The Killing of Karen Silkwood
Karen Silkwood, an employee of the Kerr-McGee plutonium processing plant, was killed in a car crash on her way to deliver important documents to a newspaper reporter in 1974. Silkwood was a union activist concerned about health and safety issues at the plant, and her death at age twenty-eight was considered by many to be highly suspicious. Was it Kerr-McGee's revenge on a troublesome whistle-blower? Or was it part of a much larger conspiracy reaching from the Atomic Energy Commission to the FBI and the CIA? Richard Rashke leads us through the myriad of charges and countercharges, theories and facts, and reaches conclusions based solely on the evidence in hand.Originally published in 1981, his book offers a vivid, edgy picture of the tensions that racked this country in the 1970s. However, the volume is not only an important historical document. Complex, fascinating characters populate this compelling insider's view of the nuclear industry. The issues it explores--whistle-blowers, worker safety, the environment, and nuclear vulnerability--have not lost relevance today, twenty-six years after Silkwood's white Honda Civic was found trapped in a concrete culvert near Oklahoma City. For this second edition, Rashke has added a preface and three short chapters that explore what has been learned about Silkwood since the book's original publication, explain what happened to the various actors in the drama, and discuss the long-term effects of the events around Silkwood's death.

The Killing of Karen Silkwood Details

TitleThe Killing of Karen Silkwood
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 13th, 2000
PublisherILR Press
ISBN-139780801486678
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Crime, True Crime, Biography, History, Mystery

The Killing of Karen Silkwood Review

  • Rebecca McNutt
    January 1, 1970
    Shocking and disturbing, incredibly well-written, this book dives deep into what might be one of the most obscure cases out there. Karen's story is still a mystery. Was she just an irresponsible hopped-up drunk driver who crashed her car... or was there something more sinister at work in the nuclear industry?
    more
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    The Killing of Karen Silkwood by Richard Rashke is a 2014 Open Road Integrated Media publication. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange in the for an honest review.The Karen Silkwood case is one many of you may have seen depicted in a movie starring Kurt Russell and Meryl Streep. This book was originally published back in 1981 and is now being released in digital format with a few updates. The introduction attempts to draw a parallel between Karen Silkwood The Killing of Karen Silkwood by Richard Rashke is a 2014 Open Road Integrated Media publication. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange in the for an honest review.The Karen Silkwood case is one many of you may have seen depicted in a movie starring Kurt Russell and Meryl Streep. This book was originally published back in 1981 and is now being released in digital format with a few updates. The introduction attempts to draw a parallel between Karen Silkwood and the now notorious whistle blower, Eric Snowden. But, for me the only thing the two had in common was they were both whistle blowers and both allegedly took sensitive documents and therefore broke the law. The similarity ends there. I'm not sure why this was added to the introduction except to perhaps freshen it up for the reissue , but I didn't think the comparison was a good one in this is case. The information was well organized and thankfully did not bounce back and forth in time. We start with a little background on Karen and how she came to work for the plant in Oklahoma. We follow her through her days of gathering information, to the car wreck and then the fall out. There are periods in the book that are so dry it is hard to stay focused. It was like reading a technical manual or something. Then we get into the FBI and the incredible saga that was , but it took the focus off of the main story with all the players trying to jockey for power and control and journalist and authors getting dragged into the mix, I almost forgot we were trying to solve a possible murder and expose the motive for the crime. Then we finally enter the trial phase and this will really get to you. Again so much legal wrangling, the wins, then loses, and the final result was just anti-climatic. The Cimarron Plant , for those who are wondering, was a plutonium manufacturing plant operated by Kerr- McGee from 1965-1975. When 40 pounds of plutonium went missing there was a massive coverup and Karen Silkwood's poking around made someone really nervous. When Karen became contaminated, the company went so far as to claim she did so on purpose to make the company look bad. But, Karen's dogged determination to uncover the truth and expose the dangers in the plant that could have led to many deaths, may have been a contributing factor in her own death.In 1974 Karen was on her way to a meeting with a reporter from the New York Times. She never made it. She was killed in a single car “accident” before she could completely blow the lid off the inner working of the plant. From that day forward Karen's friends and family became convinced Karen was ran off the road deliberately and was also contaminated deliberately. Strange coincidental accident? Drugs and alcohol? She fell asleep at the wheel? Or was it something far more sinister? How did Karen become contaminated? We will never really know for sure. What happened to the plutonium? A clerical error is the official explanation, but the entire situation is as murky as the Mississippi River.Now, I like a good conspiracy theory like anyone else. Sometimes there is enough tangible proof that what the public is being told is not all there is to it or it's a total damage control situation. Mostly though conspiracy theories are spun because of the inability to believe a person died they way they did. Did Marilyn really overdose on pills? Was Princess Diana's accident staged? Sometimes things happen just the way it's reported. But, in this case, there is ample proof that something was rotten in Denmark. From the mysterious way the car went off the road, to the unexplained dents in the side, to the company simply refusing to give answers , the all out smear campaign by the FBI on those investigating the allegations and the mountains of paperwork and court documents, the years the case lingered through the legal system with more losses than wins. The hair should stand up on the back of your neck when you think of the ramifications if only one quarter of the information is accurate. Whatever happened to that missing plutonium? That really bugs me, obviously.Although I do think the case reeks of a cover up and that Karen Silkwood died under the most suspicious of circumstances there were some theories spun in the book that went beyond belief. Conjecture and facts sometimes have to mix to give us the whole picture, but when you throw out wild theories with legitimate facts you lose some credibility. The frustrating thing about this case is that after years and years of litigation the case just kind of fizzles out. We will never get the whole story of what happened to Karen that night her car went off the road, or the missing plutonium, and those who should have done the right thing will walk away scot free leaving behind a devastated family and friends as well as a very high rate of cancer diagnosis in the area surrounding the plant. I do wish we could have gotten to know Karen a little better. Her likes, dislikes and what moved her or motivated her. I think she was a little quirky and had a lot of problems, her job and what she knew about the day to day operations at the plant certainly didn't help her health and the contamination, despite mixed test results may have been the death knell for her years in the future if she had lived. This case is one of the most frustrating cases I have ever read about. So, little was ever really proven, so many red herrings, so many dead ends and stonewalling and manipulations. A life cut short and all her secrets buried with her, Karen Silkwood still remains a figure of mystery, a women admired for her tenacity and courage and an inspiration to many. 3.5 stars rounded to 4
    more
  • Heather Fineisen
    January 1, 1970
    This is an interesting story of a whistle blower and the conspiracy of the company that Silkwood was seeking to expose. I have seen the movie and it offers a lot that this book does unless you want more detailed information of the alleged crime against Silkwood. I would skip the book and watch the movie.
    more
  • Frank
    January 1, 1970
    [ebook]I settled on this, actually an updated later version only in ebook, as an assignment for an occupational health and safety class. The story has everything for such a class, starting with a meticulous summary of the evidence and the history of public perception of the case. It follows with analysis of the social forces impacting health and safety in a factory in Trump country and a Trump industry before Trump. It depicts the complexity of figuring out what really happened.
    more
  • Biggus
    January 1, 1970
    Life's too short to struggle though poorly written books. This one sounded interesting, but boy, is it the opposite. Not because the story itself is boring, in fact, I was intrigued, just the author's way of telling it doesn't do it for me. Some authors have the knack, others don't. I see in response to the question, "how do you deal with writer’s block?" he replied, "I just keep on writing and writing."Yeah well, I believe it. He must've had writer's block quite often in this one. :)
    more
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, this is an investigation into the death, possible murder, of the trade union and nuclear safety activist Karen Silkwood. We all know the film, right? With Meryl Streep? Well, where that film gripped this just sends one to sleep.Don't get me wrong the story is good. Here was a union activist, drawing attention to really appalling safety violations in a nuclear plant. She allegedly got hold of some dynamite files that would have blown the lid off the plant (excuse the pun when plutonium is con Ok, this is an investigation into the death, possible murder, of the trade union and nuclear safety activist Karen Silkwood. We all know the film, right? With Meryl Streep? Well, where that film gripped this just sends one to sleep.Don't get me wrong the story is good. Here was a union activist, drawing attention to really appalling safety violations in a nuclear plant. She allegedly got hold of some dynamite files that would have blown the lid off the plant (excuse the pun when plutonium is concerned) only to die in a very mysterious car wreck on the way to deliver those documents which were never found.So what's the problem? Unfortunately, the writer of this account appears to have done no research into the case themselves. Instead we're treated to a long winded account of the various civil actions taken on behalf of Silkwood's family against the company. If you've ever sat through a trial you'll know how mind numbingly boring they often are and Richard Raske does little to bring proceedings to life.I'm sorry, I really wanted to like this book, I really did. But instead of being gripped my an apparent injustice, I found myself near sedated.
    more
  • Melynda
    January 1, 1970
    This is absolutely the best edge-of-your-seat crime investigation book I've ever read. Although it's nonfiction, it reads like a fast-paced novel. Richard Rashke is one of the best writers alive today. I highly recommend this book.
  • Laurie Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I would not recommend this book not well written does not hold your interest very boring
  • Fishface
    January 1, 1970
    Combines true crime with glazey-eyed conspiracy theory, and the really scary part is that it could easily be true. A whistleblower loses her life, maybe because she blew that whistle.
  • Tara (box5angel)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm finally done! It took me a while to read but I did it. Not because it was slow or boring or a hard read. It was suspenseful, intriguing, and pretty sad. There's so many names and incidents and trials to remember. You take it in, digest it, take a breather and then pick it up again. It was a really good book. And extremely well researched. The ending is somewhat satisfying but you're still left with questions though. One particular question. Highly recommend.
    more
  • Tom Lopez
    January 1, 1970
    Thank God for uniondI really found it interesting how far a company will go to cover up safety hazards in the work place. I've been an industrial mechanic for 43 years I can't imagine not working under union protections. Nothing compares to Karen's story though.
    more
  • Kathrin
    January 1, 1970
    Stories like these (while wholly disturbing) really keep my love for non-fiction writing going.The book seems very well researched and clearly structured and therefore manages to guide the reader through all these crazy layers.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    One Conspiracy Theory That Just Might Be TrueI became interested in Karen Silkwood after watching the 1983 movie "Silkwood". The film seemed to suggest that Silkwood was murdered, but a number of reviews I subsequently read dismissed "Silkwood" as an irresponsible docudrama that was based on sensationalism rather than fact.After reading Richard Rashke's "The Killing of Karen Silkwood", I'd have to say that the film didn't take its allegations far enough. Based on thousands of pages of court docu One Conspiracy Theory That Just Might Be TrueI became interested in Karen Silkwood after watching the 1983 movie "Silkwood". The film seemed to suggest that Silkwood was murdered, but a number of reviews I subsequently read dismissed "Silkwood" as an irresponsible docudrama that was based on sensationalism rather than fact.After reading Richard Rashke's "The Killing of Karen Silkwood", I'd have to say that the film didn't take its allegations far enough. Based on thousands of pages of court documents, including depositions, sworn statements, internal memos, and federal records, Rashke makes a convincing case for the following:Silkwood was deliberately contaminated with plutonium by someone at Kerr-McGee, perhaps on several occasions. Had she lived, Silkwood had a good likelihood of developing cancer because of the significant exposure she experienced.Silkwood was most likely carrying important documents the night she was murdered; among other things, she had proof that 42.5 pounds of plutonium was missing from K-M's Cimarron plant, which is enough to make three or four nuclear bombs.Security at the Cimarron plant was dangerously lax, as were safety measures. Workers received little education in regards to nuclear energy or the safety risks that accompany it, and consequently contamination was not taken seriously by employees.Union members' (and particularly Karen Silkwood's) rights were repeatedly violated by K-M officials, who continually interfered in union activities and even began to spy on Silkwood.However, the conspiracy surrounding Silkwood's death became even more heinous and inconceivable as Silkwood's side investigated in preparation for trial. Though the truth will probably never be known, Rashke lays out a compelling - though sketchy - account, involving the FBI, the CIA, the National Intelligence Agency (NIA), the National Security Agency (NSA), the Justice Department, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and a shadowy network of Iranians, Russians, and Israelis. Rashke hints at an international plutonium smuggling ring, and supplies evidence that the FBI was responsible for illegally and covertly spying on a number of organizations as late as the mid-1970s, including various labor unions and their members - and Silkwood was one of their targets.Rashke's story might sound unbelievable, but most of it is based on public court documents. His interviews with the assorted players in the case may be less trustworthy; yet, many statements are corroborated by court papers. Also lending credence to the Silkwood camp's version of the story is the fact that several significant witnesses died, disappeared, or were threatened during the investigation and ensuing court case. Additionally, the Silkwood lawyers and investigator received death threats and were followed and even assaulted - one must wonder why, if the Silkwood case was wholly without merit. Especially appalling is the federal government's role in the affair, and their failure to cooperate with the civil case."Who Killed Karen Silkwood" reads like a novel - it's a compelling book that's hard to put down. Indeed, I expect that I won't soon be able to forget about Silkwood's story and its larger implications. I'm far from what you'd call a conspiracy nut (though I love the X-Files, I identify with Scully as opposed to Mulder!) - yet, the evidence in this case is as convincing as it is frightening. The final two pages will simply blow you away.My only gripe - Rashke's update to the 2nd edition of the book (released to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Silkwood's death) was sorely lacking. He made no mention of what's become of those involved in the case; of any information, either directly or indirectly related to the case, that's been discovered since the end of the investigation; or of the movie, which was a critical and box-office success. Rashke coins the newest section "The Legacy", but he doesn't discuss Silkwood's legacy even briefly. The new chapters focus on the court battles since May 1979 and K-M's troubles with and termination of their nuclear program, but speak little of Silkwood. http://www.easyvegan.info/2003/10/17/...
    more
  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Karen Gay Silkwood is still one of the most intriguing and shocking. A fan of the movie 'Silkwood' starring Meryl Streep and Cher, I was eager to read this real-life account of Karen and the Kerr-McGee Plutonium Case that ultimately cost Karen her life. The author draws parallels with the recent whistleblowing from Edward Snowden - showing that Karen's story is still every bit as relevant today. Karen worked at the Cimarron plutonium Plant in Oklahoma owned by Kerr-McGee. This book The story of Karen Gay Silkwood is still one of the most intriguing and shocking. A fan of the movie 'Silkwood' starring Meryl Streep and Cher, I was eager to read this real-life account of Karen and the Kerr-McGee Plutonium Case that ultimately cost Karen her life. The author draws parallels with the recent whistleblowing from Edward Snowden - showing that Karen's story is still every bit as relevant today. Karen worked at the Cimarron plutonium Plant in Oklahoma owned by Kerr-McGee. This book is the product of a mind-blowing amount of research into Karen and the plant. Suspicious of deliberate contamination, breached safety procedures, lax quality control and broken machines (among other things), Karen began to keep notes of every little thing she saw going wrong. Workers at the plant were unaware of the dangers, and unaware of the carcinogenic properties of plutonium. She collected documents and testimonials from workers and with the help of a select few trusted people, she was ready to take it to the New York Times. On her way to the meeting, her car crossed the road, travelled 240ft along the grass shoulder, flew for 24ft over one wingwall and smashed into the other wall. Karen Silkwood was dead. If it were an accident, as was claimed, where did her documents go? And why was there a large dent on the side of her car, as if she were rammed off the road?This book starts right at the beginning, and covers the entire Silkwood story from her time at the plant right up to the investigations and court cases after her death. It's incredibly detailed and in-depth. It took me a long time to finish it, because some of the information was hard to absorb. There was so much going on at the plant - leaving aside the Silkwood case, there was also the matter of 40lbs of plutonium that is still, to this present day, unaccounted for. To put that into perspective, plutonium is 20,000 times more deadly than the potassium used in Auschwitz chambers. 40lbs is enough to make 3 atomic bombs. A hard read, but very worthwhile.Thanks to Open Road Media & Netgalley for providing me with a digital copy in exchange for honest review.
    more
  • Sharonh
    January 1, 1970
    Although I was quite surprised to read that my favorite movie was based on so much truth and much controversy, the book was quite dull.
  • Vera
    January 1, 1970
    Terrifying. Everyone's probably had the experience of working in a disorganized office where your superiors are utterly incompetent, lazy, or downright hostile. Now imagine that that office is a plutonium plant where people daily come into contact with a substance that causes cancer. Further, imagine that NONE of them have been properly trained about the health risks involved; contaminations and accidents routinely occur and are either ignored or shoddily dealt with to keep the plant running; an Terrifying. Everyone's probably had the experience of working in a disorganized office where your superiors are utterly incompetent, lazy, or downright hostile. Now imagine that that office is a plutonium plant where people daily come into contact with a substance that causes cancer. Further, imagine that NONE of them have been properly trained about the health risks involved; contaminations and accidents routinely occur and are either ignored or shoddily dealt with to keep the plant running; and that both the body charged with regulatory oversight of this plant and many others like it, and the federal government itself, have a vested interest in covering up any problems and silencing (this means killing if necessary, and complete character assassination at the very least) anyone who tries to voice a concern.THIS IS A TRUE STORY. A real-life conspiracy complete with CIA bugging, threats, unexplained deaths of people asked to testify... seriously unbelievable. The author, an investigative reporter, became fascinated by the case of Karen Silkwood, a union member and whistle-blower at the plant whose car mysteriously ran off the road when she was on her way purportedly to deliver evidence to the New York Times of the plant's health and safety violations and falsification of records. The book starts with Karen's efforts to change things at the plant, up to her death, then follows advocates' and legislators' efforts to get the incident investigated, and details the court case that ultimately resulted. It's a factual, not sentimental, telling-- making the tale all the more chilling, as the facts stand on their own. Despite all the (long) details of the court proceedings, it's gripping. I've never read a non-fiction book so quickly.
    more
  • Ptreick
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I knew nothing about Karen Silkwood before reading this book (despite a movie! with Cher! with Meryl Streep!), and since reading it, I've found myself rattling off all kinds of things about Karen Silkwood, about plutonium and uranium and cover-ups. Much of the information in here was very interesting, and the comparison made with Edward Snowden in the preface is definitely food for thought.Bu I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I knew nothing about Karen Silkwood before reading this book (despite a movie! with Cher! with Meryl Streep!), and since reading it, I've found myself rattling off all kinds of things about Karen Silkwood, about plutonium and uranium and cover-ups. Much of the information in here was very interesting, and the comparison made with Edward Snowden in the preface is definitely food for thought.But.And it's a big but.The story is tedious. I felt like I needed an index of names to pop back to every few pages. There were so many national agencies, private companies, journalists, investigators, scientists, workers at Kerr-McGee, and the names would come up randomly and then disappear for fifty pages or so, that it was difficult to keep track. So look--I understand it's non-fiction, and facts and names, etc., can't just be glossed over. I'm not calling into question the veracity of the reporting, but I do wish for said facts to be arranged in a way that is more interesting and palatable for the reader. This book is arranged chronologically, and I had the same sense of frustration I once had in a Latin American history course, where the continent was studied by time, not by region or theme. With a chronological arrangement attempting to cover what everyone in all aspects of this investigation is doing at once, sometimes completely independent of each other, what is essentially the most important information does not bear appropriate weight. It's constantly competing with other information that may turn out to have little importance at all. I think I will watch the movie, though.
    more
  • CHC94
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. I saw the movie "Silkwood" around the time it was released in 1983 (or '84). I was 11 at the time, so I viewed it as a very interesting story, nothing more.After reading this book, I realized that the movie was a highly sanitized version of the actual events.Karen Silkwood was an employee at a nuclear power plant in Oklahoma operated by Kerr-McGee. She had begun doing research into the safety of the plant and training procedures for new hires.The company began to see her as a threat because Wow. I saw the movie "Silkwood" around the time it was released in 1983 (or '84). I was 11 at the time, so I viewed it as a very interesting story, nothing more.After reading this book, I realized that the movie was a highly sanitized version of the actual events.Karen Silkwood was an employee at a nuclear power plant in Oklahoma operated by Kerr-McGee. She had begun doing research into the safety of the plant and training procedures for new hires.The company began to see her as a threat because she was asking questions about sensitive issues (missing plutonium, defective product) at a time where the company was attempting to disband the workers' union. Odd things started happening to her... radioactive contamination of her body and home (not the entire home, just different areas) and she began to wonder if she were being followed.The circumstances surrounding her death were never completely investigated, according to author Richard Rashke, and remain a mystery to this day.The fact is this: she died in a car accident when she was traveling to meet a New York Times reporter. Why? To deliver information that probably would have closed the company and caused all manner of legal and financial fallout.The characters in the story, especially the reporters and government agents are enough to boggle the mind and make you take notes as you read just to keep everyone straight. That was my only complaint, but those people were a necessary part of the story.A very enrgossing story that will make you consider if our government is doing its kob in some areas.
    more
  • Bren
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this book a four even though I could not read the whole thing.Not because it is not a good book. But it is SO disturbing. I wound up having to skim quite a bit of it. I have seen the movie and had (mistakenly) thought I read this book earlier in my life but as it turned out I had not.I cannot see how anyone could possibly read this, even parts of it, and not come away being extremely disturbed. I felt that way with the movie as well. This book highlights all that is wrong with the system I gave this book a four even though I could not read the whole thing.Not because it is not a good book. But it is SO disturbing. I wound up having to skim quite a bit of it. I have seen the movie and had (mistakenly) thought I read this book earlier in my life but as it turned out I had not.I cannot see how anyone could possibly read this, even parts of it, and not come away being extremely disturbed. I felt that way with the movie as well. This book highlights all that is wrong with the system and their treatment of Whistle blowers and also makes clear what a brave and special woman Karen Silkwood was. She will never be forgotten nor will her story.
    more
  • Christina Green
    January 1, 1970
    Much of what I knew about the story came out of the movie but the "alleged" reality was vastly different with a much larger cover-up than what the movie portrayed. It's funny that they didn't cover so much of the dealings in the movie because as you're reading it, it feels very much like something out of Hollywood, a bit unbelievable at times.If you are already a bit of a conspiracy theorist and believe the government has its hands in a lot of secret dealings, this book will push you over the ed Much of what I knew about the story came out of the movie but the "alleged" reality was vastly different with a much larger cover-up than what the movie portrayed. It's funny that they didn't cover so much of the dealings in the movie because as you're reading it, it feels very much like something out of Hollywood, a bit unbelievable at times.If you are already a bit of a conspiracy theorist and believe the government has its hands in a lot of secret dealings, this book will push you over the edge. I gave it a 3, not because of the subject, which certainly held my attention. The 3 was for the average writing.
    more
  • Meichler
    January 1, 1970
    For a non-fiction, this was a solid 4 stars - a bit long at parts but overall, fascinating. I learned about Karen Silkwood recently and became quite obsessed with her story, which led me to this book. It was fascinating, infuriating, amazing, kind of boring at times, but well worth the read. Given that this investigates the murder of Silkwood (a whistle blower at a power plant in OK in the 1970's), it's surprising - but not - that these environmental disasters remain in place all of these decade For a non-fiction, this was a solid 4 stars - a bit long at parts but overall, fascinating. I learned about Karen Silkwood recently and became quite obsessed with her story, which led me to this book. It was fascinating, infuriating, amazing, kind of boring at times, but well worth the read. Given that this investigates the murder of Silkwood (a whistle blower at a power plant in OK in the 1970's), it's surprising - but not - that these environmental disasters remain in place all of these decades later. Her story is eye opening and should be remembered.
    more
  • Victoria Brown
    January 1, 1970
    This story is about Karen Silkwood who was a whistle blower at a plutonium factory and was killed on her way to give documents to Time magazine. Love love love the movie...this book not so much. Started out great...but the middle was so dry...I was just bogged down in the investigation and hearings parts. The most important part..Karen herself..her work and life was a tiny part of the book. I felt the real story got lost in all the overwhelming information and did not see her as a person like I This story is about Karen Silkwood who was a whistle blower at a plutonium factory and was killed on her way to give documents to Time magazine. Love love love the movie...this book not so much. Started out great...but the middle was so dry...I was just bogged down in the investigation and hearings parts. The most important part..Karen herself..her work and life was a tiny part of the book. I felt the real story got lost in all the overwhelming information and did not see her as a person like I wanted to. I would recommend this if someone wanted to know all the facts in this case.
    more
  • Garpu
    January 1, 1970
    So far very interesting. While a bit dry, it's compelling. It attempts to debunk (in light of a FOIA) myths around her death.The circumstances around Silkwood's death are (if the book accurate) way more complicated than the movie would seem. It's a situation that would make Philip K. Dick proud. Or paranoid.
    more
  • Joanna Bastian
    January 1, 1970
    Rashke outdid himself in the detailed research of this true story of Karen Silkwood - a woman who was just trying to make the workplace safe suddenly finds herself embroiled in corporate greed and government coverups that put hundreds of lives at risk. An enlightening read!
    more
  • Mike Mercurio
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting read to say the least. I'm left with more questions than answers, but I doubt those answers will be forthcoming. Gotta wonder how Uncle Sam can get away with this kind of stuff...
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I knew this was being made into a film and raced to read up on the true story prior to seeing it. Freaked me out completely. Absolutely terrifying.
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of questions; very few answers.
  • Tammy Hinton
    January 1, 1970
    If you didn't know it was true you'd think this could never happen in the US. A real eye opener to the misuse of power.
  • Kayo
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting however, so much to sort through. A lot of information most people wouldn't want to read thru.
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Scary.
Write a review