, presided over by Lady Catherine de Bourgh, who runs the courtroom with an iron fist. The case at hand: a lawsuit against everyone who's written an Austen fanfic story or made an Austen movie. Fitzwilliam Darcy himself testifies that Austen fans (many of whom are in the courtroom as spectators) keep throwing cold water on him, causing him discomfort as well as a perpetual cold. The plot is thickened by a romantic attraction between the lawyers for the plaintiffs and the defendants.Overall, there are a few gems in this collection as well as several others that are well worth reading if you're an Austen fan. Just don't go throwing water on Darcy or offending Jane's ghost.
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  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    I love all things Jane Austen but sadly a collection of short stories inspired by her couldn't shift me out of my book funk this summer and I returned this book unfinished to my library. I did however jot down this quote from one of the stories and I really liked it. from 'The Ghostwriter' (unfortunately I didn't take note of the author's name)"It surprises me that people are still reading my novels so long after they were written and I departed this earth, but for a young woman of your age, I I love all things Jane Austen but sadly a collection of short stories inspired by her couldn't shift me out of my book funk this summer and I returned this book unfinished to my library. I did however jot down this quote from one of the stories and I really liked it. from 'The Ghostwriter' (unfortunately I didn't take note of the author's name)"It surprises me that people are still reading my novels so long after they were written and I departed this earth, but for a young woman of your age, I suppose of moderate intelligence, to yearn for the hero of a novel seems extraordinary to me. I would have thought you had more sense. Crushes on real people are tiresome enough, and should have grown out of any such propensity by now. ... Jealousy of a living character is one thing, but no man can compete with a character who never existed."Certainly makes me blush when I think about my undying love for Mr Darcy!!! :P
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    This is like the ultimate box of chocolates of Jane Austen inspired stories. Now I will admit I didn't love everyone of them completely but there are enough choices that if you don't love nuts or caramels there are plenty of butter creams and jellies.For what ever reason my favorites were the Northanger Abbey modern versions each of which involved very different ghosts. A Night at NorthangerThe Mysterious ClosetRegencyJane Austen's Nightmare which has her challenged by various characters.Jane Au This is like the ultimate box of chocolates of Jane Austen inspired stories. Now I will admit I didn't love everyone of them completely but there are enough choices that if you don't love nuts or caramels there are plenty of butter creams and jellies.For what ever reason my favorites were the Northanger Abbey modern versions each of which involved very different ghosts. A Night at NorthangerThe Mysterious ClosetRegencyJane Austen's Nightmare which has her challenged by various characters.Jane Austen and the Mistletoe KissJane and the Gentleman rogueModern versionsIntolerable Stupidity which is the last story and truly the funniest.The GhostwriterJane Austen, Yeah Yeah yeahMe & Mr. Darcy AgainFaux Jane When Only a Darcy will DoWhat Would Austen Do (YA)P&P VariationsMr. Bennet Meets his MatchLetters to Lydia which has that artful Maria Lucas unintentionally pushing the plot of P&P via her letters to Lydia.The Riding Habit where the newly married Mrs. Darcy must content with her first real London Season as well as Georgiana's coming outEmmaNothing Less than Fairy-land
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  • Ana T.
    January 1, 1970
    When I was asked to review this book I was very excited. I love Jane Austen's books and I just can't resist reading sequels and spinoffs because I love revisiting the characters.Jane Austen Made Me Do It is an anthology including many different stories. There are contemporary stories and historical ones. There are sequels and there are spinoffs. And there are stories about Jane Austen and her family. The fact that the stories are so varied makes it easy to appeal to readers, there's something fo When I was asked to review this book I was very excited. I love Jane Austen's books and I just can't resist reading sequels and spinoffs because I love revisiting the characters.Jane Austen Made Me Do It is an anthology including many different stories. There are contemporary stories and historical ones. There are sequels and there are spinoffs. And there are stories about Jane Austen and her family. The fact that the stories are so varied makes it easy to appeal to readers, there's something for everyone. Maybe no one will love all of them but we will all find some to love.I, happily, found a few. Even if historicals are my favourite genre I have also enjoyed some of the contemporaries. That has clearly something to do with my Jane Austen favourite. Stories connected or influenced by Persuasion are much more appealing to me. The success of an anthology such as this also resides in the author's ability to write short stories. Not everyone can craft a well strutured story in a smaller format but some of the stories in this anthology are definitely winners. Without further ado, here are my favourites:Jane and the Gentleman Rogue by Stephanie BarronA regency mystery well done and interesting enough to make check out Barron's other boks that have Austen has chief detective. I wonder if the ain character in this storyappears in one of the others.Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss by Jo BeverleyA lovely short story, set in Austen's time and written in traditional regency style. Lovers of regency romance have a small gem in this one.Heard of You by Margaret Sullivan I love to know what happens to interesting secondary characters and the Crofts (Persuasion) really deserved a story of their own. Faux Jane by RJ MeiersWhat happens when a couple decides to untangle the mystery of how a snobbish actress decides to buy an "autographed" Austen book, how an english lord lets himself be conned to save her. The Love Letter by Brenna Aubrey A second chance story set in modern times and from a male point of view. I rather liked it's connection to Persuasion.You might not enjoy the same ones I did but you will definitely find some stories to love. A must read for Jane Austen fans!
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  • Shannon Winslow
    January 1, 1970
    The strength of this book as a whole - its impressive variety - constitutes its only weakness for the individual reader. While there's bound to be something that appeals to every taste, the corolary is also true. Not all the short stories in this collection will appeal to any one person. And that's okay. Although we may all love Jane Austen, we probably love her for different reasons. This book delivers a prime example of the wide-ranging ways today's authors interpret the essence of her work. T The strength of this book as a whole - its impressive variety - constitutes its only weakness for the individual reader. While there's bound to be something that appeals to every taste, the corolary is also true. Not all the short stories in this collection will appeal to any one person. And that's okay. Although we may all love Jane Austen, we probably love her for different reasons. This book delivers a prime example of the wide-ranging ways today's authors interpret the essence of her work. That diversity never ceases to amaze and entertain me.
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  • QNPoohBear
    January 1, 1970
    This is an anthology of stories edited by AustenProse's Laurel Ann Nattress. The stories are inspired by Jane Austen, her family, her writings and her attitudes towards life and love. Most of the stories are written by Austenesque authors and other romance writers. One story is written by a contest winner.The first story "Jane Austen's Nightmare" follows Jane into the depths of a dream in which she is confronted by her characters. Some of her characters are angry at her portrayal of them and oth This is an anthology of stories edited by AustenProse's Laurel Ann Nattress. The stories are inspired by Jane Austen, her family, her writings and her attitudes towards life and love. Most of the stories are written by Austenesque authors and other romance writers. One story is written by a contest winner.The first story "Jane Austen's Nightmare" follows Jane into the depths of a dream in which she is confronted by her characters. Some of her characters are angry at her portrayal of them and others are happy. I really didn't like this story very much. It felt more like literary criticism than fiction. I felt sorry for Jane Austen to be thus confronted by her own creations."Waiting : A story inspired by Jane Austen's Persuasion" by Jane Odiwe fills in the blank between the final action of Persuasion and the conclusion. I liked reading this story about Anne and Frederick waiting for Sir Walter's blessing while they reflect back on how they met and fell in love. I think Jane Austen would have imagined the story like this. Anne and Frederick have long since been my favorite Austen couple and this story makes their romance all that much sweeter and more enjoyable. "A Night at Northanger" by Lauren Willig parodies ghost hunting shows and Northanger Abbey, which itself makes gentle fun of gothic novels. Since Ghost Hunters is one of my favorite TV shows and Jane Austen is one of my favorite authors, this story is my favorite of the bunch. It made me laugh a lot and roll my eyes a bit but I think the author intended it to be a gentle parody like Northanger Abbey. I highly recommend this one for those practical minded individuals who have enough sense of humor to laugh at their guilty pleasures."Jane and the Gentleman Rogue: Being a fragment of a Jane Austen mystery" by Stephanie Barron fills in the gap between her Jane Austen mysteries up to that date. Jane finds herself associating with the nobility in the company of Lord Harold, helps uncover a spy and is tormented by her own heart. Given what happens in the novels, this story is bittersweet. It doesn't work on it's own but having read the rest of the series and gone back to read this one, I enjoyed it much more. Read this if you liked the novels and loved Lord Harold. "Faux Jane" by F.J. Meier is a take on The Thin Man movie series. Nicola Scott and her beloved husband Charlie Scott have a brush with celebrity as they discover a young woman in love is attempting to appease her new mother-in-law to-be with a first edition signed copy of Pride and Prejudice. The problem? There is no such thing as Jane Austen wrote anonymously. The married couple, along with their disreputable uncle must work together to solve the mystery. I had high hopes for this story being a huge fan of the movies. The names are taken from the movies but that's about it. What I loved about Nick and Nora is that she never gets jealous, unlike Nicola. I couldn't like Nicola or Charlie in this story. They both acted like idiots. The mystery is unusual and figured out too quickly and introduces too many characters for a story of this length. Perhaps it would have worked better as a longer novel. This is my least favorite story in the collection."Nothing Less Than Fairy-Land" by Monica Fairview is an additional chapter of Emma dealing with Emma and Knightley's early married life. Not all is rosy in Highbury thanks to the constant demands of Mr. Woodhouse and Knigtley's estate duties. While I'm sure this story is realistic, it's a bit sad and I prefer to leave the story where it ended with everyone happy. "Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane" by Adriana Trigiani imagines a letter by a contemporary Jane Austen to her niece on the occasion of her niece's engagement. Aunt Jane offers advice on love and happiness. This letter is very long and boring. It feels more like the Trigiani is sharing her views with her daughter or someone younger. It is also not edited very well as the name of Anna's fiance changes halfway through. This is Trigiani's first attempt at publishing Austenesque fiction and she should stick to her usual romantic melodramas or find another format for her idea."Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss" is a new story by one of my favorite Regency romance authors. This story is about a widow Elinor Carsholt who is struggling to care for her young adult daughters after her husband's death. The new estate owner, Sir Nicholas, is kind and attentive. Elinor is uncomfortable with his attentions, believing them to be charity. As Christmas approaches and the two families spend more time together, Elinor thinks her teenage daughter has been unduly influenced by Miss Austen's novels to think above her station. Can true love really cross class lines? Miss Austen has some advice for Elinor and her daughters that may solve the problem. This is a very sweet story by one of the masters of the genre. It lacks her usual passionate style, thankfully, and sticks to the heartwarming style of a typical Regency Christmas story. The story is a little slow and confusing but is sweet and happy at the end. This is my second favorite story in the collection."When Only a Darcy Will Do" by Beth Pattillo is set in contemporary London. Our heroine offers a bootleg Jane Austen tour to bored tourists. She thinks she's going crazy when she spots Mr. Darcy in the crowd and he asks to take her tour. Is he for real or is she hallucinating? This is a sweet story that could be about any one of us. I enjoyed the take on Pride and Prejudice and the contemporary twist worked quite well. This is definitely one of my favorite stories."Heard of You" by Margaret C. Sullivan tells the story of Admiral and Mrs. Croft, my favorite secondary characters of any of Austen's novels. When Frederick Wentworth was a young midshipman his sister Sophie was a teacher at a girls' school. They exchanged frequent letters which caught the attention of the ship's bully. Captain Croft was kind and sympathetic and longed to know more about Sophie. The rest as they say is history. I adored the Crofts and their relationship and this story is true to Austen's portrayal. It's a very sweet and soft romance. I loved it as a supplement to Persuasion and wish Jane Austen had thought of it!"The Ghostwriter" by Elizabeth Aston borrows many elements from her previous book Writing Jane Austen. A contemporary writer with writer's block receives a visit from a mysterious visitor who helps revive Sara's career and helps her solve her romantic dilemma as well. I really didn't like this story. I couldn't relate to Sara except for the writer's block. I found her whiny and self-centered and the whole ghost plot stretched by credibility beyond belief because it was meant to be taken seriously. I'm more intrigued by the twist at the end. "Mr. Bennet Meets His Match" by Amanda Grange is a prequel to Pride and Prejudice telling the story of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet. Mr. John Bennet is the only son of a minor gentry family. If John never marries the estate passes to a distant cousin who no one can stand. Miss Jane Gardiner and Miss Mary Gardiner are two lively girls from the village dreaming of romance. Their parents are dreaming of social climbing. The young ladies catch the eye of young Mr. John but only one catches his heart. This story is true to the portrayal of the Bennet parents in the original novel. He is indifferent to anything except books and she is silly. Jane and Mary are just like Kitty and Lydia. I am not overly fond of this story. I feel sorry for Mr. Bennet and would like to think that their relationship was more substantial in the beginning. In "Jane Austen, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah" by Janet Mullany a teacher in a girls' school in the 1960s attempts to teach her students about Jane Austen through their understanding of The Beetles and comes to an understanding of herself and her own relationship. This is one of the darker, more somber stories in the collection. The girls are funny and just like any teenage girl with a celebrity crush. The story would be better if it was longer so the characters could be fleshed out more. There's little motivation for the main character's actions in this brief space. I found this story interesting though and liked it well enough."Letters to Lydia" by Maya Slater is a fun take on Pride and Prejudice from Maria Lucas's point-of-view. She writes to Lydia Bennet with all the enthusiasm and exclamations of her tender years. This is a cute story. If you can stand Lydia, Kitty and Maria's youthfulness you will enjoy this different viewpoint. In "The Mysterious Closet" by Myretta Robens a young woman comes to stay at an old Gothic inn and discovers a mysterious closet that leads her to a handsome man and every expectation of happiness or unhappiness for surely she has dreamed up her true love. This story is one after Catherine Morland's own heart however, I found it too strange, especially the unusual ending. If you can swallow your disbelief and enjoy passionate (but clean) romances you'll like this one.The premise of "Jane Austen's Cat" is very similar to Trigiani's story except it's told in story format. In the summer of 1813 brothers Edward and Charles and families are in residence at the Great House. Jane is busy writing Mansfield Park. Her writing is interrupted by a visit from two of her nieces. Anna, already grown, is unsure of herself. She enjoys writing horrid novels but would like to be a serious novelist like Aunt Jane. Anna's little sister Caroline doesn't care for romance, she would like Aunt Jane to tell her a story about a cat like her pet Tyger. Aunt Jane tells the tale of Mansfield Park in a simplistic way using cats as the main character. It's a cautionary tale for Anna sharing lessons on writing and on love. I liked this quiet story. I think it could have actually happened. Jane Austen was a devoted aunt and enjoyed telling stories. She was a keen observer who had much advice to offer on life and love and knew how best to deliver it. In "Me and Mr. Darcy, Again . . ." by Alexandra Potter, a contemporary young woman and her best friend are off on a girls only trip to London. Last time she was in London for a Jane Austen tour, she met Mr. Darcy. Then she found a real boyfriend in Spike but he hasn't been there for her lately and she's both dreaming of and dreading meeting Mr. Darcy again. When she does, it leads to unexpected results. Not having read the novel Me and Mr. Darcy, I feel like I missed a huge part of the story. This short story is more like an epilogue to the novel I suppose. I liked the message but the fantasy element just isn't my thing. "What Would Jane Austen Do?" by Jane Rubio and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway is the most surprising story in the collection. A fourteen year-old boy has gotten in trouble at school - not for the usual reasons but because of a change in behavior that has resulted in James becoming gentlemanly! James's mother was on his case to do something with his summer so he signed up for a country dancing class at the library thinking it was country western line dancing. Instead he discovered that country dancing is the style of dance done in Jane Austen's day. At first James is not impressed but the more he gets to know the other dancers, especially the beautiful Cathy, the more he enjoys himself. With some help from his mom, a devoted Jane Austen scholar, he develops an understanding of the human heart and an appreciation for nineteenth century manners that helps him stand out in the treacherous high school world. This is such a cute story. I could picture everything that was happening in my mind and felt very engaged in the story. I adored young James (where was he when I was in High School?) and wanted him to succeed. James's voice is wry and a little old for his years which may turn off some readers. The author bio says they are developing this story into a full length novel. I can't wait to read it. The ending left me hanging a bit. I hope mothers make their sons read this story for the world needs more boys like James!"The Riding Habit" by Pamela Aidan is a continuation of Pride and Prejudice. The Darcys are in London for the peace celebrations of 1814 and Georgiana's come out. Mr. Darcy is extraordinarily happy. He has a thriving young heir in the nursery and his Elizabeth by his side to love him and guide Georgiana to womanhood. His only regret is that his beloved Elizabeth does not ride. He hits upon the grand plan to teach Elizabeth to ride. Elizabeth has her hands full planning Georgiana's debut. She hardly has time for herself, let alone time to learn to ride. She's determined to please her beloved and show him she belongs in his world by learning to drive. A near tragedy results in the moral of the story. This is not Pamela Aidan's best story. She gets inside Darcy's head very well but I think she lacks understanding of Elizabeth. A story about riding turns into a self-confidence tale that while realistic, I do not think would happen given what we know about Elizabeth. The story didn't captivate me the way Aidan's Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman novels did but fans of her writing and of Pride and Prejudice will certainly enjoy this story."The Love Letter" by Brenna Aubrey is the winner of the short story contest. It's a contemporary take on Persuasion. Dr. Mark Hinton receives a mysterious message in the mail quoting from some unknown book. His quest to find out which book leads him to reflect on his lost love Justine and face to face with the lady once again. This story is rather sad. The forces that separated the main character and his love are more dramatic and of course contemporary than in the original. The story is more bittersweet as a result. It didn't appeal to me because of the contemporary setting and the plot dragged on in flashback before suddenly and randomly turning back to present time then came to an abrupt ending. I enjoyed some of the other stories in the contest a lot more than this one. "The Chase" by Carrie Bebris is something different from her. Instead of a gothic mystery, this story follows Jane Austen's brother Francis on board his ship The Petterel in pursuit of a French ship. The subject matter of this story is quite unusual and frankly, quite boring. If you enjoy nautical stories and British Navy stories like Horatio Hornblower and Master and Commander, you would probably like this one."Intolerable Stupidity" by Laurie Viera Rigler is also a new theme for this author. It resembles the first story in this anthology as Jane Austen's characters appear outside the pages of their books. In this story, The Court of Intolerable Stupidity, presided over by Judge Lady Catherine de Bourgh pits the young untried lawyer Fitz Williams against super star advocate for the plaintiff Tawny Wolfson. The defendant claims that so-called literary works have cause grave and irreparable harm to the plaintiffs who only wish to continue living their lives as their creator intended. What does this mean? Well, it means that Andrew Davies and other screenwriters and novelists who write and rewrite Jane Austen's novels are intolerably stupid. Mr. Darcy appears dripping wet and complaining of living constantly with a cold and being the object of obsession of many hysterical women. Wolfson vows to burn every Creator-inspired work she owns when she wins the case but Fitz Williams discovers a secret that he could use to win this case. Will he let his infatuation for Tawny bring him down or win the case of a lifetime? This story raises some issues that I don't think need to be dealt with in a short story anthology. Though I agree that most Jane Austen inspired creations are intolerably stupid, this story IS one, so what does that say about Laurie Viera Rigler? It's all in good fun I suppose. I'd rather read a fun and frivolous story than literary criticism.Overall, I expected more from this anthology and many of my favorite writers. I think by and large the stories failed to live up to my expectations. Like all anthologies, some stories were suited to my taste and others weren't. There were some fabulous stories in the contest that would be better suited to this collection than some of the ones which were included by well-known authors.
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  • Eliza Shearer
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starts rounded up to 5Jane Austen Made Me Do It is a gem of a book, perfect for Jane Austen fans who like variety. As the title suggests, it's an anthology of Jane Austen-inspired fiction and it embraces a wide range of settings, genres and themes. The quality of the editing work is superb; I found all stories to be really enjoyable, which is rare in compilations. I tend to prefer novels to short stories, but this compendium is a joy to read and I readily recommend it to all Janeites keen to 4.5 starts rounded up to 5Jane Austen Made Me Do It is a gem of a book, perfect for Jane Austen fans who like variety. As the title suggests, it's an anthology of Jane Austen-inspired fiction and it embraces a wide range of settings, genres and themes. The quality of the editing work is superb; I found all stories to be really enjoyable, which is rare in compilations. I tend to prefer novels to short stories, but this compendium is a joy to read and I readily recommend it to all Janeites keen to explore new voices.
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  • Dianna
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes you pick up the right book at the right time, and that's just what happened for me with this book. I can't tell you how much I enjoyed it. With any anthology, I would expect to like some stories more than others—and I did—but there was hardly a dud in the bunch. They were all excessively diverting. I also appreciated that the stories were relatively clean: a little language and a few references here and there but nothing nasty. Thank you.
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  • Laurie Rigler
    January 1, 1970
    I had so much fun writing my story, reading contest entries for the short story contest (winner got published in the book), and reading descriptions of my fellow authors' contributions that I cannot wait to read the book! It promises to be a diverse and fascinating collection of stories from a diverse group of authors connected by their love of Austen.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Austen Made Me Do It is a collection of 22 stories inspired by Jane Austen. Edited by Laurel Ann Nattress of Austenprose, this anthology features an assortment of authors best known for their Austenesque novels, including Stephanie Barron, Laurie Viera Rigler, Amanda Grange, Syrie James, and Beth Pattillo. Jane Austen Made Me Do It is the perfect book for readers who want to try a sequel or retelling of an Austen novel or those who simply want to enjoy the fact that so many authors share th Jane Austen Made Me Do It is a collection of 22 stories inspired by Jane Austen. Edited by Laurel Ann Nattress of Austenprose, this anthology features an assortment of authors best known for their Austenesque novels, including Stephanie Barron, Laurie Viera Rigler, Amanda Grange, Syrie James, and Beth Pattillo. Jane Austen Made Me Do It is the perfect book for readers who want to try a sequel or retelling of an Austen novel or those who simply want to enjoy the fact that so many authors share their passion for one of the most beloved novelists in English literature.I’d like to highlight my favorite stories in this collection. In “Jane Austen’s Nightmare” by Syrie James, author of The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen, Jane dreams she is walking the streets of Bath, where her characters confront her about how she has portrayed them. Elinor Dashwood (Sense and Sensibility) and Fanny Price (Mansfield Park), for instance, lament that they are too perfect. In “Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss” by Jo Beverley, Elinor, a young widow in her 30s, prepares to celebrate Christmas with her three children and is frustrated with having to accept gifts of charity from her deceased husband’s cousin, Sir Nicholas Danvers. When she encounters Jane Austen, who is considered by Elinor to be the authoress of “dangerous” novels that fill the heads of young girls with fantasies about marrying above their station, she learns about a mistletoe tradition that gets her hoping that she might have a second chance at love.In “When Only a Darcy Will Do” by Beth Pattillo, author of Mr. Darcy Broke My Heart, a troubled American graduate student in London hopes to earn some money by hosting Jane Austen walking tours and realizes her Mr. Darcy may have been right in front of her all along. In “Heard of You” by Margaret C. Sullivan, author of The Jane Austen Handbook and editrix of AustenBlog, Anne Wentworth hears the sweet story of how Captain Wentworth played matchmaker for his sister, Sophy, and Admiral Croft. “What Would Jane Austen Do?” by Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway, authors of Lady Vernon and Her Daughter, tells the story of a teenage boy who, under the influence of his mother and a girl from a summer dance class, enjoys Austen’s novels and stands out from the zombs, vampires, and werewolves roaming the school halls by displaying perfect manners, much to the chagrin of the principal.“The Love Letter” by Brenna Aubrey, the winner of the Jane Austen Made Me Do It short story contest, is a beautiful retelling of Persuasion in which a medical student faces the woman who rejected his marriage proposal six years ago. And finally, “Intolerable Stupidity” by Laurie Viera Rigler, author of Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict, puts the Austenesque authors and filmmakers on trial…with Lady Catherine de Bourgh as judge and the opposing attorneys acting out their own version of Pride and Prejudice.The stories in Jane Austen Made Me Do It have a little something for everyone — mystery, ghosts, humor, and Regency and contemporary romance. They feature Austen’s characters, Austen herself, Austen’s relatives, and even modern-day characters somehow affected by Austen and her novels. While I found some stories more entertaining than others, there was enough variety that I was never bored and didn’t skip a single story. Nattress did a wonderful job gathering these stories, and I would love to see her create another anthology just like this one.Review posted on Diary of an EccentricI received a free copy of this book for review.
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Austen made me do it. Made me do what? Mostly made me have a lot of fun reading this collection of short stories inspired by her works!Jane Austen Made Me Do It, the book, is a collection of short stories inspired by the life and works of Jane Austen. Of course. The collection was edited by Laurel Ann Nattress, and features stories by a host of writers from Stephanie Barron to Lauren Willig.I read most of the Jane Austen oeuvre during my interminably long commuting days, which means I liste Jane Austen made me do it. Made me do what? Mostly made me have a lot of fun reading this collection of short stories inspired by her works!Jane Austen Made Me Do It, the book, is a collection of short stories inspired by the life and works of Jane Austen. Of course. The collection was edited by Laurel Ann Nattress, and features stories by a host of writers from Stephanie Barron to Lauren Willig.I read most of the Jane Austen oeuvre during my interminably long commuting days, which means I listened to it on audio. I enjoyed them immensely, but I'm not obsessive. I say this because the stories in JAMMDI fall into two categories, the ones that require detailed knowledge of particular Austen works, and the ones that use Austen's life and works as jumping-off points.The stories that used Austen as inspiration were ones I particularly enjoyed. You might even say I found a couple of them, well, inspiring.In "The Ghostwriter," by Elizabeth Aston, Jane's ghost comes to the aid of a 21st century author who has spent much too much time admiring Mr. Darcy and not nearly enough energy on her own love life or on her sagging book sales. Jane's apparition leads Sara to a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, an unpublished manuscript by one of Jane's contemporaries that will be a shot in the arm for her dying career. While Sara copy-edits the found manuscript, Jane fixes up her love-life for her."The Chase," by Carrie Bebris, is about how Jane's brother Francis received his commission as Post-Captain, based on Francis own logbooks. This story was as vivid a recreation of a naval battle as any of Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey and Maturin series.My favorite was the story by Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway titled "What Would Austen Do?" A high school student whose mother is a Jane Austen aficionado has saddled him with the name James Austen. Mom may even have married Dad just so she could snag the Austen last name! The story starts with poor James getting hauled into the school principal's office and being accused of becoming a drug user. Why? Because he's been exhibiting unusual behavior. What unusual behavior? He's become polite and mannerly to his teachers. He wears khakis and button-down shirts to school. And he has strange paperwork in his locker. With numbers on it, and weird words like "arming" and "inside hand" and "ECD".If you want to find out what "ECD" stands for, you have to read the story. It's worth it.Escape Rating B: Because this is an anthology, it's a mixed bag. There were a couple of stories I absolutely adored. "What Would Austen Do?" being at the top of the list. The ones that required really deep knowledge of Jane Austen's works were not as much fun for me. Collections like this are classic instances of the principle "your mileage may vary".The stories that used Jane Austen as a springboard were the best ones. The attempts to out-do or re-do her work fell a little flat. The stories that took flight from her, most of those were terrific.
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  • Meredith (Austenesque Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    OVERVIEW:In this magnificent anthology, twenty-four praiseworthy and skilled authors take up their pens to pay homage to one of the most adored and beloved authors of all time. United by their love for Jane Austen, these authors composed stories that are well-crafted, enchanting, and compelling. With stories averaging around twenty pages each in this compilations, plus a section of Jane Austen quotes and discussion questions, this comprehensive tome is sure to fill up many hours of enjoyable rea OVERVIEW:In this magnificent anthology, twenty-four praiseworthy and skilled authors take up their pens to pay homage to one of the most adored and beloved authors of all time. United by their love for Jane Austen, these authors composed stories that are well-crafted, enchanting, and compelling. With stories averaging around twenty pages each in this compilations, plus a section of Jane Austen quotes and discussion questions, this comprehensive tome is sure to fill up many hours of enjoyable reading!MY READING EXPERIENCE:There are several types of Austenesque stories to be found in this anthology, the most popular being stories that are Austen-Inspired (eleven stories). These stories don't necessarily pertain to or involve characters from a Jane Austen novel, yet they have some link, whether it is in theme, subject, or plot that connects them to Jane Austen. Another type of story found in this anthology are Vignettes (five stories), short scenes that could have been written by Jane Austen. The third category I labeled Jane Austen and Her Family (five stories) which includes tales where Jane Austen or someone from her family is the main character. There was one story, “Intolerable Stupidity” by Laurie Viera Rigler, that was so wholly unique that I couldn't place it in a category! While reading, I gave each story a rating on a scale of 1-5, 1 being the lowest and 5 the highest. Here is the breakdown for each rating: 5 stars (fourteen stories), 4 stars (five stories), and 3 stars (three stories).My average rating was: 4.5! To continue reading, go to: http://janeaustenreviews.blogspot.com...
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  • Tatiana
    January 1, 1970
    Each one of these short stories was inspired by Jane Austen or her works, in some way paying homage to the “soother of every sorrow”—with original stories about the characters in her books, modern day influences, or even Jane herself. Some of my friends here on GR will recall that certain ode to Jane Austen *cough* that I wrote awhile back. Needless to say, I understand where all these writers are coming from concerning their infatuation with the queen of regency romance. I did take notes while Each one of these short stories was inspired by Jane Austen or her works, in some way paying homage to the “soother of every sorrow”—with original stories about the characters in her books, modern day influences, or even Jane herself. Some of my friends here on GR will recall that certain ode to Jane Austen *cough* that I wrote awhile back. Needless to say, I understand where all these writers are coming from concerning their infatuation with the queen of regency romance. I did take notes while reading, but I was long-winded and don’t have time now to transcribe it all. So, the highlights will have to suffice. My favorites were “The Riding Habit,” “Jane Austen, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah!,” “What Would Jane Austen Do?,” "Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane," “When Only a Darcy Will Do,” “Mr. Bennet Meets His Match,” and “Letters to Lydia.” These stood out because they brought something fresh to the genre of inspired-by fiction for Jane Austen and her world. I especially can’t wait for the full-length novel of WWJAD.Overall, a very fine compilation.
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  • Alisha
    January 1, 1970
    I have to rate the book on the average of how I felt about all the stories, though obviously some I really liked, some I didn't, and some I didn't really read due to supernatural content. Here are the stories I liked. The others, you can assume I found either dull, saccharine, or problematic in some way.Jane Austen's Nightmare, entertaining enough story about Jane dreaming that her characters come to life and either reproach her or thank her for the way she made them.Jane Austen and the Mistleto I have to rate the book on the average of how I felt about all the stories, though obviously some I really liked, some I didn't, and some I didn't really read due to supernatural content. Here are the stories I liked. The others, you can assume I found either dull, saccharine, or problematic in some way.Jane Austen's Nightmare, entertaining enough story about Jane dreaming that her characters come to life and either reproach her or thank her for the way she made them.Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss, a cute bit of Regency fluff just barely connected to Jane Austen.When Only a Darcy Will Do, contemporary story about a university student trying to make some money by hosting her own Jane Austen walking tour. She only gets one customer, a guy dressed as Mr. Darcy. Cute little reveal about who he is."Letters to Lydia", letters from Maria Lucas to Lydia. If you ever wondered what Darcy and Elizabeth's relationship looked like from the outside, this is kind of fun, and fills in a couple of speculative gaps in the plot."What Would Jane Austen Do?" Surprisingly, best story in the book. A high school boy decides to take a country dancing class over the summer to please his mom, finds out it's English country dancing, and gradually realizes he's having an awesome time. When school starts, his parents get called to talk to the principal, who is worried that their son is headed for trouble or maybe is on drugs, since he's regularly wearing a necktie, holding the door for his teachers, and addressing everyone with polite civility. (It's a pretty funny scene.) The takeaway from the story is a refreshing commentary on not being embarrassed about the things you like even if no one else seems to understand.
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  • willaful
    January 1, 1970
    The introduction to this collection of short stories made me uneasy. Movies, t.v., Darcy getting dripping wet -- there seemed to be very little about Jane Austen’s actual words. I wanted to read stories inspired by her books, not by wet t-shirt night Colin Firth.Happily, “Jane Austen’s Nightmare” by Syrie James cheered me up immensely and was a great start to the collection. Rather than a sequel or retelling, it’s a first person narrative by Austen herself about unexpectedly meeting some of her The introduction to this collection of short stories made me uneasy. Movies, t.v., Darcy getting dripping wet -- there seemed to be very little about Jane Austen’s actual words. I wanted to read stories inspired by her books, not by wet t-shirt night Colin Firth.Happily, “Jane Austen’s Nightmare” by Syrie James cheered me up immensely and was a great start to the collection. Rather than a sequel or retelling, it’s a first person narrative by Austen herself about unexpectedly meeting some of her characters... who have a few choice words for her about how she portrayed them. It’s very funny, with some affectionate bite to it.Adriana Trigiani pens a charming fictional letter of life advice from Austen as she might write it if she were alive today in “Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane.” “I lament the loss of letter writing in our time. I cannot imagine that a tweet or a post, an email or a text, will provide the great thrill of receiving a letter, written by hand. There is so much to learn about a person from their handwriting, and even more in the depths of the words one chooses to express himself.” “The Ghostwriter” by Elizabeth Ashton visits the sharp-witted and sharp-tongued spirit of Austen upon a young woman whose lover has left her because he can’t compete with fictional Mr. Darcy. How satisfying to see a sentimental image of Austen dashed by a ghost saying things like “‘Pull yourself together. Your tears have made your complexion blotchy, and your nose is running. Do you often cry? If Charles sees you like that, I’m not surprised he’s left you.” Ghost-Austen also gives a fascinating insight into some of her characterizations, claiming to have based Lizzy on her beau Tom Lefroy and Mr. Darcy on herself: “Had I been born male instead of female, and in affluent circumstances, I would have been just such a man: reserved, proud, and clever. And no doubt have made some woman’s life a misery. Put him out of your head, or at least leave him on the page where he belongs and, as you say today, get a life.” I don’t know if this is an original idea from Ashton (though Googling leaves me thinking that Tom Lefroy was far more like Mr. Wickham than Mr. Darcy.) but either way, I love it. I think the story pulls a few punches, but it was sharp, and the ending made me laugh out loud. What’s an Austen-inspired collection without an epistolary story? “Letters to Lydia” by Maya Slate cleverly retells the last half of Pride and Prejudice though the eyes of a minor and quite clueless character, who unwittingly affects the outcome.The most innovative story in the collection is “Jane Austen, Yeah Yeah Yeah!” by Janet Mullany. I expected a historical from Mullany and it is -- but set in the 1960’s rather than the Regency, where a young teacher helps her students learn to appreciate Sense and Sensibility by showing how it relates to their lives. In the process she makes discoveries about her own life and what she really wants. The rest of the collection is a mixed bag of sequels, prequels and ghost stories. Some work and others don’t quite capture what they’re aiming for. My most frequent complaint was abrupt, unsatisfying endings. The romantic stories, oddly enough, were the most disappointing -- perhaps because there just isn’t enough room in the short story format to do justice to romance as Austen would do it, with great care and attention to character and detail. But I was genuinely moved by "The Love Letter," winner of a contest to be included in this book by currently unpublished author Brenna Aubrey, in which Persuasion influences a young doctor to try again with his own lost love.Overall I enjoyed this very much. The writers clearly know their Austen -- many have written other books in a similar vein, or nonfiction about her -- and there are only a few moments that twanged as wrong. Best of all, unlike some Austen-inspired fiction there’s no attempts to portray her classic characters getting it on... and only one dripping wet faux Darcy.(Reviewed from an e-arc courtesy of netGalley.)
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  • Vic
    January 1, 1970
    Great Read: Loved This AnthologyOne regret I have in my busy life is the lack of leisure time I have for reading. Right now there are four stacks of books on the floor of my office, all waiting to be read. So many books! So little time. Given my schedule, I am glad I set aside the required hours to read 'Jane Austen Made Me Do It', an anthology of Jane Austen-inspired stories by published Jane Austen sequel authors and edited by Laurel Ann Nattress.I rarely read anthologies front to back, but fl Great Read: Loved This AnthologyOne regret I have in my busy life is the lack of leisure time I have for reading. Right now there are four stacks of books on the floor of my office, all waiting to be read. So many books! So little time. Given my schedule, I am glad I set aside the required hours to read 'Jane Austen Made Me Do It', an anthology of Jane Austen-inspired stories by published Jane Austen sequel authors and edited by Laurel Ann Nattress.I rarely read anthologies front to back, but flit here and there, landing instead on a story with an intriguing title or by a favorite author. In this instance I began with Stephanie Barron's tale of 'Jane And the Gentleman Rogue: Being a fragment of a Jane Austen mystery'. I am so glad I did, for it prompted me to linger longer over dinner and read another short story. Beth Pattillo's 'When Only a Darcy Will Do' was a delight, as was Margaret C. Sullivan's 'Heard of You', which I read just before going to bed. The list of authors in this anthology is impressive: Pamela Aidan * Elizabeth Aston * Brenna Aubrey * Stephanie Barron * Carrie Bebris * Jo Beverley * Diana Birchall * Frank Delaney & Diane Meier * Monica Fairview * Amanda Grange * Syrie James * Janet Mullany * Jane Odiwe * Beth Pattillo * Alexandra Potter * Myretta Robens * Jane Rubino & Caitlen Rubino Bradway * Maya Slater * Margaret Sullivan * Adriana Trigiani * Laurie Viera Rigler * Lauren Willig.I've always enjoyed reading anthologies. They allow one to pick and choose on a whim, and finish a story in a short space of time. Anthology stories serve as literary versions of amuse bouches, those tasty bites served at the start of dinner. Even the most the discerning reader is bound to find selections and authors they will love. (Or discover a new author!) I favored some stories over others, but won't share them with you for the simple reason that some of the stories I disliked received rave reviews on other blogs. Anthologies appeal to a variety of tastes, and I found it remarkable how many in 'Jane Austen Made Me Do It' captivated me. If you decide to purchase this book, I can guarantee that you will discover new authors and stories that you will want to reread.This is due, no doubt, to the hard work that editor Laurel Ann Nattress put into the project. As a blogger, I can't imagine how much of her time was spent in contacting the authors and working with them, overseeing a contest for an unpublished author (the honor went to Brenna Aubrey), working with her publishing house in editing the stories, and now publicizing the book. I tip my hat to Laurel Ann for overseeing this ambitious and very worthwhile project, for this is her first book. This is why I gave 'Jane Austen Made Me Do It' five out of five stars! Vic, Jane Austen's World and Jane Austen Today
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  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    Published by: Ballantine BooksPages: 464Genre: Fiction, General & Historical RomanceThe Dame's View:Will it be enough to say that I wish this book had gone on and on just like a Jane Austen novel? Laurel Ann Nattress has achieved a coup in this first of her books. Who could have imagined that so many "mash-up" short stories would have been released about Jane Austen's novels and her characters? I'll bet the great Jane wouldn't have. And, I'll bet she's having a delighted laugh over this one Published by: Ballantine BooksPages: 464Genre: Fiction, General & Historical RomanceThe Dame's View:Will it be enough to say that I wish this book had gone on and on just like a Jane Austen novel? Laurel Ann Nattress has achieved a coup in this first of her books. Who could have imagined that so many "mash-up" short stories would have been released about Jane Austen's novels and her characters? I'll bet the great Jane wouldn't have. And, I'll bet she's having a delighted laugh over this one because it's by far the best of the best in concept and expression of any books like it.Fun, luminous, entertaining, in the original sense; meaning a time when a book was meant to entertain before television and video games, "Jane Austen Made Me Do It.." is the book of this literay season that you'll want to give your best friends, your daughters, neices and mother. I'm getting copies for Christmas gifts.How on earth Ms Nattress ever chose from what had to have been a mountain of fabulous entries, because those that made it are the finest of the finest, I have no idea. With writers such as Stephaine Barron, Janet Mullany, Lauren Willig, Margaret C. Sullivan...and I could go on, I just can't fathom who was left out!These stories are about nightmares, ghostly visitations, visits from Austen characters, ideas and imaginations mixed with readings of Jane's books and more. Short stories that lead one into another until you want to grab the orginal books and thumb through them to laugh or cry again at the characters and Jane Austen quotes. And, Jane is quoted with such majesty here.What more can I say except this is a book great fun to have in your Austen collection. And I know anyone who's read this review so far, by this lackluster blogger, has a Jane Austen collection.5 tearoom nodsDeborah/TheBookishDame
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  • Yvann S
    January 1, 1970
    “‘You made us too perfect’ said Elinor”This is a collection of short stories inspired by Jane Austen, all never-before-published. Unfortunately, for many of them, that is for a good reason. The start to the blurb rather gives away why:“My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.” If you just heaved a contented sigh at Mr. Darcy’s heartfelt words, then you, dear reader, are in good company.I thought I could keep an open mind about fan ficti “‘You made us too perfect’ said Elinor”This is a collection of short stories inspired by Jane Austen, all never-before-published. Unfortunately, for many of them, that is for a good reason. The start to the blurb rather gives away why:“My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.” If you just heaved a contented sigh at Mr. Darcy’s heartfelt words, then you, dear reader, are in good company.I thought I could keep an open mind about fan fiction. It lasted as far as the second story; I rather liked the first, a nightmare of Jane’s in which she finds herself in Bath, meeting all of her characters – Marianne is incensed that she was portrayed as so emotionally useless, Elinor and Fanny that they were too perfect, Lizzy and Jane are delighted with the husbands she gave them. Another very clever episode was an exchange of letters between Lydia Bennet and Maria Lucas (Charlotte’s younger sister) – two very minor characters in the novel and the retelling from their perspective was amusing, if somewhat predictable.After that, there were rather too many re-imaginings; I wasn’t that happy with the idea of pursuing the characters of P&P after their wedding in Death Comes To Pemberley (review to come soon), but most of these stories reinforced all of my snobby ideas about fan fiction – one-dimensional, far too many dared to set themselves from Jane’s perspective, and everyone wants to get with Darcy (WHY??? He may have £10,000 a year, but not even Colin Firth made him attractive!).I know that there are fan fiction fans out there, and to them I heartily recommend this volume. It is a diverse and yet entirely Austen-focussed collection.I just don’t get the point.
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  • Isobel
    January 1, 1970
    This collection is okay. The only story I really liked is Lauren Willig's Northanger Abbey story. Don't recommend.
  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Austen Made Me Do It: Original Stories Inspired by Literature's Most Austute Observer of the Human Heart.Introduction by Laurel Ann Nattress*Jane Austen's Nightmare by Syrie JamesAs Jane finds herself in Bath, her characters show up and complain what Jane did wrong with them in her books. Only the Darcy's and Bingley's are content.*Waiting: A story inspired by Jane Austen's Persuasion by Jane OdiweAnne Elliot & Captain Wentworth are thinking about what happened nine years ago as he once Jane Austen Made Me Do It: Original Stories Inspired by Literature's Most Austute Observer of the Human Heart.Introduction by Laurel Ann Nattress*Jane Austen's Nightmare by Syrie JamesAs Jane finds herself in Bath, her characters show up and complain what Jane did wrong with them in her books. Only the Darcy's and Bingley's are content.*Waiting: A story inspired by Jane Austen's Persuasion by Jane OdiweAnne Elliot & Captain Wentworth are thinking about what happened nine years ago as he once again goes to Anne's father to ask for her hand in marriage.*A Night at Northanger by Lauren WilligGhost Trekkers TV show goes to check out the ghosts at Northanger Abbey. When Cate retires to her room early, after the power goes out, she meets the ghost. *Language*Jane and the Gentleman Rogue: Being a fragment of a Jane Austen mystery by Stephanie Barron. Jane Austen helps Lord Harold as he tries to protect naval plans from getting to France. And she tries to protect him while he duels Lord Cecil.*Faux Jane by Diane Meier and Frank Delaney writing as F.J. MeierNicola & Charles Scott help a spoiled actress and her fiance' Lord to get to the bottom of a autographed Jane Austen book she is paying a million dollars for.*Nothing Less Than Fairy-Land by Monica FairviewThe Knightley's have their first trials when they return from their honeymoon and have to find a way that two men can both live under the same roof.*Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane by Adriana TrigianiJane Austen writes a letter of congratulations to a niece on her engagement.*Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss by Jo BeverlyJane Austen tells the story of the mistletoe bough to a widow and her three daughters.That if kissing their one true love under the bough, their hearts will know.*When Only a Darcy Will Do by Beth PattilloElizabeth, an American in London. Is giving Jane Austen tours to make some extra money. No bites until Mr. Darcy shows up for the tour. *Heard of You by Margaret C. SullivanFrom Persuasion; the story of how Captain Croft & Sophie Wentworth meet. They recap the story for Anne and tell her how Frederick was their matchmaker.*The Ghostwriter by Elizabeth AstonCharles left Sara, due to her unending love for Mr. Darcy. He left a locket with Jane's hair which brings Jane to Sara. She helps her with her book and Charles before leaving.*Mr. Bennet Meets His Match by Amanda GrangeOn the day of Jane & Lizzy's wedding John Bennet thinks back to the time of his parents pushing him to get married and how he chose Jane Gardiner.*Jane Austen, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah! By Janet MullanyJulie teaches as a all girls school, during detention with three girls she teaches them how exciting Jane Austen can be when she replaces the characters with the Beatles.*Letters to Lydia by Maya SlaterLydia Bennet's friend, Maria Lucas sends her letters. The first of them from her stay with the Collin's and reporting what she thinks is happening between Lizzy & Mr. Darcy.*The Mysterious Closet: A Tale by Myretta RobensCathy is staying at an Abbey. She is given the Ratcliffe Suite in the haunted section. She meets Henry. Finally a man she could love, if he were only real rather than a ghost!*Jane Austen's Cat by Diana BirchallWhile her brother James is visiting at the small house, Aunt Jane takes time from writing to tell her nieces stories. This one happened to have cats as the characters.*Me and Mr. Darcy, Again... by Alexandra PotterCan Emily know if she truly loves Spike by spending time with Mr. Darcy, who really does not even exist. **Mild language*What Would Austen Do? By Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-BradwayJames Austen is in trouble at school, his parents are called in. His offense is... he is too polite. Blame it on a summer of English Country Dance and reading Jane Austen books.*The Riding Habit by Pamela AidanDarcy has a passion for riding and he desires his wife at his side. Elizabeth has never conquered the feat. Unfortunately Hyde Park is a bit unruly on the day of her first ride.*The Love Letter by Brenna AubreyAfter receiving a mysterious page from a book, a love letter. Mark finds it is from Persuasion. It sounded much like his love for Justine. Could he have a 2nd chance too?*The Chase by Carrie BebrisThis is about Francis “Frank” Austen. Jane's brother who was about a year older than her. As he Captain's his ship in the Royal Navy.*Intolerable Stupidity by Laurie Viera RiglerA modern day trial to put all the writers and producers in the dungeon for how they have rewrote Mr. Darcy. Will Judge Lady Catherine De Bourgh even hear the defense?**Received through NetGalley for Review
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  • Romancing the Book
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed by RobinEbook provided by NetGalleyWho would have thought that a book containing short stories centered on the works of Jane Austen could be so utterly entertaining? Each one is an inspiration to Jane Austen and how strong she made her characters. Each one is able to definitely stand the test of time. Characters that even when taken today and developed into new stories still stand strong on their own.From the first we are drawn into the lives of Ms. Austen and her characters. In Jane’s Reviewed by RobinEbook provided by NetGalleyWho would have thought that a book containing short stories centered on the works of Jane Austen could be so utterly entertaining? Each one is an inspiration to Jane Austen and how strong she made her characters. Each one is able to definitely stand the test of time. Characters that even when taken today and developed into new stories still stand strong on their own.From the first we are drawn into the lives of Ms. Austen and her characters. In Jane’s Nightmare by Syrie James, we find the characters attacking Jane so to speak and letting her know what she did wrong in developing their personalities. As she dreams they each let her know whether they are to perfect, need a little more backbone or whatever they say that their flaws are. She realizes that she should have made them more real. It is rather funny how characters become so real that you find yourself talking to them all the time. Past and present ones even.Each story as it relates to Ms. Austen’s stories in some way let us see how much she writes a part of herself in some way into each character. In, A Night at Northanger by Lauren Willig, for instance; Jane is not compared to Ms. Bennett but to that of the proud Mr. Darcy.Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane by Adriana Trigiani, let’s us imagine what it would be like to get life advice from Ms. Austen if she were to write us a letter today. It was refreshing to read letters in a day and age where letter writing has become a lost art form and has given way to an email or a text. Something to think about and maybe give writing letters another chance.The Ghostwriter by Elizabeth Ashton, we get the chance to visit with a sharp-witted and sharp-tongued spirit of Austen, who pulls no punches. Ms. Austen’s spirit let’s a young woman whose lover has left her because he can’t compete with fictional Mr. Darcy, hear things only a best friend can say to you. It was wonderful that the ghost of Ms. Austen just came right out and told her that she needed to “pull herself together”, “her tears made her face blotchy”, and “her nose was running”. Things you need to hear and only hear from a really good friend. This very witty and charming story found me laughing out loud.One of my favorites is, Jane Austen, Yeah Yeah Yeah! By Janet Mullany, where we find ourselves in the 1960’s and detention; as a young teacher helps her students learn how to appreciate Sense and Sensibility by aptly applying it to their lives. While helping the students she how something that was written a long time ago and still apply to today, she finds herself discovering things about herself and her own life.Another favorite on mine was: What Would Austen Do, by Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway. In this we find that even boys can find charm and help in reading stories by Ms. Austen. This story had a very clever way of letting the reader know that it is okay to be different.The collection ended with, Intolerable Stupidity by Laura Viera Rigler; in which she takes us into the courtroom with Mr. and Mrs. Darcy. Poking fun at the way Mr. Darcy is perceived differently by each person that reads his story in Pride and Prejudice. He complains about being wet all the time, vampire teeth and everything else that people have interpreted into his character over the years. Recently Colin Firth coming out of the lake wet, which Mr. Darcy himself would never have done. It just wasn’t heard of in his time. The vampire teeth were just a scare tactic and not real. He wouldn’t draw blood from his neighbor’s, would you? Aunt Catherine as the judge is perfect as she is appalled by the unsavory ways that he has been portrayed.I could write something about each story but that would just ruin it for you.Overall I loved this collection allot. Each and every contributor understands and loves the work of Ms. Austen. Jane Austen Made Me Do It; is a very clever collection of short stories written a wide array of genres and subjects that take us from gothic romance to fantasy. We find Jane herself along with many of her more recognizable characters in each story. Each story is unique but when added makes every person wanting to be a Jane Austen follower.I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone who loves Jane Austen. Even if you never read anything written by her this collection makes you want to go out and read her classic stories, and fall in love all over again.
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  • Rikke
    January 1, 1970
    This was fun. But perhaps not as fun as I had hoped.
  • Blodeuedd Finland
    January 1, 1970
    As always like with all stories, some I liked some not so much. Some I wanted to read more of because they were good, and some I thought also needed to be longer because I was just confused when they were so short. All in all this was a nice collection of different variations, modern version and a few ghosts.Jane Austen's Nightmare Syrie JamesJA meets her characters, it was such a delightful and short story :D Must read more by this author.Waiting: A story inspires by Jane Austen's Persuasion by As always like with all stories, some I liked some not so much. Some I wanted to read more of because they were good, and some I thought also needed to be longer because I was just confused when they were so short. All in all this was a nice collection of different variations, modern version and a few ghosts.Jane Austen's Nightmare Syrie JamesJA meets her characters, it was such a delightful and short story :D Must read more by this author.Waiting: A story inspires by Jane Austen's Persuasion by Jane OdiweAnne and Wenthworth. A little but about the past and the proposal now. Sweet.A Night at Northanger by Lauren WilligGhost Trekkers at Northanger. Not my favorite story. It was good, but to me it did not feel very Jane Austen like.Jane and the Gentleman Rogue: Being a fragment of a Jane Austen mystery by Stephanie BarronJane Austen and spies. I do not know about this one, it was ok, but I just do not know why she cared for something.Faux Jane by Diane Meier and Frank Delaney writing as F. J. MeierI do admit to feeling confused during the whole story. Not for me.Nothing Less Than Fairy-land by Monica FairviewEmma and Knightley after the honeymoon. Another sweet one. Poor Emma, her dad sure is troublesome. Very enjoyable and I must read more by this author.Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane by Adriana TrigianiA letter and I was bored, that is it.Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss by Jo BeverleyA lovely story about a widow with 3 daughters and a HEA. A short story that worked well and would surely have made a great book too.When Only a Darcy Will Do by Beth PattilloI was worried that the modern stories would not work for me, but this one was nice. A woman holds JA tours and meets a guy. And what a guy.Heard of You by Margaret C. SullivanAdmiral Croft and the story how he met his wife. Awww young Frederick Wentworth, I always did like stories set at sea.The Ghostwriter by Elizabeth AstonJA helps an author write a book. I liked how JA was portrayed here, not as you would imagine her at all.Mr. Bennet Meets His Match by Amanda GrangeHow he met his wife. Yes he fell for a pretty face, and I liked how it showed that he was still happy with his choice.Jane Austen, yeah, yeah, yeah by Janet MullanyA teacher talks about Sense and Sensibility during detention and compares them to the Beatles to get the girls interested. I liked this discussion as it does show you can do anything with JA.Letters to Lydia by Maya SlaterMaria Lucas is watching and writing letters about how she thinks Lizzy and Darcy are up to something. Delightful letters, and it seems Maria could have played a crucial par behind the scenes.The mysterious Closet: A tale by Myretta RobertsHonestly again I was just confused. i think the story was good, but needed to be fleshed out cos now confusion took over.Jane Austen's Cat by Diana BirchallAn ok story. Not much going on in it.Me and Mr Darcy, Again.... by Alexandra Potter4 years after book 1 and I do have that book...I might just have to read it and see the woman who met Mr DarcyWhat would Mr Darcy do? by Jane Rubino and Caitleen Rubino-BradwayA YA story, very nice and I liked this one where a young boy learns to dance and meets a girlThe Riding Habit by Pamela AidanNot much happened in this one where Lizzy learns to ride but it was still good.The Love letter by Brenna AubreyA twist on Persuasion, an ok story but not much happening.The Chase by Carrie BebrisA story about JA's brother. Sea chases and so on, something I would rather see on tv than read.Intolerable stupidity by Laurie Viera RiglerFirst I was all confused because it was really strange, but after a while I started to enjoy it. A very weird story that should just be read.
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  • Cleo
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Austen Made Me Do It is just that; a book of short stories inspired by Jane Austen. Some are stories of Austen's own life, others are a kind "after the book ends" (for Persuasion and Emma) and some are just Austen related. In the first story, Jane Austen ventures out into Bath, and encounters many of her literary characters, all of whom have serious complaints about their characters and how their stories turned out (except for the characters of Pride and Prejudice). And these are the heroin Jane Austen Made Me Do It is just that; a book of short stories inspired by Jane Austen. Some are stories of Austen's own life, others are a kind "after the book ends" (for Persuasion and Emma) and some are just Austen related. In the first story, Jane Austen ventures out into Bath, and encounters many of her literary characters, all of whom have serious complaints about their characters and how their stories turned out (except for the characters of Pride and Prejudice). And these are the heroines. Then, all of the weak and nasty characters show up. Anyway, I really liked that one, and many others too.Overall, I LOVED this collection; there were some really great stories, some good ones, and some not-so-good ones. But it's well worth it for the good stories. "Nothing Less Than Fairy-Land" and "Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane" were both really good stories; entertaining and interesting to read. The only two authors that I knew in this collection were Amanda Grange and Adriana Trigiani. I haven't actually read Adriana Trigiani, though I do want to read The Shoemaker's Wife. But "Love and Best Wishes, Aunt Jane" was by her, and as I said, I really liked it, as well as "Jane Austen's Nightmare" and several others. Some of the ones set in the present day, like the one at a haunted Northanger Abbey and the one about the actress named Anne Elliot were just okay for me. I felt like they lacked the distinctive verve of the Austen style, that special sparkle. Though the one in Northanger Abbey wasn't terrible.This anthology contains many good stories, not just a few. I also really liked "Mr. Bennet Meets His Match", which tells of how Mr. Bennet married Mrs. Bennet. And "Intolerable Stupidity" was hilarious! The various people who have dared to meddle with Austen's works are put on trial. This includes the film adaptions- the wet shirt scene, for example. And of course, people who have dared to add zombies, vampires, and sea monsters to Austen's books. This story features Lady Catherine de Bourgh presiding, and Mr. and Mrs. Darcy, of course. Though very silly, it was really funny, and I loved reading it, though the actual plot between the defense lawyer and the prosecutor wasn't that interesting. Though some stories were just okay, I others I really liked, and still others I loved. I would highly recommend this collection.This is an Austen inspired book worth buying, so I'm certainly glad that I did. It offers many a story for every Austen fan, and I loved it.www.novareviews.blogspot.com
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  • Paula Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    Growing up , I have always been a Jane Austen fan and have loved to read any form of Literature associated with her books , so when I saw this anthology come up on Netgalley for review , I just had to read it :) and I'm glad I did as I loved it. Jane Austen Made Me Do It is the perfect short story collection for any fan of Jane Austen whether you prefer to stick to the originals or like me have a fancy for the renditions like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Prada and Prejudice etc. This collect Growing up , I have always been a Jane Austen fan and have loved to read any form of Literature associated with her books , so when I saw this anthology come up on Netgalley for review , I just had to read it :) and I'm glad I did as I loved it. Jane Austen Made Me Do It is the perfect short story collection for any fan of Jane Austen whether you prefer to stick to the originals or like me have a fancy for the renditions like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Prada and Prejudice etc. This collection of stories features favourite historical fiction authors and authors that have featured tales of Jane Austen in their very own novels."My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." Ifyou just heaved a contented sigh at Mr. Darcy's heartfelt words, then you, dear reader, are in good company. Here is a delightful collection of never-before-published stories inspired by Jane Austen-her novels, her life, her wit, her world. Ever wondered whether Jane Austen's characters loved the predictaments that Jane wrote them in ? Syrie James -author of the book "The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen" brings the tale of Jane Austen's Nightmare to A Night at Northanger which brings in a bit of 80's Ghostbusters theme with The Pink Carnation series author Lauren Willig , I loved this as a fan of Vampire Novels and Gothic Novels - Northanger Abbey is like one of the originals , though not in a Vampire Diaries way. From Valentine Series author Adriana Trigiani , she decides to play on the fact that as we all know there is alot of old-fashioned letter writing in Jane's novels , so she has written her tale in the form of a Letter of Congratulations from Aunt Jane to her niece Anna. From the fun-loving author Beth Pattillo whose titles include Jane Austen Ruined my Life and Mr Darcy Broke my Heart has had a slight change of mind with her story titled "When Only a Darcy will Do".Other Authors include : Lauren Willig •Adriana Trigiani • Jo Beverley • Alexandra Potter • Laurie Viera Rigler • Frank Delaney & Diane Meier • Syrie James • Stephanie Barron • Amanda Grange• Pamela Aidan • Elizabeth Aston • Carrie Bebris • Diana Birchall • Monica Fairview • Janet Mullany • Jane Odiwe • Beth Pattillo • Myretta Robens • Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway • Maya Slater • Margaret C. Sullivan • and the winner of astory contest hosted by the Republic of Pemberley website and many more in this wonderful Jane Austen Collection of Tales.
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  • ☕ Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    I have long been a fan of Jane Austen and was excited to read this collection. Jane Austen Made Me Do It, is a collection of short stories written by modern authors who love Jane Austen. As with any collection of short stories I have read, not all of them were my cup of tea. Overall, I truly enjoyed this wonderful collection. The book boasts a wide range of authors and a few of my personal favorites. I was also delighted with the mixed genres including paranormal, suspense, gothic romance and co I have long been a fan of Jane Austen and was excited to read this collection. Jane Austen Made Me Do It, is a collection of short stories written by modern authors who love Jane Austen. As with any collection of short stories I have read, not all of them were my cup of tea. Overall, I truly enjoyed this wonderful collection. The book boasts a wide range of authors and a few of my personal favorites. I was also delighted with the mixed genres including paranormal, suspense, gothic romance and contemporary fantasy. There is a mix of journal entries, short stories and letters. One of my favorites was Elizabeth Aston’s short story entitled “The Ghostwriter”. A young writer named Sara comes home to find a Dear John letter from her boyfriend. It contains a departing gift, a locket containing a piece of Jane’s hair. After crying herself to sleep, she wakes to find the ghost of Jane at the foot of the bed. The story that unfolds is simply delightful and the ending had me laughing out loud. Jo Beverly’s work, “Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss”, finds a widowed woman with four young girls. The widow takes Jane’s advice and finds love. In Beth Pattillo’s story, “Only A Darcy Will Do”, a young woman studying abroad gives guided tours. Dressed in vintage garb, she leads them on a walk of places Austen has visited in London. This is the third Sunday she hasn’t had a single customer when a young man dressed as Mr. Darcy asks to take the tour. This is only a glimpse of the adventures inside this charming book. This would make a great holiday gift for anyone who loves Jane Austen and a must have for Austen enthusiast. This book will be published October 11, 2011. A special thank you to netGalley and Random House Publishing Group for sending me this ARC in exchange for my unbiased review. http://kimbathecaffeinatedbookreviewe...
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  • Charla Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    This wonderful book is full of stories written in Jane Austen fashion. Each writer was asked to pair a story with their favorite Jane Austen Quote. It is editied by my friend Laurel Ann Nattress over at Austenprose.com. Laurel Ann also wrote the introduction which is great all by itself! This book is for all Jane Lovers! I found that as I was reading the stories, I would forget that I was not reading Jane Austen. The stories are that good! There are 22 original stories and each one is as good as This wonderful book is full of stories written in Jane Austen fashion. Each writer was asked to pair a story with their favorite Jane Austen Quote. It is editied by my friend Laurel Ann Nattress over at Austenprose.com. Laurel Ann also wrote the introduction which is great all by itself! This book is for all Jane Lovers! I found that as I was reading the stories, I would forget that I was not reading Jane Austen. The stories are that good! There are 22 original stories and each one is as good as the first. If my saying over and over how wonderful this book is doesn't make you want to read it, then look at some of the authors names, because that should change your mind and give you reason to read it! Here is a list of the wonderful authors in this book: Syrie James, Jane Odwie, Lauren Wilig, Stephanie Barron, F.J.Meir, Monica Fairview, Adriana Trigiani, Jo Beverly, Beth Patillo, Margaret Sullivan, Elizabeth Aston, Amanda Grange, Janet Mullany, Maya Slater, Myretta Robens, Diana Birchell, Alexandra Potter, Jane Rubiano and Caitlen Rubiano-Bradway, Pamela Aiden, Brenna Aubrey, Carrie Bebris, and Laurie Vierra Rigler.Now that is an impressive list! I cannot pick a personal favorite, but I will say that I loved how some of the stories incorporate Jane Austen in the stories and the way she interacts with her own story characters. If you are a Jane Austen fan, you really need to read this book! And who knows, it may even inspire you to write your own Jane Austen story!For my full review, please visit http;//booktalkswithcharla.blogspot.com
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  • Maria Grazia
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Austen Made Me Do It is a wonderful collection of Austenesque short stories and an illuminating example of how … union is strength. A group of 22 Austen Authors have been writing for the same goal and have aimed at this extraordinary achievement all together under the guide of a very special editor, Laurel Ann Natress, who is at the same time a great expert of Jane Austen and of the book market and marketing. It has been a delightful full immersion in Austen fan fiction. I had already read Jane Austen Made Me Do It is a wonderful collection of Austenesque short stories and an illuminating example of how … union is strength. A group of 22 Austen Authors have been writing for the same goal and have aimed at this extraordinary achievement all together under the guide of a very special editor, Laurel Ann Natress, who is at the same time a great expert of Jane Austen and of the book market and marketing. It has been a delightful full immersion in Austen fan fiction. I had already read most of these authors in at least one of their personal achievements and to find them all together in one book was like … watching a firework show. What I especially appreciated is the range of variety, the originality and the high quality of the 22 tales. There are stories for all tastes: from gothic to comedy, from classic romance to chick lit, from what-ifs to sequels, from spin-offs to modernizations. I’ve picked up 5 of my favourite stories and I want to share with you my notes, that is, what I scribbled about each of them immediately after finishing reading. Go on reading on My Jane Austen Book Clubhttp://thesecretunderstandingofthehea...It was great fun reading this book and discovering all these little Austeneque gems one after one: different colours, different shades, different shape and size but all so charming!
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  • Heather McKeon
    January 1, 1970
    This is my 'a book of short stories' for my reading challenge. In fact it's a book of short stories inspired by Jane Austen's life and/or novels and on the whole it was lovely. Of the 22 short stories there were only 3 that weren't my favorite - 2 of the 3 were just OK for me and only 1 did I just plain not enjoy. So I'd say that's pretty good - cause you never know what you're going to get from a bunch of different authors, so I think I have to say that I really quite liked this book. My favori This is my 'a book of short stories' for my reading challenge. In fact it's a book of short stories inspired by Jane Austen's life and/or novels and on the whole it was lovely. Of the 22 short stories there were only 3 that weren't my favorite - 2 of the 3 were just OK for me and only 1 did I just plain not enjoy. So I'd say that's pretty good - cause you never know what you're going to get from a bunch of different authors, so I think I have to say that I really quite liked this book. My favorites were "What Would Austen Do?" which is written from the point of view of a teenage boy - I loved it extra because at first I wasn't sure I'd like it at all, and then I just fell into it and ate it up. And "The Love Letter" which was written by a previously unpublished author - there was a short story contest for this book, and the winner got their story published in it - and I liked her story, it was lovely. I also really enjoyed "Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss" it was sweet and a nice little Christmas story. So the point is, if you're a Jane Austen fan, I think you'll enjoy this little collection of stories.
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  • Charlene
    January 1, 1970
    This compilation of short stories was wonderful. There were to many to comment on any specific story, as there were 22 such stories. They ranged from continuations/alteration of Jane's works to stories with Jane herself in the story plot. There were also a lot of modern versions of Jane Austen's work. They were all written very entertaining and I enjoyed them immensely. I personally rated most of the stories 4 stars, some 5 stars. I also rate a few 3 stars but did enjoy those stories very much! This compilation of short stories was wonderful. There were to many to comment on any specific story, as there were 22 such stories. They ranged from continuations/alteration of Jane's works to stories with Jane herself in the story plot. There were also a lot of modern versions of Jane Austen's work. They were all written very entertaining and I enjoyed them immensely. I personally rated most of the stories 4 stars, some 5 stars. I also rate a few 3 stars but did enjoy those stories very much! There was only 1 story that I was disappointed in and could not understand why it was included, I had a difficult time reading it and will admit that I jumped to the next story. The winner of the story contest was one of my favorites. It is a modern version of "Persuasion" and definitely not to be missed. I hope the writer continues writing. I thoroughly enjoyed the story!!!
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