The Progress Principle
What really sets the best managers above the rest? It’s their power to build a cadre of employees who have great inner work lives—consistently positive emotions; strong motivation; and favorable perceptions of the organization, their work, and their colleagues. The worst managers undermine inner work life, often unwittingly.As Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer explain in The Progress Principle, seemingly mundane workday events can make or break employees’ inner work lives. But it’s forward momentum in meaningful work—progress—that creates the best inner work lives. Through rigorous analysis of nearly 12,000 diary entries provided by 238 employees in 7 companies, the authors explain how managers can foster progress and enhance inner work life every day.The book shows how to remove obstacles to progress, including meaningless tasks and toxic relationships. It also explains how to activate two forces that enable progress: (1) catalysts—events that directly facilitate project work, such as clear goals and autonomy—and (2) nourishers—interpersonal events that uplift workers, including encouragement and demonstrations of respect and collegiality.Brimming with honest examples from the companies studied, The Progress Principle equips aspiring and seasoned leaders alike with the insights they need to maximize their people’s performance.

The Progress Principle Details

TitleThe Progress Principle
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 19th, 2011
PublisherHarvard Business Review Press
ISBN-139781422198575
Rating
GenreBusiness, Leadership, Nonfiction, Management, Psychology, Self Help

The Progress Principle Review

  • André Bueno
    January 1, 1970
    Good book though I felt it was a bit redundant and long winded.READING NOTESCHAPTER 01Inner work life has to do with how an employee feels about working somewhere and which direction you are shifting their feelings toward their goal. Do you make them feel good about being apart of the organization?Three components of inner work life: emotions, perceptions, and motivation.CHAPTER 02Intrinsic and extrinsic motivationHappiness boosts creative problem solving that can longer and build up over timeCH Good book though I felt it was a bit redundant and long winded.READING NOTESCHAPTER 01Inner work life has to do with how an employee feels about working somewhere and which direction you are shifting their feelings toward their goal. Do you make them feel good about being apart of the organization?Three components of inner work life: emotions, perceptions, and motivation.CHAPTER 02Intrinsic and extrinsic motivationHappiness boosts creative problem solving that can longer and build up over timeCHAPTER 03 and CHAPTER 04Making progress in meaningful work is the greatest stimulant in promoting the inner work lifeCHAPTER 05Progress and achievement is importantSmall wins and incremental change is powerful especially when aligned with meaningful workMeaningful work: is it contributing value to someone? Does someone depend on you? Are you contributing towards someone?Give people ownershipMake sure that the work in your organization is producing is progressing forward inch by inch and you're building up momentumKeep the progress loop going and remove obstacles to make the job easierCHAPTER 06 The Catalyst Factor (7 Catalysts):1. Clear goals and time frames2. Give autonomy3. Provide access to resources4. Given enough time5. Given help and collaborating with others6. Learning from success and failures7. Allowing ideas to flow, being open to creative solutionsKnow how to manage the work climate by knowing the 3 forces: Consideration for people and their ideas, does the organization promote collaboration?,Communication between lines of work are important.Small wins are important for building momentum or work catalystsSupport inter divisional communicationRemove inhibitions that hinder progress and successesCHAPTER 07Nourishment factor 1. Respect your employees and their efforts. Especially when handling negative situations.2. Encouragement of their work3. Handling emotional situations with empathy.4. Group inclusion and making sure everyone feels included.ToxinsMinimize conflicts between teams by promoting clear communication between employeesCHAPTER 08 Manage your employees using checklists to ensure your subordinates feel there is constant progress that is occurring. The more they feel they are making constant progress (and are recognized for these actions)- the more they will feel they are working towards something worthwhile.- PROGRESS PRINCIPLE CHECKLIST -PROGRESSBriefly describe 1 or 2 events today that indicated either a small win or a possible breakthrough.CATALYST1. Did the team have clear short- and longterm goals for meaningful work?2. Did team members have sufficient autonomy to solve problems and take ownership of the project?3. Did they have all the resources they needed to move forward efficiently?4. Did they have sufficient time to focus on meaningful work?5. Did I encourage team members to help one another?6. Did I discuss lessons from today’s successes and problems with my team?7. Did I help ideas flow freely within the group?SETBACKSBriefly describe 1 or 2 events today that indicated a small setback or a possible crisis. INHIBITORS1. Was there any confusion regarding long- or short-term goals for meaningful work?2. Were team members overly constrained in their ability to solve problems and feel ownership of the project?3. Did they lack any of the resources they needed to move forward effectively?4. Did they lack sufficient time to focus on meaningful work?5. Did I or others fail to provide needed or requested help?6. Did I “punish” failure, or neglect to find lessons and/or opportunities in problems and successes?7. Did I or others cut off the presentation or debate of ideas prematurely?NOURISHERS1. Did I show respect to team members by recognizing their contributions to progress, attending to their ideas and treating them as trusted professionals?2. Did I encourage team members who faced difficult challenges?3. Did I support team members who had a personal or professional problem?4. Is there a sense of personal and professional affiliation and camaraderie within the team?TOXINS1.Did I disrespect any team members by failing to recognize their contributions to progress, not attending to their ideas, or not treating them as trusted professionals?2. Did I discourage a member of the team in any way?3. Did I neglect a team member who had a personal or professional problem?4. Is there tension or antagonism among members of the team or between team members and me?INNER WORK LIFE1. Did I see any indications of the quality of my subordinates’ inner work lives today?a. Perceptions of the work, team, management, firmb. Emotionsc. Motivation2. What specific events might have affected inner work life today?ACTION PLAN 1. What can I do tomorrow to strengthen the catalysts and nourishers identified and provide ones that are lacking?2. What can I do tomorrow to start eliminating the inhibitors and toxins identified?
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  • Roy Klein
    January 1, 1970
    I've decided to stop reading this book halfway through. The reason is that the book contains a small amount of simplistic advice, almost no practical methods for implementing this advice, and a large body of narrated stories of people who the writers researched. The narrative is interesting at first, but grows tedious and uninformative very quickly. I suppose the writer didn't want to throw to waste all the body of text she collected from her tests subject, but that doesn't make that body of tex I've decided to stop reading this book halfway through. The reason is that the book contains a small amount of simplistic advice, almost no practical methods for implementing this advice, and a large body of narrated stories of people who the writers researched. The narrative is interesting at first, but grows tedious and uninformative very quickly. I suppose the writer didn't want to throw to waste all the body of text she collected from her tests subject, but that doesn't make that body of text worth my time.I have a feeling that the book could've been effectively shortened to a booklet or an essay while retaining most of its value.
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  • loafingcactus
    January 1, 1970
    One of the main points of the book is a by-the-way in chapter 8 that isn't even mentioned in the chapter title. What doofs! So here's the deal: work nourishers, catalysts and a sense of progress matter. If you are manager, don't leave those things to chance. Instead, make a checklist and make sure those things happen for your people. There, now you don't have to read the book.
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  • Fred
    January 1, 1970
    Was prompted to read this book by review by Seth Godin. Primary concepts are pretty much a no brainers once they are explained. I recommend it because it brings light to the common sense we know, but need reminded that we do know. Plus the idea that creativity has many facets hopefully will empower a reader.It continues to amaze me that current management dogma has largely missed the boat on these precepts. It is somewhat repetitive, but that seems to be a hallmark of current business related li Was prompted to read this book by review by Seth Godin. Primary concepts are pretty much a no brainers once they are explained. I recommend it because it brings light to the common sense we know, but need reminded that we do know. Plus the idea that creativity has many facets hopefully will empower a reader.It continues to amaze me that current management dogma has largely missed the boat on these precepts. It is somewhat repetitive, but that seems to be a hallmark of current business related literature.
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  • Yevgeniy Brikman
    January 1, 1970
    This book would've been far better as a blog post. It makes several important arguments in the preface and then repeats them over and over again for a few hundred pages, adding only a handful of valuable nuggets throughout the rest of the book. So, to save you some time, here's a summary that captures 95% of the book's content: * Making progress in work—small incremental steps forward on a daily basis—is one of the most important drivers of happiness, productivity, and motivation. Consider video This book would've been far better as a blog post. It makes several important arguments in the preface and then repeats them over and over again for a few hundred pages, adding only a handful of valuable nuggets throughout the rest of the book. So, to save you some time, here's a summary that captures 95% of the book's content: * Making progress in work—small incremental steps forward on a daily basis—is one of the most important drivers of happiness, productivity, and motivation. Consider video games (e.g., experience points, progress bars, leveling up) and fitness (e.g., lifting a few more pounds every time you go to the gym). * Hitting setbacks in work—getting stuck, having projects canceled, being ignored, yak shaving—is one of the most important causes of unhappiness, lack of productivity, and loss of motivation.* Therefore, the main job of management is to (a) ensure that the work feels meaningful and (b) to remove all obstacles to daily progress. Do that well, and motivation, happiness, and high performance will take care of itself; do it poorly, and no amount of incentives or punishments will help. That's really all there is to it. There are a few other bits and pieces in the book that are painfully obvious (e.g., provide support to your workers, don't ignore their opinions or insult them), some vague advice on how to facilitate progress, and that's it. So, in short: make small, incremental progress, every single day. Not surprisingly, this is also a guiding principle of agile and many other methodologies.As always, I've saved a few quotes from the book: "Most people have strong intrinsic motivation to do their work, at least early in their careers. That motivation exists, and continues, until something gets in the way. This has a startling implication: as long as the work is meaningful, managers do not have to spend time coming up with ways to motivate people to do that work. They are much better served by removing barriers to progress, helping people experience the intrinsic satisfaction that derives from accomplishment.""This pattern is what we call the progress principle: of all the positive events that influence inner work life, the single most powerful is progress in meaningful work; of all the negative events, the single most powerful is the opposite of progress—setbacks in the work. We consider this to be a fundamental management principle: facilitating progress is the most effective way for managers to influence inner work life. Even when progress happens in small steps, a person’s sense of steady forward movement toward an important goal can make all the difference between a great day and a terrible one.""The effect of setbacks on emotions is stronger than the effect of progress. Although progress increases happiness and decreases frustration, the effect of setbacks is not only opposite on both types of emotions—it is greater. The power of setbacks to diminish happiness is more than twice as strong as the power of progress to boost happiness. The power of setbacks to increase frustration is more than three times as strong as the power of progress to decrease frustration."
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  • David Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book for leading other people. It helps those leading others to see what really matters to others. It helps focus our efforts at inspiring and motivating others and to help those we lead make progress along the way to meaningful work and a healthy inner life. Based on a year of research with multiple companies, this book is worth the leaders time and reflection. The more meaningful the work, the more healthy our inner life and the more progress we make in our work, the more effec This is a great book for leading other people. It helps those leading others to see what really matters to others. It helps focus our efforts at inspiring and motivating others and to help those we lead make progress along the way to meaningful work and a healthy inner life. Based on a year of research with multiple companies, this book is worth the leaders time and reflection. The more meaningful the work, the more healthy our inner life and the more progress we make in our work, the more effective the company and the more creative and production people will be.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Not bad. It's research, so it takes a while before we get to any practical bits. Once we did get into the meat of it though, there were lots of insights into how managers can cultivate productive work in their teams. I wish I had read this five years ago.
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  • Bernd Schiffer
    January 1, 1970
    Good research, over time boring and repetitive narrative.
  • Kelley
    January 1, 1970
    This book has some great insights into the myriad of small moments that have a big impact on our “inner work life”. I did find it laboured the same points repeatedly and elaborated on them with an unnecessary amount of neuroscience.
  • Melvin
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable reading addressing how positive and negative work environments arise and how they affect people's creative problem solving.This book is based on a study conducted in a set of 7 companies in 3 different industries in which knowledge workers and professionals working on complex problems collected and reported daily diary entries about their inner work lives, i.e., their perceptions, emotions, and motivations during the work day. Although most questions asked for numerical ratings, the An enjoyable reading addressing how positive and negative work environments arise and how they affect people's creative problem solving.This book is based on a study conducted in a set of 7 companies in 3 different industries in which knowledge workers and professionals working on complex problems collected and reported daily diary entries about their inner work lives, i.e., their perceptions, emotions, and motivations during the work day. Although most questions asked for numerical ratings, the most important question, "Briefly describe one event from today that stands out in your mind.", allowed respondents free rein.Why inner work life matters?: no matter how brilliant a company's or project's strategy might be the strategy's execution depends on great performance by people inside the organization. Unquestionably, performance improves greatly when workers have positive perceptions, emotions, and motivations about their work and their working environment. The Key Three positive types of events that are part of every workday and that influence inner work life are: (1) progress in meaningful work, (2) catalysts (events that directly help project work), and (3) nourishers (interpersonal events that uplift the people doing the work). Of all of these positive events that influence inner work life, the single most powerful is progress in meaningful work [The Progress Principle]. Hence, the best way to motivate people, day in and day out, is by facilitating progress-even small wins. Conventional management practices for a healthy and productive working environment include hiring the best talent and providing them appropriate incentives, giving stretch assignments to develop talent, using emotional intelligence to connect with each individual, and reviewing performance carefully. Although these conventional practices are important, they miss a fundamental act of good management: managing for progress . The findings in this book are highly relevant to Agile software processes, due to their strong dependency on, perhaps motivated, individuals; Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches should manage for progress as one of their main responsibilities is to remove roadblocks impeding progress of the development team.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a psychological look at the human side of management. Rather than measuring employees and productivity with simple numbers or behavioral psychology, the authors conducted a survey of employees at work to judge cognition, perception, and emotion. The employees were from numerous businesses, all with different management styles, goals, and operational environments. One theme was that employee[s invisible and inner perceptions, emotions, and motivations effect productivity. Utilizing d This book is a psychological look at the human side of management. Rather than measuring employees and productivity with simple numbers or behavioral psychology, the authors conducted a survey of employees at work to judge cognition, perception, and emotion. The employees were from numerous businesses, all with different management styles, goals, and operational environments. One theme was that employee[s invisible and inner perceptions, emotions, and motivations effect productivity. Utilizing different methods of measurement, the authors correlated factors such as business success, product success, helpful project management, task successes and setbacks, and communication as having an effect on employees inner work lives, and thus their productivity. Although some factors were based on external effectors, such as market forces, numerous methods of improving successes and preventing loss to these inner lives were developed. Techniques were given for both managers and individuals to become aware of, develop, review, and plan on progress to bolster their inner selves at work.
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  • John Pestka
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent and insightful. The authors make it incredibly clear that managers must realize and recognize that making progress in meaningful work is the top motivating factor for employees, leading to, as they call it, superior inner work life. I appreciate that it's another book backed by lengthy, significant research, this time following employees at various companies for months on end and asking them to do daily journal entries. Another book I highly recommend for anyone that supervises/manages Excellent and insightful. The authors make it incredibly clear that managers must realize and recognize that making progress in meaningful work is the top motivating factor for employees, leading to, as they call it, superior inner work life. I appreciate that it's another book backed by lengthy, significant research, this time following employees at various companies for months on end and asking them to do daily journal entries. Another book I highly recommend for anyone that supervises/manages people.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    "The Progress Principle" states simply that progress in meaningful work is the single greatest factor when it comes to creating high functioning teams and work environments. Progress in meaningful work serves as trigger for positive perceptions, emotions, and motivations. This creates a virtuous feedback loop, greatly increasing workplace performance.The tenor of the book echoes that of "The Happiness Advantage" and "Drive", suggesting that by supporting progress, providing positive catalysts, a "The Progress Principle" states simply that progress in meaningful work is the single greatest factor when it comes to creating high functioning teams and work environments. Progress in meaningful work serves as trigger for positive perceptions, emotions, and motivations. This creates a virtuous feedback loop, greatly increasing workplace performance.The tenor of the book echoes that of "The Happiness Advantage" and "Drive", suggesting that by supporting progress, providing positive catalysts, and nourishing staff, leaders can increase teamwork, creativity and performance.
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  • Penn
    January 1, 1970
    This book talks about how the small progress well appreciated on time keeps up the momentum and helps in building success in the teams we lead.I wanted to apply the progress principle on myself before applying it on my team. My personal takeaway- Every small progress made is more important than being perfect from the very beginning. All that matters is the progress made. Appreciating and supporting myself is the most important factor.Always make sure there are more number of positive events and This book talks about how the small progress well appreciated on time keeps up the momentum and helps in building success in the teams we lead.I wanted to apply the progress principle on myself before applying it on my team. My personal takeaway- Every small progress made is more important than being perfect from the very beginning. All that matters is the progress made. Appreciating and supporting myself is the most important factor.Always make sure there are more number of positive events and triggers at work place than the negative events. Negative events make more damage than we all can imagine.The Progress principle (Power of meaningful accomplishment): Small wins are very powerful when aligned with meaningful work. Help your team find meaning in what they do by clearly defining ownership and connect it with the big picture, by appreciating the progress and by clearing the obstacles.The catalyst Factor(Power of project support)Clear goals, autonomy, resources,enough time,help with the work, learning from problems and successes, allowing ideas to flow.The nourishment factor(Power of interpersonal support) Respect during tough times, Encouragement, Emotional support, Feeling of inclusion.
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  • Sammy
    January 1, 1970
    The whole book can basically be outlined by these ideas.Journaling everyday with discipline is the most important contributor to progress and reflection. It also contributes to self realization and happinessFocusing on progress everyday no matter how small is the biggest contributor to growth.Create positive feedback loops instead of negative because...negative happenings have a stronger effect on psyche than positive onesHelping people helps youWork that is meaningful is difficult and that's ok The whole book can basically be outlined by these ideas.Journaling everyday with discipline is the most important contributor to progress and reflection. It also contributes to self realization and happinessFocusing on progress everyday no matter how small is the biggest contributor to growth.Create positive feedback loops instead of negative because...negative happenings have a stronger effect on psyche than positive onesHelping people helps youWork that is meaningful is difficult and that's okay.
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  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Confirms what seems to be intuitive that our perceptions about our work, what we do, how we do it can not only be influenced positively and negatively but will ultimately impact our ability to perform. And that making progress no matter how small is the key drive, good stuff along with some takeaways that can be used to help create the environment for progress and a fulfilling inner work life.
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  • Nathan Holm
    January 1, 1970
    A book full of insightful and practical ideas for anyone looking to work with teams to accomplish meaningful work. I found some very easy to incorporate tools, techniques and approaches to incorporate into my role as a leader.
  • Warren Lebovics
    January 1, 1970
    This book provides an insightful dive into case studies that indicate the importance of a positive inner work life. Most managers miss an important focal point - progress - when deciding how to lead their teams. Progress is a key driver in the sentiments people feel about their work life.
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  • Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    You’re fine if you read the cover and the jacket flaps. Not much depth.
  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Empower people in meaningful work, sound principle, average writing.
  • Iris Ooyen
    January 1, 1970
    Well-founded. Has a lot of valuable insights and practical information any manager needs to get the most out of his/her team with the most fun and ease!
  • Carolyn Schlueter
    January 1, 1970
    Practical & engaging!This book gave me some great perspective on how to be a better manager and contributor in my work team.
  • Kevin Sea
    January 1, 1970
    Helpful research on how to optimize inner work life. But narrator sounded like sky was always falling. last chapter on optimizing my work life was disappointing-just told me to keep a journal. unlikely.
  • Angela Counter
    January 1, 1970
    Well researched and highly actionable.
  • Barry Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Subtitled Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work, this book is an excellent example of what I like to call “uncommon sense,” insights that seem to be patently obvious but are simply not observed. Describing the powerful impact of what the authors call Inner Work Life, they quote – “Managers can’t help but influence subordinate’s inner work lives; the only question is how.”The authors’ research involved reading and analyzing 11,637 diaries from 238 individuals in 26 te Subtitled Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work, this book is an excellent example of what I like to call “uncommon sense,” insights that seem to be patently obvious but are simply not observed. Describing the powerful impact of what the authors call Inner Work Life, they quote – “Managers can’t help but influence subordinate’s inner work lives; the only question is how.”The authors’ research involved reading and analyzing 11,637 diaries from 238 individuals in 26 teams across a wide spectrum of businesses and industries. The results are shared in comparison of a number of companies (all disguised by pseudonyms) and are supported with a number of articles first published in the Harvard Business Review. Rich with practical insights, some of the key findings include:• Inner Work Life is a combination of one’s perceptions, emotions and motivation.• These issues are constantly impacted by workday events, impacting individual performance. • Positive emotions have been shown to be directly related to better creative problem-solving.• The Progress Principle (identifying small wins) can create the Progress Loop, a self-reinforcing process where progress and inner work life fuel each other. • Progress in meaningful work was the most powerful in enhancing inner work life, while setbacks were the strongest negative factor. • Research showed that the vast majority of managers rated support for making meaningful progress dead last as a motivator (!?), • The impact of negative effects of any size far outweighed the impact of the effect of something positive. Individuals spent more time in their diaries describing these negative events and recalled them more intensely than positive events. • The key catalysts for positive inner work life were identified as 1) setting clear goals, 2) allowing autonomy, 3) providing resources, 4)giving enough time – but not too much, 5), help with the work, 6) learning from problems and successes, and 7) allowing ideas to flow. • Catalysts and/or Inhibitors are shaped by the positive or negative side of 1) consideration for people and their ideas, 2) coordination and 3) communication. • The “local” sources of catalyst factors (team leaders and co-workers) have a much stronger impact on inner work life than the “broad” sources (top level managers and organizational systems). • The four major nourishers for inner work life are 1) respect, 2) encouragement, 3) emotional support and 4) affiliation. This excellent resource closes with some do/don’t lists for Team Leaders as well as a check list (in the chapter At the End of the Day) to aid in reviewing daily progress in relation to Catalysts/Inhibitors, Nourishers/Toxins, as well as evaluating Inner Work Life and any Action Plans for the next day.
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  • Lenny D
    January 1, 1970
    I talk about employee engagement a lot for work, so I'm always interested to see original takes on the subject. I read this book on the strength of a review that said Amabile and Kramer use a ton of evidence to support their management theory. They do, but in a way that's not particularly interesting.The book is a string of anecdotes that the authors use to draw out a sensible, if messy, management theory that they call the progress principle, I guess. The book is the product of a large-scale st I talk about employee engagement a lot for work, so I'm always interested to see original takes on the subject. I read this book on the strength of a review that said Amabile and Kramer use a ton of evidence to support their management theory. They do, but in a way that's not particularly interesting.The book is a string of anecdotes that the authors use to draw out a sensible, if messy, management theory that they call the progress principle, I guess. The book is the product of a large-scale study that the husband-and-wife team conducted with almost 200 individuals in a number of teams and organizations. Each subject journaled every day about the struggles and successes they dealt with during the work day. These journals revealed patterns of behavior that the researchers used to construct the ideas that sell the book.The theory they come up with is better than the book they wrote about it. In short, it's the idea that small events—positive and negative—have outsized effects on "inner work life." I think inner work life, not the progress principle itself, is the team's best contribution to the engagement discussion. It's the simple idea that knowledge workers are humans first and foremost, and we interact with our work the way we interact with family and friends. Politics happen, but so do moments of life-affirming pride spurred by relatively small occurrences. People do their best work when they are confident and happy, not under the gun of some hard-driving boss.It's nice to see this feel-good management theorem borne out by evidence, but the evidence that appears in the book is far from ironclad. It's all anecdotal and circumstantial. If someone wanted to truly prove this theory, they would probably use data in their study. If Amabile and Kramer did use rigorous data, they don't show their work here. Fine by me, because it was kind of a slog already. The anecdotes were supposed to help readers relate to the ideas. Instead, they formed a confusing parade of meaningless, heartland-America names generated to protect the subjects' real identities. I also noticed all the companies seemed to be from the world of industrial design, more or less. Not sure if that's consequential.This was a fine, boring read with an insightful message for managers: being driven at work not only coexists with comfort, it might even demand it. I know for a fact that the authors have stated this more succinctly elsewhere.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    What really sets the best managers above the rest? It’s their power to build a cadre of employees who have great inner work lives—consistently positive emotions; strong motivation; and favorable perceptions of the organization, their work, and their colleagues. The worst managers undermine inner work life, often unwittingly.As Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer explain in The Progress Principle, seemingly mundane workday events can make or break employees’ inner work lives. But it’s forward moment What really sets the best managers above the rest? It’s their power to build a cadre of employees who have great inner work lives—consistently positive emotions; strong motivation; and favorable perceptions of the organization, their work, and their colleagues. The worst managers undermine inner work life, often unwittingly.As Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer explain in The Progress Principle, seemingly mundane workday events can make or break employees’ inner work lives. But it’s forward momentum in meaningful work—progress—that creates the best inner work lives. Through rigorous analysis of nearly 12,000 diary entries provided by 238 employees in 7 companies, the authors explain how managers can foster progress and enhance inner work life every day.The book shows how to remove obstacles to progress, including meaningless tasks and toxic relationships. It also explains how to activate two forces that enable progress: (1) catalysts—events that directly facilitate project work, such as clear goals and autonomy—and (2) nourishers—interpersonal events that uplift workers, including encouragement and demonstrations of respect and collegiality.Brimming with honest examples from the companies studied, The Progress Principle equips aspiring and seasoned leaders alike with the insights they need to maximize their people’s performance
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  • Bibhu Ashish
    January 1, 1970
    I heard the audio book while commuting to and from the work. This book not only was enjoyable to listen but also gave me a lot of food to think about how to have a great motivated team.I would suggest all the people having any managerial responsibilities and dealing with people to read or hear this book once. The principle which this book is based on is a time tested one. Though a lot of people are aware of the principle but sometimes it is easier said than done to adhere to the principle of hel I heard the audio book while commuting to and from the work. This book not only was enjoyable to listen but also gave me a lot of food to think about how to have a great motivated team.I would suggest all the people having any managerial responsibilities and dealing with people to read or hear this book once. The principle which this book is based on is a time tested one. Though a lot of people are aware of the principle but sometimes it is easier said than done to adhere to the principle of helping the team to achieve their inner work life balance. This book gives the nuts and bolts to achieve that hard task of having a great motivated team. With the help of journal entries of more than thousand employees, the authors have tried to bring home the point that a great leader listens to his people and helps them to achieve what they aspire for. And when a leader listens, he truly leads. Highly recommended!!
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  • Amby
    January 1, 1970
    Simple principle yet most forgotten when it come to management and art of managing.It todays hyper-connected world, competence is not scarce, your team is talented enough to figure out how to solve the problem . So as a manager, it is not the solution or direction that they are looking for. Give them autonomy to figure out a solution but what they are looking for isolation from distraction what we call blockers, impediments. What is most fundamental to human satisfaction is whether I had progres Simple principle yet most forgotten when it come to management and art of managing.It todays hyper-connected world, competence is not scarce, your team is talented enough to figure out how to solve the problem . So as a manager, it is not the solution or direction that they are looking for. Give them autonomy to figure out a solution but what they are looking for isolation from distraction what we call blockers, impediments. What is most fundamental to human satisfaction is whether I had progress today !!. Day in day out , team members are happy and motivated to see they are making progress in work that been "asked" to do . That means , the work needs to be meaningful for the organization and they are making daily incremental progress. As a manager , our job is to provide them environment and support. This book helps articulating those simple but critical principles.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the concepts presented in this book. It provides some great, practical advice for managers backed by solid research. Any manager or leaders could benefit from understanding the benefits of progress, nourishers and catalysts.As much as I loved the concepts, I just couldn't love the book. In a sense, I think the book's greatest strength is also its greatest weakness. While I appreciated the solid research behind this book, the examples provided became really distracting. I couldn't keep st I loved the concepts presented in this book. It provides some great, practical advice for managers backed by solid research. Any manager or leaders could benefit from understanding the benefits of progress, nourishers and catalysts.As much as I loved the concepts, I just couldn't love the book. In a sense, I think the book's greatest strength is also its greatest weakness. While I appreciated the solid research behind this book, the examples provided became really distracting. I couldn't keep straight all of the companies and people presented as examples. It made the book feel a bit tedious to read, despite the accessible language. That said, I would strongly recommend that any manager or leader familiarizes themselves with these concepts. The Progress Principle offers a strong model for what sets apart the most effective managers.
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