Wall and Piece
Banksy, Britain's now-legendary "guerilla" street artist, has painted the walls, streets, and bridges of towns and cities throughout the world. Not only did he smuggle his pieces into four of New York City's major art museums, he's also "hung" his work at London's Tate Gallery and adorned Israel's West Bank barrier with satirical images. Banksy's identity remains unknown, but his work is unmistakable with prints selling for as much as $45,000.

Wall and Piece Details

TitleWall and Piece
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 25th, 2018
PublisherCentury
ISBN-139781844137879
Rating
GenreArt, Nonfiction

Wall and Piece Review

  • Manny
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone in Britain knows Banksy, but I'm often surprised to find that my US friends haven't heard of him. He's one of the funniest artists around, and has taken graffiti to a completely new level. The paintings and installations just turn up, in the most unlikely places. Here's one of my favorites, which was discovered one morning on the wall of a family planning clinic in Bristol. (Note the thematically appropriate content). The local authorities were going to remove it, but the doctors asked Everyone in Britain knows Banksy, but I'm often surprised to find that my US friends haven't heard of him. He's one of the funniest artists around, and has taken graffiti to a completely new level. The paintings and installations just turn up, in the most unlikely places. Here's one of my favorites, which was discovered one morning on the wall of a family planning clinic in Bristol. (Note the thematically appropriate content). The local authorities were going to remove it, but the doctors asked if they were crazy. Erase an original Banksy?He's incredibly good at outwitting security. One of his greatest coups was the following exhibit, which turned up in the British Museum. They also decided to keep it!This book collects together most of his work, and is wonderfully amusing to leaf through. The thing I like most about him is his complete refusal to take himself seriously: what a contrast with Damien Hirst and the other pretentious idiots currently getting absurd sums for stuff that isn't any better than the pieces Banksy does for free. And although his main purpose is to entertain, he does have a serious side too. I'll give the last word to the man himself.
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  • Nat
    January 1, 1970
    After seeing this next post on Tumblr, I simply had to add this book to my TBR. “A wall has always been the best place to publish your work.”I was looking for something to lift my spirits a bit, and thank the stars for sending this piece of art in my direction. Wall and Piece is guaranteed to brighten even your bleakest day.Banksy, Britain's now-legendary "guerilla" street artist, has painted the walls, streets, and bridges of towns and cities throughout the world.Wall and Piece sets the mood wi After seeing this next post on Tumblr, I simply had to add this book to my TBR. “A wall has always been the best place to publish your work.”I was looking for something to lift my spirits a bit, and thank the stars for sending this piece of art in my direction. Wall and Piece is guaranteed to brighten even your bleakest day.Banksy, Britain's now-legendary "guerilla" street artist, has painted the walls, streets, and bridges of towns and cities throughout the world.Wall and Piece sets the mood with a phenomenal introduction that not only made me open up my eyes to a new world but also seriously educated me.“The people who truly deface our neighbourhoods are the companies that scrawl their giant slogans across buildings and buses trying to make us feel inadequate unless we buy their stuff. They expect to be able to shout their message in your face from every available surface but you’re never allowed to answer back. Well, they started this fight and the wall is the weapon of choice to hit them back.”Not only is Bansky an incredible artist but his way with words lanced my heart. And thankfully that wasn't the only written part because we then smoothly move onto the works of Banksy, where he occasionally attaches a piece text to describe the art.Here are a few of my favorites: And lastly, I was greatly surprised when it mentioned a short story that was also featured in Almost Famous Women: Overall, I was incredibly amazed with Wall and Piece, especially getting to know that some of the works took only minutes to get done. MINUTES!!*Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Wall and Piece, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission!* This review and more can be found on my blog.
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  • Mon
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: Haters are not cool. I'm not 'hating' Banksy because it's the hipster thing to do (go grab an art school undergrad, you'll see what I mean). One problem with reviewing solo-artist art book is that you can't avoid talking about the actual artist, so here it is. I can't even be bothered to write about graphics. I mean, surely you're only considering buying this book because of the guy not the pretty layout right? ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Disclaimer: Haters are not cool. I'm not 'hating' Banksy because it's the hipster thing to do (go grab an art school undergrad, you'll see what I mean). One problem with reviewing solo-artist art book is that you can't avoid talking about the actual artist, so here it is. I can't even be bothered to write about graphics. I mean, surely you're only considering buying this book because of the guy not the pretty layout right? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Why do people like Banksy?It seems like people either hate him or love him, and not the traditional oh-he's-so-controversial-edgy-can't-possibly-be-in-between kind. 'Serious' practicing artists loathe this guy because 1) he's an auction babe and 2) non-'serious' artists love him. His fellow graffiti artists have similarly divided opinion about him, ranging from the Robbo Vs. Banksy hatred to admiring him as the God of stencil art. A couple years ago when he first started doing those gallery stunts where he sneaked his own work in major museums (Brooklyn, MoMA etc) in that masked Sherlock Holmes outfit, I thought 'why, this guy is not a popular artist, what he's doing is clearly conceptual and bravo to someone who is expanding the boundary of performance art!'. Over the years as he got more public attention, Banksy became more reserved and civilised in the media. There is a trend in the rising street artists where the stereotypical persona of the rough, I'm-from-the-hood attitude is discarded for a safe, white bourgeoisie irony of look-I'm-fiddling-with-something-cool-and-dangerous-but-remember-drugs-and-alcohol-are-bad-for-you-kids! Remember Twilight? Remember how bad-ass things were actually bad-ass, but now the symbol of rebellious angsty anti-authority icons are either Gossip Girls or Jersey Shore? (excluding ironic Che references)What Banksy does is arguably beneficial to the art community, in a way that he exposes the traditional obscure and anonymous operation of street artists to a wider audience. But he IS Edgy, Dangerous and c00l, you might say, look at what he did in Palenstine! Paris Hilton CDs! See, Banksy works best with a contextual focus rather than technical originality. In terms of fame and money, yes he makes a lot of those but he is by no means the first one (haters, please remember Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons are still out there). Andre, Basquiat and a bunch of other artists have benefited from the popularity of street art by boxing it into Sotheby's home. If you want to be more extreme, you can even argue Banksy isn't an artist at all. What he does is make statements and provoke his audience through civic sentiments. He is not consciously creating art. Even traditional graffiti tags have a narcissistic quality that is unique to art. Similar to Twilight, Banksy is another subject I avoid talking about. Yes, he's a serious artist and interesting phenomenon but many of his fans are obnoxious in labeling him as an academic artists because of this political nature and somewhat 'unconventional' genre. Banksy never publicly denounced other 'sell out' street or shock artists and I respect his unpretentiousness. Of course, people say 'well, I don't care if you're only into those 'serious' minimalists, abstract-nobody-except-your-art-professor-understands or installation art, Banksy is too cool for "definition"'. However, you can't discuss the artistic merit of Banksy without including him in the circle, an exact contradiction to his principle. Well, now that he's widely accepted in the art crowd (I'm sure he doesn't have a problem with it, considering his generous rise in pay check) only complicates the matter. Is he still a serious 'street' artist? Sure he works with the same medium and similar themes, but his works are getting safer and more political for politic's sake. It is a shame considering the artistic merit of his works (although that is also debatable, some graffiti artists consider stencil art contrived. Personally I believe efficiency is important due to street art's, well, illicit nature of production)It is perhaps unfair to hate on Banksy for all the above reasons. After all, can you name one popular artist who hasn't been called a phony in recent years? The point I'm trying to make is that if you're serious about art, or street art for that matter, Banksy is merely credible and nothing unusual beyond that. Banksy is not 1) breaking new grounds, or rather, not that 'new' in the course of art history 2) technically/structurally innovative 3) authentic just because he works on the street and break laws and shit. I'm not saying he's not a good artist (if such thing exists), but I'm just going to avoid the next person that calls him the greatest 'artist' in the century, not that Banksy himself, I imagine, would care about this anyway, so why should you?
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  • Kirsti
    January 1, 1970
    In 2003, Banksy donated one of his artworks to the Tate Gallery in London. The thing is, the Tate Gallery hadn't actually asked for anything of his. He just walked in (or had a friend walk in, or had a member of the collective walk in--Banksy's true identity is uncertain) and stuck it to the wall. This is just the kind of appalling disrespect that I think the world needs more of.Over the next couple of years, he made similar donations to the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, th In 2003, Banksy donated one of his artworks to the Tate Gallery in London. The thing is, the Tate Gallery hadn't actually asked for anything of his. He just walked in (or had a friend walk in, or had a member of the collective walk in--Banksy's true identity is uncertain) and stuck it to the wall. This is just the kind of appalling disrespect that I think the world needs more of.Over the next couple of years, he made similar donations to the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Brooklyn Museum, MoMA, the Natural History Museum in New York and the one in London, and the British Museum. At least two of the museums have added these donations to their permanent collections.It takes a special kind of mind to tag Trafalgar Square with an enormous sign reading DESIGNATED RIOT AREA. Also to sneak into the penguin enclosure at a zoo and leave the message "We're bored of fish." And the Lady Di ten-pound "Banksy of England" notes are incredible . . . too bad he would face 12 years in prison if he actually distributed them.It's a shame that Batman and Wonder Woman aren't real, but at least we have Banksy.
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  • Jonathan Ashleigh
    January 1, 1970
    “Imagine a city where graffiti wasn't illegal, a city where everybody could draw whatever they liked. Where every street was awash with a million colours and little phrases. Where standing at a bus stop was never boring. A city that felt like a party where everyone was invited, not just the estate agents and barons of big business. Imagine a city like that and stop leaning against the wall - it's wet.”
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  • Trevor
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this. Particularly this
  • Amir
    January 1, 1970
    شاید خود بنکسی بهتر از همه گفته باشه: یه عده میخوان پلیس بشن که دنیا رو بهتر کنن؛ یه عده هم میخوان وندال باشن که ظاهر دنیا رو بهتر کنن. گرفیتیهای بنکسی پر از ایدههای دوستداشتنی و انسانیه. مخصوصا مجموعهی فلسطینش و همینطور مجموعهی میمون و موزها. بد نیست نگاهی بندازید بهش شاید خود بنکسی بهتر از همه گفته باشه: یه عده می‌خوان پلیس بشن که دنیا رو بهتر کنن؛ یه عده هم می‌خوان وندال باشن که ظاهر دنیا رو بهتر کنن. گرفیتی‌های بنکسی پر از ایده‌های دوست‌داشتنی و انسانیه. مخصوصا مجموعه‌ی فلسطینش و همین‌طور مجموعه‌ی میمون و موزها. بد نیست نگاهی بندازید بهش
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  • 7jane
    January 1, 1970
    (my copy has the "now with 10% more crap" red sticker in the lower right corner)This book holds examples of graffiti/stencil artist Banksy, from 2001 to 2006, which aren't always on walls, and not always just with paint :) Sometimes it's just his name. Often the photographs have information with it: time, place, how long did it take to do it, how long it lasted - at least once in the last one the art was saved into a collection!Surfaces: walls, animals, on grass and beach sand, vehicles of road (my copy has the "now with 10% more crap" red sticker in the lower right corner)This book holds examples of graffiti/stencil artist Banksy, from 2001 to 2006, which aren't always on walls, and not always just with paint :) Sometimes it's just his name. Often the photographs have information with it: time, place, how long did it take to do it, how long it lasted - at least once in the last one the art was saved into a collection!Surfaces: walls, animals, on grass and beach sand, vehicles of road and water, street itself, some zoos.Themes: war, consumerism, thinking outside the rules, freedom, criticizing narrowness of 'what is art' definiton etc.Types: policemen/Buckingham palace guards, certain animals (monkeys, rats, cows, birds etc.), war machines, famous people, children, "designated _ area", and so on.As I've said, it's not always art: sometimes it's fake museum pieces, or sneaking art pieces (traffic cone art, decorating cameras with stuffed animals, putting 'shark fins' in park lakes, stickers etc.). I do have to admit that I don't like him spraying live animals, but him sneaking into zoos was amusing. He does most of his work in southern England, but has also done it in US and Israel, and it non-UK cities like Vienna, Berlin, and Paris.This is a good view into his art, thought-provoking and often amusing. As many are no doubt now gone, this is a good way of seeing them now."Some people become cops because they want to make the world a better place. Some people become vandals because they want to make the world a better *looking* place."
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  • Jon(athan) Nakapalau
    January 1, 1970
    Thought provoking and powerful - a tour de force of the absurdity that has become institutionalized in our modern world.
  • Maggie Stiefvater
    January 1, 1970
    Like many people, I just find the story of Banksy -- a sort of artist Robin Hood -- incredibly compelling. In my head this most elusive of graffiti artists looks like Sean Bean and drives a Lotus Elan or something like that. This book spares the words and lavishes the photographs, letting Banksy's political statements, hastily and secretly sprayed onto walls, speak for themselves. If Banksy was just an anarchist, rustling with discontent, this book, and his art, would be unimpressive. But Banksy Like many people, I just find the story of Banksy -- a sort of artist Robin Hood -- incredibly compelling. In my head this most elusive of graffiti artists looks like Sean Bean and drives a Lotus Elan or something like that. This book spares the words and lavishes the photographs, letting Banksy's political statements, hastily and secretly sprayed onto walls, speak for themselves. If Banksy was just an anarchist, rustling with discontent, this book, and his art, would be unimpressive. But Banksy's art speaks with an edgy, wry, stylish accent. His spray-painted creations are no defacement. Instead, they're the graphic, unheard voices of those shouting "something is wrong here!"
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  • notgettingenough
    January 1, 1970
    Added later: I found it quite moving, his description of being drawn to graffiti the outside of the walls imprisoning the Palestinians and being told off in no uncertain terms by the inhabitants. To beautify the walls is to insult them. Of course. Obvious when you think of it.----------------------------------------I'm loving this, of course. And it's not that I disagree, exactly, with his messages, but a dominant one is this idea that The people who truly deface our neighbourhoods are the comp Added later: I found it quite moving, his description of being drawn to graffiti the outside of the walls imprisoning the Palestinians and being told off in no uncertain terms by the inhabitants. To beautify the walls is to insult them. Of course. Obvious when you think of it.----------------------------------------I'm loving this, of course. And it's not that I disagree, exactly, with his messages, but a dominant one is this idea that The people who truly deface our neighbourhoods are the companies that scrawl their giant slogans across buildings and buses trying to make us feel inadequate unless we buy their stuff. Well, okay, but. There is lots of really clever, funny, aesthetically pleasing advertising out there and lots of crap graffiti.I like the following pictures, taken recently near where I live. I don't find the advertising displeasing juxtaposed with the graffiti. In fact, I don't understand why I'm supposed to find the graffiti pleasing either absolutely or relatively. Banksy's stuff is pictures which either contain words or read like words. I don't see why it is comparable to the first three of these pictures and nor do I see why these three are supposed to represent something more acceptable than the last.I think blank space is as important as silence. I don't understand why we have a desperate need to fill them up.Later: and I'm not very happy about this either: Art is not like other culture because its success is not made by its audience. The public fill concert halls and cinemas every day, we read novels by the millions and buy records by the billions. We the people, affect the making and the quality of most of our culture, but not our art.The Art we look at is made by only a select few. A small group create, promote, purchase, exhibit and decide the success fo Art. Only a few hundred people in the world have any real say. When you go to an Art gallery you are simply a tourist looking at the trophy cabinet of a few millionaires. Sorry, Banksy, but this is bull. There is a literary canon. There is a notion of 'classical music', both of which are exclusive in exactly the same way you complain about Art.Just as there is popular music and popular writing, both looked down upon by their respective canons, so too in Art. There is a vast amount of popular art, including graffiti, including cartoons, including street art. People do that, they buy pictures being sold on the side of the road and they love them. They think they have purchased art. The mere fact that the governors of the Tate do not think so is neither here nor there.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    There are two kinds of people in this world: those who know the work of Banksy, and those who should. I recommend this book to both.I think this quote from the back cover says a lot about Banksy:  "There's no way you're going to get a quote   from us on your book cover"   Metropolitan Police spokesperson________________ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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  • Sara Alaee
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a collection of Graffitis that “Banksy” - one of the world’s most famous street artists - has painted on walls, streets, bridges and many other open places throughout the world. Quite amazing and artistic. (To know what graffiti is, the following lines give the best explanation of it as a piece of art):“Graffiti is not the lowest from of art. Despite having to creep about at night and lie to your mum it’s actually the most honest artform available. There is no elitism or hype, it ex This book is a collection of Graffitis that “Banksy” - one of the world’s most famous street artists - has painted on walls, streets, bridges and many other open places throughout the world. Quite amazing and artistic. (To know what graffiti is, the following lines give the best explanation of it as a piece of art):“Graffiti is not the lowest from of art. Despite having to creep about at night and lie to your mum it’s actually the most honest artform available. There is no elitism or hype, it exhibits on some of the best walls a town has to offer, and nobody is put off by the price of admission.A wall has always been the best place to publish your work.”
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  • Manny
    January 1, 1970
    I noticed this yesterday in the window of a bookshop on the Route de Carouge. The translator has found quite a clever way of rendering the title: War and Peace in French is Guerre et paix, and "paix" sounds similar to "spray". The odd thing is that he's done it by moving the pun from "War" to "Peace"!
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  • Luís C.
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book after watching the video "Make the wall" that I had already found excellent.It's amazing.I don't like artists who are content with a work of form, aesthetics. For me the art must also be social, I like the sentence of René Char "what comes to the world so as not to disturb anything deserves neither respect nor patience".Frankly contemporary art, for what I know, deserves neither ... nor ... according to the criterion given above.Banksy is clearly an exception.It's disturbing, bo I read this book after watching the video "Make the wall" that I had already found excellent.It's amazing.I don't like artists who are content with a work of form, aesthetics. For me the art must also be social, I like the sentence of René Char "what comes to the world so as not to disturb anything deserves neither respect nor patience".Frankly contemporary art, for what I know, deserves neither ... nor ... according to the criterion given above.Banksy is clearly an exception.It's disturbing, both in form and substance, and always right. We say to each page "it's great" and I rarely use this word.What a freshness!
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  • H
    January 1, 1970
    Provocative and clever, but I would argue ultimately vapid. Something like an underground cultural icon for urban youth today. I only see three basic techniques or themes in his methods:Irony. Soldiers painting peace signs, zoo monkeys holding homeless signs, traffic signs warning of more (or less) serious things. They're all clever enough, but ultimately just artifacts of a stagnant, consumerist generation that's well aware of its stagnation and consumerism. Like television commercials that pok Provocative and clever, but I would argue ultimately vapid. Something like an underground cultural icon for urban youth today. I only see three basic techniques or themes in his methods:Irony. Soldiers painting peace signs, zoo monkeys holding homeless signs, traffic signs warning of more (or less) serious things. They're all clever enough, but ultimately just artifacts of a stagnant, consumerist generation that's well aware of its stagnation and consumerism. Like television commercials that poke fun at the fact that they're a commercial: it's witty and self-protective. This either leads to people hating the content and calling it a bastardization of art, or people loving it because they're in on the joke and they "get it." There's basically no message except, "What's the message?"Commentary on political decadence. Valid enough. But again there's no solution, no grappling with the actual complexity of issues. Just toting anarchy, non-hypocrisy, peace exclusively in terms of non-violence. His anonymity is fortunate because if Banksy were a real figurehead there might be some small shudders of revolution leading toward nothing real.Pranks/daredevilism. Gets him more laughs than respect, I'd say, except among disenchanted youth. There's a lot of ego involved despite his claims to anonymity and unpaid, unpretentious art. Why spray your tag across the world in challenging places if you're really being anonymous?He's an important figure for urban history, but he's not a hero and he's not a role model. He's full of talent (he wouldn't get this much attention if his art and stencils were ugly and untrained) and potential but ultimately has nothing to say and no real method of causing significant change. He's on a soapbox. On the other hand, though, because of the way he's popularizing the art, he's also an example of empowerment for the voiceless. But I would also suspect that his example has led to just as much useless or vapid graffiti as it has intelligent graffiti.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Thought provoking....
  • Rob
    January 1, 1970
    I love Banksy's artwork, and this was collection displays it very well. He's a brilliant man with a paint can, and a clever writer as well. I would recommend this book to anyone not familiar with his work. A few quotes of his I enjoyed were:Some people represent authority without ever possessing any of their own.The greatest crimes in the world are not committed by people breaking the rules but by people following the rules--it's people who follow orders that drop bombs and massacre villages.A r I love Banksy's artwork, and this was collection displays it very well. He's a brilliant man with a paint can, and a clever writer as well. I would recommend this book to anyone not familiar with his work. A few quotes of his I enjoyed were:Some people represent authority without ever possessing any of their own.The greatest crimes in the world are not committed by people breaking the rules but by people following the rules--it's people who follow orders that drop bombs and massacre villages.A recent survey of North American males found 42% were overweight, 34% were critically obese, and 8% ate the survey.We can't do anything to change the world until capitalism crumbles. In the meantime we should all go shopping to console ourselves.We don't need anymore heroes, we just need someone to take out the recycling.
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  • Hasan Makhzoum
    January 1, 1970
    During my studies at the Law school, I came across this poetic expression in a boring document about the administrative decentralization in the EU: The world is like your home, except that it has few more walls.. To me, the essence of Banksy's art incarnates this quote for it humanistic and internationalist.Banksy is an English artist from Bristol... and that’s all we know.He remains anonymous and is still hiding his real identity, like the awesome guys from the Daft Punk. He is internationally During my studies at the Law school, I came across this poetic expression in a boring document about the administrative decentralization in the EU: The world is like your home, except that it has few more walls.. To me, the essence of Banksy's art incarnates this quote for it humanistic and internationalist.Banksy is an English artist from Bristol... and that’s all we know.He remains anonymous and is still hiding his real identity, like the awesome guys from the Daft Punk. He is internationally praised for having revolutionized the graffiti art, like the DP has did too with the Electronic Dance music genre in the mid-90s. However, the two french djs used to mix at parties with uncovered faces whereas Banksy has never painted or appeared in public.Well, anonymous unless the recent surprising revelation by an investigative journalist turns out to be true.Craig Williams has published in the Daily Mail an article with a surprising revelation that is based on a long investigation. Williams claims that Robert 3D Del Naja, member of the famous Massive Attack band, is the guerrilla graffiti star because art keeps appearing near their gigs in different countries. https://www.google.com.lb/amp/www.dai...If this revelation turns out to be true, than I'll add it to the many other reasons behind my love and admiration for this band:1-Their avant-garde Electro music2- the remarkable and amazing appearances of immensely beautiful and talented actresses/models in the creative music videos of their latest album : ~ Rosamund Pike (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElvLZ...~ Kate Moss ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhI5T...) who btw also happens to be painted by Banksy in a Warholish artwork (https://goo.gl/images/4l2sRh) ...hmm, could it be just another coincidence? ~ And the divine Cate Blanchett (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r31D...) More recently, a new article by The Independent seems to approve this hypothesis. It's all in the headline: Banksy identity 'accidentally revealed by Goldie' during interview. Fans and media claim the slip up proves the artist is a member of the band Massive Attack.[http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-ent...]However, Goldie could also be referring to Robin Gunningham, which was the claim of a «scientific» study conducted by academics at the Queen Mary University of London in 2016. This study relies on “Geographic profiling” (Geotagging), a technique used to catch serial criminals:~ https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.inde...~ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...Gunningham was first pinned by the Mail on Sunday as the elusive artist back in 2008.Most journalists are inclined to believe that Robin Gunningham is really the mysterious ‘graffiti bomber’, moreover since it is believed that he was caught on camera a few months agohttps://www.google.com/amp/s/metro.co...The attempts to unmask his identity are numerous but none of the claims is confirmed and the saga of Banksy’s mysterious identity still goes on.. What i find irritating is how the artist's nickname, Banksy, has become a generic term, overused as a label and as an attribute. It is tossed off by most journalists every time the subject is related to the graffiti art. It is like making an analogy between my 3 years old niece's paintings with Picasso's cubism every time she draws straight lines. Very often, you will read articles about the Banksy-likes:+ There are the 'Young Banksys', such as the 10 years old Solveighttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/pictu...+ The 'Rightwing Banksy', like 'Sabo', an American Republican Street artist based in LAhttps://www.theguardian.com/artanddes...+ There are the 'female Banksys': -A graffiti artist called Aikuhttps://www.google.com.lb/amp/www.ind...+ And of course Bambi, the most famous one:https://www.google.com.lb/amp/s/amp.t...On the other hand, Banksy has inspired many female artists to get involved in this form of art:https://www.google.com.lb/amp/s/m.mic... Of course, in our capitalist mass-consumerist society, everything ends up being commercialized and measured by its money value. Art is no exception, as its creation for autotelic reasons by the artist seems to be an ongoing myth. Of course, I don't mean that an artist must work for free like those who consider that Art is a disinterested activity. I meant to point out the catastrophic monopoly exercised today by the art galleries in the nauseating market of Arts, pricing the artists' artworks (the one million dollars question: what are the criterias?) and appointed as the high authority who decides for the public what is good art and what is not (Exhibit A: that pseudo-artist by the name of Jeff Koons).. Most often, It's some clueless tasteless snobs who buy and sell these paintings as safe long-term financial investments (In the past century, the aristocrats used to finance the greatest artists (like the impressionists), but that's a long story), instead of having them displayed for the public in the more and more financially powerless museums. Anyway, that is another long debate.. The auctions at the prestigious Galleries that are featuring Banksy's artworks has no doubt tainted his reputation as a guerrilla-artist. Btw, The book description on GR has to be updated, the prices of his artworks exceeds 45k by far, this one https://goo.gl/images/r79ZDM was sold for the modest amount of one million and a half dollars.Banksy is a street artist. Basically, street art is defined as a visual art created in public locations, usually unsanctioned artwork executed outside of the context of traditional art venues (..) Street art is often motivated by a preference on the part of the artist to communicate directly with the public at large, free from perceived confines of the formal art world. Street artists sometimes present socially relevant content infused with esthetic value, to attract attention to a cause or as a form of "art provocation”.- [Wikipedia]In 2015 Banksy has created a huge dystopian park called Dismaland (obviously lampooning Disneyland) in which he has installed huge creepy artworks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wruE.... Banksy's art takes always the form of urban activism.He proved it again recently in 2017 with his new project, the Walled Off Hotel in Betlehem. It's an hotel packed with his artworks and with a horrible view on the concrete slabs of the separation wall* https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglis...* https://www.theguardian.com/world/201... Banksy's creations and epigrams are purposed, transgressive, provocative and subversive. The political messages and symbols that his drawings and murals deliver are powerful, particularly those on the Palestinian side. He has even sneaked undercover in 2015 to the war-torn Gaza and painted a series on the rubbles and ruins of the demolished buildings in the devastated areas.~ Some of his works in Gaza during the Israeli strikes in 2008.. Unfortunately, they are still relevant today:https://goo.gl/images/mWZAd3https://goo.gl/images/WyeJnJAgain, what does Bambi paint? Brad Pitt, for example, is alleged to have bought Bambi’s wedding portrait of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge for £60,000 as a gift for Angelina Jolie, before commissioning portraits of his own family. Other works by the street artist have fetched upwards of £100,000. - [The Guardian] This says it all, she is a prominent artist worthy of Banksy's legacy because Brad Pitt thinks so. Or is it the other way around, he bought her 'amazing' works because an Art gallery has said they are?Anyway, I'm not interested in the evaluation of her artworks, my point is to show how much ridiculous I find this analogy is.
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  • Rupert Dreyfus
    January 1, 1970
    There are many great stencilists in this world (Orion and Fairey come to mind), but Banksy is up there with the best of them. Some people enjoy hating on him because he makes loads of money out of stencilling these days and his messages are sometimes vaguely anti-establishment. I remember Charlie Brooker once dedicating a whole article to how much he thinks Banksy blows nuts and it's the only time I've found myself disagreeing with my personal Jesus. This is because if we focus on the artistry r There are many great stencilists in this world (Orion and Fairey come to mind), but Banksy is up there with the best of them. Some people enjoy hating on him because he makes loads of money out of stencilling these days and his messages are sometimes vaguely anti-establishment. I remember Charlie Brooker once dedicating a whole article to how much he thinks Banksy blows nuts and it's the only time I've found myself disagreeing with my personal Jesus. This is because if we focus on the artistry rather than the personality, then the sheer scale of his work and just how public it has been over the years is phenomenal. Anyone who has made a stencil bigger than A4 or has tried putting up graffiti in public places will tell you that the technical aspects of what he does are jaw dropping. Even if he gets planning permission (which I'm pretty sure he doesn't given the content of what he's put up), the scale alone is incredible.And call me a moron, but I actually appreciate the images. He has kept with the historical spirit of political stencilling as a form of protest. Contrary to what Wikipedia tells us, political stencilling was around during WWII - often employed by fascists and the resistance movements to spread propaganda messages. From what I've read and seen over the years political stencils have always been vague because they're supposed to be provocative; they're not supposed to be academic essays with footnotes and bibliographies. So, yeah, I like this guy. There are better books on graffiti and stencilling out there, but this is a worthy read if you appreciate what this fella does - either technically or through his vague anti-establishment messages.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    “Nobody ever listened to me until they didn’t know who I was.”When I lived in LA a few years ago, I went to a downtown warehouse after receiving a text message with the address. Banksy was in town, and in true clandestine fashion, the location of his show was a secret until just hours before it opened. I was impressed. I had never heard of Banksy, but his highly successful, clandestine, guerilla marketing intrigued me. I did a Google search on him and was even more impressed with the images of h “Nobody ever listened to me until they didn’t know who I was.”When I lived in LA a few years ago, I went to a downtown warehouse after receiving a text message with the address. Banksy was in town, and in true clandestine fashion, the location of his show was a secret until just hours before it opened. I was impressed. I had never heard of Banksy, but his highly successful, clandestine, guerilla marketing intrigued me. I did a Google search on him and was even more impressed with the images of his work. He was a famous graffitti artist from Britain, but the work I found also included beautifully altered oil paintings from the previous century -- work that conveyed intelligence, humor, and political intent. Who was this guy? The LA show was dominated by an elephant in a room. A live elephant, elaborately painted in pink, in a staged living room. Brilliant!“I like to think I have the guts to stand up anonymously in a western democracy and call for things no-one else believes in -- like peace and justice and freedom.” I loved every page of Wall and Piece. Banksy’s work encompasses different styles and techniques, but all capture the mind of an engaged and passionate artist. Every image evokes a reaction from me. Some are laugh out loud funny, some are disturbing, all are clever and thought provoking. His words are just as effective.Banksy ends this book, “People either love me or they hate me, or they don’t really care.” I’m part of the first category, and I honestly don’t know how anyone can go through this book and not have an opinion. What’s yours? Check this book out and discover more about yourself.
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Banksy is clever without being deep, adventurous without being ground-breaking, and quite possibly the best known visual artist active in the world without being extremely talented. He's against the global soulless corporate machine, but his art is by nature a quick hit, the artistic equivalent of a Big Mac. It's incredibly refreshing and accessible and it's art that actually means something. In a wander through a museum like the MoMA or the Tate Modern, you see some interesting designs, the occ Banksy is clever without being deep, adventurous without being ground-breaking, and quite possibly the best known visual artist active in the world without being extremely talented. He's against the global soulless corporate machine, but his art is by nature a quick hit, the artistic equivalent of a Big Mac. It's incredibly refreshing and accessible and it's art that actually means something. In a wander through a museum like the MoMA or the Tate Modern, you see some interesting designs, the occasional piece that's quite clever in concept or execution and a lot of pretentious crap. Banksy as an artist is a reaction to the high brow direction of art over the last hundred years - he makes art that's relevant to, accessable to, and understandable by the average person.Also, his work is damn entertaining, usually showing a great cheeky sense of humor.This book is, if nothing else, a great introduction to the man and his work. I highly recommend it, especially to those that really like art, and those that really dislike art.
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  • Bryce Holt
    January 1, 1970
    Banksy is the most original artist (or potentially "artists"...) living today. Screw Matthew Barney's "Cremaster" series and all the Rothko and Rauschenberg nonsense some of the more effete curators shove down your throats. This is art at its most emotional and provocative, and it's in book form (which I assume pisses him off to no end).Anti-establishment, anti-consumer, anti-intelligencia, and pretty much any other "anti-fill-in-the-blank" you can throw at him, his works are unfathomably creati Banksy is the most original artist (or potentially "artists"...) living today. Screw Matthew Barney's "Cremaster" series and all the Rothko and Rauschenberg nonsense some of the more effete curators shove down your throats. This is art at its most emotional and provocative, and it's in book form (which I assume pisses him off to no end).Anti-establishment, anti-consumer, anti-intelligencia, and pretty much any other "anti-fill-in-the-blank" you can throw at him, his works are unfathomably creative, carry an array of emotions, and are unrivaled. Let's face it...this man's work makes us all want to pick up a can of spraypaint and make a little magic on the walls. * * *Just got through this for the third time. Trying to learn how he does the cut-ups for his stencils, and man...they're more difficult than they look. They should hang the cardboard cut outs of these things in museums. Damn difficult or I am doing something seriously wrong.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    An art book that probably hates that it's an art book. Of note:"There's no way you're going to get a quote from us to use on your book cover" --Metropolitan Police spokesperson, quoted on back cover"Copyright is for losers" --copyright page"Despite what they say graffiti is not the lowest form of art. Although you might have to creep about at night and lie to your mum it's actually one of the more honest art forms available. There is no elitism or hype, it exhibits on the best walls a town has t An art book that probably hates that it's an art book. Of note:"There's no way you're going to get a quote from us to use on your book cover" --Metropolitan Police spokesperson, quoted on back cover"Copyright is for losers" --copyright page"Despite what they say graffiti is not the lowest form of art. Although you might have to creep about at night and lie to your mum it's actually one of the more honest art forms available. There is no elitism or hype, it exhibits on the best walls a town has to offer and nobody is put off by the price of admission. A wall has always been the best place to publish your work.""There are no exceptions to the rule that everyone thinks they're an exception to the rules""The human race is the most stupid and unfair kind of race. A lot of the runners don't even get decent sneakers or clean drinking water. Some runners are born with a massive head start, every possible help along the way and still the referees seem to be on their side. It's not surprising a lot of people have given up competing altogether and gone to sit in the grandstand, eat junk and shout abuse. What the human race needs is a lot more streakers.""Art is not like other culture because its success is not made by its audience. The public fill concert halls and cinemas every day, we read novels by the millions and buy records by the billions. We the people, affect the making and the quality of most of our culture, but not our art.The Art we look at is made by only a select few. A small group create, promote, purchase, exhibit and decide the success of Art. Only a few hundred people in the world have any real say. When you go to an Art gallery you are simply a tourist looking at the trophy cabinet of a few millionaires." "TV has made going to the theatre seem pointless, photography has pretty much killed painting, but graffiti remains gloriously unspoilt by progress.""Brandalism: Any advertisement in public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is yours. It belongs to you. It's yours to take, re-arrange and re-use. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw at your head." "Nothing in the world is more common than unsuccessful people with talent, leave the house before you find something worth staying in for." "The time of getting fame for your name on its own is over. Artwork that is only about wanting to be famous will never make you famous. Fame is a by-product of doing something else. You don't go to a restaurant and order a meal because you want to have a sh*t."
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  • Keith
    January 1, 1970
    British graffiti, guerilla installation, etc. artist's book of documented works and quotes. It's great fun for anyone with a bit of an anarchist bent to their personality. Even if, for some reason, you strongly disapprove of graffiti, you gotta admit Banksy's stuff is pretty cool (I think you do anyway, but who am I to tell you what to think). He may be too well known and hip for his political message to be heard now, unfortunately... I'm not sure, but it's my sense that to a lot of folks once i British graffiti, guerilla installation, etc. artist's book of documented works and quotes. It's great fun for anyone with a bit of an anarchist bent to their personality. Even if, for some reason, you strongly disapprove of graffiti, you gotta admit Banksy's stuff is pretty cool (I think you do anyway, but who am I to tell you what to think). He may be too well known and hip for his political message to be heard now, unfortunately... I'm not sure, but it's my sense that to a lot of folks once it's 'cool' you can like it without paying attention to what's being said, like Rage Against the Machine... do you really think that whole heaving crowd of baseball cap wearing humanity in audience at Lollapalooza is cognizant of the plight of indiginous people in Mexico? Or do they hear the band on the hard rock station, like the ripping guitars and thumping bass and anger and only think of Señor Frog's and illegal immigrants when you mention Mexico?
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  • Rick Christiansen
    January 1, 1970
    This is an art book, but here some of my favorite quotes:"Despite what they say graffitti is not the lowest form of art...it's actually one of the more honest forms available.A wall has always been the best place to publish your work.A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to.Why would someone just paint pictures of a revolutionary when you can actually behave like one instead?Sometimes I feel so sick at the state of the world I can't even finish my second apple pie.P This is an art book, but here some of my favorite quotes:"Despite what they say graffitti is not the lowest form of art...it's actually one of the more honest forms available.A wall has always been the best place to publish your work.A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to.Why would someone just paint pictures of a revolutionary when you can actually behave like one instead?Sometimes I feel so sick at the state of the world I can't even finish my second apple pie.People either love me or they hate me, or they don't really care."Pick yourself up a copy! :)
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  • Emily (Falling for YA)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a coffee table-esque book. It was primarily pictures of Banksy's pieces. Some I had seen before, some I hadn't.Still, I love the work Banksy does and thoroughly enjoyed this book. I ended up reading it while sitting next to my Mom and she kept looking over my shoulder when I'd laugh or shake my head. It's one thing to show someone an image you like online it's another thing to show them a picture in a book and have them want to read it after you're done.Update: Mom read and loved it =P
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not always on board with Banksy's peaceful anarchy philosophy. I was a bit horrified to find he defaced actual paintings in museums. Still, I find most of his work brilliant and provocative, and I love his sense of humor and whimsy as he artfully conveys his messages. I thoroughly enjoyed this volume of his work along with his commentary.
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  • Pheobe
    January 1, 1970
    The first time I heard of Banksy was on this website. I gathered from the summary and people's reviews that, more or less, HE was worth the read, if not the book itself. I love art, it's my vessel to any interpretation I choose to have, and if you truly love art, there are no lines that a person can't cross. There are no lines that an artist can't draw, no limits. I firmly believe artists also think differently than normal people. More often, it is the artist who is the introvert or extreme extr The first time I heard of Banksy was on this website. I gathered from the summary and people's reviews that, more or less, HE was worth the read, if not the book itself. I love art, it's my vessel to any interpretation I choose to have, and if you truly love art, there are no lines that a person can't cross. There are no lines that an artist can't draw, no limits. I firmly believe artists also think differently than normal people. More often, it is the artist who is the introvert or extreme extrovert, the mysterious, the most imaginative, the more thoughtful and always the most perceptive. So really, this book makes me think that he is a scatterbrained person, as most artists are, who do not work well with organization but rather impulse, which I happen to like...it's easier but at the same time quite difficult. The compilation of this book was amusing and pretty rebellious; I just got this feeling that it wasn't voyeuristic in any way. And I wasn't inspired because it had ideas of "revolution" or "F*** pigs" and a singular, slightly irrelevant (in the way that only artists can get away with) reference to the Nazi camp and how through a lipstick tube, individuality sprouted. The issue I had with the book was how the ideas were inputted in a quote or two and expressed in pictures, but the pictures following were all the same (rat, rat, rat with gas mask. policeman, policeman, policeman urinating on the wall) so I couldn't develop my initial interpretation.His art is wonderful to see, he is truly an artistic soul. He is witty and thinks outside the box, then cuts the box up with daggers. (referenced) It was interesting and recommendable. My friend told me this changed the way he viewed art, but I would've thought that the concept of art displayed anywhere, art that is different and rebellious against authority, art in a different medium, is not foreign and not necessarily unique. He graffitis in the security of knowing it is true art, and it is risky because of the places he chooses for display. I thought the "f*** pigs" on the pig was predictable, the security cameras in the woods relatively blah, tagging cows, the defacing of other people's art pretty lame. I don't know for sure if he cares to have respect for graffiti art, but if he does, he's going from the angle that other art disrespects his art, instead of their artists, in this book.I read/interpreted it, carefully and with perspective. Again, cool cool art. But in the end, it just didn't read me. But I liked it! Don't take any of these reviews to heart. Art is art. Art is like people. Interpret away. That's why I'm focusing more on the book as a whole, not just his art. That's why it's a book review. Now I'm off to check out Banksy reviews!
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  • abatage
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who has a passing interest in street art will have heard of Banksy and the work he has done. In fact, so many people are aware of his work that it gets a little annoying from time to time, as it becomes a badge of honour for some people. To the point that I was getting sick and tired of hearing people say his name with that knowing tone that seems to say 'yeah, I'm hip too'. Thankfully this book restored my faith in why Banksy's infamy is well deserved. I've never been able to actually si Anyone who has a passing interest in street art will have heard of Banksy and the work he has done. In fact, so many people are aware of his work that it gets a little annoying from time to time, as it becomes a badge of honour for some people. To the point that I was getting sick and tired of hearing people say his name with that knowing tone that seems to say 'yeah, I'm hip too'. Thankfully this book restored my faith in why Banksy's infamy is well deserved. I've never been able to actually sit down and read it until now, because I never had my own copy. It was always one of those books that people I know had on their coffee table. Some because they used it for inspiration (amongst other books) and some because they wanted to display it and tell everyone that came over that they were a little bit 'in the know' and had kept up with trends.Thankfully the words in this book say a lot about the philosophy of the artist and the point/pointless nature of his work. Of course, there's a fine collection of photos and prints showing a portfolio of sorts, which is the main reason to gaze on this book, but the words round it off nicely and give the images a purpose.It is inspiring to an artist; especially an artist who prefers deconstruction over profound technique (despite how developed Banksy's technique may actually be), and I'm thrilled to finally have a copy of my own that I can look at intricately and use for inspiration.My interest in Banksy had waned a little as his name became the 'in thing' to discuss so that everyone knew you were a little bit alternative, but his work speaks for itself and cannot (in my mind) be disputed. Not to mention his methods and motivations, which deserve respect for their integrity.Not to compare, but now when someone tries to show me how 'hip' they are by discussing Banksy, I can happily balance it with a few sentences from this book and lose the frustration.Don't let the hipsters fool you into thinking that Banksy buys into the cocktail bar bullshit. Have a few minutes with this book and you'll be reminded why he actually is a great artist who matters... and why he really doesn't matter at all.
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