A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, #2)

A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, #2) Details

TitleA Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 28th, 2002
PublisherBantam
ISBN-139780553381696
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, Epic Fantasy, Science Fiction Fantasy

A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, #2) Review

  • Cassy
    January 1, 1970
    This isn’t going to be a cutesy review. I am well into the third book. I fear that if I don’t blurt out my thoughts about this one soon, then all the books in the series are going to meld together in my memory. Here are my three main impressions:1. Bleak, dreary, and dismalDon’t expect any happiness in this book. Martin is merciless with his characters. And if you do see a bright light, don’t trust it. One character learned she won’t have to marry an abusive, horrible guy. She and I were elated. This isn’t going to be a cutesy review. I am well into the third book. I fear that if I don’t blurt out my thoughts about this one soon, then all the books in the series are going to meld together in my memory. Here are my three main impressions:1. Bleak, dreary, and dismalDon’t expect any happiness in this book. Martin is merciless with his characters. And if you do see a bright light, don’t trust it. One character learned she won’t have to marry an abusive, horrible guy. She and I were elated. Then someone pointed out that her ex-fiancé could still rape her as he desires and few would be able to stop him. Darn.2. Eeny, meeny, miny, moeIt occurred to me halfway through a big battle that I didn’t know who I was rooting for. The defender is a cruel king and has a tenuous claim to the throne, but I like a few of the characters in his castle and feared what would happen to them if they lose. The attacker would probably be a fair king, yet he is cold and distant. He has a better claim than most to the throne. However I doubt he could hold it for long. Precisely who did I want to win? It was not a problem of apathy. Martin drew the characters and politics so craftily that I just could not decide. Honestly, instead of picking, I sat back and enjoyed the twists and turns.3. Better keep up!The scope of the plot is ever-expanding. I give Martin kudos for having such a grand vision and keeping it all straight. I don't feel that any of the storylines are unnecessary (except, I hate to say it, maybe Arya’s). And I have complete faith that they will culminate in the most amazing way by the end of series. Yet it is inevitable that you will prefer some perspectives over others. I counted the pages in between Daenerys’ chapters – an average of 130 pages! And this is a middle book. There are no cliffhangers, but very little is resolved. If it is resolved, that means someone died. Unless they are only pretending to be dead, of course.I lied. One more point.4. Awesomeness
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  • Reynje
    January 1, 1970
    Instead of writing a review, I'm just going to post a list of the facial expressions I made while reading this book: However... I feel this one most accurately sums up A Clash of Kings:
  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    WINTERFELLLLLLL!!obey your nerds. is what i am learning.srsly - i was never going to read this series, but once i started... it is like a drug. and - yes - i watched season two before i read this book, but i am not going to wait for seasons 3-4 to read the next one, no way, because i am hooked and I MUST KNOW! and if any one of you people spoils the third book for me, i am going to make one of those torture devices with the bucket, the rat, and the torch, and it is bye-bye stomach for you!i see WINTERFELLLLLLL!!obey your nerds. is what i am learning.srsly - i was never going to read this series, but once i started... it is like a drug. and - yes - i watched season two before i read this book, but i am not going to wait for seasons 3-4 to read the next one, no way, because i am hooked and I MUST KNOW! and if any one of you people spoils the third book for me, i am going to make one of those torture devices with the bucket, the rat, and the torch, and it is bye-bye stomach for you!i see now why it takes him so long to write these things. this is the densest and more fully-realized world i have ever read. martin just plants these little seeds, and they sometimes take hundreds of pages to sprout but when they do - oh my word! and there are so many little details, so much backstory, so many overlaps and connections, and history and so much depth to this world. it feels so genuine. it is like my beloved donald harington - where he created an entire town full of people and then just set them loose and let them live their lives, and his touch is so light that it feels like he is just writing down his observances of them rather than creating them, because the mind simply reels at the idea that all of these details and tight storylines came from one person's mind. but with martin, the scope is so much bigger. and it kills me. there is just so. much. going on.i loved the second season. and i love how reading the book after the season really enhanced my enjoyment. most of the show is faithful to the book, but not as much as the first season/book. but one is not better than the other. i am sad that some of the book-things didn't make it into the show, and sad that some of the show-things were not in the book.but together - ahhhh - my brainheart is pleased.the characters whose stories changed the most from the book to the screen are (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)](??? it is almost entirely changed for the show)and (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]i mean, really - what could be better than every single one of these scenes:(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]so i was sad it was not in the book at all.and obviously, all his stuff:(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]cuz he isn't even in the book. robbed! (view spoiler)[oh my god, a pun!! (hide spoiler)]hmmm more thoughts...at first, i hated (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]because of his affectation-laden dialogue. but oh, man, did i ever come around. and now i want one for my very own.and who is a worse human being??(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]or (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]??i am still deciding, but i am rubbing my hands in glee in anticipation of just desserts. although martin's sense of justice is very specific and unpredictable. but a girl can dream.the book is by no means perfect. every time it got to one of (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]'s pov chapters, i was all zzzzzzzzzzzzz. because, obviously, the only perspective that matters is (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]who is great in the books, but somehow even better onscreen. and everything with(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]is wayyy better onscreen, and since she is one of my favorite actresses, i am glad she has a lot more to do than was written for her originally.and george r.r. martin...so that is hardly a book review, but there are a lot of reviews for this book and i am pretty much ordering you to go out and read these right now, so just do it and stop your backtalk. i leave you with this thought:and this one, because oh my god - what a perfect comparison that i somehow overlooked!twins!! my beloveds!now go read.oh, but p.s. - CHAINS!!!god i loved this book.come to my blog!
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  • Melissa Rudder
    January 1, 1970
    It was right about at the beginning of George R. R. Martin’s A Clash of Kings, the second book in his A Song of Ice and Fire series, that I admitted to myself that I wanted to quit my job and everything else in my life so I could stay home and read all day. I resisted the urge. I’m still not quite sure if I made the right decision.You think you know someone, and then you read the second book about her. (Or him. Though, for the most part, the changes of the hers were more exciting for me in this It was right about at the beginning of George R. R. Martin’s A Clash of Kings, the second book in his A Song of Ice and Fire series, that I admitted to myself that I wanted to quit my job and everything else in my life so I could stay home and read all day. I resisted the urge. I’m still not quite sure if I made the right decision.You think you know someone, and then you read the second book about her. (Or him. Though, for the most part, the changes of the hers were more exciting for me in this book. Minus the most clever and entertaining character to waddle through the pages of a fantasy book, who will go unnamed so I don’t spoil the fact that he lived through the first book. Okay, I may have given it away a little.) It’s not that the characters went through any unrealistic shifts; it’s just that Martin let us get to know them even better and we got to watch how they responded to new situations. Or at least I did. You may not have even read A Clash of Kings yet. Your loss. I think enjoyed the first book more because the slow corruption of an innocent and stable world interested me. But everything else that utterly enthralled me from the first book—the complex and endearing characters, the mystery and intrigue, the moments when honor, family, love, and pride all seem at odds with one another—was there in the second, and was amplified because, with each chapter, I grew more and more invested. Don’t start this series unless you’re ready to devote yourself to reading every published book of it. I don’t know what I’m going to do when I’ve finished the fourth book and have to sit around waiting for Martin to write and publish the rest. That will be a sad, sad day.Quotes! “Crowns do queer things to the heads beneath them.”“He who hurries through life hurries to his grave.” “A good lord comforts and protects the weak and helpless.”“When we speak of the morrow nothing is ever certain.” “Only a fool humbles himself when the world is so full of men eager to do that job for him.”"People often claim to hunger for truth, but seldom like the taste when it's served up.""There's no shame in fear... what matters is how we face it.""A man agrees with god as a raindrop with the storm.""When you tear out a man's tongue, you are not proving him a liar, you're only telling the world that you fear what he might say.""The best lies contain within them nuggets of truth, enough to give a listener pause.""Oh, to be sure, there is much we do not understand. The years pass in their hundreds and their thousands, and what does any man see of life but a few summers, a few winters? We look at mountains and call them eternal, and so they seem... but in the course of time, mountains rise and fall, rivers change their courses, stars fall from the sky, and great cities sink beneath the sea... Everything changes.""The unseen enemy is always the most fearsome."
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  • John Wiswell
    January 1, 1970
    If long Fantasy stories have fundamental rules, they probably go like this: 1) create a rich world, 2) put interesting characters in it, and 3) mix up some sequence of interesting things happening around them, happening to them, and being done by them. Martin’s first novel in this series, A Game of Thrones, fulfilled all three swimmingly. He forged one of the deepest Fantasy realms since Tolkien, with a mythology, culture and history. He spun characters of a few key families and then scattering If long Fantasy stories have fundamental rules, they probably go like this: 1) create a rich world, 2) put interesting characters in it, and 3) mix up some sequence of interesting things happening around them, happening to them, and being done by them. Martin’s first novel in this series, A Game of Thrones, fulfilled all three swimmingly. He forged one of the deepest Fantasy realms since Tolkien, with a mythology, culture and history. He spun characters of a few key families and then scattering them throughout that world and by the mid-point getting nearly all of them into some form of political, romantic or military intrigue. Active scenes illustrated the world and put it into motion, largely through political intrigue and the build to war.This second book takes a mallet to what the first set up, dulling and dumbing down the world and putting the majority of the characters into boring or redundant situations where they do not escape the inertia of wasted prose until the final third of the book. Where the slow build to great promise was acceptable in the first, the sharp drop into bleak and sluggish chapters here is deeply disheartening.Martin’s prose drops off noticeably. Fewer scenes generate atmosphere, and often it seems downright immature with sub-JK Rowling lines like, “The shame of that hurt worse than the pain, and the pain hurt a lot.” There is no language in this volume that rivals the blacksmith’s metallurgy or the dragon eggs in the first, leaving the thousand-page trek much less worthwhile.Plotting and pacing have suffered similar fates. The first book took a few hundred pages to get off the ground but then flew into character development and action divvied up between a dozen (or so) lives, giving us a sense of a full and cohesive world. The narrative is divvied up again here, but with different results. A couple of characters are in intense situations: one girl poses as a boy, heading to an army garrison with a questionable guide and the possibility of being attacked by the enemy at any time on her attempt to get home; and a young soldier has gone to the other side of “the wall” and is risking facing creatures and perils never written about in the span of his homeland’s culture. They should have this volume to themselves, but instead we spend the first half waiting to hear more about them while we watch other characters sneaking into whorehouses and chatting about freshman-level theology. It’s especially annoying to leave someone hiding from enemy troops so you can read about some guy we haven’t thought about for hundreds of pages is getting a blowjob (Martin’s approach to sex is perhaps more adolescent than in the first book, and definitely has less appealing placement). While the last third expands the number of useful and interesting roles, the book has far too many chapters that serve as dull blockades to worthwhile narrative. These low-action chapters are not artistic or particularly expressive of original opinions (The Song of Ice and Fire seems like a prime franchise to expand into semi-literary fiction), but rather fumbles over clichés of sadness, lust and nonsense that are all strikingly less immediate than the situations we leave to read about them. We do not need another conversation about how some form of magic or divinity can’t possibly be real. Five or six of them will suffice.It ties into a troubling sluggishness about this book. The first book ended on the verge of war with one major battle having ended. The second book ends on the very beginning of war, with a whole bunch of people arriving. It ends essentially on the same promise of future progress that the first did, and has so much unnecessary material that I couldn't help looking at my copy of A Storm of Swords, the 1,200-page third book, and wonder if it wasn’t bloated by the same problems. UPDATE: Storms of Swords conquered all expectations and was the best start-to-finish entry in the series so far. To read about what changed you can click here.It stings worse because the first book ended with so many promises – NEW READERS MAY WANT TO SKIP THIS PARAGRAPH. We ended on the revelation that dragons are real, and three fell into the hands of one of the most tragic characters. In this volume they spend 1,000 pages doing little more than eat as we’re informed that they’re weak and helpless, and serve only as an excuse for their owner to go to a couple of fancy places. The revelation of the undead in the first book is even more underdeveloped here. Even the other side of “the wall” turns out to not by a realm of nightmares or perils, but more barbarians and sad people – a nice literary point, but severely underwhelming in delivery. There were so many things to look forward to, but they don’t manifest.In short: Clash of Kings doesn't have much clashing and the kings do little of value. It would have been more aptly titled The Sadness of the People Who Aren’t Kings, but that wouldn’t have sold as well.
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  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Re-ReadI freaking finished it! I have to admit I have watched, well own the boxsets, of all the shows up to the current one. I can't watch is because I don't have HBO! But I digress. There really isn't much more that I can say that hasn't already been said etc and so on. I will just add a few excerpts and some pictures and some thoughts. That stuff. I love Jon Snow It seems like he didn't have much in the book. A few of the characters I love didn't have a lot of stuff going on in this book. But Re-ReadI freaking finished it! I have to admit I have watched, well own the boxsets, of all the shows up to the current one. I can't watch is because I don't have HBO! But I digress. There really isn't much more that I can say that hasn't already been said etc and so on. I will just add a few excerpts and some pictures and some thoughts. That stuff. I love Jon Snow It seems like he didn't have much in the book. A few of the characters I love didn't have a lot of stuff going on in this book. But they will be back. --->EXCERPT<---The Dothraki named the comet shierak qiya, the Bleeding Star. The old men muttered that it omened ill, but Daenerys Targaryen had seen it first on the night she burned Khal Drogo, the night her dragons had awakened. It is the herald of my coming, she told herself as she gazed up into the night sky with wonder in her heart. The gods have sent it to show me the way.I love Daenerys. --->EXCERPT<---Arya looked down at her ragged clothes and bare feet, all cracked and callused. She saw the dirt under her nails, the scabs on her elbows, the scratches on her hands. Septa Mordane wouldn't even know me. I bet Sansa might, but she'd pretend not to. "My mother's a lady, and my sister, but I never was.""Yes, you were. You were a lord's daughter and you lived in a castle, didn't you? And you. . . gods be good, I never. . ." All of the sudden Gendry seemed uncertain, almost afraid. "All that about cocks, I never should have said that. And I been pissing in front of you and everything, I. . .I beg your pardon, m'Lady."I love Arya :-)There really is no point in loving anyone in these books or shows because they all die! I found a lot of the book boring and drawn out. I guess when it's not about the people you really like it's sort of... yawn. I loved how most of the book was about Tyrion. Or it seemed that way to me. I Love Tyrion. Because Tyrion is too cool. and he does this ↓And Brienne finally arrives on the scene. I love her too :-) and Bran to all of you I have loved before and still love, you will all die and I will miss you and I will hate that episode and so forth and so on! and stop killing my damn wolves! MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List
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  • Mohammed Arabey
    January 1, 1970
    مات ملك، أنبثق 5 ملوك كل منهم يري إنه الملك الشرعي..وأنقسمت البلادهذا غير ملك قادم بجيشه من أرض الجليد، وملكة قادمة من وراء البحار بالتنانين والنارسبع ملوك في مملكة واحدة .. ماذا تتوقع أن يحدث؟صـــراع الــملــوكاﻷنشودة الثانية في أغنية الجليد والنار، إنشودة ملحمية لحروب الملوك علي عرشهم..وصراع اﻷبرياء للبقاء علي قيد الحياة في ظل لعبة الملوكلعبة العروشحيث 3 ملوك،خلفاء الملك السابق، أخويه وأبنه، يتصارعون علي عرش الممالك السبع..العرش الحديديو ملك ينصبه عشيرته ملك الشمالوأخر يعترض وينصب ملك الجزر ال مات ملك، أنبثق 5 ملوك كل منهم يري إنه الملك الشرعي..وأنقسمت البلادهذا غير ملك قادم بجيشه من أرض الجليد، وملكة قادمة من وراء البحار بالتنانين والنارسبع ملوك في مملكة واحدة .. ماذا تتوقع أن يحدث؟صـــراع الــملــوكاﻷنشودة الثانية في أغنية الجليد والنار، إنشودة ملحمية لحروب الملوك علي عرشهم..وصراع اﻷبرياء للبقاء علي قيد الحياة في ظل لعبة الملوكلعبة العروشحيث 3 ملوك،خلفاء الملك السابق، أخويه وأبنه، يتصارعون علي عرش الممالك السبع..العرش الحديديو ملك ينصبه عشيرته ملك الشمالوأخر يعترض وينصب ملك الجزر الحديديةوأخر منصب نفسه الملك وراء الجدار و ملكة وراء البحار تخطط لأستعادة عرش الممالك السبع كأجدادها..نفس العرش الحديديالعرش الذي أغتصبه الملك السابق من والدهاالأحــداث-----صراع ملحمي، بدأ بعد مصرع الملك روبرت بأحداث الجزء اﻷول ، مع أن شراراته بدأت قبل ذلك بشهور...منذ أكتشاف جون آرين مساعد الملك خيانة الملكة ، وأن أبناءه منها ليسوا من صلبه، وإنما من علاقتها اﻵثمة مع أخيها ، أي أن العرش ليس من حقه فهو ليس من صلب عائلة 'براثيون' وإنما في هذه الحالة هو ينتمي لمنزل 'لانيستر' منزل عائلة أمه الملكةلقد عرف إدارد ستارك الحقيقة باﻷنشودة اﻷولي "لعـبة العـروش"، ودفع ثمنها هو وأسرته غاليا كجون آرين المساعد السابقوالشخص اﻷخير الذي يعرف السر هو ستانيس باراثيون اﻷخ اﻷخر للملك روبرت ، وعليه نصب نفسه ملكا 'الملك في البحر الضيق' وسعي ليأخذ العرش الحديدي ، عرش الممالك السبع كأخيه الراحل وجهز جيشا ليستعد للأبحار عبر البحر الضيق لأحتلال 'أراضي الملك' فور أعلان جوفري براثيون ملكا وأمه الملكة سيرسي الواصية حتي يبلغ سن الرشد ويساعده في ذلك الكاهنة الحمراء...التي تتبع دينا غريبا عن الممالك السبع , دين "أله النور" والقلب المشتعلولكن هناك ملكا أخر 'الملك في هايجاردن' هو رينلي باراثيون ، اﻷخ اﻷصغر للملك الراحل، والذي يري أنه اﻷصلح بعد أخيه لتولي العرش بعدما عرف الحقيقة من ستارك قبل القبض عليه، وباﻷخص ﻷنه يحظي بجاذبية وشعبية لدي الكثير من الشعب واللوردات بعكس أخيه المتزمت ستانيس..والحق يقال انه يملك فعلا مقومات الملك الجذاب..فقط لا غير .. فهو يجد سعادته في تلك اللعبة .. لعبة العروشوهو أيضا بدأ يعد جيشا باﻷشتراك مع كثير من لوردات الجنوب للهجوم علي 'أراضي الملك' للجلوس علي العرش الحديدي بتحالفه مع "هايجاردين" تلك العائلة العريقة حيث أنه سيتزوج أبنتهما مارجريبينما علي العرش الحديدي أبن اخيهما المتوفي جوفري بارثيون والذي أثبت أنه من أكثر الشخصيات قسوة ووحشية بالرغم من أنه مجرد مراهقوهنا أخيرا نجد شئ من شرارة ثورة الشعب, ثورة الجياع في "اراضي الملك ,كينج لاندينج" علي الملك المراهق المشكوك في نسبه وأصلهثورة للاسف تخمدها حرس الملك..والحرب في صراع الملوك , في لعبة العروشوفي الوقت الذي فيه روب ستارك الذئب الصغير والذي أختاره سادة ولوردات الشمال لمنصب ملك الشمال يحارب بيت 'لانيستر' الذي يغزو ويغير علي قري وبلدان قرب الشمال 'وسط قارة ويستروس' ..قرر بولون جرايجوي ،سيد الجزر الحديدية المعروف عنه بالتمرد والخيانة,فقام بغارات علي قري وبلدان بالشمال في غياب روب ستارك لبلدان النهر ليدافع عنها ونصب نفسه ملك الجزر الحديديةأما في شمال الممالك السبع ، خلف الجدار الضخم بالشمال، فذهب الحرس الليلي ومن ضمنهم جون سنو للبحث عن عمه، والتحقيق في اﻷمور الغريبة التي تحدث وراء الجدار ليكتشف أن مانس رايدر الذي نصب نفسه ملك وراء الجدار يخطط ﻷمرا غامضا ، وضخماوأخيرا سنتابع رحلة دانيريس تارجيريان، اخر عائلة التنانين، صاحبة عرش الممالك السبع شرعيا ، في منفاها في الشرق فهي 'الملكة عبر البحار' ..ولكنها لتعود للويستروس والممالك السبع تحتاج لجيش، و سفن.. وليس فقط ثلاث تنانين وليدة...فهل ستجد من يقدم لها هذا في مدينة كارث العجيبة بالشرق؟-----------------------اﻷحداث هنا أكثر سخونه من الجزء اﻷول ولكنها أيضا اﻷكثر أرهاقا لكثرة اﻷسماء ووصف الحروب والمعارك والتحالفات... وكما أشرت في الريفيو اﻷول ، جورج آر آر مارتن مولع بالتفاصيل ودقة اﻷسماء ..والتاريخ والأساطير الخاصة بذلك العالم العجيب الذي أبتدعهلا أنكر أن الخطط الحربية كانت جيدة جدا، ولكنها مرهقة في القراءة ومتعددة ، الغارات التي تحدث أيضا وتحالفات اللوردات والسادة ، ناهيك عن أن اﻷسماء متشابهة بشكل رهيبوإذا ما قارنت بالمسلسل، فقد نجح المسلسل في كثير من اﻷختصارات التي بعضها كان يصلح ﻷن يحدث في الرواية دون الخلل بالقصة النهائية ، ججزء هارينهال وآريا ستارك ، وجزء ما بعد مقابلة الملك ستانيس والملك رينلي التي يرويها دافوسولكن دعنا نبدأ بمراجعة الشخصيات بالترتيب.. الشخصيات التي تطورت بشكل ملحوظ عن الجزء الأول , بأنخراطهم أكثر سواء بأرادتهم او رغما عنهم في .. لــعبة العــروش********************آريــا ستـارك~~~~~~~~~~~~نتابع رحلتها مع 'آيون' الحارس الليلي الذي ينقلها إلي الشمال لمدينتها ﻷنه كان يعرف والدها، متخفية كصبي مع مجندين جدد للحرس بجدار الشمال ... ولكن رحلتها تنقلب لمأساة عندما يغير عليهم جنود تابعين للانيستر ويأسروهم في هارينهول ، المدينة المحترقةبالرغم من طول هذا الجزء ، إلا أن رسم الشخصية كان ممتازا ، تطور آريا من فتاة شقية أبنة أحد النبلاء، إلي التخفي بهيئة صبي فقير ، وشعورها الطبيعي وسط الخطر إنها مجرد فأر مذعور أحيانا , ثم جراءتها وشجاعتها ثم العودة لمجرد فتاة صغيرة مذعورة ومن رعبها من مجرم خطير ثم التعاون معه بذكاء شديد فيما يخدم مصلحتها بل ومصلحة سادة الشمال..كل هذا جعل جزءها ثري، ومشوق حتي النهايةمن الشخصيات المثيرة هنا هو المجرم البافاروسي الغامض وهديته الساحرة 'فالار ماجوليس' والتي ستتعرف عليها بالأحداثهناك أيضا جريندي اﻷبن الغير شرعي للملك روبرت والذي لا يعرف أنه كذلك، وهوتباي ، فتي الفطائر ..وكيف هذه الشخصيات قد تفضل أن تكون أسيرة عن حريتها في وقت ما خلال اﻷحداث طالما ينعمون بسلام عوضا عن الهروب والحرية في ظل الحروبولكن آريا تعلم أن لا أحد يسلم خاصا في منتصف الصراع، صراع الملوك*************سانـسا ستارك~~~~~~~~~~~~الحالمة التي تعيش أصعب كوابيسها، أغنيتها التي تحولت لنشاز ، وعد كانت تظنه حلما بأنها ستكون زوجة جوفري الملك، صار كابوسا علي وشك التحققواﻷدهي أن جوفري صار أسوأ ألف مرة...باﻷخص بعد قرع ناقوس الحرب سواء من أعمامه ستانيس و رينلي ، أو من تمرد أخيها روب ملك الشمالمن الشخصيات المثيرة في هذا الجزء هو الكلب 'ساندور كاليجان' وهي شخصية معقدة ومثيرة جدا بنفس الوقت، وغامض جدا تجاهها ، فهو يثير فزعها وفي نفس الوقت ربما هو الوحيد في حرس الملك الذي يحاول حمايتهاوهناك أيضا الملكة سيرسي، وهنا قدم المؤلف أثنان من أقوي المشاهد بهذا الجزء، عندما جلست مع سانسا تحكي لها عن تحولها لأمرأه، الولادة ، اﻷمومة ، وعلمها بمشاعرها الحقيقية تجاه جوفريواﻷخر عندما وقعت 'كينج لاندينج' تحت الحصار كم أتمني أن يصير لسيرسي فصولا خاصة بهاولكن حتي سيرسي لم تختلف كثيرا عن سانسا في قلقها من صراع الملوك الذي قد يهدم حياتها وعرش أبنها في ظل لعبة العروش******************تايرون لانيستر~~~~~~~~~~~~هل منصب وكرسي يد 'مساعد' الملك مشؤم شؤم منصب مدرس الدفاع ضد فنون الظلام بهوجوارتس؟اﻷنشودة اﻷولي كان إيدارد ستارك يلعب هذا الدور بشرف وأخلاص...ونال ما نالهولكن تايرون هنا يلعبه بدهاء، دهاء ومكر سياسي، متخذا كل اﻷحتياطات، واضعا الملك والملكة الواصية، أخته، تحت المراقبة قدر المستطاع وفي نفس الوقت يحاول حمايتهم وحماية المملكة من الحرب القادمة من ستانيس و رينلي، بجانب المؤامرات المتعددة التي تعج ب'أراضي الملك' سواء من الداخل أو الخارج، فلا يعرف بمن يثقوضف فوق كل هذا ما سنراه ﻷول مرة هنا، ثورة الشعب ضد فساد الملك، ضد الفقر ، المطالبة بالعيشوبالرغم من قسوة ووحشية جوفري، إلا أن كراهية الشعب تنصب علي القزم أو 'العفريت' كما يطلقون عليه تارة 'القرد' تارة أخري ..هو أكثر من حاول حماية الشعب والمدينة نال النصيب اﻷكبر من الكراهيةأما الجانب العاطفي المعقد لديه فهو أيضا مكتوب بعبقرية ، وإن كان في بعض اﻷجزاء جنسيا، ولكنه أقل من أجزاء شخصيات أخري كما يعد أقل من المسلسلالشخصيات المثيرة بهذا الجزء، بجانب اﻷجزاء الممتازة مع سانسا، هي مرة أخري سيرسي، أخته التي تكرهه ولا تخفي ذلك، فتجد المشاهد بينهما كالقط والفأر ، ولكن المؤلف أيضا يذكرك في بعض المواقف أنها أخته في مشهد مؤثر وحيد بينهما الذي دار دون شجار أو خديعةلورد فاريس ، سيد الهمسات، العنكبوت المخصي، من الشخصيات ذات الحضور القوي بهذا الجزء ، كما كان مع نيد ستارك في أخر الجزء اﻷول، شخصية عميقة أيضا ومثيرةولكن هل مساعدات فاريس ستخدم تايرون وقت صراع الملوك الشرس هذا؟*************** بران ستارك~~~~~~~~~~~~في غياب أخيه الملك يجب أن يتعامل ك'لورد' وينترفيل، أو أميرها الصغير، ولكن صراعه الداخلي بأنه مكسور ، معاق عن المشي، يظل عائقا لهأعجبني تحول المؤلف في سرد هذا الجزء بين أفكار الفتي الصغير بران وبين أفكار ذئبه 'صيف' التي يشعر بها بران وقت حلمهالمشكلة هنا أن أعباء المحملة عليه كسيد الشمال ستزيد عندما يبدأ تمرد أحد الأبناء الغير شرعيين ﻷحد سادة الشمال "روز بالتون" وسبب مشاكل في بعض المدن بالشمال ، وأيضا تمرد ملك الجزر الحديدة وإغارة أبنه ثيون جرايجوي علي وينترفيلفي هذا الجزء سنري مصير وينترفيل في ظل تلك الصراعات , ومعاناة بران النفسية بالأخص في افتقاده لأخوته في مشهد مثير للشجن عندما كان في مأدبة مع سادة الشمال ,وحيدا دون باقي افراد اسرتهتذكر بران أخر مرة رأي والده يشرب من هذا الكأس في أحتفاللقد كان هذا في ليلة الأحتفال بقدوم الملك روبرت وحاشيته إلي وينترفيل. الصيف مازال قائما. والديه شاركا روبرت والملكة المائدة , مع أخويها. العم بينجامين كان هنا أيضا متشحا بالسواد. بران وأخوته جلسوا مع أبناء الملك, جوفري و تويمن والأميرة ميركيلا التي قضت وقت المأدبة تتأمل روب بنظرات أعجاب. آريا تعمل وجوه مضحكة عندما لاينظر أحد وسانسا تسمع بشغف لأغاني الشجاعة التي يغنيها المغني الأعلي للملك , وريكون ظل يسأل لماذا جون لم يأتي معهم حتي همس له أخيه مضطرا "لأنه أبن حرام" من الشخصيات المثيرة هنا هي شخصية من عائلة رييد التي تسكن المستنقعات، والذي هو و أخته وبمساعدة البربرية أوشا سيحاولا فتح عين بران علي موهبته العجيبة في الحلم والرؤية بعين ذئبه وماهو اكثر من ذلك كما تقول الأساطير مما أضاف لهذا الجزء شيئا من الغموض والسحر من تراث ذلك العالم العجيب ، عالم أغنية الثلج والنارفهل سيصمد هذا الفريق الضئيل عندما يبدأ الملوك صراعهم؟**************جـــون سـنـو~~~~~~~~~~~~قرر أخيرا مورمون قائد الحرس الليلي الذهاب وراء الجدار للتحقيق في أختفاء عم جون سنو 'بنجامين ستارك' والتحركات المريبة للبرابرة وهجرانهم للكثير من القري إما للشمال اﻷقصي أو التسلسل من الجدارهذا غير عودة الرعب من الموتي اﻷحياء كما ظهر باﻷنشودة اﻷوليوفي هذا الجزء نتابع رحلة جون سنو وزملائه من الحرس الليلي خلف الجدار بدرجة وصف المؤلف التي ستجعلك ترتعد من برودة هذا الجزء ومشاعر الترقب التي به حقا لمعرفه سر ترك البرابرة لقراهم خاوية ، وما يخططه ملك وراء الجدار...وخطر الموتي اﻷحياءمن الشخصيات المثيرة والتي تطورت بهذا الجزء هو سام تيلي ، البدين الجبان، والذي بالرغم من أنه كان أجبن الحرس الذي خرج في تلك الدورية خلف الجدار إلا أنه بمرور الوقت تزداد شجاعته شيئا ملحوظا بالرغم من أنخفاضها بشكل أكبر بين زملائه، خاصا عند الشعور بالقلق تجاه مخطط ملك ماخلف الجدار ..ذلك الملك الذي قد يتسبب في صراعات اكبر في صراع الملوك****************كاتـلـين ستارك~~~~~~~~~~~~تماما كالجزء الماضي، اﻷم ، الأبنة والزوجة -عذرا اﻷرملة- كمية مشاعر حزن تعتصر قلبها بأبتعادها عن بنتيها ولا تعرف حقيقة مصيرهما كأسري لانيستر في أراضي الملك، أنباء عن تمرد جرايجوي في الشمال بينما أبنيها الصغيران وحدهما في الشمال ، أبيها علي فراش الموت ، بينما أبنها ملك الشمال الذي ترافقه لا يروقه نصائحها ، ويسعي لأعطائها مهام تبعدها عنه ولو لبعض الوقت، فيرسلها للملك رينلي ليطلب منه طلب تحالف ضد آل لانيستر والملك جوفري ، العدو المشترك من الشخصيات المثيرة بهذا الجزء شخصية راينلي باراثيون الملك، حيث في جزئها فقط يظهر في بعض المشاهدراينلي شخصية محبوبة ولكنه مازال شاب صغير ، تقف كاتلين بينه وبين أخيه اﻷكبر ستانيس في صراع الملوك بينهما كلا يري أنه اﻷصلح ليكون ملكا...بينما هي -اﻷم- تحاول تذكيرهما إنهما أخوة -في مشهد ممتاز- ،ولا يصح أن يتقاتلا بينما العدو المشترك لهما مازال يضغي في الممالك السبع، ويراقب صراعهما بشماتة الشخصية الثانية هي بيرني من آل تارث ، فتاة ضخمة الجسد ومتجهمة الملامح ، متواضعة الجمال -لقب بيرني الجميلة يعد سخرية صريحة- وهي شخصية قوية لها أبعاد وجمال دفين، مخلصة جدا لرينلي الذي يبدو أنها تحبه من طرف واحد ولذلك ترجوه أن يوافق علي تعيينها كحرس شخصي له، و ترافق كاتلين وقت وجودها في هايجاردن لعرض التحالف مع رينلي، وهذا قبل تصاعد اﻷحداث في صراع الملوك************* ثيون جرايجوي~~~~~~~~~~~~أثناء مشاهدتي المسلسل أعتبرته الشخصية الكريهة اﻷكثر ، وبلا أي أثارة في نفس الوقت -بعكس جوفري مثلا فهو شخصية كريهة جدا ولكن مثيرة جدا تلك اﻷحداث التي يكون بها-شعرت كم هو بغيض، كريه ، حقود ، وشهواني جنسيا لدرجة مقززةوفوجئت عندما وجدت أنه من الشخصيات الجديدة التي أضيفت للكتاب في فصول خاصة من وجهة نظرة مع باقي الشخصيات التي نجت من الجزء الأولما الفرق بين شخصيته في المسلسل والكتاب؟الكتاب جعل في جزءه، والذي بالرغم من قلة عدد فصوله ولكنها أطول في الصفحات، كل المبررات الممكنة لكل الحقد، الكراهية ، البغضاء التي تعج بثيون جرايجوي -عدا اﻷجزاء الجنسية مازالت زائدة جدا عن الحد ومقززة كما بالمسلسل كما بالكتاب وربما أكثر من أي أجزاء أخري بالرواية والسلسلة نفسها- شخصية معقدة للغاية ، من ضيف, أو رهين لدي عائلة ستارك كما تراه عائلته إلي ضاغية جديد علي المدينة التي عاش بها أغلب حياته فقط من أجل الحقد, وأثبات لأبيه أنه ليس ضعيفاورسم المؤلف شخصيته بشكل يجعلك تشعر أن كل هذا مبررا ولكن المهم هنا كيف ستسير اﻷحداث بالنسبة له، هذا هو ما كان مثيرا فقط في جزء ثيون جرايجوي وأخته آشا وأبيه المتمرد ملك الجزر الحديدية كما نصب نفسه في خضم صراع الملوك***************ديـفــوس~~~~~~~~~~~~فارس البصل، بحار ومهرب سابق نصبه ستانيس باراثيون بلقب فارس بعد مساعدته في حصار اﻷعداء له منذ سنوات بقلعة 'ستورم إند' هو مساعد 'الملك' ستانيس ، وعين القارئ علي تلك الشخصية المتزمتة وخططها للإستيلاء علي العرش الحديدي ، عرش أخيه الراحل الملك روبرتالمثير في شخصية ديفوس أنه شخصية حتما ستجد ملامحها في الحياة في طبقات كثيرة، هو الجاهل أو الأمي الذي قد يكون له سوابق ولكنه تحول للشرف بعد عطف أحد اﻷسياد عليههو الرجل غير المتدين كليا ولكن يثير حفيظته بهجوم دين جديد -دين الآله الواحد آله النار- الذي تبناه سيده وقرر حرق رموز الآلهة السابقةاﻷب لسبعة أولاد يري تدرجهم وصعودهم في الحياة السياسية وتحول أحدهم أيضا للدين الجديد الذي يثير حفيظتهولكن من لا يستثار حفيظته عندما يري كاهنة هذا الدين، المرأة الحمراء، وأساليبها الشيطانية بأسم هذا الدينأساليب مظلمة ، يستعين بها سيده ، الملك ستانيس، في صراع الملوك**************************************************** دانـيريـس~~~~~~~~~~~~وفي الشرق نتابع رحلة دانيريس ، أكثر الشخصيات التي مرت بمراحل صعود و هبوط كثيرة. من أميرة ضعيفة منفية إلي خاليسي 'زوجة ملك، زعيم' لقبيلة همجية الي أرملة وبدون حتى مسكن سوي رفيقها المخلص سير جوراه هنا تذهب إلي مدينة كارث ، مدينة عجيبة يحكمها تجار ، نبلاء و سحرة تستضيفها المدينة ليس ﻷسمها، أو أعترافا منهم أنها الملكة الشرعية للممالك السبعة بالغرب، وإنما ﻷنها أم التنانين، فقط الثلاث تنانين الوليدة هي ما أثارت فضولهم..وأثارت أطماعهم أيضاما يميز جزء دانيريس في اﻷنشودة الثانية 'صراع الملوك' - والذي ليس بجمال جزئها باﻷنشودة اﻷولي- هو تطرق المؤلف لعجائب تاك المدن الشرقية ، والسحر بطريقة غامضة ومثيرة وتصل أحيانا لشئ من الرعبفالجزء الذي تلتلقي فيه دانيريس ببيت السحرة مثلا ملئ بالترقب، الرعب و النبوءات العجيبة مع ملامح من الماضي عن أببها، والملك المجنونبل وعن أغنية الجليد والنار والتي تذكر في السلسلة ﻷول مرة بهذا الجزء ، ولا نعرف حتي اﻷن ماهي بالظبطبما لا يكون جزئها هنا بقوة الجزء الخاص بها في الأنشودة الأولي ولكنه مازال يعج بالعجائب والشخصيات المثيرة ونظرية عجيبه عن السحر والتنانينو يعتبره المؤلف فرصته للتجول في خريطة عالمه العجيب نحو الشرق بعيدا عن الغرب وصراعات الملوك بهولكن لا تنس أن خطتها الأساسية بعد أن ينمو تنانينها الثلاث هي العودة إلي الغرب..لتستعيد عرشها ..العرش الذي يلعب عليه الجميع لعبة عروشهم-----------------النهاية*******جزء حافل بالأحداث والصراعات والعجائبتطورات للشخصيات ورحلات مرهقة تنتظرهم للنجاة من ذلك الصراع الدمويقد يكون تقييمي للرواية أقل قليلا من الجزء السابق لكن فعلا شعرت بمدي التفاني في تقديم قصة وعالم محكم, يحاكي صراعاتنا السياسية وحكوماتنا الجشعة التي لا تفكر سوي في لعبة المناصبلعبة العروشوإلي ريفيو الجزء الثالثمحمد العربيمن 30 مارس 2015إلي 15 أبريل 2015
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  • mark monday
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone seems to agree that George R.R. Martin and A Song of Ice and Fire are titans in the genre of Epic Fantasy. True, true. Everyone also seems to agree that the best characters are Tyrion, Arya, and Jon Snow. They are indeed wondrous characters. They are heroes. They fail many times, but in a way they are infallible: they are so incredibly sympathetic, they are always trying to do the right thing, they have kindness & empathy & bravery & loyalty. In fact nearly every voice in th Everyone seems to agree that George R.R. Martin and A Song of Ice and Fire are titans in the genre of Epic Fantasy. True, true. Everyone also seems to agree that the best characters are Tyrion, Arya, and Jon Snow. They are indeed wondrous characters. They are heroes. They fail many times, but in a way they are infallible: they are so incredibly sympathetic, they are always trying to do the right thing, they have kindness & empathy & bravery & loyalty. In fact nearly every voice in the first two novels is of this type: the HERO. Sansa is one exception – however she is a victim, and I found her perspective to be very uncomfortable. But I found the tale of the novel’s other non-hero, barely even an anti-hero, to be particularly compelling: Theon Greyjoy. You’re the bomb, Theon.The kid is an asshole, a smug and irritating asshole. He thinks he’s smarter than everyone else. He makes plans upon plans that seemed based entirely around the idea that because he is thinking these thoughts, they will no doubt occur. He is arrogant beyond belief. He has an annoying, self-pleased smirk whenever another character describes him. He is a rough sex-loving womanizer and he strings girls along. In the first novel, he kicks around a decapitated head like a soccer ball.Favorite Theon part: getting a blowjob while thinking about how awesome his future successes will be. And then he climaxes as he considers how his great deeds will even overshadow those of his dear old dad. What a self-absorbed asshole! I couldn't help but laugh out loud.And yet he has positive qualities too, he’s no cardboard cut-out. He has guilty feelings of loyalty. He is brave and quick-thinking and is no kiss-ass. His rapid response time saves a child's life. Unlike his men, he doesn’t enjoy cruelty or barbarism and actively stops their occurrence. He is thwarted repeatedly and never lets that stop him. He sees no point in the grim vendettas of the old. He is not, as they say, “all bad”. In Theon, perhaps the nurture of the Starks has had some slight impact on the nature of the Greyjoys.I really appreciate that Martin included Theon’s voice because honestly, reading wall-to-wall heroic perspectives is enough to make me want to cut some throats. Theon is an asshole, but he’s the kind of guy I’d love to get a beer with, shoot the shit, and enjoy his various mean-spirited bitching and self-absorbed plans of conquest. He is seriously imperfect, quite unlike most of the other voices in the tale.
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  • Candace
    January 1, 1970
    Whew! Another one down. These have got to be some of the longest audiobooks that I've ever listened to. Yet, despite the length, I cannot pull myself away from this series. I am completely hooked on this sordid and gory saga.The second book in the series, 'A Clash of Kings' picks up the story and submerges readers in action and adventure. With all of the new kings coming forward to lay claim to different lands and all of the battles, I found myself again, lost at times. There are so many moving Whew! Another one down. These have got to be some of the longest audiobooks that I've ever listened to. Yet, despite the length, I cannot pull myself away from this series. I am completely hooked on this sordid and gory saga.The second book in the series, 'A Clash of Kings' picks up the story and submerges readers in action and adventure. With all of the new kings coming forward to lay claim to different lands and all of the battles, I found myself again, lost at times. There are so many moving parts and so many characters that it was hard to keep track of everything at times.Although the storyline continues to be very complex and multifaceted, I have immensely enjoyed the evolution of the storyline and characters. Tyrion especially has grown on me, in spite of his horrible family. He seems to be the only one in his family that isn't entirely despicable. Thank goodness that he is doing damage control or his wicked sister and her depraved spawn would bathe the streets in blood.With Robb growing his army day by day, he is getting closer to avenging the death of Eddard. Deals are made that will, no doubt, prove to be influential later in the story. In truth, I'm growing a bit impatient waiting for him to storm Joffrey's castle. Meanwhile, with multiple stories running parallel to one another, I have been completely absorbed in this book, waiting for the next little piece of each story. Dani and her dragons find themselves in a perilous situation. There are huge changes in Winterfell with Bran. New kings are coming out of the woodwork. Arya struggles to survive under the guise of an orphan boy. Things that go bump in the night are proving dangerous near the north wall. Without a doubt, there is plenty of danger and adventure to keep your head spinning.Overall, I continue to be engrossed in this epic tale. It is brutal and grim, but I'm loving every minute. The narration is done superbly, but it is still a tough audiobook for me to follow. There are just so many moving parts with this story that I've had to rewind a few times to keep up with what is going on. I highly recommend this series to anyone that loves action/adventure. I'm on to book 3 now.
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  • Bookdragon Sean
    January 1, 1970
    This is the Imp’s hour; this is the Imp’s book. Forget about Dany, and forget about Jon Snow because this is the book where we get to see the true quality of Tyrion Lannister. Tyrion is my favourite character in this series, so I’m somewhat biased in my review. For me, he is the most unique, and original, character that George R.R Martin has written. He is wise beyond his years and has developed an acute perception of things; he knows his own place in the world and he knows exactly what it is. I This is the Imp’s hour; this is the Imp’s book. Forget about Dany, and forget about Jon Snow because this is the book where we get to see the true quality of Tyrion Lannister. Tyrion is my favourite character in this series, so I’m somewhat biased in my review. For me, he is the most unique, and original, character that George R.R Martin has written. He is wise beyond his years and has developed an acute perception of things; he knows his own place in the world and he knows exactly what it is. Instead of letting it destroy him, like a lesser man would, he uses it to his advantage. He is often overlooked and drastically underestimated by his family, and players of the game, so when he is thrust into the role of King’s hand he does incredibly well, much to the dismay of all. This surprises no other more than Tyrion himself. So far he has been given no real opportunity to show the world what he is actually capable of, and when his chance comes he seize it and even comes to relish it. In this, we get to see the worth of the man. He is much more beyond the silver tonged drunkard he initially appeared to be; he is a man of great compassion, but also one who can be ruthless when he has to be. He learns to play the game, and he learns quickly to become its master. If you look further beyond that you get to see a man who is as fragile as he is wise. But, as ever, he has learned to prevent that from becoming his weakness. He has learnt that love is a necessary facet for man, and he has learnt to use it to his advantage. He loves but one man, his brother Jaimie. No harm can come from that as there is small chance of losing the master swordsman. His lover he keeps in secret so his enemies don’t use her against him; thus, he is not weakened by his need for love in the face of constant rejection. He hides his only weakness.Through all this Tyrion plays the game with a steady hand and take no chances. He learns to succeed over the other schemers and solidifies his place at court. And, if that isn’t enough, he does all this without losing his good nature whilst being in the company of snakes. Indeed, it is only because of his nature and a practical form of honour, that Ned Stark completely lacked, does he do so well in the most dangerous city in Westeros. Well, at least until his farther shows up. Tyrion is great character, and is reason enough to love this series. He is hilarious, wise and brave, but at the same time one of the book’s biggest victims. His revenge thus far has been bitter sweet. I do hope he gets the ending he deserves. A Song of Ice and Fire 1. A Game of Thrones- A life chnaging five stars2.A Clash of Kings- An Impish five stars3. A Storm of Swords - A Lannister loving five stars 4. A Feast for Crows - A flat 3.5 stars
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  • Etnik
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and more about this book on my blog!I HAVE NO WORDS,just as the first one,perfection.After Game of Thrones ending,with the head on the spike and the naked mother of dragons with her dragons in her body,you can imagine my level of excitement.I recall reading this in 6 days,and I am proud about that.For my opinion the first one was better than this,but still this one was almost as enjoyable as the first.My favorite is Daenerys Targaryen,I just like to read about her an You can find the full review and more about this book on my blog!I HAVE NO WORDS,just as the first one,perfection.After Game of Thrones ending,with the head on the spike and the naked mother of dragons with her dragons in her body,you can imagine my level of excitement.I recall reading this in 6 days,and I am proud about that.For my opinion the first one was better than this,but still this one was almost as enjoyable as the first.My favorite is Daenerys Targaryen,I just like to read about her and the cities she goes.She is a badass hot character and you know I am a sucker for that.The scene with Unsullied was kind of predictable,but still awesome.Also in this one I started to like Jamie,I don't know,I just don't care about the incest anymore,and I am glad I got to see him more as a own character because in the King's Landing he was always in the shadow of Cercei.And the ending,like what the hell was that,the white walkers? I must admit,I got a Walking Dead vibe there.I thought Winter coming would bring like Giants as high as the Night's Watch wall with spikes and stuff,but white walkers in horses? That was like the excitement for Hangover 3(if you know what I mean),but still I am so deep in this series,I can't wait to read the next book(Already read it)*grins* Okay so you what you get from reading this: My favorite thing ever:A great cool character that is totally awesome and cool:The person you always wanted to kill:The second person you always wanted to kill:Dragons:Arya freaking Stark:More Daenerys:I can't recommend this enough:)
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  • Kai
    January 1, 1970
    “Crowns do queer things to the heads beneath them.”So. Many. Pages. But I did it! It was a great read, but less satisfying than A Game of Thrones . I'm not entirely sure why, but I think the many Kings and their battles were a little tiring.So here are the many POVs, starting with the chapters I liked the most down to the ones I didn't:Tyrion - Unexpected turns, witty and intruigingDaenerys - New unknown lands and strange magic, dragons!Arya - Danger, Jaqen H'ghar, and many different facesSansa “Crowns do queer things to the heads beneath them.”So. Many. Pages. But I did it! It was a great read, but less satisfying than A Game of Thrones . I'm not entirely sure why, but I think the many Kings and their battles were a little tiring.So here are the many POVs, starting with the chapters I liked the most down to the ones I didn't:Tyrion - Unexpected turns, witty and intruigingDaenerys - New unknown lands and strange magic, dragons!Arya - Danger, Jaqen H'ghar, and many different facesSansa - King's Landing's games and intruiges and Sansa struggling to keep her head upCatelyn - Tired of her sorrow, but loved the parts with Brienne and RenlyJon - Love Ghost, like Halfhand and Sam, annoyed by winter and coldBran - Again: love the Direwolves, like Osha, Jojen and Meera but just not interested in BranSer Davos - Melisandre is the only interesting thing in those chaptersTheon - Vain stupid little dipshit only thinking with his cockFind more of my books on Instagram
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    While reading A Clash of Kings for the second time, it struck me that George R.R. Martin makes writing fantasy seem insultingly effortless. At first glance, Martin hardly bothers to do more than sketch his characters, yet they become legends so quickly.For example, Quorin Halfhand is a brother in the Night's Watch. He eats an egg and has perhaps five lines, but he is a character that readers will find difficult to forget. Why is he called "halfhand?" Well, he lost all but the thumb and an index While reading A Clash of Kings for the second time, it struck me that George R.R. Martin makes writing fantasy seem insultingly effortless. At first glance, Martin hardly bothers to do more than sketch his characters, yet they become legends so quickly.For example, Quorin Halfhand is a brother in the Night's Watch. He eats an egg and has perhaps five lines, but he is a character that readers will find difficult to forget. Why is he called "halfhand?" Well, he lost all but the thumb and an index finger of his right hand and had to learn to fight with his left hand. They say he's even more dangerous with a sword now than he was before. What about Roose Bolton? He's the lord of the Dreadfort, he uses leeches to purify his blood, and his sigil is a flayed man. He speaks quietly but no one dares to defy him. Behold.Usually characterization has to be done well to create a memorable character, but all Martin needs to do is come up with a nickname, a slogan, and a sigil. Maybe a cool sword or a notorious deed.Like it or lump it, it's tough to forget these characters.Martin also has a talent for architecture. Here's how long it takes Martin to transform Lord Balon Greyjoy's distant castle into the coolest keep in Westeros:Drear, dark, forbidding, Pyke stood atop those islands and pillars, almost a part of them, its curtain wall closing off the headland around the foot of the great stone bridge that leapt from the clifftop to the largest islet, dominated by the massive bulk of the Great Keep. Farther out were the Kitchen Keep and the Bloody Keep, each on its own island. Towers and outbuildings clung to the stacks beyond, linked to each other by covered archways when the pillars stood close, by long swaying walks of wood and rope when they did not.I would rather not see Pyke in a movie if only so that I could continue to remember it as I imagine it now. In fact, I find that I have carried these characters and castles with me since I first read this story ten years ago.It's easy to get caught up in the Tyrion's intrigues and Jon Snow's adventures, but even Arya's scrappy determination to exact revenge on everyone that has wronged her makes for a compelling storyline. Each night, Arya recites a list of villains that have wronged her, ranging from the Lannisters to Ser Gregor Clegane to Raff the Sweetling. After Arya rescues Jaqen H'ghar and his two companions from certain death, he declares that he will kill any three people she names to even the stakes. Could he kill King Joffrey in King's Landing? Jaqen explainsSpeak the name, and death will come. On this morrow, at the turn of the moon, a year from this day, it will come. A man does not fly like a bird, but one foot moves and then another and one day a man is there, and a king dies.Arya is a courageous underdog, but perhaps the best part of her story is that she always attracts memorable mentors. Jaqen H'ghar is neither the first nor the last of Arya's guides, but like Syrio before him and (view spoiler)[Sandor Clegane (hide spoiler)] after, he is impossible to forget.It just doesn't seem fair that Martin is able to come up with so many great characters, and it seems criminal that he introduces and dismisses them so callously.So I was happy to notice upon re-reading A Clash of Kings that Martin's seemingly effortless world building and characterization are largely due to a carefully structured series of revelations. Quorin is only impressive because of the many ways he stands out amongst the Night Watch's rangers. He is clean shaven, well mannered, and surprisingly loyal to the Wall's mandate. Roose Bolton is not just a strange lord with leeches: there are legends that the Starks once lost a battle to one of their bannermen -- who not only killed the Stark but also wore his skin as a cloak. Pyke isn't just a castle in the sea. It took the might of the realm to put down the Greyjoy rebellion. Jaqen H'ghar isn't just a strange man. Daenerys was betrayed by a maegi in the first novel that had occult knowledge that is tantalizingly similar to Jaqen's. Clearly, there is a great deal of thought that goes into these novels.Thank goodness. The first time I read A Clash of Kings, I was struck by the hypocrisy of Westeros' ideals. Perhaps history teaches us that power and wealth shape our lives more than ideals and principles. So A Clash of Kings is sometimes quite depressing. However, this time, it struck me that talent counts for little without hard work, and I find that encouraging.
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  • Charlotte May
    January 1, 1970
    "Power resides where men believe it resides. No more and no less."If A Game of Thrones was the introduction to the characters, setting the scene for the later trials and conflicts; then A Clash of Kings is the angrier, battle fuelled brother. Four men strive to take the Iron Throne from the newest King currently sat on it. All the while Daenerys is over in the east with her Khalasar looking for ships and growing more famous as the Mother of Dragons day by day. We are introduced to the new religi "Power resides where men believe it resides. No more and no less."If A Game of Thrones was the introduction to the characters, setting the scene for the later trials and conflicts; then A Clash of Kings is the angrier, battle fuelled brother. Four men strive to take the Iron Throne from the newest King currently sat on it. All the while Daenerys is over in the east with her Khalasar looking for ships and growing more famous as the Mother of Dragons day by day. We are introduced to the new religion of The Lord of Light, powered by Red Priestesses who strike fear into even the strongest of hearts. "For the night is dark and full of terrors."All the characters have moved on from their previous location - for good or for bad. The entire Stark family is separated. New loyalties are created while old ones are destroyed. Fights are begun, and won. But this is only the beginning. "A day will come when you think yourself happy, and suddenly your joy will turn to ashes in your mouth and you'll know the debt is paid"The Lannisters still hold Kings Landing but for how much longer? A Song of Ice and Fire is the only series to continually shock me. We never know what is around the next corner. Who will still be alive in the places where everyone is out for them and theirs. "If you step in a nest of snakes, does it matter which one bites you first?"As if I could give any less than 5 stars! Outstanding fantasy and world building. An entire host of characters who drift in and out of importance as it goes on. I am entranced. The magic just gets better and better. "Valar Morghulis"
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  • Issa Deerbany
    January 1, 1970
    بعد ان اصبح هناك عدة ملوك. اصبح عددهم يقل تدريجبا..صراع رهيب باسلوب مشوق. ممالك تسقط واخرى تقوم وما زال الصراع محتدما.مصير عائلة ستارك اصبح مجهولا بعد تشتت العائلة.من اروع روايات الخيال ومتحمس لقراءة الجزء الثالث"عاصفة السيوف"
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    It’s been a long time since I’ve read a series of books. When I was a kid, my dad read The Hardy Boys before my brother and I went to sleep. That was a nice bedtime ritual; so nice we never had the heart to tell him The Hardy Boys sucked. A little bit later on, I worked my way through The Berenstain Bears, which taught me not to watch too much T.V., get greedy, or talk to strangers. Oddly enough, it taught me to trust bears, which is probably not the best message to impart to an impressionable c It’s been a long time since I’ve read a series of books. When I was a kid, my dad read The Hardy Boys before my brother and I went to sleep. That was a nice bedtime ritual; so nice we never had the heart to tell him The Hardy Boys sucked. A little bit later on, I worked my way through The Berenstain Bears, which taught me not to watch too much T.V., get greedy, or talk to strangers. Oddly enough, it taught me to trust bears, which is probably not the best message to impart to an impressionable child. During my elementary school years, I followed the travails of The Boxcar Children, which spoke to the inner desire each of us has to make our home in an abandoned freight train. Sometime around book sixteen, however, I realized that The Boxcar Children had morphed into waspy version of Scooby Doo. Oh, those spoiled rich kids stumbled on another mystery? Joy! Call me up when the mystery centers on Benny’s kidnapping. In middle school and early high school, I went through a strong techno-thriller phase, mainly centered on Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan series. I remember a summer vacation in which I wouldn’t leave the car because I wanted to find out what happened next in The Sum of All Fears. Then, inexplicably, Jack Ryan became president of the United States, and my love affair with Tom Clancy ended.And so did my love of series in general.The years have come and gone, and with them many popular series. I have ignored them all. I’ve never read of that boy wizard, or that moping teen vampire, or that girl with that tattoo. I’m not against series in general, it’s just that most series sound incredibly dumb. They’re repetitive and formulaic and predictable and generally tiresome.On the other hand, the small part of me that is still young at heart remembers what it was like to be in the grip of a long, unfolding story, to finish one volume and eagerly dive into the next, to spend countless hours with characters so that you knew them almost as family. It’s a feeling I hadn’t had in a long while: the feeling of being compelled to read. To put aside all the other obligations of life, like my job, or paying bills, or crafting wry Facebook status updates, or drinking heavily, or playing video games, or doing anything else, and I mean that literally: anything. My childhood self would want to beat up my adult self for ignoring all the things that my adult self can do, including the booze, the PS3 video games, and that other stuff; then again, my childhood self never read a book as kickass as A Game of Thrones. When I picked up George R.R. Martin’s Thrones, the first installment in his Song of Ice and Fire cycle, I had tempered expectations. I’d been tricked by geeks before. The novel, however, lived up to all its hyperbolic billing. As I neared the end, I decided I would order the second book. Eventually, I thought, I’d get around to reading it. But a strange thing happened. As soon as I actually finished Thrones, I realized I wanted to read A Clash of Kings immediately. Right away. Like, two minutes ago. It was an intense feeling, a strange gripping sensation. I tried to read a novel by Stuart O’Nan, but it was too slim and precise. I tried to read Ron Chernow’s biography on George Washington, but all I wanted to do was learn more about the Mad King Aerys Targaryen. I was hooked. Obsessed. Addicted. I was a kid again. Except I got to read about incest and eviscerations and there was talk of woman-breasts and turkey legs…Hell, it was better than being a kid. Unfortunately, Amazon was slower than I anticipated. I started suffering withdrawal symptoms. I started refusing to eat anything that wasn’t skewered. I would only take liquids from a flagon. When I lost a trial, I muttered under my breath that the American court system was nothing but a mummer’s farce. I pulled out a sword that I’d purchased at a long ago renaissance fair (and which had been packed away pursuant to my marriage contract) and pretended that I was Syrio Forel. I finally understood what all those internet nerds were complaining about: if I had to wait years between books, rather than days, I’d probably go a little crazy too (still, I wouldn’t hole up in my mom’s basement in my pajamas and curse on the internet all day). Finally, the book came. I started reading. Life returned to normal. I began eating things like spaghetti, which cannot be consumed on a stick. I drank water from the tap, rather than pouring it into a flagon. I stopped saying words like “mummer” and put away my blunt-edged sword. I didn’t have time for swordplay or flagons or anything else. I had A Clash of Kings to read. At first it was like a wineskin full of ice cold water on my white hot expectations. A Clash of Kings has a slow, unsteady beginning, partially because its prologue introduces unfamiliar characters in an unfamiliar setting (that setting being the castle of Stannis Baratheon). Even when we get back to our heroes from the first book, it took some time for things to pick up the pace. It was as if Martin needed time to warm up and find his stride.But I’m getting ahead of myself. Before I levy any criticism, I should say a word on the plot, so that the criticism might make sense. So the plot: there’s a lot of it. Also, since you’re reading a review of Book II, I’m going to assume you’ve read Book I. Accordingly, there will be spoilers about Book I, while I will do my best to avoid any spoilers about Book II. (On a side note, I’ve managed to spoil the surprises in Book I and III already. The lesson is: stay away from Google. There is a definite downside to having every bit of information in the world at your fingertips). When A Game of Thrones ended, King Baratheon had died, the Hand of the King Ned Stark was executed, and Joffrey, the bastard son of brother-sister tandem Jaime and Cersei Lannister, was king of Westeros. Soon, everyone else is clamoring to be king as well. Robert’s older brother and younger brother, Stannis and Renly, both claim the throne, as do Robb Stark and Balon Greyjoy. Meanwhile, Ned Stark’s young daughter Arya, the insufferable tomboy from Thrones, is led north by the ranger Yoren, disguised as a boy joining the Night’s Watch. Arya’s dimwitted sister Sansa is held captives by the Lannisters, and is subjected to brutal torments at the hand of Joffrey. In Stannis-land, the smuggler-turned-knight Davos watches uncertainly as his king falls under the spell of a priestess who serves a Lord of Light. Theon Greyjoy, the Stark’s ward from Thrones, returns to the land of his father, in preparation for an invasion of the north. All the while, the widowed wife of Khal Drogo, Daenerys, wanders the desert with her dwindling band of blood-riders and three dragons (yeah, now there are dragons).I suppose I could also mention that Tyrion Lannister, the crafty dwarf, is sent to King’s Landing to be Joffrey’s Hand, and that he brings his lady friend Shae and his sullen sell-sword Bronn. There’s also goings-on in the far north, where Jon Snow and the Night’s Watch go beyond the Wall on a massive ranging expedition. I could keep going – literally, that summary barely scratches the surface – but my fingers are starting to tire. Also I’m starting to confuse myself. Really, you don’t need to remember all this stuff. Martin does a good job reminding you of the importance of the major characters, and gives you little nudges that help you recall all the many ways these people intertwine. Besides, after awhile, the cumulative effect of thousands of pages spent with these characters and on the history of Westeros seeps into your subconscious. I can now recall a surprising amount of information about the bloodlines of the dragon kings. Unfortunately, I’ve forgotten how to do calculus. As with Thrones, Kings is written in the third-person limited style, with alternating chapters from the viewpoint of nine characters, not including the prologue. These nine characters are: 1. Tyrion Lannister, known as the Imp. He is Martin’s star creation, a wry, winking, crafty man with a penchant for wine and women. His many shadings keeps you guessing as to whether he is ultimately hero or villain, and his wryness leavens the pomposity of the proceedings; 2. Catelyn Stark, Ned Stark’s widow. She is predictable, dull, unimaginative, and hopelessly self-righteous, just like her husband. It’s a bit odd, and oddly refreshing, to read a novel in which the putative heroes are actually quite unlikeable; 3. Davos Seaworth, who unsurprisingly spends a lot of time on the sea (some of the surnames in Kings are hilariously on the nose, and I don’t mean that as a compliment). Seaworth serves King Stannis Baratheon and is our entrée into his castle, though he spends a limited time around him; 4. Sansa Stark, the eldest daughter of Ned Stark. She is betrothed to Joffrey and held captive in King’s Landing. Of all Martin’s characters, she is the flimsiest. The low archetype of a damsel in distress, hopelessly out of her depths, waiting for a knight to save her, and without two original thoughts in her head; 5. Arya Stark, Ned Stark’s younger daughter. She spends much of the book making her way north with a band of suspect recruits for the Night’s Watch. I found her character a massive yawn in Thrones; here, however, her adventures actually life Kings out of the doldrums; 6. Bran Stark, the crippled son of Ned. Bran was self-pitying and frankly boring in Thrones. Here, he starts to evolve as his dream life and his real life begin to merge; 7. Jon Snow, the bastard of Ned, who is a brother of the Night’s Watch. He is part of a large ranging expedition to find out what’s going on north of the Wall. I like Jon’s sections because they are stripped of all the tiresome backstabbing and squabbling in the south. Up north, it’s all about wildlings and wolves and the walking dead. In other words, the fun stuff; 8. Theon Greyjoy, former ward of the Stark family, who decides to strike back at Winterfell when his father invades the north. His character is a dread chore to follow. Martin’s decision to make him a central character in Kings is one of the few times I felt that Martin bowed to the exigencies of plot, rather than allowing his plot to flow organically from the characters; and 9. Daenerys, the heir to the Stormborn dynasty, former kings of Westeros. At the end of Thrones, she gave birth to three dragons, in what was a fascinating, over-the-top, what-the-f**k just happened kind of scene. I understand that there are a lot of Daenerys-backers out there; I’m not one of them. Her story seems to take place in an entirely different novel and I find it distracting. It also doesn’t help that with the exception of Theon, who only comes to the fore in Kings, and Sansa, who is a waste of space, Daenerys is the most underwritten character in A Song of Ice and Fire. Nothing about her even hints that she is a human being, with human motivations or human tendencies. Rather, she has a novelistic motivations and novelistic tendencies. (Did Martin really need another person with a centuries-long grudge pining for revenge?) The alternating viewpoints serve an important purpose by defining the boundaries of the story and limiting its scope. Without confining the novel to nine narrators, the plot would simply explode like an overloaded blender. I totally understand why Martin has chosen to craft A Song of Ice and Fire in such a matter. That being said, the structure has severe drawbacks. I first noticed these drawbacks in Thrones, but I was so dazzled I didn't really care. In Kings, they become more noticeable. As is often the case, once I started noticing, I couldn’t stop. First off, let it be said that A Song of Fire and Ice is filled with awesome characters. In Thrones, I loved the bluff and blustery King Robert, the sly, ever-shifting Varys, the charismatic Kingslayer, Jaime Lannister, and the silver-tongued Baelish. In Kings, some of these surviving characters, such as Varys, have important roles. Others, such as Jaime Lannister, almost disappear. Meanwhile, new characters spring up in supporting roles. My favorite was the mysterious shape-shifter named Jaqen H’ghar, who speaks in the third person and is very particular in the promises he makes. Unfortunately, the best characters, the ones who glitter with the most wit and inventiveness, disappear for long periods of time. In their place we are stuck with the nine men, women, and children chosen by Martin to convey his epic tale. Of these nine, there are some serious liabilities. Sansa, who spends the whole book as a captive, is a cipher. In the first book she was in love with Joffrey because the plot forced her to be in love with Joffrey, so that she would have a motivation to unwittingly betray her father. In the second book, she’s no longer in love, but she’s just as dimwitted. She keeps getting beaten for saying stupid things, but that doesn’t stop her from continually saying stupid things. Of course, you could argue that Sansa is just acting as any thirteen year-old child. In which case, I have to wonder, why did Martin feel the need to overpopulate his narrators with children? It’s like a blood-soaked The Chronicles of Narnia out there. You want to know what’s interesting about kids? Nothing. Nothing is interesting about kids. I don’t want to hear about your kids on Facebook, and I don’t want to read about them in novels. Sansa is every lame teenager you’ve ever met, except here, we’re supposed to care deeply about her fate, and how it will effect Westeros. I’ve already mentioned my problems with the character of Catelyn Stark. It’s not that she’s poorly written. I just don’t like her. I don’t like her for the same reason that I didn't like Ned Stark. Simply put, self-righteous heroes bore the hell out of me. And then there is Theon. What to say about Theon? Well, there is an extended Oedipal-like sequence in which Theon unknowingly flirts with his sister and entertains detailed sexual fantasies about her while riding with her to his father’s castle. That’s about all there is to say about Theon. It’s these people, not the Kingslayer or Varys or Jaqen H’ghar, that we spend the bulk of our time with. These character deficits are underscored by my increasing irritation at Martin’s decision to highlight indirect, rather than direct action. Because his story is told through only nine characters, you end up looking at the wide world of Westeros as though through a pinhole. You only learn what is before the faces of these nine people. Thus, there are huge swatches of the story you never witness firsthand. You never learn much about Renly Baratheon or Tywin Lannister, except when the main characters come into contact with them. Everything you find out about Stannis comes from the perception of Davos, who often as not is not in Stannis’ presence. Martin requires his peripheral characters to do a lot of heavy lifting with regards to storytelling.The ultimate consequence of Martin’s narrative style is that much of the action in the first two-thirds of Kings is hearsay. It consists of one character telling another character about something that happened. A lot of times, these conversations are really interesting. More often than not, they concern a battle that has been fought off-page. Once this happens three or four times, without any actual battles happening on-page, I started to get pissed. Allegedly, the land of Westeros was engaged in “the War of the Five Kings.” Unfortunately, I wouldn’t know that, because I’m stuck with Sansa in King’s Landing. I kid you not: HBO does not need a $50 million dollar budget for Season 2. They can turn Kings into an off-Broadway play with very little effort. Things get more supernatural in Kings, which is fine. This is fantasy, after all, and I knew what I was signing onto.My one caveat is that I don’t think Martin is being consistent in his treatment of the supernatural. How much is Westeros like Medieval England and how much is it like Middle Earth? Does magic exist or not? In Thrones, the ratio was 90-10 in favor of Medieval England. It could’ve been a Ken Follett historical novel, except with better writing, believable characters, and worse sexual metaphors. Martin’s treatment of religion was very modern. Everyone prayed to the gods, but those gods never gave any sign they existed. There were stories of fantastical creatures, but they were only stories, passed off as children’s fables. However, at the very end of Thrones, dragons had entered the picture, no longer a myth but real. I suppose that’s when the worm began to turn. In Kings, things get a lot more wizardly. The gods are still indifferent, but sorcery has entered the picture. For instance, Stannis’ red priestess is able to use the magic of her Lord of Light to turn into a shadow and kill her enemies. What troubled me is the consistency. If there is going to be mumbo-jumbo and potions and such, I need some ground rules. I need to know if the gods exist, or if people are just praying to an empty sky. I need to know why sometimes magic exists and sometimes it doesn’t. If you don’t establish this framework, you lose story integrity, because anytime you write yourself into a corner, you can just say then something magical happened. By now, you will have noticed that it’s been one complaint after another. This is a reflection of my mounting aggravation throughout much of Kings. There were bright spots, yes. I thought Arya’s storyline was great, and featured most of the action in what is otherwise a very talky book. Despite those moments, I was on the verge of judging Kings a letdown. And then came the final third of the book. I won’t spoil anything, other than to say there are unexpected plot development and shocking surprises and twists and turns and some people die and some people don’t and the stakes seem real and there is wildfire and swordplay and a castle siege and a naval battle and enough blood to slake the thirst of any fantasy reader. It is an incredible late-inning surge. When I finished, I was awed by Martin’s genius. All the talking, all the dense plotting, all those wasted pages of Theon receiving oral sex and then hitting on his sister are forgotten as the various storylines collide in an epic manner. A Song of Ice and Fire was originally conceived as a trilogy; in that sense, Kings is the perfect middle book. It delivers a damn fine action sequence while leaving the main characters in precarious cliffhanger situations. In that way, it’s a bit like The Empire Strikes Back, right down to the weird brother and sister stuff.I'm on Martin's hook now, and I know that two things are going to have to happen if I am to ever lead a normal life. First, Martin will have to finish this series. Or two, I will have to lose interest. At this point, for the sake of my sanity and my intellectual curiosity, I hope I get bored real soon. But it just doesn’t seem likely.
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  • Lyn
    January 1, 1970
    George R.R. Martin demonstrates in Clash of Kings, his second Song of Ice and Fire novel, that he is the American J.R.R. Tolkien.Raymond Richard, born in New Jersey, differs from Ronald Reuel, born in what is now South Africa, in many ways, but their fantastic world building is what puts them in a class with few others. If any.While Tolkien’s Middle Earth is more poetic and his language more lyric, Martin’s Westeros and Essos is more adult (by far), and with more graphic violence and sex. More m George R.R. Martin demonstrates in Clash of Kings, his second Song of Ice and Fire novel, that he is the American J.R.R. Tolkien.Raymond Richard, born in New Jersey, differs from Ronald Reuel, born in what is now South Africa, in many ways, but their fantastic world building is what puts them in a class with few others. If any.While Tolkien’s Middle Earth is more poetic and his language more lyric, Martin’s Westeros and Essos is more adult (by far), and with more graphic violence and sex. More modern and more American.Clash of Kings reveals more of the jaw dropping world building that made A Game of Thrones so much fun. I had compared this to Tolkien and Frank Herbert, but Martin might be king of the hill as this universe has enough detail and backstory to make a Western Civ professor choke on his Starbucks.And have you seen the Interactive map?OMG – I started exploring and an HOUR after I came up for air, still putting all the pieces together and absolutely enraptured with this story.The king is dead, long live the king. Except little Joffrey Baratheon is a smug little s*** and his uncles and Robb Stark and the Greyjoys are getting in on the action too. (Thus the cool title).Meanwhile, a world away, Daenerys Targaryen is in BFE Essos gathering her forces for a return to the Seven Kingdoms and her small but growing band now includes some juvenile (but getting bigger) dragons.As in Game of Thrones, Martin divides up his narrative between several point of view characters and this lets the reader keep up with all the action across the enormous playing field. The backstabbing intrigue is as entertaining as the sword and sorcery action and Martin’s cornucopia of intriguing characters keeps the pages turning.This time around we get to know the Greyjoys – a piratical kingdom in the islands off the western coast – as well as Davos Seaworth and some other new characters and we get to know the Starks and Lannisters better. Tyrion Lannister, the LITTLE brother to naughty Jaime and Cersei, takes over as the Hand to the king and proves he’s more than half a man up for the challenge. Tyrion knows how to play the game and keeps a copy of Machiavelli’s The Prince in his back pocket (but I think he has it fully annotated and memorized.) Matter of fact, Tyrion gets my STEAL THE SHOW award for this novel as the IMP makes this even better.For all the great characters and action, though, the real hero is Martin himself and his incredible world building as he takes the baton from Tolkien and keeps running.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    1.) A Game of Thrones ★★★★★#readASOIAF Read-Along - Hosted by Riley from Riley Marie, Elizabeth from Liz Loves Literature, and Kayla from BOOKadoodles. ♥Well, no one said this title was misleading. When GRRM named this A Clash of Kings he couldn't have been more right. This review will contain SPOILERS! Please refrain from reading if you have not read this book or its predecessor, A Game of Thrones. So, we have the king sitting on the Iron Throne, Joffrey. We have Theon's father crowing himself 1.) A Game of Thrones ★★★★★#readASOIAF Read-Along - Hosted by Riley from Riley Marie, Elizabeth from Liz Loves Literature, and Kayla from BOOKadoodles. ♥Well, no one said this title was misleading. When GRRM named this A Clash of Kings he couldn't have been more right. This review will contain SPOILERS! Please refrain from reading if you have not read this book or its predecessor, A Game of Thrones. So, we have the king sitting on the Iron Throne, Joffrey. We have Theon's father crowing himself King of the Iron Islands. We have both of brothers of the late King Robert, Stannis and Renly, calling themselves kings and proving they will do anything to keep their titles. We have Robb Stark, the young wolf himself, proclaiming he is King of the North. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, we have the lovely Daenerys trying to throw her hat crown in the ring, while trying to find a fleet of ships to take her to Westeros. “The contents of a man's letters are more valuable than the contents of his purse.” I absolutely am in love with the start of this book. Each chapter is a new POV with a new character within the Seven Kingdoms seeing Daenerys' red comet for the first time. We, as readers, know that the comet is because of the birth of her three dragons at the end of A Game of Thrones, but each character tells their own interpretation of what omen they think the falling comet brings with it. “People often claim to hunger for truth, but seldom like the taste when it's served up.” We finally meet my favorite character in the ASOIAF world; Davos. I always loved Davos in the books, and then Liam Cunningham playing him on the show, just completely sealed the deal for me. I don't have high hopes for him living throughout the entirety of this series, but I completely live for his chapters in these five books that are out. My heart bleeds for him at Battle of the Blackwater. Actually, my heart just continues to bleed for Davos. He always does the right thing, not the selfish right thing that other characters in this world trick themselves into thinking is the right thing, but the actual right thing. Please, GRRM, leave my precious little cinnamon roll alone! Seeing Stannis act like a jealous twelve-year-old girl, because Robert's BFF was Ned and that he gave Renly Storm's End, is always hilarious. I know many, many people want/wanted him to be the true king, but that theory never, ever resonated with me. Stannis always seemed so childish, the only redeeming quality he ever has going for him is his daughter, Shireen.Catelyn's chapters where much more bearable for me than they were in A Game of Thrones. I actually could feel her pain and regret, and she really impacted me much differently this time around. She actually made some pretty strong decisions, and this whole story would have gone much differently if Robb would have taken some of her advice. Robb was actually the Stark I couldn't stand in A Clash of Kings. He was so heartless about even attempting to get his sisters back. Then, he made stupid decision after stupid decision. I feel like maybe he has to be a bastard, too, because I cannot believe this is the son of Ned Stark with his actions. I know people who were upset that Robb never got any chapters, but during this reread I was extremely thankful for that. Another one of my favorite characters is introduced in this book, which is Brienne of Tarth. You know, I've been on the fence about if Brienne actually killed Stannis in S5E10, but after rereading her love for Renly, I completely believe she did in the TV show. Regardless, Catelyn made her first good decisive choice, in my eyes, by rescuing Brienne from a very unfair situation. And we all know Brienne goes forth to repay that debt tenfold. Speaking of the TV show, one thing that the TV doesn't show is all the foreshadowing the book does about Arya's wolf, Nymeria. There are so many passages hinting about this new wolf pack leader that is ruling the Riverlands, and scaring the hell out of a lot of people. Poor Arya, she might have the worst deal of them all in this book. After having to witness the public execution of her father, she is forced into hiding by Yoren, who helps smuggle her out with a group of boys and wishes to take her to Castle Black to be with Jon. She ends up making friends, Gendry (Robert's bastard) and Hot Pie, but after even more unfortunate events in her life, Yoren winds up dead and the group captured. She then ends up being Roose Bolton's cupbearer, but the whole situation seems kind of weird for me. Arya did not know the Bolton's already were traitors against Robb, I imagine she would still think they were one of the Stark's banner men, no? And if she thought this, like I imagine I would, I would bet she would tell him who she really is! I mean, in hindsight we know she made the much, much, much better choice keeping her identity a secret, but the situation felt a little strange for me this read-through. Regardless, Arya also meets, and we are introduced to, Jaqen H'ghar in this book. They have a few very intense moments, and he leaves her with his coin and explains to her that if she ever needs to find him to give the coin to anyone in Braavos. "valar morghulis" Roose Bolton isn't the only Bolton that is in Clash of Kings; his bastard son, Ramsey, is as well. Okay, now I know Ramsey goes down on the TV show as the most evil villain ever, but that's why I freakin' love him! Actually, ASOIAF is so good because GRRM really does write the best villains, and you can see where every one of them is coming from! Ramsey will do anything, and I mean anything, to prove to his rather that he should have the last name Bolton. “In the songs all knights are gallant, all maids are beautiful, and the sun is always shining.” Theon, another character that can be seen as a villain that is willing to do anything to please his father, has betrayed Robb and decided to take Winterfell for himself. If only Rob acutally listened to his mother this time. Unfortunately Robb didn't listen and unfortunately Theon will never be as cunning as Ramsey, who is posing under the guise of Reek, even though the real Reek died after having sex with a dead body of a girl that Ramsey had just raped and killed, who is now a prisoner in Winterfell. It is so genius, and so well executed by GRRM I will applaud him until the day I die. Twists and storylines like this is why this series is a step above the rest and completely deserves all the praise it receives. I guess I should always state a disclaimer, like with all of the books in this series, that there are many very graphic rape and gang-rape scenes. I couldn't even list all of the triggers for sexual abuse in this book, so please use caution when reading if this is something that concerns you. As scary as the sexual violence is to me, I think it is very believable in this world and helps to show people that the real monsters aren't just beyond the wall; they are human beings capable of very evil things. "To omit them from a narrative centered on war and power would have been fundamentally false and dishonest, and would have undermined one of the themes of the books: that the true horrors of human history derive not from orcs and Dark Lords, but from ourselves. We are the monsters. (And the heroes too). Each of us has within himself the capacity for great good, and great evil," GRRM even says (perfectly) himself, via The Guardian. I feel like this book doesn't have enough Jon POVs, but every chapter we got a POV of him was phenomenal. I have always liked Ygritte more in the books, and this reread proves no different. We get to see Jon kill his first wildling, and then see something in Ygritte he hasn't been able to see in another living soul. I get teary-eyed just thinking about this sub-plot. Jon obviously doesn't kill Ygritte either time he is "supposed" to, while being north of the wall looking for his uncle, Benjen, and I cannot wait to start my reread of A Storm of Swordsjust for Ygritte and Jon alone. And speaking of crows north of the wall, can we just talk about how Jeor Mormont is the real MVP? Like, not only has he completely taken Jon under his wing (hehehe) and is guiding him like a father should, I'm kind of thinking his raven is more important that what we are lead to believe in this book. With what we know from the TV show, which will probably be canon for the book as well, we have this raven saying "king" and all these other questionable word choices. Who are my other personal MVPs of this book? Howland Reed and his kids, Meera and Jojen. Not only was Howland maybe the most loyal man to Ned Stark, but now his two children have run away with Bran, after Winterfell is under siege, to help him on a much bigger journey ahead. I mean, where the hell would the Starks be without the Reeds? I mean, besides dead. I know Howland has never had a POV in this series, yet, but I can't help but dream of the day he will. Hopefully it will be in The Winds of Winter.Lastly, in Westeros, we have King's Landing. Thanks to Tyrion and wildfire, they have defeated Stannis' army at Battle of the Blackwater. Sadly, this had also driven the Hound away, because he is scared of fire and it breaks my little black heart every time. Joffrey is still the crowned king after the victory, but many people are opposing it. Cersei is trying to guide him as best she can, while also giving Sansa some pretty sound life advice about women in this world and what they need to do to protect themselves. Sansa is also somewhat saved, considering her father is now seen as a traitor to the crown, who has no money or men willing to fight because Robb has them, so her marriage proposal to Joffrey isn't looking as good to the Lannisters. House Tyrell on the other hand, has lots of money and fifty-thousand swords they are willing to bring with a marriage proposal. After this marriage proposal is deemed more worthy, Margaery is sent for, because Renly, her now late husband, was killed by Stannis. It is pretty crazy how intricate this story is, and how everything works out. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, George RR Martin truly is a genius and words cannot express how much I love this world he has created. I mean, I sure in the hell wouldn't memorize all these names for just any old author. Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch
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  • Madeline
    January 1, 1970
    "Kill your darlings" is a popular piece of advice given in creative writing classes - it's the concept that you shouldn't ever be afraid to take drastic and destructive action on your precious baby of a novel in order to move the plot forward or improve the story. George RR Martin should be held up as the gold standard of this rule, since his books might as well come labeled with a giant "Don't Get Too Attached" warning. It isn't just major and beloved characters (Eddard Stark, you will be aveng "Kill your darlings" is a popular piece of advice given in creative writing classes - it's the concept that you shouldn't ever be afraid to take drastic and destructive action on your precious baby of a novel in order to move the plot forward or improve the story. George RR Martin should be held up as the gold standard of this rule, since his books might as well come labeled with a giant "Don't Get Too Attached" warning. It isn't just major and beloved characters (Eddard Stark, you will be avenged!) that get killed off in the space of a sentence; entire plots that have been building slowly for hundreds of pages are laid to waste with a single action so a new clusterfuck can get started. If Martin spent A Game of Thrones carefully constructing a miniature world and showing us around its various towns and characters, A Clash of Kings is when he suddenly starts stomping on everything and making Godzilla noises. Major characters aren't the only ones who get the axe (sometimes literally) here - towards the end of the book, one of the major setpieces of the story, a place whose geography I was just starting to understand, is burned to the ground and abandoned. Just like that. Even if these books aren't your particular cup of tea (and they happen to be my particular cup of crack cocaine), you have to admire Martin's ruthlessness when it comes to this world he's created. Nothing and no one is safe, which makes reading the books a delightfully tense experience - nothing is off limits here, and I look forward to seeing how far Martin can push things. (why only three stars, you might ask? Simply because this book, as I said in one of the comments, doesn't really have much of a plot, when you think about it. This book really feels like the second of a trilogy, which means it's mostly setting up events that will come around in the next installment. Still, I can't wait to see what Martin rebuilds in the wake of the destruction he wreaked in A Clash of Kings)
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    I know what you're thinking... "Only 4 stars??!" Yeah. I shall tell you why. First, because getting to the halfway mark of this book took me 11 days. In my edition, which was 807 pages of book, that's about 400 pages. I read more than half that just today, so 11 days is a LONG time for me to get into a story. Secondly, because so much of this book felt like set up and maneuverings and I was ready for stuff to happen! A Game of Thrones had me on the edge of my seat almost from the word "go", and I know what you're thinking... "Only 4 stars??!" Yeah. I shall tell you why. First, because getting to the halfway mark of this book took me 11 days. In my edition, which was 807 pages of book, that's about 400 pages. I read more than half that just today, so 11 days is a LONG time for me to get into a story. Secondly, because so much of this book felt like set up and maneuverings and I was ready for stuff to happen! A Game of Thrones had me on the edge of my seat almost from the word "go", and Clash just didn't have that same tension for a large part of it. I know that, considering events, that's appropriate, but I couldn't help wanting to feel the way I felt while reading Game - which was a gnaw-my-fingers-raw anxiety. I got my wish in the second half of the book though, for sure. And I want to make it clear that I don't think the writing was bad or that the story was slow or anything like that. All the maneuverings and set ups and everything were exceptionally well done, but to me, it just didn't feel the same... (view spoiler)[ Game of Thrones spoiler: (view spoiler)[ ...with Ned and Robert and Drogo all dead. (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)] Missing characters were missed by me, and it made a difference. The story though... Even when I read it in dribs and drabs, was fantastic. Once again, picking up this story is like immersion in Westeros, and I love that. The second half of the book was incredibly exciting and harrowing. When the maneuverings and plots started to come together, I almost couldn't look away. 11 days to read the first half set up, and 3 to finish. But it's a mark of how incredible this series is that it affects me like that. Too bad Martin doesn't care about the characters I love. HE'S RUTHLESS! *sniffle* (I secretly love that though. Authors take note: Don't sacrifice your story to save a character.)I am almost scared to continue this series... scared to see what is coming. Chaos and winter, likely. *shiver*
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  • Dan Schwent
    January 1, 1970
    In the wake of King Robert's death, five men lay claim to his crown. The Mother of Dragons builds her khalazar as magic slowly returns to the world. Jon Snow braves the wilds beyond the Wall. Tyrion Lannister struggles to hold the power behind the Throne. And Winterfell harbors a viper in its midst...Like I said before, it's hard to write a teaser for a book this size. Look at it! You could club a narwhal to death with it if you were so inclined.The epic of The Song of Ice and Fire continues to In the wake of King Robert's death, five men lay claim to his crown. The Mother of Dragons builds her khalazar as magic slowly returns to the world. Jon Snow braves the wilds beyond the Wall. Tyrion Lannister struggles to hold the power behind the Throne. And Winterfell harbors a viper in its midst...Like I said before, it's hard to write a teaser for a book this size. Look at it! You could club a narwhal to death with it if you were so inclined.The epic of The Song of Ice and Fire continues to unfold in the second volume. Robb Stark, the King in the North, continues his campaign to avenge his father and take the Iron Throne. His sister Sansa remains in King's Landing, still betrothed to the vile Joffrey. Arya, well, she has quite a bit going on. Jon Snow continues being my favorite character as he ventures beyond the wall, probably marking him for death sometime soon. I'm wondering if the Starks will ever be reunited. In non-Stark news, Tyrion Lannister continues being the best character in the series and pulls the strings behind the scenes. The conflict between Robert's brothers Stannis and Renly came to a head much earlier than I thought. Jaime Lannister is still in the clink and I'm hoping he and Robb Stark get more screen time in the next book. And Theon! What a colossal douche! Cercei Lannister has a lot more facets to her character than I originally thought.Much like the last book, most of the action happens near the end. I love the constant intrigue behind the scenes. The battle of Blackwater Bay was my favorite battle in the series so far.Since I read this without seeing season 2 of Game of Thrones, I'm looking forward to the following events being depicted on the show:1. Jon Snow beyond the Wall2. Tyrion's dialog with Cercei early on3. the battle of BlackwaterThat's about all I have to say. I liked Clash of Kings almost as much as the first book.
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  • James Trevino
    January 1, 1970
    This might be my favorite book in the entire series. If the first book is more of an introduction to George Martin's cruel world, A CLASH OF KINGS is a straight up feats of nastiness (and goodiness because, you know, the books is perfect).Shit starts to go down really fast (or as fast as it can go for a 800 pages book). We see Arya starting to become a badass, Tyrion being just as badass as before, Daenerys becoming a badass b**ch and, my favorite, Robb being the one to rule them all. So overall This might be my favorite book in the entire series. If the first book is more of an introduction to George Martin's cruel world, A CLASH OF KINGS is a straight up feats of nastiness (and goodiness because, you know, the books is perfect).Shit starts to go down really fast (or as fast as it can go for a 800 pages book). We see Arya starting to become a badass, Tyrion being just as badass as before, Daenerys becoming a badass b**ch and, my favorite, Robb being the one to rule them all. So overall a badass book, duh!But seriously, one of the reasons why I think I like this book so much is the North story line. I loved that plot so much and it is my absolute favorite in the entire series... that is until Martin decided to Red Wedding us and leave me in a state of pure misery. Thanks Martin! Really smooth of you!!!
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  • Ben Babcock
    January 1, 1970
    N.B.: When it comes to spoilers, I'm going to be talking rather liberally about the events of A Game of Thrones, so if you have not read the first book and want to remain spoiler free, stop reading now. I have avoided major spoilers for this book.Suddenly everyone and his butler wants to be king!In A Game of Thrones, we had the distinct pleasure of watching a kingdom fall apart as various individuals and their families jockeyed for positions of power. With A Clash of Kings, George R.R. Martin mo N.B.: When it comes to spoilers, I'm going to be talking rather liberally about the events of A Game of Thrones, so if you have not read the first book and want to remain spoiler free, stop reading now. I have avoided major spoilers for this book.Suddenly everyone and his butler wants to be king!In A Game of Thrones, we had the distinct pleasure of watching a kingdom fall apart as various individuals and their families jockeyed for positions of power. With A Clash of Kings, George R.R. Martin moves beyond the ambitions of individuals to show how FUBAR the situation in Westeros has become. In the first book, there was a sense of impending doom, but there was also the hope that it could be averted if certain people only worked together. Perhaps the death of King Robert could have been prevented, perhaps Ned Stark's life could have been saved, or perhaps Renly and Stannis would not have faced off against each other, both surviving Baratheon brothers claiming the throne for themselves. As A Clash of Kings opens, it's clear we are beyond the point where peace is an option. The scales have tipped firmly in favour of war, war, war, and it just gets messier.Tyrion is, hands down (no pun intended), the best part of this book. He arrives in King's Landing to assume the post of Hand at his father's behest. He professes love for Cersei and Joffrey and loyalty to the Lannisters, but he has his own unique way of showing it, and Tyrion often works at cross-purposes to Cersei. He does terrible things, arranges for people to die or be sent to prison, and of course he's fighting for the Lannisters, so it's not like we want him to succeed—but there are times when I just couldn't help myself. Tyrion is just such a delicious, devious character that I can't help liking him even though he does terrible things for the Lannister cause.Furthermore, Tyrion's machinations as the Hand are the most coherent of the political intrigue running throughout A Clash of Kings. He knows what the endgame has to be: either Stannis or Renly or both are going to attack King's Landing, which is woefully under-defended. All of his efforts go toward securing the city. Yet he has more to worry about than the external threats. King's Landing is suffering through a famine that he has no way of relieving, and it doesn't help that Joffrey is a tyrannical brat who prefers to watch people fight to the death and beat back rioters with a crossbow to, you know, actually helping the people he nominally rules. Tyrion also has qualms about the extent to which he relies upon Varys, the realm's eunuch spymaster with creepy-good intelligence-gathering skills. Finally, Cersei has her own schemes afoot, and Tyrion finds himself constantly countering or co-opting them for his own purposes.Cersei comes across as much more emotional than she did in A Game of Thrones. Now she's an overprotective mother, and she is desperate to free her brother/lover from the clutches of the Starks. This, in my opinion, makes her a much less formidable enemy and therefore a much less interesting character. Nevertheless, her attempts to protect Joffrey are an important influence on his stunted emotional maturity: he can never hope to become a man, much less a real king, if his mother is always trying to keep him safe.There's plenty of parallelism here if you want to look for it, because there is another king who has a somewhat protective mother as well. Robb Stark's retainers proclaimed him "King in the North," and now he is doing his best to live up to that title. Catelyn finds herself disquieted by the changes in her son. She wants to give him counsel, but unlike Cersei, she is aware of how that would undermine Robb. Even though she was one of the more bloodthirsty characters in the first book, wanting to hold Tyrion responsible for the attack on Bran and bring all the Lannisters to justice, Catelyn is the voice of reason throughout A Clash of Kings. She pushes Robb to send terms for peace back to King's Landing, and she serves as Robb's envoy to Renly.So thanks to Catelyn and Ned, Robb grew up to be a mature, responsible, upstanding young man who is well on his way to becoming a great leader. Thanks to Cersei and Robert, Joffrey is a snivelling, immature, misogynistic brat. There is a lesson here about parenting, and about the values we pass on to our children. Because for all its vast and epic drama, A Song of Ice and Fire is also a story about family: family loyalty and family rivalry. It's the cohesion of all these elements, and Martin's wonderful job of balancing them, that makes this series so successful; A Clash of Kings is no exception in that regard.In comparison to its predecessor, however, there are faults that make this book the less impressive of the two. Mainly, I didn't like any of Daenerys' story in A Clash of Kings. She spends the entire book leading her Dothraki diaspora east, eventually arriving in prosperous Qarth, where she has some dealings with a merchant and a warlock. Whereas we saw Daenerys grow from a young girl serving as her brother's pawn into a powerful, confident queen and leader in A Game of Thrones, this book has no corresponding developments. Her dragons grow larger, and we hear all about how she has no ships and no army. Frankly, it's a little depressing. Although I don't relish the consequences if Daenerys' achieves her dreams of invading Westeros, I still, as I do with Tyrion, want her to succeed; she's just such a compelling character. It's a shame she is wasted here.Similarly, Bran Stark and his younger brother Rickon have a difficult time. Bran is slowly waking to the idea that magic is real and he is psychically connected to his direwolf, Summer. Of course, Maester Luwin is sceptical about magic and attempts to dissuade Bran from putting stock in any such nonsense. We can't discuss Bran without talking about Theon Greyjoy, and this is something I think worked well. Theon's story feels almost like a separate novella woven into the rest of the book, and it's a very tragic story. In his expanded role, Theon is a foolish and ambitious young man who would be king. He returns to his father only to find himself softened by his adolescence among the Starks; he is no longer an Ironman, and everyone can tell (except maybe Theon). Also, he sucks as a strategist, and almost every decision he makes later contributes to his ruination. Theon is a character with doom hanging over him for the entire book, and it's a little bit terrible that I get so much satisfaction from seeing him laid low. Nevertheless, the consequences of his bid for power are far-reaching, especially for Winterfell and the Starks.A Clash of Kings lacks the novelty that is part of the appeal of A Game of Thrones, and Martin attempts to compensate by increasing the depth of the intrigue and the gruesomeness of the tragedy that befalls the characters. Arya, in particular, has a very interesting time posing first as a boy on the way to the Wall and then later as a serving girl for a lord allied with the Starks. I loved her tenuous alliance with Jaqen H'ghar; she saves his life and those of two other criminals bound for the Night's Watch when she could have let them perish in a fire. So he grants her three "deaths" (kind of like wishes). Remember that Arya is only nine, maybe ten, and here she is with the power of life or death over three people. This is a surreal and serious situation, and it was one of my favourite subplots in the book. (I also like the revelation of Jaqen's "real" identity, which is subtly done but obvious enough if you read closely.)Arya's sister, Sansa, doesn't have an easy time being a hostage and betrothed to King Joffrey. She experiences Joffrey's fits of pique firsthand, and it reinforces the disillusionment that begun to seize her at the end of A Game of Thrones. Sansa, who until now has inhabited a semi-fantasy world where knights are chivalrous heroes, gets a very rude awakening. And she fast starts maturing into a much more self-aware character. She doesn't have the same skill for dissembling and deception that seems to come so naturally to other characters, but she is definitely far from the innocent, starstruck young girl we met in the first book.With the HBO series based on the first book now being broadcast, I couldn't help but read A Clash of Kings with an eye for how it will appear on television. If anything, this just made me more excited about the book, because there are some really great scenes I can't wait to see. Still, if my review seems scattered, I hope it's not too presumptuous to suggest that's due, in part, to the scattered nature of this book. A Clash of Kings is a little messy—to good effect—and it carries the burden of the story begun in A Game of Thrones as well as can be expected. There's plenty I didn't discuss here because I just want this to be a casual review, not a in-depth analysis, and even that hope seems rather vain at this point! I guess if I'm supposed to be addressing the question of whether you would care to read this book, the easy answer is: yes, if you liked A Game of Thrones. If you didn't, then A Clash of Kings is not suddenly going to endear you to A Song of Ice and Fire. If you did, then I won't guarantee you are going to fall in love with this book, but I found it a solid successor.My Reviews of A Song of Ice and Fire:← A Game of Thrones | A Storm of Swords →
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  • Hasham Rasool
    January 1, 1970
    There are two new characters: Davos Seaworth and Theon Greyjoy.I like this book but personally, I prefer the first book, 'A Game of Thrones' than this book.A Clash of Kings is my least favourite book of A Song of Ice and Fire.
  • Jason Koivu
    January 1, 1970
    If the first book, A Game of Thrones felt to me a little like stepping into an iron maiden, its sequel A Clash of Kings felt like slipping on a well-smithied gauntlet. Ooooh yeah...feel it.The problem with the first book was that I felt poked and prodded with a 101 different characters, all new to me and all with their own disparate agendas. It took me half the book just to get the names straight and it's a huge honkin' book! But with A Clash of Kings there aren't nearly as many new characters a If the first book, A Game of Thrones felt to me a little like stepping into an iron maiden, its sequel A Clash of Kings felt like slipping on a well-smithied gauntlet. Ooooh yeah...feel it.The problem with the first book was that I felt poked and prodded with a 101 different characters, all new to me and all with their own disparate agendas. It took me half the book just to get the names straight and it's a huge honkin' book! But with A Clash of Kings there aren't nearly as many new characters and new story lines to contend with, so I was able to relax and enjoy the read, rather than feel as if I was back in school cramming for a test.Okay, and now for the twist! I don't think A Clash of Kings is as good a book as the first. It's perfectly fine. The story is linear, the narrative flow makes sense, there's plenty of action, but there's also a lack of enchantment that the first book had in spades. Technically there is just as much and maybe more magic in the second book - it definitely leans more on fantasy elements - but the MAGICALNESS is missing. To put it another way: The first book swept me away like a pretty pretty princess! The second book bought me lunch at Mickey D's and dumped me on the curb. In the end, I think I'll give them both the same 4 star rating, but for different reasons. A Game of Thrones evoked, entertained, confused, but enthralled. A Clash of Kings carried on the story smooth and steady.
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  • Raya راية
    January 1, 1970
    في المراجعة حرق لبعض الأحداث تتواصل في هذا الجزء الملحمة الفانتازيّة العظيمة "أغنية الجليد والنار"، التي بدأناها بلعبة العروش، حيث كانت الممالك السبع على موعد مع حرب طاحنة تتمزّق فيها البلاد والأبرياء يموتون بالمجان، وأبناء الصيف يخوضون حرب الشتاء الطاحنة. وتقوم تحالفات وتُكتشف خيانات. وكل ذلك من أجل العرش الحديدي ومن أجل مصالح وأطماع عديدة.خمسة ملوك تتمزّق بينهم الممالك: روب ستارك الملك في الشمال، الذي يريد الثأر لأبيه الراحل، لورد الشمال، ويد الملك روبرت باراثيون، إدارد ستارك، الذي اتُهِم با في المراجعة حرق لبعض الأحداث تتواصل في هذا الجزء الملحمة الفانتازيّة العظيمة "أغنية الجليد والنار"، التي بدأناها بلعبة العروش، حيث كانت الممالك السبع على موعد مع حرب طاحنة تتمزّق فيها البلاد والأبرياء يموتون بالمجان، وأبناء الصيف يخوضون حرب الشتاء الطاحنة. وتقوم تحالفات وتُكتشف خيانات. وكل ذلك من أجل العرش الحديدي ومن أجل مصالح وأطماع عديدة.خمسة ملوك تتمزّق بينهم الممالك: روب ستارك الملك في الشمال، الذي يريد الثأر لأبيه الراحل، لورد الشمال، ويد الملك روبرت باراثيون، إدارد ستارك، الذي اتُهِم بالخيانة والتآمر على العرش بعد وفاة روبرت. جوفري باراثيون، الابن غير الشرعي للملكة سرسي وأخيها جيمي لانستر، والذي يظنه الجميع ابن الملك روبرت، ويخوض عنه الحرب جدّه لأمه، تايوين لانستر. رنلي باراثيون، الملك في الجنوب، والذي صُعِقنا باغتياله بواسطة قوى سحرية شريرة بشكل مفاجئ. ستانيس باراثيون، الملك في البحر الضيق، الوريث الشرعي لأخيه روبرت. وبالون غرايجوي، المتمرّد السابق على العرش الحديدي، والذي يطلق على نفسه ملك جزر الحديد والشمال. ولا أحد يعلم بعد بوجود الملكة السادسة وراء البحار، دينريس تارغارين الأولى! ولا أحد يعلم بعد عن الخطر الحقيقي الذي يُهدد الممالك السبع! الخطر البارد، الذي استيقظ بعد سبات طال مئات من السنين! الخطر وراء الجدار!تظهر في هذا الجزء الكثير من الشخصيات الجديدة ويتم أيضًا تسليط الضوء على شخصيات أخرى عرفناها في الجزء الأول، فيظهر ستانيس باراثيون وعائلته ولورداتها، والراهبة الحمراء، مليساندرا الآشايية، والتي كان لها دور مؤثر في تغيير مجرى الأمور. وثيون غرايجوي، ذلك الوغد الخائن، الذي انقلب على آل ستارك واستولى على ونترفل! جاكن هاجار، ذلك الأسير اللوراثي، الذي ساعد آريا ستارك في كثير من المواقف. جندري، نغل روبرت باراثيون. بريان التارثية، من الحرس الشخصي للملك رنلي، ثم أصبحت مرافقة كاتلين ستارك. لوراس تايرل، مارجري تايرل، آشا غرايجوي. رامزي سنو وغيرهم الكثير.لدى جورج مارتن قدرة خارقة على وصف الشخصيات، وتصويرها بصورة واقعية كما لو أنها شخصيات حقيقية حيّة، قريبة جدًا من القارئ، وليست مجرد شخصيات خيالية تعيش على الورق. ويرصد ما يختلج بنفوسها وما يدور بعقولها بشكل مذهل، فلا يمكننا أن نقرر بسهولة ما إذا كانت هذه الشخصية أو تلك خيّرة أم شريرة! لأنه هذا هو حال الإنسان حقًّا فلا يوجد إنسان خيّر تمامًا أو شرير تمامًا! وإنما النفس البشرية تتنازع فيها جميع الرغبات والبواعث والمشاعر! وبرأيي أن مارتن أبدع في ذلك أيّما إبداع. نكتشف في هذا الجزء الكثير من الأسرار والقصص من الماضي التي تُلقي بظلالها على الحاضر والمستقبل، وقد يكون تبريرًا لتصرفات بعض الشخصيات. إن من العبث حقًّا محاولة كتابة مراجعة لهذه الملحمة السحرية، العجيبة المتولّدة من أكثر العقول البشرية الحيّة إبداعًا وعبقرية. وأشكر المترجم هشام فهمي على الجهد الجبار الذي بذله ليقدّم للقارئ العربي فرصة قراءة هذا السحر، وجاءت الترجمة على مستوى عال من الجودة والاحترافية.لا أصدق بأنها انتهت بهذه السرعة!بانتظار ما ستتكشّف عنه الأمور في الجزء القادم. ...
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    I'm re-band wagon jumping. Back a bunch of years ago, I guess in 2005 when Feast for Crows finally came out I picked up a specially priced copy, $3.99 copy of Game of Thrones to find out what it was about George RRRRRRRRR Martin (this is how I sometimes say his name in real life, and always say it in my head, lots of ARE's) that caused so many people to crave his books and get so disappointed each time the publication date for Feast for Crows came and went without a book being released* I don't I'm re-band wagon jumping. Back a bunch of years ago, I guess in 2005 when Feast for Crows finally came out I picked up a specially priced copy, $3.99 copy of Game of Thrones to find out what it was about George RRRRRRRRR Martin (this is how I sometimes say his name in real life, and always say it in my head, lots of ARE's) that caused so many people to crave his books and get so disappointed each time the publication date for Feast for Crows came and went without a book being released* I don't like feeling fucked around with by release dates, and I don't like waiting for sequels to books or for series to be completed but from time to time curiosity gets the best of me for what makes something so massively appealing (and there was nothing like the pop-culture appeal that this series has today back then, which sort of blows my mind). So I jumped on the George RR Martin bandwagon and gave him a try.After a bit of a slow start I found myself really enjoying the first book. As the plot unfolded it proved to be less of the Lord of the Rings sort of adventure story I imagined it would be and more the kind of murky, dark, ethically-blurred story that I really enjoy. It appealed to the same part of me that loved watching The Wire, which was still airing at the time. It was like the wire but with incest and swords, and by the time that (view spoiler)[Ned Stark got his head cut off (hide spoiler)] I was totally sold. I love it when an author has no problem with just killing off major characters.At the time I read through the whole series, my enjoyment with the series growing through the third book and then taking a fairly steep decline with the disappointment of book four. I think at the time I read the whole series in about a month. When I was done I went on a brief fantasy book buying frenzy and tried looking for some other series that I could enjoy as much as this, but the results weren't good, and some of the books I picked up have turned into some of my 'cleaning-house' books (books I've read just so that I could get them out of my house) and usually proved to be very unenjoyable.After the fourth book I might have read book five if it had come out in a timely manner. It didn't.And I pretty much shelved the series. My swiss cheese memory had enough trouble keeping track of all the characters and families when I was reading them back to back. If I was going to read another book in the series I'd have to re-read the previous books which would take a long time, and then there would be another book after that one, and I'd have to read all the previous books again in the five or six or twenty years it took for that one to be released, and this wasn't something I wanted to commit myself to. So I said, adios George RR Martin. I even went as far as never adding any of the books to my goodreads shelves, I didn't want to admit to having ever read them, I didn't want to ever talk about them, I didn't want to get into conversations with anyone over where the plot was going, about the lack of the 'important' story lines in book four or anything. But then came the TV show. I didn't watch it. I knew it was probably really good. It was HBO. It was the fantasy series that in my head was as good as The Wire. It was HBO, there would be lots of gratuitous nudity, there would be some awesome violence, there would be the moral ambiguity. I knew I would like the show but I wouldn't watch it. George RR Martin was on the shelf. He wasn't coming off of the shelf. Stay there!But my defenses were gradually beaten down by Connor and Karen. They could believe I hadn't seen Game of Thrones, Karen kept telling me how great it was. Season two started and Karen couldn't stop telling me how great it was, how I should watch it. And a couple of weeks ago, I think on Easter to be exact, she finally broke me down. I started watching the show and in about three days I made my way through the first season. I was hooked again. Even though about seven years ago I read the books I had forgotten almost everything except for the really big plot points. And when I got to the end of the season I had the choice of watching the second season and having it slowly unfold week by week, or finding out everything that was going to happen in the season by re-reading the second book. I went for the latter, leaving the actual watching of the show till probably this summer when I can sit down and watch all the episodes in a couple of days again. How about a review instead of just writing about myself?I don't want to try to review this. Almost anything I write about the actual book itself would be a spoiler. Besides by this time you probably already have an opinion on the series and are either going to read the books or watch the show, or not. I'd recommend them, but with the caveat that I think it's quite possibly going to be an epic disappointment, sort of like Lost where as the time goes on story more and more fails to live up to the early expectations, or that with the snail's pace the series has been written that the author will die before getting anywhere near the end of this story. *(in my decade plus servitude in the bookselling business the question about when the next Martin book is being released and the disappointment, exasperation, resignation and dismay that would usually follow the ever changing answer to that question has been as constant as the question of 'where is the bathroom', Feast for Crows didn't prepare me for the roller-coaster ride of release dates that Dance with Dragons would produce and the enjoyment(?) of watching people's reactions first as the initial promise that book five would be out within a year of book four (or so as it was written in the afterward or forward or somewhere in book four) was broken and then the release date was continually pushed back by about six months or a year every time the publication date neared, to (yes I'm serious about this, I don't know if the publishers ever meant this, or if this was the Barnes and Noble info on the book just fucking with people) to the book being promised in the very near future about two and a half years ago, to the change a few weeks later to a December, 2025 release (oh man, was this a funny one, I remember laughing out loud the first time someone asked me if there was any update on the book's release and I saw this, the customer I think laughed too,because George RR Martin fans are used to being dicked around with), to a quick change of a November 2010 release date that fans were sure was correct to the last change to the actual release).
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  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    January 1, 1970
    A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2), George R.R. MartinA Clash of Kings is the second novel in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin expected to consist of seven volumes. It was first published on 16 November 1998 in the United Kingdom. Like its predecessor, A Game of Thrones, it won the Locus Award (in 1999) for Best Novel and was nominated for the Nebula Award (also in 1999) for best novel. A Clash of Kings depicts the Seven Kingdoms of A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2), George R.R. MartinA Clash of Kings is the second novel in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin expected to consist of seven volumes. It was first published on 16 November 1998 in the United Kingdom. Like its predecessor, A Game of Thrones, it won the Locus Award (in 1999) for Best Novel and was nominated for the Nebula Award (also in 1999) for best novel. A Clash of Kings depicts the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros in civil war, while the Night's Watch mounts a reconnaissance to investigate the mysterious people known as wildlings. Meanwhile, Daenerys Targaryen continues her plan to reconquer the Seven Kingdoms.تاریخ نخستین خوانش: از ششم ماه آوریل سال 2015 میلادی تا روز بیست و ششم ماه آوریل سال 2015 میلادیجلد دو: نبرد پادشاهان، شامل دو کتاب: کتابهای 1 و 2؛ عنوان کتاب نخست: نبرد پادشاهان کتاب 1 از جلد 2 (نغمه آتش و یخ، #2)؛ نویسنده: جورج آر. آر. مارتین؛ مترجم: رویا خادم الرضا؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، ویدا، 1391، در 629 صعنوان کتاب دوم: نبرد پادشاهان کتاب 2 از جلد 2 (نغمه آتش و یخ، #2)؛ نویسنده: جورج آر. آر. مارتین؛ مترجم: رویا خادم الرضا؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، ویدا، 1391، در 662 صنبرد پادشاهان دومین رمان از سری رمان‌های ترانه یخ و آتش در سبک خیال‌پردازی حماسی اثر جرج آر. آر. مارتین است. این مجموعه رمان گفته می‌شود که در هفت کتاب منتشر خواهد شد. این کتاب در شانزدهم ماه نوامبر سال 1998 میلادی در بریتانیا منتشر شد، هر چند انتشار آن در آمریکا تا ماه مارس سال 1999 میلادی رخ نداد، کتاب همچون کتاب پیشین همین مجموعه، با عنوان بازی تاج و تخت، برنده ی جایزه لوکاس در سال 1999 میلادی برای بهترین رمان و نامزد جایزه نبولا در همان سال برای بهترین رمان شد. داستان‌ها را «جان»، «برن»، «کتلین»، «داوس»، «دنریس»، «تیان»، «آریا»، «سنسا» و «تیریون»، روایت میکنند. جنگهایی که هفت پادشاهی را درگیر کرده است. اما از نظر مکانی در یک نقطه نیستند. «سنسا» و «تیریون» داستان آماده‌ سازی بارانداز پادشاه، برای حمله‌ ی پادشاه‌ های مدعیِ را روایت می‌کنند، «کتلین» خوانشگر را با ریورران و تالی‌ها همراه می‌کند، «آریا» خوانشگر را کنار لرد تایوین لنیستر، و سپس کنار شمالی‌ها نگاه می‌دارد، «داوس» هم از اردوگاه استنیس گزارش می‌دهد. از سوی دیگر «برن» و «تیان» از وینترفل میگویند، «جان» به پشت دیوار رفته است و «دنریس» نیز آنسوی دریاهاست. ا. شربیانی
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  • Νόρα
    January 1, 1970
    Πριν 6 μήνες τελείωσε και ο πέμπτος κύκλος της σειράς Game of thrones. Οι τηλεθεατές έμειναν καθηλωμένοι στις οθόνες τους από τις συγκλονιστικές εξελίξεις της σειράς και το τόσα αναπάντητα ερωτήματα που έμειναν.Πλέον πρέπει να περιμένουμε μέχρι την άνοιξη του 2016 μέχρι τον νέο κύκλο. Μέχρι τότε όμως; Σκεφτόμουνα ποιος είναι ο καλύτερος τρόπος για να περάσει πιο ευχάριστα ο καιρός μέχρι τον Μάιο που θα αρχίσει ο έκτος κύκλος; Μα φυσικά να συνεχίσω την ανάγνωση των βιβλίων του Μάρτιν που θα μου κ Πριν 6 μήνες τελείωσε και ο πέμπτος κύκλος της σειράς Game of thrones. Οι τηλεθεατές έμειναν καθηλωμένοι στις οθόνες τους από τις συγκλονιστικές εξελίξεις της σειράς και το τόσα αναπάντητα ερωτήματα που έμειναν.Πλέον πρέπει να περιμένουμε μέχρι την άνοιξη του 2016 μέχρι τον νέο κύκλο. Μέχρι τότε όμως; Σκεφτόμουνα ποιος είναι ο καλύτερος τρόπος για να περάσει πιο ευχάριστα ο καιρός μέχρι τον Μάιο που θα αρχίσει ο έκτος κύκλος; Μα φυσικά να συνεχίσω την ανάγνωση των βιβλίων του Μάρτιν που θα μου κρατήσουν συντροφιά μέχρι την ημερομηνία της πολυπόθητης πρεμιέρας και να μάθω την ιστορία όπως θα έπρεπε να είναι γιατί η σειρά παραλείπει πολλά πράγματα και δεν συμβαδίζει 100% χρονικά με τα βιβλία,όπως μου έχουν πει.Η συγκλονιστική συνέχεια ενός καταπληκτικού βιβλίου.Δεν υπάρχουν λόγια ...πάνω που έχεις τελειώσει το πρώτο και δεν μπορείς να πιστέψεις τις ανατροπές που μόλις διάβασες και το σκηνικό το οποίο έχει στηθεί...έρχεται το δεύτερο βιβλίο όπου η δράση είναι καταιγιστική,και η πλοκή τόσο γρήγορη, μεστή και καλά δομημένη, που δεν θέλεις να τελειώσει ποτέ και οι σχεδόν 1000 σελίδες φαντάζουν τόσο λίγες.Δεν μπορούσα να σταματήσω την ανάγνωση.Απόλαυσα κάθε λέξη, κάθε ανατροπή,κάθε λεπτομέρεια.Η προσέγγιση που κάνει στις Μακιαβελικές μηχανορραφίες της πολιτικής, ο συγγραφέας των επικών βιβλίων.H μοχθηρή ματιά των ανθρώπων που είναι εθισμένοι στην εξουσία. H μάχη για την κυριαρχία είναι το κεντρικό ζήτημα γύρω από το οποίο εξελλίσονται διαμάχες προσώπων, συγκρούσεις συμφερόντων και επικές μάχες.Πολλές σπονδυλωτές ιστορίες,αν και επικεντρώνεται λίγο περισσότερο στον πόλεμο και το Κινγκς Λάντινγκ όπου κυριαρχεί το ψεύδος, η υποκρισία,οι ίντριγκες και η κολακεία,στρατηγικές αποφάσεις, δολοπλοκίες, μηχανορραφίες και σκευωρίες, πάθη, δολοπλοκίες, κρυμμένα μυστικά και θαμμένες επιθυμίες.Προσωπικά βρίσκω απίστευτα ενδιαφέροντες όλους τους χαρακτήρες,έχει χτιστεί σπουδαία το πορτραίτο τους και με τόσες λυκοφιλίες,προδοσίες,δολοπλοκίες,μηχανορραφίες είναι αδύνατον να βαρεθείς!Πολλές φορές ακολουθεί την αδικία της πραγματικής ζωή. Οι άνθρωποι πεθαίνουν και δεν πραγματοποιούν ποτέ τα όνειρά τους ή τις φιλοδοξίες τους. Και για μένα αυτό είναι το δυνατό στοιχείο του «Game of Thrones.Παρακολουθούμε τη ροή της πλοκής μέσα από παράλληλη αφήγηση .Νέοι χαρακτήρες κάνουν την εμφάνιση τους και η πλοκή επεκτείνεται.Κοφτεροί διάλογοι,η ανάπτυξη των χαρακτήρων γίνεται με έναν τέλειο τρόπο (πάρα πολύ δύσκολο κατόρθωμα αν αναλογιστούμε το πόσοι είναι οι χαρακτήρες,παλιοί και καινούργιοι) και εννοείται ότι δεν λείπουν και οι ανατροπές.Ένα άλλο σημαντικό πράγμα που έχει καταφέρει,είναι η αξιοποίηση τών δεύτερων χαρακτηρών σε τέτοιο σημείο που ο αναγνώστης να τους συμπαθεί αρκετά και να γίνονται και αγαπημένοι του.Οι χαρακτήρες ακόμα πιο αληθινοί, έντονοι, παθιασμένοι, και ρεαλιστικοίΤα κεφάλαια που απόλαυσα πιο πολύ είναι αυτά που την περιγραφή της δράσης την αφηγούνται οι αγαπημένοι μου χαρακτήρες :Τζον Σνόου Είναι από τους αγαπημένους μου χαρακτήρες Η αναλυτική, στρατηγική του σκέψη, οι μονίμως αγνές προθέσεις του και ο απαράμιλλος αλτρουισμός του είναι μερικοί από τους λόγους που τον αγαπώ. Εκτός από τον πρωταγωνιστή μου αρέσει και ο τόπος.Η επιβλητική ατμόσφαιρα του βορρά με το χιόνι το μυστήριο με τους λευκούς οδοιπόρους με έκαναν να περιμένω με ανυπομονησία τα κεφάλαια.Θέλω να μάθω περισσότερα γι αυτά τα μυστήρια πλάσματα.Άρυα Στάρκ Ποιος δεν συμπαθεί αυτό το πιτσιρίκι ;Αποτελεί έναν αξιαγάπητο όσο και σύνθετο χαρακτήρα. Το μικροκαμωμένο αγοροκόριτσο που ήθελε να παίζει με τόξα και σπαθιά.Αυτό όμως που θεωρώ ότι την καθιστά από τους πιο ωραίους χαρακτήρες είναι είναι η εξυπνάδα της,το πείσμα της.Ένας άλλος λόγος που απόλαυσα τα δικά της κεφάλαια είναι η παρουσία του Ζάκεν Χ'γκαρ και ο αινιγματικός χαρακτήρας του.Σάντορ ΚλεγκεινΑν και δεν βλέπουμε τη δική του οπτική γωνία,ήταν ο μοναδικός λόγος που μου άρεσαν τα κεφάλαια της Σάνσα Στάρκ.Αν και έχει παρουσιαστεί ως ο απολαυστικός αγροίκος που η μόνη γλώσσα που μιλάει είναι αυτή των διαμελισμών και των σκορπισμένων εντέρων, έχει καταφέρει να ξεδιπλώσει κι άλλες πτυχές του χαρακτήρα του.Ρόμπ Στάρκ Ο «Βασιλιάς του Βορρά» αποτελεί έναν από τους πιο νορμάλ χαρακτήρες σε μια αχανή θάλασσα διεστραμμένων βιαστών, ψυχοπαθών δολοφόνων και ασυγκράτητων ψευτών.Μπραν σταρκΑκόμα ένα αξιολάτρευτο και γλυκό παιδί,πολύ ώριμο για την ηλικία του.Ο χαρακτήρας του γίνεται ακόμα πιο ενδιαφέρον όταν αρχίζεις επιτέλους να ανακαλύπτει όλο το εύρος των ικανοτήτων του.Σίγουρα σε αυτό το βιβλίο την παράσταση κλέβει ο πανέξυπνος Τύριον ,με όλες τις κινήσεις του και από ότι αποδεικνύεται ένα δυνατό στρατιωτικό μυαλό. ΒάρυςΔεν έχω αποφασίσει αν πρόκειται για αγαπημένο χαρακτήρα,αλλά είναι από τους πιο ενδιαφέροντες και μυστηριώδης,Η “Αράχνη” γνωρίζει ίσως καλύτερα από τον καθένα τι σημαίνει παιχνίδι του θρόνου. Πριν ακόμα καταλάβουμε σε ποια πλευρά βρίσκεται, ο Βάρυς δείχνει ένα μικρό αλλά λαμπρό κομμάτι του μυαλού του με τις φοβερές και καμιά φορά σοφές ατάκες του.Ο συγγραφέας χτίζει με τρομερή μαεστρία την υπόθεση, ανατρέποντας συχνά και απρόσμενα την εξέλιξη.Πραγματικά απολαυστικός.Το δεύτερο βιβλίο της σειράς μου άφησε τις καλύτερες εντυπώσεις και πολύ υψηλές προσδοκίες για το επόμενο.
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  • Andrea ❤Ninja Bunneh❤
    January 1, 1970
    Fuck this book.Fuck .Fuck books 3, 4, and 5 that I haven't even read yet.Fuck book 6 that better be getting written at this very moment.Fuck the characters that I hate and are evil pieces of shit but seem to be the ones that survive.Fuck the characters I love because I know I'm going to see them get picked off by Mr. Martin one by one.Last but not least, fuck me for getting hopelessly hooked on this series in the first place. The fucking end. 5 Ninja-Bunnehs-Flipping-Everyone-Off
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