Dregs (William Wisting, #1)
Meet Chief Inspector William Wisting, an experienced policeman who is familiar with the dark side of human nature. He lives in challenging times for the Norwegian police force, meeting them with integrity and humanity, and a fragile belief that he can play a part in creating a better world. Dregs begins with a police report giving the place and time of the discovery of a training shoe washed up on the sand, still containing a severed foot from the victim's body, the introduction of CI William Wisting, and the first hint of his health worries. Soon a second shoe is washed up, but it is another left. What is the explanation for this? Has there been some kind of terrible accident at sea? Does it indicate the killing and dismembering of two victims? Is there a link with the unsolved mystery of a number of disappearances in the Larvik area in recent months? In this gripping police procedural, Wisting gradually gets to the bottom of the mystery with the help of his all too human colleagues and his journalist daughter, Line.

Dregs (William Wisting, #1) Details

TitleDregs (William Wisting, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 20th, 2019
PublisherSandstone
ISBN-139781905207671
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Fiction, European Literature, Scandinavian Literature, Scandinavian Lite..., Nordic Noir

Dregs (William Wisting, #1) Review

  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    In an attempt to expand my literary horizons, I took it upon myself to introduce myself to Jorn Lier Horst, acclaimed Scandinavian mystery writer. Chief Inspector William Wisting has a great deal of experience with police work in Norway, as well as its dark underbelly. After a shoe washes ashore with a left foot still inside, Wisting cannot tell if this is foul play or some horrible accident. When a second shoe turns up, also containing a left foot, Wisting must begin to wonder if there is a dis In an attempt to expand my literary horizons, I took it upon myself to introduce myself to Jorn Lier Horst, acclaimed Scandinavian mystery writer. Chief Inspector William Wisting has a great deal of experience with police work in Norway, as well as its dark underbelly. After a shoe washes ashore with a left foot still inside, Wisting cannot tell if this is foul play or some horrible accident. When a second shoe turns up, also containing a left foot, Wisting must begin to wonder if there is a disaster out at sea, or is a murderer is dismembering victims and trying to destroy the evidence. Could these feet have anything to do with a number of recent disappearances in the area as well? As Wisting continues to probe, his daughter, Line, undertakes a project of her own, interviewing some of Norway's most notorious killers to write news articles documenting their progress. Line sets out to dig deeper and offer the generl public insight into the role prison plays in rehabilitation. When Line's interviewees have ties to those who have gone missing, Wisting cannot help but wonder if there is a larger, and more sinister, game at play. A wonderful English introduction to a well-established author is sure to make waves in the mystery genre.Horst joins the ranks of Lars Keplar and Soren Hammer in creating an interesting mystery that surpasses the language barrier. He is able to present both the mystery, as well as a keen characterisation of Norway's political and social lifestyle, unknown to many outside the region. Horst also aptly titles his book, drawing parallels between the severed feet and the criminal outcasts Line interviews, both the dregs of society. The story and the characters reflect both the unique Scandinavian flavour of a crime procedural, but also show ties with the more familiar Western judicial system, making the story easily digestible by the masses. The reader is in for a treat, with short chapters full of information and teasers, which propel the story forward in an easy manner. Bring on the second (English translated) novel, as I want to learn more about this Wisting character.Kudos, Mr. Horst for this wonderfully crafted novel. I hope to see more action and character development as we proceed.Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/
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  • Nancy Oakes
    January 1, 1970
    It really is a shame to have missed the first five novels in this series, because Dregs is exactly what I look for when I'm reading a novel of crime fiction. It has a good plot, enough suspects to keep the reader guessing, very little in the way of extraneous subplot, romance or main-character existentialist angst/crisis so that the reader stays focused on the crime and its solution. It is a brilliant police procedural which is all about getting to the root of the mystery at the heart of the sto It really is a shame to have missed the first five novels in this series, because Dregs is exactly what I look for when I'm reading a novel of crime fiction. It has a good plot, enough suspects to keep the reader guessing, very little in the way of extraneous subplot, romance or main-character existentialist angst/crisis so that the reader stays focused on the crime and its solution. It is a brilliant police procedural which is all about getting to the root of the mystery at the heart of the story.Set in Norway, the novel opens with the discovery of a tennis shoe which is rolling around at the edge of the shore. Inside the shoe is a left foot, and much to the dismay of Chief Inspector William Wisting, it is not the first left foot in a shoe to have washed up recently, meaning that the feet do not belong to the same people. Certain characteristics of the shoes lead the group to consider whether or not these shoes have anything to do with four people who have recently gone missing. Three of them are elderly; the fourth, a paranoid schizophrenic, suffers from delusions of being watched and her home secretly searched by some sort of foreign intelligence organization. And things get even more complicated as more shoes come to the shore and a body or two is found. The killer has to be stopped, but this will not be an easy task: before the case can be solved, Wisting and his team are faced with having to unravel decades worth of secrets which someone really want to keep hidden.This is not a high-adventure, on-the-edge-of-your-seat kind of thriller, nor is it a fast-paced crime fiction with lots of subplots to be resolved. It is a very clean, intelligent and streamlined police procedural, very realistic and credible, with very little in the story to come between the reader and his or her attention to the main plot and the investigation. The author manages to offer an intriguing mystery that hooks the reader from the very first paragraph. He also smoothly integrates his thoughts about important social and political issues and reflects on the nature of imprisonment and punishment through the journalistic work of Wisting's daughter Line. It is very well written, although I must say I would have liked to have been better acquainted with the main characters' backstories before having to start with book six. -sigh-The lack of a gimmicky serial killer or high-speed thrills may turn off some readers who are used to that sort of thing in their Scandinavian crime fiction, but to me, this book borders on perfect. While those elements are fun, there's nothing like a serious, good old-fashioned police procedural for the true lover of crime and mystery fiction. In Dregs, there is a good mystery, a good plot, and good, well-timed and well-paced progress through the investigation leading to the revelation at the end. Very highly recommended, and it will work for readers not only of Scandinavian crime fiction but for readers of serious, intelligent police procedurals as well.
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  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great police procedural. Set in Norway this is a solid read, a great crime story with a intriguing plot.I think I have found another great character in William Wisting, looking forward to more if the first five books are ever translated.
  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    I usually hate reading a series out of order but since, even though, this is the 6th it is the first translated into English. Characters were not as flawed as the characters in many nordic crime fiction, but the storyline was interesting. A bit of historical data and really enjoyed the alternate but complimenting storyline by Wisting's daughter, who is a journalist. Looking forward and hoping that the rest of the series is translated and released in the US.
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  • Steven Z.
    January 1, 1970
    William Wisting’s career as a law enforcement professional who became a Chief Inspector in the Criminal Investigation Department of Lavrik Police mirrors that of DREGS author Jorn Lier Horst. The author, one of Norway’s most experienced crime fighters introduces Wisting as he is immediately called to a crime scene at a tourist beach south of Oslo where he is confronted by a training shoe with a severed foot inside that has washed along the shore. What is disconcerting is that it is the second le William Wisting’s career as a law enforcement professional who became a Chief Inspector in the Criminal Investigation Department of Lavrik Police mirrors that of DREGS author Jorn Lier Horst. The author, one of Norway’s most experienced crime fighters introduces Wisting as he is immediately called to a crime scene at a tourist beach south of Oslo where he is confronted by a training shoe with a severed foot inside that has washed along the shore. What is disconcerting is that it is the second left footed training shoe with a human foot inside that has appeared in a six day period.Wisting is an interesting character who has been a widow for three years and has begun a relationship with a woman named Suzanne. He is the father of twins one of which is his daughter, Line, a journalist who plays a significant role in the novel. Wisting is well respected and the type of law enforcement individual, unlike some colleagues, who shuns publicity. He is very workmanlike in his approach to crime and follows the mantra that there are no coincidences when investigating. Other important characters that Lier Horst develops include; Espen Mortensen, a young crime technician, Ebbe Slettaker, an oceanologist, Nils Hammer, the leader of the Narcotics Division, Torunn Borg, a female colleague, and Audun Vetti, the Assistant Chief of Police, an arrogant careerist who has difficulty making critical decisions.Wisting and his colleagues are at a loss after examining missing person’s files from the previous year. They have come up with a series of names, that at the outset lead nowhere, but after pursuing further examination there appear to be some interesting coincidences. Torkel Lauritzen, a widower who suffered from the effects of a stroke had resided at the Stavern Nursing Home. Otto Saga, a former Air Force officer who suffered from dementia also lived at the Stavern Nursing Home. Sverre Lund, an old school teacher went missing after leaving his home, and Hanne Richter, a nursery teacher, and a diagnosed schizoid paranoiac has disappeared.Lier Horst twists the plot by having Wisting’s journalist daughter, Line on an assignment that brings her to interview murderers who have served their time in prison. Her goal is to investigate the impact of punishment on homicidal killers, believing that a milder use of coercion by the state could contribute to a more humane society. Line’s second interview subject is Ken Ronny Hague who had killed a policeman in 1991. The victim was the same age and an acquaintance of her father which brought back memories from when Line was eight years old. When she learned of the case her father was dealing with, her boss informed her that her newspaper was sending a team to Lavrik to cover the missing “feet” story.Lier Horst deftly works the poor care at the Stavern Nursing Home into the plot as patients and then a care giver from the home go missing. Wisting grows very frustrated with the lack of progress in the investigation as “everything seemed so meaningless and improbable,” particularly as two more left footed training shoes with human feet float ashore. A major break takes place when Hannah Richter tells Wisting she believes it was her sister that is one of the missing. For Wisting the coincidences seemed to build as the house in which Hanne Richter lived before her disappearance was owned by Christian Hague, but he died three weeks before she disappeared. Interestingly, his heir was his grandson, Ken Ronny Hague, the convicted cop killer who was interviewed by Wisting’s daughter. What the reader is left with is the beginning of the unraveling of the spider’s web that the author has created.It seemed that all the presumed dead or missing people knew each other. They may have formed their own intelligence unit that feared for a Soviet invasion of Norway in 1970. Wisting comes across a photo of five men, but only four of which can be identified. After showing the photo to his father, Wisting learns the identity of the fifth man, Carsten Meyer, who had worked at the Norwegian Defense Department Research Institute. From this point on it seems that the crime investigation should come together, but it does not and Wisting becomes even more frustrated as bodies, minus their left foot are uncovered by a mini-submarine employed by the police after the calculations of Ebbe Slettaker.Lier Horst’s conclusion is somewhat predictable, but there is an element of surprise, particularly in the role played by Line. Wisting is a practitioner of deductive logic and in the end he will figure it out. Despite the plethora of bodies, the author keeps the bloodshed to a minimum, unlike many other practitioners of this genre. Lier Horst has had a number of his novels translated into English, the next being CLOSED FOR WINTER. If you enjoyed DREGS, you should try the next in the series, for me I have yet to decide.
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  • Caroline Hanssen
    January 1, 1970
    Starten var litt treig, mest fordi Wisting ikke hadde noen gode ledetråder å følge og alt var egentlig en stort surr av mulige løsninger. I denne boka følte jeg at jeg hadde allerede kommer fram til mulige ting som burde sjekkes ut lenge før hovedpersonen selv tenkte på det. Noen ting, som jeg tenkte at han burde ha sjekket, sjekket han ikke i det hele tatt.Enkelte av drapsofrene ble ikke etterforsket ondet hele tatt. Hvorfor ikke? Jeg ville fjerne likt å vite hva som var grunnen til at akkurat Starten var litt treig, mest fordi Wisting ikke hadde noen gode ledetråder å følge og alt var egentlig en stort surr av mulige løsninger. I denne boka følte jeg at jeg hadde allerede kommer fram til mulige ting som burde sjekkes ut lenge før hovedpersonen selv tenkte på det. Noen ting, som jeg tenkte at han burde ha sjekket, sjekket han ikke i det hele tatt.Enkelte av drapsofrene ble ikke etterforsket ondet hele tatt. Hvorfor ikke? Jeg ville fjerne likt å vite hva som var grunnen til at akkurat de var drept.Men etter en litt seig start, så hadde denne boka en veldig spennende slutt! Jeg syntes det er bra den måten han skriver på, og at det er ganske likt hvordan politiet faktisk jobber med slike saker!
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  • Jimena
    January 1, 1970
    I am a fan of all Scandinavian mystery crime novels available in English. My favorite authors are Jussi Adler-Olsen, Camilla Lackberg, Asa Larsson, among others. I was so excited and looking forward to have found a new series, saw great reviews about this series and was not very impressed. It was a bit slow, not much to keep me going, very slow and the main character always drained of energy, it kinda transfer his lack of energy to the reader. A real downer without much excitement and in the cli I am a fan of all Scandinavian mystery crime novels available in English. My favorite authors are Jussi Adler-Olsen, Camilla Lackberg, Asa Larsson, among others. I was so excited and looking forward to have found a new series, saw great reviews about this series and was not very impressed. It was a bit slow, not much to keep me going, very slow and the main character always drained of energy, it kinda transfer his lack of energy to the reader. A real downer without much excitement and in the climax of the book, again the main character disappoints the reader. I know this is book 6 in the series but it is the first available in English in the US, but I do not know I will continue to read the next in the series. I do not recommend this book.
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    It was fine, quick read but slightly boring. Ending is abrupt in my opinion but I didn’t actually figure out who did it until the end so it’s got that going for it. Unfortunately, I won’t be continuing the series. I suppose perhaps it’s just not my type of book, a lot of others seem to really enjoy it.
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  • Bokbabbel
    January 1, 1970
    Bra intrig med vänsterfötter som spolas iland på stränder, fattar bara inte varför jag inte engageras mer? Sen är det aldrig gastkramande spänning hwller - och det behöver det inte vara, men jag känner mig förunderligt likgiltig trots att jag ändå gillade boken?! *förvirrad*
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  • Hans Brienesse
    January 1, 1970
    Well, that was a pretty good read. The plot was good, spoiled only by a small reference to a heist that had parallels to a film I watched recently. The ending, although becoming more apparent, was a different ending than what was hinted at earlier in the book. I did feel, however, that the author must revere Henning Mankell and the leading character could have been called Wallander rather than Wisting. That notwithstanding it was a meaty read and really plausible. I shall certainly be reading mo Well, that was a pretty good read. The plot was good, spoiled only by a small reference to a heist that had parallels to a film I watched recently. The ending, although becoming more apparent, was a different ending than what was hinted at earlier in the book. I did feel, however, that the author must revere Henning Mankell and the leading character could have been called Wallander rather than Wisting. That notwithstanding it was a meaty read and really plausible. I shall certainly be reading more of this author's contributions to the Nordic Noir scene.
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  • Rachel Hirstwood
    January 1, 1970
    I would heartily recommend this to fans of scandinavian crime fiction. This is the first of Horst's books to be translated into English, and it introduces us to William Wisting - Norwegian detective, widower and father. Wisting is a very likeable character and his daughter is for once, not flawed as in other Scan Crime fiction - especially Jar City by Indriadsson! Line Wisting is also a likeable character who you get the feeling will go far in her chosen professional field of journalism.This nov I would heartily recommend this to fans of scandinavian crime fiction. This is the first of Horst's books to be translated into English, and it introduces us to William Wisting - Norwegian detective, widower and father. Wisting is a very likeable character and his daughter is for once, not flawed as in other Scan Crime fiction - especially Jar City by Indriadsson! Line Wisting is also a likeable character who you get the feeling will go far in her chosen professional field of journalism.This novel was intriging, and not just because they it has been written by a policeman - 4 left feet are washed up on the beaches around Stavern. THat means there must be 4 bodies surely,but where? And why just feet? And whose feet? The investigation moves at a good pace - slow enough for lots of details about characters and scenery, but fast enough that you don't get left feeling bored.I really enjoyed this book - and now I have to add this part of Norway to my list of travel destinations wish list! I'll keep my eye out for more translations by Horst as well - he has written 5 others that have yet to be translated into English.
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  • Rebecca Martin
    January 1, 1970
    This is Jorn Lier Horst's first book to be translated into English.I will certainly read more in the series (6 books so far) when they are available. The only complaint I would make is that, as the case is resolved, the explanation that is given simply comes from our being told what happened. Someone explains to us, as if we are being lectured. This is a non-dramatic, cop-out way of bringing detective fiction to a close and is, unfortunately, very common in detective fiction. I see this as a qua This is Jorn Lier Horst's first book to be translated into English.I will certainly read more in the series (6 books so far) when they are available. The only complaint I would make is that, as the case is resolved, the explanation that is given simply comes from our being told what happened. Someone explains to us, as if we are being lectured. This is a non-dramatic, cop-out way of bringing detective fiction to a close and is, unfortunately, very common in detective fiction. I see this as a quality that typifies a lot of European (including British) detective fiction, while much American fiction allows the "discovery" to come out in a way that maintains tension. Much European fiction ends with a confession, while American fiction features cases where the truth is drawn out through conflict. This is a huge over-simplification and perhaps it comes from my vast reading of detective fiction which includes the good, the bad and the ugly, rather than the best!
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  • Mary Grace Walsh
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the plot and people in the first I've read by this author. It's the first of the series to be tranlated and the dopey publishers chose to translate the 6th book first. My favorite Scandinavian cops are Harry Hole, Erlendur and Wallander and William Wisting is certainly welcome at the table. I don't mean to leave out Larsson's trio, which is how most of us mystery folk were led to this treasure trove; however his death ended that source. I might add that I'll never forgive Mankell for wha I liked the plot and people in the first I've read by this author. It's the first of the series to be tranlated and the dopey publishers chose to translate the 6th book first. My favorite Scandinavian cops are Harry Hole, Erlendur and Wallander and William Wisting is certainly welcome at the table. I don't mean to leave out Larsson's trio, which is how most of us mystery folk were led to this treasure trove; however his death ended that source. I might add that I'll never forgive Mankell for what he did to Kurt in the most recent book.On a similar note; I've read all Indridason Inspector Erlendur that have been tranlated (9) and am eagerly awaiting my preordered copy of number 10: "Outrage" coming to my Kindle on 9/17.
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  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy reading crime stories that are not originally written in English. Of course "those" Swedish ones but also Danish, Icelandic, Japanese, French, Mexican, and now this very good Norwegian book. Great story, complex but not complicated, a fast read but meaty enough, and the explanation of the "severed legs" that kick off the murder investigations is novel and plausible. I believe that this is the only English translation of his work.Read on my Kindle (of course!) but sourced from the Ontario I enjoy reading crime stories that are not originally written in English. Of course "those" Swedish ones but also Danish, Icelandic, Japanese, French, Mexican, and now this very good Norwegian book. Great story, complex but not complicated, a fast read but meaty enough, and the explanation of the "severed legs" that kick off the murder investigations is novel and plausible. I believe that this is the only English translation of his work.Read on my Kindle (of course!) but sourced from the Ontario Download Centre.
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  • Hpnyknits
    January 1, 1970
    Another Scandinavian police procedural. This time in Norway. At first the so called formula has threatened to make this a bore, but despite it (the blood shot eyes, the overworked mid-age cop, the conflict with the press, top brass politics, the sexy girlfriend, the adult professional daughter etc) the story was engaging and kept me up. I had a tough time keeping up with so many characters with the unfamiliar Norwegian names, but got the relationships right.
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  • Jozef Kuric
    January 1, 1970
    Horst sa rozhodol servírovať napätie po kúskoch. A to doslovne. Nechýba opäť precízna psychológia postáv a druhý rozmer knihy, ktorým sú úvahy o vine a treste. K pozitívnemu čitateľskému zážitku prispieva opäť aj pridaná hodnota v podobe historickej a povedzme spoločensko-etickej vrstvy. Dejepisnú rovinu tvorí kontext o nórskej zaangažovanosti sa do druhej svetovej vojny a tiež do povojnového obdobia tzv. studenej vojny.viac tu: https://dennikn.sk/blog/jorn-lier-hor...
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  • Michele Abrams Lehn
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable read set in Norway for a change. Good character development, and an exciting finish. But overall, it was a bit slow moving and not particularly thrilling. I would, however, read this author again.
  • Dylan Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this crime procedural novel ...really likeable characters and a great plot too...hurry up and translate the earlier ones ..ahh Please
  • Anja Hildén
    January 1, 1970
    Ah, jag var nog inte på humör; allt kändes för lika, för långsamt. Chefen är karriärist, och vår hjälte "känner på sig" saker men vet inte riktigt vad, och allt hänger ihop med det som journalistdottern skriver om. Och så en historisk twist. Nä. Vi har läst den förut.
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  • Hanna Andersen
    January 1, 1970
    Bra, jag är så förtjust i Lier Horst just nu. Gillade vändningarna. Det är kul att vara så säker på vem som är skyldig och sedan ha fel. Inte så spännande men bra ändå. Jag löste dessutom DNA-twisten innan boken ens kom i närheten av att det var en twist :)
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Bought four in the series at a book sale. After reading this one, I'm glad I have a whole set of them to look forward to.
  • Manuel Antão
    January 1, 1970
    I finally got round to reading Jorn Lier Horst in English. Unfortunately, this is the first translation from Norwegian into English and it started off with the 6th volume, not with the first. Shame on you publishers!! Now I'll have to buy the first volumes in German, to see what the fuss is all about. I should have waited, but I wasn't sure whether I should buy the first 5 volumes in German. There's lots of so-and-so (and let's say it outright, bad...) fiction coming out of Scandinavia nowadays, I finally got round to reading Jorn Lier Horst in English. Unfortunately, this is the first translation from Norwegian into English and it started off with the 6th volume, not with the first. Shame on you publishers!! Now I'll have to buy the first volumes in German, to see what the fuss is all about. I should have waited, but I wasn't sure whether I should buy the first 5 volumes in German. There's lots of so-and-so (and let's say it outright, bad...) fiction coming out of Scandinavia nowadays, that's why I was reluctant to buy the first volumes in German. I fondly remember the days that if you wanted to read Scandinavian Fiction you'd have to read them in German (the Scandinavian and German editions were published almost at the same time). The english publishers found the rich vein of the scandinavian crime fiction 4 or 5 year's ago, but now only the gems remain...Horst is nothing like Jo Nesbo (a fellow Norwegian). I would tend to compare Horst more with Maj Sjöwall, Per Wahlöö, Arnaldur Indridason or Henning Mankell (all Swedish, with the Arnaldur's exception - Icelander), while Jo Nesbo tries to emulate the american crime fiction writing. Not so with Horst, Maj Sjöwall, Arnaldur Indridason, Per Wahlöö or Henning Mankell. And that's one of the reasons why I tend to prefer Scandinavian Crime Fiction than its american counterpart (there're exceptions naturally).I won't get into details about the plot. Suffice to say, is that, if your tastes go in the direction of the more traditional Crime Fiction coming out of Scandinavia, you'll most certainly like this book. I certainly did.NB:I'm curious to find how the relationship between Line and Wisting came to the point portraid in this book.
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  • Audiothing
    January 1, 1970
    ReviewI’m always excited at the prospect of finding a new crime mystery series and was happy to come across the William Wisting books by Jørn Lier Horst.However, it was not until I had this book in my hand that I realised that this is not, in fact, the first in the series but the sixth, it is though the first to be translated from the Norwegian.I’m not sure of the logic behind that decision but I’m happy to say that I didn’t feel too short changed, nevertheless, a brief account of the back story ReviewI’m always excited at the prospect of finding a new crime mystery series and was happy to come across the William Wisting books by Jørn Lier Horst.However, it was not until I had this book in my hand that I realised that this is not, in fact, the first in the series but the sixth, it is though the first to be translated from the Norwegian.I’m not sure of the logic behind that decision but I’m happy to say that I didn’t feel too short changed, nevertheless, a brief account of the back story would have been much appreciated.William Wisting is middle aged Police Inspector, he has an adult daughter who works as a journalist, and he has a girlfriend. He neglects his health so is not as fit as he ought to be, he has a few quirks, but not so many as to make him one of those deeply flawed police officers that we come across in some types of crime fiction.William Wisting and his team are investigating the mystery surrounding the discovery of a second severed foot washed up on a beach, it doesn’t match the first foot so accident is ruled out. To deepen the mystery further, more severed feet get washed up.As four people have gone missing from the area, the team must investigate the possibility of these two incidents being related. Their investigation leads them to some very unexpected places and to some very interesting characters.This is a police procedural at its best, it is intriguing, credible, well plotted and flows beautifully and I loved the way the author meshed the parallel stories of Wisting and his daughter Line.There’s plenty here to keep the reader turning those pages in anticipation, and if you love a good British police procedural then I highly recommend the William Wisting series.Review copy supplied by Affirm Press
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    Well done and (apparently) well translated Norwegian crime novel. A severed left foot, still clad in a running shoe, is washed up on the shore; the person it was part of has to be identified before the investigation begins into whether the person was the victim of a murder and then who committed the crime. Hopes that it is an isolated accident, possibly someone who fell off a boat and macerated by a ship's propeller are dashed when another and then another foot surfaces. A police procedural with Well done and (apparently) well translated Norwegian crime novel. A severed left foot, still clad in a running shoe, is washed up on the shore; the person it was part of has to be identified before the investigation begins into whether the person was the victim of a murder and then who committed the crime. Hopes that it is an isolated accident, possibly someone who fell off a boat and macerated by a ship's propeller are dashed when another and then another foot surfaces. A police procedural with the reader looking over the shoulder and into the mind of the lead detective of the squad tasked with the crimes. Unlike many Scandinavian fictional detectives, Chief Inspector William Wisting isn't lumbered with unsolvable family problems--no dementia raddled parents, no drug addicted children, criminal siblings or even an unfaithful wife. His daughter, an enterprising and talented young photojournalist moves from the edges of the plot to the center as the story she is working on intersects with his investigation. Wisting is a sympathetic character who thinks Norwegian society fraying at the edges. His policeman's point of view is that arrest and conviction was formerly scandalous but now is just something unfortunate that happens to someone, like losing a job (which isn't really a problem in Norway, of course) or suffering a minor but painful injury. There is a subplot concerning his health which is a clunky add-on--it can only be resolved in one way and it is obvious from its introduction what that will be--but "Dregs" is overall a satisfying murder mystery with credible characters.
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  • J
    January 1, 1970
    Remember, one man's spoiler may be another man's simple summary. It's all relative so I rarely hide my reviews.William Wisting is the Norwegian police detective who is assigned the case - an athletic shoe with a foot inside washes ashore. Soon more shoes and feet arrive.The police start correlating these "dregs" to missing people, but can't find a link.What appears at first to be the criminal activity of a psycho turns out to be a simple case of greed for money.Interestingly, Wisting's journalis Remember, one man's spoiler may be another man's simple summary. It's all relative so I rarely hide my reviews.William Wisting is the Norwegian police detective who is assigned the case - an athletic shoe with a foot inside washes ashore. Soon more shoes and feet arrive.The police start correlating these "dregs" to missing people, but can't find a link.What appears at first to be the criminal activity of a psycho turns out to be a simple case of greed for money.Interestingly, Wisting's journalist daughter has an assignment that overlaps with his own. She wants to research and interview long-term convicts who have been freed to see if/how their prison experience has impaired them.At story's end, she believes the ex-con who figures in both her current work and her father's latest case was, in fact, affected for the worse by his prison time, which is followed by the commission of even more and worse crimes.In fact, the suspect was technically innocent of the crime for which he was convicted. But I vote with the dad: get the guy for his new crimes. Proof is proof. It doesn't really matter whether he was in prison before - the roots of his new crimes lies in the past, before he ever went to prison.Nice writing.
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  • Rob Kitchin
    January 1, 1970
    Dregs is a straightforward police procedural that is very much in the Scandinavian style – a relatively dour detective, an understated narrative with close attention to detail, and realist in its depiction of police work and society. The plot works at the level of carefully revealing the solving of a puzzle rather than being driven by action and tension. Dregs starts at a relatively sedate pace, slowing moving pieces into place, and it’s only as the telling progresses that the extent of the puzz Dregs is a straightforward police procedural that is very much in the Scandinavian style – a relatively dour detective, an understated narrative with close attention to detail, and realist in its depiction of police work and society. The plot works at the level of carefully revealing the solving of a puzzle rather than being driven by action and tension. Dregs starts at a relatively sedate pace, slowing moving pieces into place, and it’s only as the telling progresses that the extent of the puzzle and intricacies of the plot is revealed. The result is an intriguing tale, with a nice denouement and explanation concerning the discovery of four severed feet that sit at the heart of the story. There is also a strong sub-plot in which the main detective’s journalist daughter is writing a feature about six people who have been released from prison after serving a sentence for murder, which sets out some interesting questions about justifiable homicide and regimes of punishment.
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  • Patti
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable start to a series about a Norwegian police detective. It's actually the 6th book, but first to be translated into English. This is a "comfortable" series--no one's drinking themselves to death or suicidal. But it's not "precious," either. Main characters are interesting and generally believable. Best of all, for me is the sense of place--getting to know more about Norwegian life and this corner of the country, southwest of Oslo. I read the next, "Closed for Winter" right away, and also Enjoyable start to a series about a Norwegian police detective. It's actually the 6th book, but first to be translated into English. This is a "comfortable" series--no one's drinking themselves to death or suicidal. But it's not "precious," either. Main characters are interesting and generally believable. Best of all, for me is the sense of place--getting to know more about Norwegian life and this corner of the country, southwest of Oslo. I read the next, "Closed for Winter" right away, and also enjoyed it. Learned something about the relationship of Norway to the less prosperous areas of Northern Europe, especially Lithuania.
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  • Chrystal Hays
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in the series available in English and the 1st I readI liked this, and read it fairly quickly. It begins a bit in media res in that it is part of a huge series and not the 1st. I think perhaps that is just as well, because it gets us moving. The backstory is sort of floating around, but we are not beaten over the head with it. This writer is praised for realistic police procedure, and I enjoyed that. It's also a mice snapshot of a time and place, recent history in Scandina This is the first book in the series available in English and the 1st I readI liked this, and read it fairly quickly. It begins a bit in media res in that it is part of a huge series and not the 1st. I think perhaps that is just as well, because it gets us moving. The backstory is sort of floating around, but we are not beaten over the head with it. This writer is praised for realistic police procedure, and I enjoyed that. It's also a mice snapshot of a time and place, recent history in Scandinavia. Very quick read for me, and I look forward to reading the next book.
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  • Carfig
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book translated from the Norwegian (as far as I know), but the sixth in the series. Books by other Norwegian authors have been translated starting at number three. Then the first ones may be translated at a later date if the money keeps rolling in, I guess.I liked this, even with references to earlier cases probably covered in the previous five novels. I'm not sure why Wisting or his team didn't figure out how the left feet were severed from the bodies, but maybe I watch too ma This is the first book translated from the Norwegian (as far as I know), but the sixth in the series. Books by other Norwegian authors have been translated starting at number three. Then the first ones may be translated at a later date if the money keeps rolling in, I guess.I liked this, even with references to earlier cases probably covered in the previous five novels. I'm not sure why Wisting or his team didn't figure out how the left feet were severed from the bodies, but maybe I watch too many crime series on TV. But then, Line had me convinced of Ken Ronny's innocence.
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  • Dianne Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    I was so disappointed when I realised that this was not the first in the series, but it really does not matter. A fast paced, very well written Scandi noir, which has lost nothing in translation. Unusually for me, I actually managed to have a clue who the perp may have been before I got to the climax, but it was not blindingly obvious. I look forward to further books in the series being translated.
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