I am Rembrandt's Daughter
With her mother dead of the plague, and her beloved brother newly married and moved away, Cornelia van Rijn finds herself without a friend or confidante--save her difficult father. Out of favor with Amsterdam's elite, and considered brash and unreasonable by his patrons, Rembrandt van Rijn, once revered, is now teetering on the brink of madness. Cornelia alone must care for him, though she herself is haunted by secrets and scandal. Her only happiness comes in chance meetings with Carel, the son of a wealthy shipping magnate whose passion for art stirs Cornelia. And then there is Neel, her father's last remaining pupil, whose steadfast devotion to Rembrandt both baffles and touches her. Based on historical fact, and filled with family dramas and a love triangle that would make Jane Austen proud, I Am Rembrandt's Daughter is a powerful account of a young woman's struggle to come of age within the shadow of one of the world's most brilliant and complicated artists.

I am Rembrandt's Daughter Details

TitleI am Rembrandt's Daughter
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 29th, 2007
PublisherBloomsbury USA Childrens
ISBN-139781599900469
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Fiction, Art, Romance

I am Rembrandt's Daughter Review

  • Ionia
    January 1, 1970
    This book is an example of why I am a hypocrite. Really, and here's why. I write reviews and I constantly tell people how important they are, but then I read a book like this, disagree with many of the other reviews and shake my head at people. In other words, I disregard everything I read and come to my own conclusion. Now about the book: I fell in love with this book just as assuredly as I fell in love with the last book I read by Lynn Cullen (Mrs. Poe.) I believe this book was marketed as a y This book is an example of why I am a hypocrite. Really, and here's why. I write reviews and I constantly tell people how important they are, but then I read a book like this, disagree with many of the other reviews and shake my head at people. In other words, I disregard everything I read and come to my own conclusion. Now about the book: I fell in love with this book just as assuredly as I fell in love with the last book I read by Lynn Cullen (Mrs. Poe.) I believe this book was marketed as a young adult read, but I felt it had much more depth than one usually finds in that category, so if the YA books tend to turn your head away, please give this one a second look anyway. Cornelia is a beautiful, strong and capable character. She has the wit and intellect to handle such a strong role as being Rembrandt's daughter. Lynn Cullen has a way of letting the reader inside the minds of her characters so that they can experience their emotions and see through their eyes. She makes you feel like you are part of the ongoing story rather than just a bystander. I felt that way with this story. I love when you read something and you just know that it must have been important to the author at the time that they wrote it. This book has some absolutely beautiful passages that support a strong story that gets stronger as the book progresses. I enjoyed watching the characters mature and grow throughout the telling.The struggle of Cornelia loving her father even through shame, humiliation and ridicule from others was incredibly well written. I felt sympathy toward her and her situation and by the end of the book, I only wanted what was best for her. The secondary characters in this story are also well penned and help to shed light on Cornelia's character and determination. I loved the setting and the historical research the author did was clearly more than adequate. This book is beautiful, and I would certainly recommend it to anyone interested in the historical period.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    A lyrical and fascinating book, based on the real family of Rembrandt. The author has richly incorporated some of Rembrandt's greatest works into the story, and it's a beautiful book.
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good historical fiction book, but I found it somewhat boring. It took a long time for the story to evolve and sometimes it was not very interesting. It was the story about a girl named Cornelia who's mother died during the plague. Her father was a once-well-known painter who has since gone soemwhat crazy. Cornelia's life seems to be spinning out of control but she finds love where she leasts expects it to make ends meet.I would not necessarily recommend this book to everyone because i This was a good historical fiction book, but I found it somewhat boring. It took a long time for the story to evolve and sometimes it was not very interesting. It was the story about a girl named Cornelia who's mother died during the plague. Her father was a once-well-known painter who has since gone soemwhat crazy. Cornelia's life seems to be spinning out of control but she finds love where she leasts expects it to make ends meet.I would not necessarily recommend this book to everyone because it was not very interesting, but it was a good read for anyone interested in historical society.
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  • Haley
    January 1, 1970
    Cornelia has always been defined by her father, Rembrandt, the once-celebrated now notorious painter. Most call her the crazy artist's bastard child.But when a man of esteem, Carel, takes an interest in her, she begins to think maybe she can escape her impoverished home, just like her brother, Titus did with the beautiful, bitchy Magdalena(can you tell I hate her? A lot?)When the her father's apprentice, serious Neel, begins to notice her, she brushes him off- why would she want to be further as Cornelia has always been defined by her father, Rembrandt, the once-celebrated now notorious painter. Most call her the crazy artist's bastard child.But when a man of esteem, Carel, takes an interest in her, she begins to think maybe she can escape her impoverished home, just like her brother, Titus did with the beautiful, bitchy Magdalena(can you tell I hate her? A lot?)When the her father's apprentice, serious Neel, begins to notice her, she brushes him off- why would she want to be further associated with the unstable Rembrandt, who has never acknowledged her as his own?I LOVE the format of this. It starts 1670 when Rembrandt's dead, then goes three years earlier in chapters. Every chapter or so is labeled by a painting of Rembrandt's and the story behind it from Cornelia's POV, like a flashback earlier.Beautiful imagery.
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  • Passione
    January 1, 1970
    cornelia is a failed painters daughter . cornelia is embarrassed by her father because to her and other he seems insane because of his relationship with God . Only neel remains at her fathers side when eveything turns for the worst . cornelia has an encounter with a boy named carel . they both take a liking for each other but when things get rough carel turns his back on her unlike neel. Cornelia has a brother named titus who has a different mother who used to be rich but when rembrandts gets il cornelia is a failed painters daughter . cornelia is embarrassed by her father because to her and other he seems insane because of his relationship with God . Only neel remains at her fathers side when eveything turns for the worst . cornelia has an encounter with a boy named carel . they both take a liking for each other but when things get rough carel turns his back on her unlike neel. Cornelia has a brother named titus who has a different mother who used to be rich but when rembrandts gets ill and gets looked down on titus mother leaves . all of cornelia's life she has been jealous of titus and her fathers relationship titus is charming to his father and cornelia as if she is nothing . cornelia has an eye for painting and loves painting . when cornelia was little a man would always pass by her house she never knew who she was until the end . only til the end of the story she really k nows she is truely rambrandts daughter and neel and her is destined to be together .i thought this was an excellente book inspite of all the horrible ratings it got i loved the book and i am glad i didn't put the book to the side because of other people.
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  • Monse
    January 1, 1970
    This novel has the main character deal with conflicts like family, self identity, poverty, the plague, and love triangle. It takes in the 1600's so if you like historical fiction it's a great choice it's also a well paced story. It doesn't feel rushed and the ending doesn't leave you wanting more, it leaves you feeling content. I recommend this book to anyone that likes these type of things plus you learn a little more about art.
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  • Shaya
    January 1, 1970
    I'm torn on this book. I really liked the writing and the imagery and the characters. But the plot? It was just way too predictable. True, it is historical fiction but the main storyline was imagined by the author and not based on fact as far as I could tell from the Author's Note. The back cover practically gives away that Cornelia is torn between two boys and you can tell she will pick the serious moral one over the very pretty, rich one. Isn't that what always happens? So the first plot stran I'm torn on this book. I really liked the writing and the imagery and the characters. But the plot? It was just way too predictable. True, it is historical fiction but the main storyline was imagined by the author and not based on fact as far as I could tell from the Author's Note. The back cover practically gives away that Cornelia is torn between two boys and you can tell she will pick the serious moral one over the very pretty, rich one. Isn't that what always happens? So the first plot strand was ruined from the start. And the second, I guessed at 100 pages before it was revealed. If only one of them had not been so cliched it would have been a much better book. There was too much foreshadowing. Ideas are drilled in about people's character that makes it obvious what will eventually occur. It felt like a first writer's attempt. I did really like Cornelia as a character. She is very strong and able to deal with a lot of her problems. It annoyed me that the book cover spoke about Rembrandt as being maybe crazy. Yes, he is an artist and a bit eccentric but he is not insane. He did make mistakes and is flawed but really no worse than any of the other characters. He ignores Cornelia but I sensed that he understood a lot about her and the people she was associating with. And he does love Cornelia. If I could go back in time I would tell myself to stop 50 pages before the end and that all my ideas were right but having them revealed was not necessary.
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  • Anne Osterlund
    January 1, 1970
    Cornelia is the bastard daughter of a reputed madman, the famous Rembrandt—a once wealthy painter brought low. When her brother marries into wealth—and she captures the smile of a young man named Carel—she begins to dream that maybe life will improve.A dream quickly squelched by her father’s careless attitude toward tradition, his failure to bow to the demands of Amsterdam society, and his complete disdain . . . for her. A disdain Cornelia cannot understand.But then the boy, Carel, returns to he Cornelia is the bastard daughter of a reputed madman, the famous Rembrandt—a once wealthy painter brought low. When her brother marries into wealth—and she captures the smile of a young man named Carel—she begins to dream that maybe life will improve.A dream quickly squelched by her father’s careless attitude toward tradition, his failure to bow to the demands of Amsterdam society, and his complete disdain . . . for her. A disdain Cornelia cannot understand.But then the boy, Carel, returns to her doorstep. And as her father’s anger grows, secrets begin to unravel. Because—like paintings—secrets have a way of surviving. Even in an era when death is as constant as the ringing of plague bells at Westerkerk church.An excellent piece of YA historical fiction! Far more than just an imagined tale about a great painter, I Am Rembrandt’s Daughter is an earnest exploration of family, the power of love, and the meaning of true art.
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  • Karey
    January 1, 1970
    I loved I Am Rembrandt's Daughter! I started reading it this morning and finished this evening. What I most enjoyed about the book was the author's vivid descriptions. Although I have never been to Amsterdam I felt like I knew it because of how she portrayed the city. I also liked reading the parts when they talked about what it takes to make paintings, about how important the light is and about brush strokes and the other things. Because I am not a painter and did not know much about painting i I loved I Am Rembrandt's Daughter! I started reading it this morning and finished this evening. What I most enjoyed about the book was the author's vivid descriptions. Although I have never been to Amsterdam I felt like I knew it because of how she portrayed the city. I also liked reading the parts when they talked about what it takes to make paintings, about how important the light is and about brush strokes and the other things. Because I am not a painter and did not know much about painting it was neat to read and learn about those things.This book reminds me of the novel Girl With a Pearl Earring. (Which is another book I enjoyed!) It reminds me of that book because both books were about famous Dutch artists and their way of living.I definitely recommend this to anyone needing a good book to read!
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  • Bernadette
    January 1, 1970
    After visiting Rembrandt House this week, in the museum shop I noticed this book and downloaded the Kindle version. A very good read. Although fictional, and very little is known about Rembrandt's illegitimate daughter, the story is about her and her life with Rembrandt. Many of Rembrandt's later works are mentioned and it was fun to look them up and in some ways see the story come to life.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    The writing was very good and the author talked about actual Rembrandt pictures. she did a lot of research on Rembrandt's life and art. But I had a very hard time believing the "surprise revelation" she put in her book.
  • musiclover
    January 1, 1970
    I love the book. I even like cornelia's way of thinking and the way she cares for ppl.
  • Sheila
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great read!
  • Tifani
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this very simple and sweet book about love and family.
  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    A marvelous story.
  • Josiphine/Tessa
    January 1, 1970
    2.5I loved reading about Rembrandt and his family, but the love triangle was so incredibly exasperating and the made up parts were too frustrating for me to really enjoy.
  • Iris
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this book was quite enjoyable. It was super intriguing, and the history in it was fascinating. I simply found that it lacked that spark that makes a book great.Although I wanted to know what happened, and for the most part it was interesting, at times I found I was a bit bored.PLOTThe plot in this was really interesting. It was, as the title suggests, about Rembrandt's daughter, and she's been left to take care of her father all on her own.They're broke, and Rembrandt, once a great pai I thought this book was quite enjoyable. It was super intriguing, and the history in it was fascinating. I simply found that it lacked that spark that makes a book great.Although I wanted to know what happened, and for the most part it was interesting, at times I found I was a bit bored.PLOTThe plot in this was really interesting. It was, as the title suggests, about Rembrandt's daughter, and she's been left to take care of her father all on her own.They're broke, and Rembrandt, once a great painter, is now scorned by society. There's quite a bit going on, and there's some interesting plot twists, that never even crossed my mind.Mostly though, this book was about the romance. Romances... aren't usually my thing. Not to mention there was A LOVE TRIANGLE! Love triangles... also not my thing.However, the love triangle was actually quite well done.(view spoiler)[At first I completely shipped her and Carel... I wasn't too impressed with Neel. As the book went on though, Neel started to grow on me. And Carel... well, he was actually something of a jerk.It was also one of the few love triangles I've read where I couldn't predict the outcome from the start... at first I really thought she would end up with Carel... he just seemed like he was the obvious winner. Then she didn't. So that was sort of satisfying. (hide spoiler)]SETTINGThis was set in the Netherlands, in the... seventeen hundreds? Maybe? Something like that anyways.It isn't a place I've read much about, so it was super interesting. I'm glad I read it just for the history alone. It was just fascinating!The setting felt really real as well. It had obviously been well researched, and it just felt so vivid.Basically, I was impressed.CHARACTERSThe characters were... I don't know. I liked them well enough, but none of them felt particularly well developed. I already addressed her love interests in the spoiler tag, and there really isn't anything else I feel I can say without spoilers, so I'm just going to completely not address them here. Other than that though...-Cornelia... she was... I don't know. I had moments where I really liked her, but she wasn't very well developed, and felt like cardboard a lot of the time.-Rembrandt was probably the best developed character. He actually had a really rich character, and although he wasn't very nice, I liked reading about him, because... he NEVER felt like cardboard.-Titus was sort of half developed... he was a fairly small character, and he was okay-ly (Tis is definitely a word... Don't question me on this...) developed for the amount he was in it, but I would have loved if he was a bit more developed.There was couple other characters I could address, but I think the risk of spoilers is just too big, and they don't seem important enough to bother with spoiler tags, so...OVER ALLI enjoyed this book well enough, the history was really interesting, and I think it was definitely worth reading. I wouldn't necessarily recommend it to everyone, but I think it's worth a read if it's your sort of thing.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Since we are visiting Amsterdam this month, I wanted to read something about Rembrandt. While this wasn't the best writing I have read, it was an interesting and plausible story based on the life of one of Rembrandt's actual children - the daughter he had out of wedlock after his wife died from the plague. It was fascinating to read about the process of his painting, and sad to learn that he had become penniless towards the end of his life.
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  • Michele Benson
    January 1, 1970
    This is a young adult novel imagining Rembrandt's youngest daughter's life. I enjoyed the detailed description of Rembrandt's painting, how he worked, the way the house was run and of Amsterdam during that period in time.
  • Kathleen O'Nan
    January 1, 1970
    This is an interesting historical novel, giving us an idea of what it might have been like to have been Rembrandt's daughter at a point when his career was rapidly going downhill. The author also portrays Rembrandt himself in great detail and in a fascinating way. I'll read more by this author.
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  • QNPoohBear
    January 1, 1970
    Cornelia van Rijn is the daughter of the once famous painter Rembrandt van Rijn and his maid. Cornelia feels shame and anger towards her father for not marrying her mother, making her life miserable and leaving Cornelia to be labeled illegitimate. Shunned by society and mostly ignored by her father, Cornelia longs for love and acceptance. She has only her older brother Titus to love though she's a bit jealous of her father's obvious love for Titus. She also worries about how her family is going Cornelia van Rijn is the daughter of the once famous painter Rembrandt van Rijn and his maid. Cornelia feels shame and anger towards her father for not marrying her mother, making her life miserable and leaving Cornelia to be labeled illegitimate. Shunned by society and mostly ignored by her father, Cornelia longs for love and acceptance. She has only her older brother Titus to love though she's a bit jealous of her father's obvious love for Titus. She also worries about how her family is going to survive now that her father's paintings are no longer sought after. Cornelia keenly feels the grinding poverty that her brother blithely ignores and her father can't seem to accept. Titus' solution is to marry his wealthy cousin, leaving Cornelia alone to deal with her father's temper. There's only Neel, her father's last remaining pupil keeping them from begging. Neel tries to befriend Cornelia but she turns her nose up at the serious young man. She prefers Carel, the handsome son of a local wealthy merchant family. He doesn't seem to mind her shabbiness and they share a love of painting and a tragic past. Cornelia reminisces about the days when her mother was alive and a man with a yellow mustache frequently walked by and winked at her and gave her presents. If she can marry Carel when she comes of age in two years, she'll have everything she's always dreamed of. Yet, there are some things she can't help worrying about even still and when tragedy visits her family, she realizes how much she's truly loved. This is a dark, rather sad story. The story is framed by events taking place in 1670 but the rest of the story goes back to 1667 and then back and forth between Cornelia's childhood and young adulthood. This made for a rather confusing story to start with. Once I got used to the time shifts, I didn't have problems following the story. I found Cornelia's flashbacks very bleak and disturbing. Her present life isn't any better or worse. Her childhood fears are confusing and her mother's lack of caring is also never really explained. Some of the childhood scenes set the stage for what comes at the end but I don't like seeing all the flashbacks was necessary. The Romeo and Juliet/love triangle plot is a bit silly. I liked one boy over the other at first but then I had the same thoughts as Cornelia about Carel. There's too much description about the city, poverty and the plague. It makes for some gruesome visuals. The descriptions add to the story but I didn't like them. Do not read this story before bed. This book is very much a young adult coming of age novel. It wasn't well written enough for me to fully engage in the story and not be annoyed with the teenage characters. I didn't like the plot all that much. There's a dramatic twist to the story at the end that I saw coming. It's obvious to anyone except Cornelia. The big reveal causes the actions at the end of the story. I wish there was more at the end of the book and less of the build up. I think the story would have been better without the romance threads and just stuck to Cornelia and her wanting to belong. There's a great line at the end that sums up Rembrandt's feelings for Cornelia and I would rather leave it at that than add all the drama. I can easily see the internal struggle Cornelia goes through. She has a love/hate relationship with her father. There's no official portrait of her so I can imagine how she must have felt watching her father paint, maybe longing for some of his attention and not getting it. The author added a lot of "what ifs?" to the story that I felt were a bit cliched and unnecessary. The characters are complex. Cornelia is growing up in a tumultuous household. She doesn't belong anywhere, or so she thinks, and she longs to belong to someone. She thinks money will buy happiness but maybe it won't. That's the lesson she has to figure out. She has to decide who she loves and whether she can accept who she is. Titus is the complete opposite of Cornelia. He's always lively and happy but he hasn't had the same experiences Cornelia has. He's the much favored only surviving son of Rembrandt's beloved first wife Saskia. Saskia's family had money. Titus is also male so he can earn a living. He doesn't think too much about what will happen to Cornelia. For all his faults though, I liked him. Neel is a nice boy but shy and series. Cornelia, being a teenage girl with hormones, doesn't appreciate him. He needed a bit more developing to make him human. None of the other characters were fully likeable. Rembrandt is portrayed as a tortured genius with a gift from God that no one understands. He drinks too much, he yells too much and treats his only surviving daughter like a slave. His paintings are dark and moody, but his technique was brilliant and paved the way for later painters though in his day he was under appreciated. Carel has his faults too. I won't name them in this review because that would spoil the story. He's a typical rich kid. He is his uncle all over again. Magdalena is a spoiled brat and I wanted to slap her. She annoyed me every time she was on the page, yet I did feel sorry for her at the end of the book. This book succeeded in making me want to learn more about Rembrandt and look up his paintings.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Historical fiction about the supposed illegitimate daughter of Rembrandt.
  • Amanda Kay
    January 1, 1970
    Historical fiction isn't usually my thing. Lynn Cullen does an excellent job of blending facts with fiction and draws me in with familiar, yet mysterious characters. I loved Cornelia van Rijn!
  • Maria Ní Choille
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favourite Historical Fiction books
  • Kaci
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this historical fiction novel about Rembrandt's daughter Cornelia in Amsterdam in the 1670's.
  • Maria Ní Choille
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favourite Historical fiction books
  • Summer
    January 1, 1970
    In the span of 300 pages Cullen does a lovely job of detailing the struggle between rich and poor in terms of living standards, health, and social acceptance. The protagonist isn't at all boring or stagnant either. By chasing romance, she discovers secrets kept by her entire family--and those she though were in her bloodline. Enjoy!
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Although I was a bit sceptical at first, I really did enjoy reading this YA novel about Cornelia van Rijn. There are two story lines going on, in between the first and last chapter which take place after Rembrandt's death. You can easily recognize which story line is which as one is in italics and one is in roman. We get to know Cornelia as a kid, and the story is told by using Rembrandt's paintings, both from that period and earlier. In the other story line we get to know Cornelia as a young te Although I was a bit sceptical at first, I really did enjoy reading this YA novel about Cornelia van Rijn. There are two story lines going on, in between the first and last chapter which take place after Rembrandt's death. You can easily recognize which story line is which as one is in italics and one is in roman. We get to know Cornelia as a kid, and the story is told by using Rembrandt's paintings, both from that period and earlier. In the other story line we get to know Cornelia as a young teen, falling in love for the first time. We get sucked in her world of books, her cat Tijger (dutch for Tiger) the growing ducklings in the canal and sounds of the peacocks across it, the love for her brother, her posing for "The Yewish Bride", the struggle to make ends meet, the common fear for the pest and the tolling of the death bells.I love how the book really gives you a sense of daily life in 17th century Amsterdam, and who can resist a story of young love set in a place such as that? And of course, Rembrandt makes a wonderful and amusing subject for a book, as does his family life.I did have some concerns though, most of all with the use of dutch words, being dutch myself. I'll hide them as a spoiler, not because I think they spoil the plot, but because they spoil my positive review. Feel free to read my rant at your own risk: (view spoiler)[-At the end of the first chapter Cornelia says she is taking us back to her earliest memory, when she was 4. But in the next chapter she is not 4, but 13! And in the one after that she is 5! And she does not get any younger after that. This got me confused all through the first chapters. Am I juts stupid, or is this a mistake?-No matter how lovely a story the two invented romances are I always find it a shame if stories about women who had an intersting life in any case are deemed in need of spicing up with an (additional) love interest. Plus I just don't buy the story of Hendrickjes love affair prior to Rembrandt. The "normal" story is far, far more plausible, plus, poor Geertje does not fit in this version (and is thus left out)-the apparently random use of dutch words (for the record: I am dutch) "Some" examples: Why use the dutch words "mijnheer" and "mevrouw" (sir and mrs) and use the english words miss (dutch; juffrouw) and stadtholder (dutch; stadhouder.) Why leave most names of streets and landmarks in Dutch but translate some (Prince's Canal must be Prinsengracht... and it took me an awful lot of Googling until I figured out what the "New Maze Park" was! - "Den nieuwen en vermaeckelijcken dool-hof, staende op de Roose-Graght, by de derde brugh" A very intersting piece of Amsterdam history I had no prior knowledge of, so I have to thank the author for this I guess. But how is someone not dutch ever to find more info on this?) I find the use of the word "clompen" odd. It is probably old fashioned spelling but it is hard to find info on it, so just sticking the he modern spelling "klompen" would be easier. And "buchts"? what the hell is that supposed to mean? In the story it sounds like something you could want to own, but the only meaning I can find for it is "junk", in a dialect not spoken in Amsterdam. I don't see a point of adding it in a book if you're not going to explain what it is and if even a dutch person is not able to Google it. If it were used in a similar novel written in dutch, a list of explanations to the old fashioned words whould have been added in the back. And why are people sometimes lovingly called "schaapje" (dutch for "little sheep") but is the main character called english nicknames instead? Why are both the dutch "hallo" and the english "hello" used? And possibly my favorite; why is "de noen" always called "de noen" and never just "noen"? "De" means "the" so saying "her de noen" means "her the middle of the day" and "the de noen" means "the the middle of the day" which is just silly.... (hide spoiler)]
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  • Bookaholic
    January 1, 1970
    Pentru cei pasionaţi de artă şi mai ales de pictura lui Rembrandt, cartea lui Lynn Cullen, Eu sunt fiica lui Rembrandt, este lectura ideală: un exerciţiu de imaginaţie care îl transformă pe pictor într-un personaj fascinant, misterios, o figură aparte ce nu-şi trădează stilul în favoarea modei vremurilor sale. Dar este şi un roman care reuşeşte să stârnească interesul faţă de lucrările lui Rembrandt chiar şi pentru cei care, aşa cum a fost şi cazul meu, nu sunt, în mod deosebit, atraşi de genul Pentru cei pasionaţi de artă şi mai ales de pictura lui Rembrandt, cartea lui Lynn Cullen, Eu sunt fiica lui Rembrandt, este lectura ideală: un exerciţiu de imaginaţie care îl transformă pe pictor într-un personaj fascinant, misterios, o figură aparte ce nu-şi trădează stilul în favoarea modei vremurilor sale. Dar este şi un roman care reuşeşte să stârnească interesul faţă de lucrările lui Rembrandt chiar şi pentru cei care, aşa cum a fost şi cazul meu, nu sunt, în mod deosebit, atraşi de genul său de pictură. Mai relevantă şi mai pasionantă decât orice plimbare printr-o galerie cu picturile lui Rembrandt, cartea lui Lynn Cullen, scrisă aproape pe structura unei cărţi poliţiste, dar conţinând elemente de un ekphrasis pur, deschide interpretări nu numai asupra stilului rembrandtian, ci şi asupra vieţii sale.Pe fundalul unui Amsterdam devastat de ciumă (anii 1660), Rembrandt, acum un paria al societăţii, după ce, în tinereţe, fusese pictorul preferat al înaltei societăţi, continuă cu încăpăţânare să picteze în noul său stil, cu tuşe groase, necizelate, un stil ce sfidează moda timpului său, care cerea linii cât mai fine. În casa lui sărăcăcioasă, în care locuieşte cu cei doi copii, Titus (din prima căsătorie, cu Saskia, iubirea vieţii lui) şi Cornelia, fiica pe care a avut-o cu Hendrickje, servitoarea sa, Rembrandt apare ca un personaj excentric, nepreocupat de grijile lumeşti, adesea părând un nebun care nu mai are nici un contact cu realitatea. Îşi adoră fiul şi îşi cultivă un ultim învăţăcel, pe Neel (Cornelis Suythof), plin de admiraţie şi devotament pentru maestrul său. (cronică: http://bookaholic.ro/rembrandt-in-cla...)
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  • Liberty
    January 1, 1970
    I admit it, this book took a while for me to get into. (2 attempts at reading it previously). But after about 2 chapters I was drawn in. I loved the heroine- Cornelia- and she actually had real problems, which is more than I can say about some of today's teen romance books. Cornelia van Rijn is Rembrant's daughter. Her father is a great painter, yet he stubbornly refuses to paint in the popular style and both he and Cornelia must suffer for it. Now that Cornelia's brother is getting married and I admit it, this book took a while for me to get into. (2 attempts at reading it previously). But after about 2 chapters I was drawn in. I loved the heroine- Cornelia- and she actually had real problems, which is more than I can say about some of today's teen romance books. Cornelia van Rijn is Rembrant's daughter. Her father is a great painter, yet he stubbornly refuses to paint in the popular style and both he and Cornelia must suffer for it. Now that Cornelia's brother is getting married and moving away, Cornelia must look after her father, who seems to despise her, for reasons Cornelia is unsure. She keeps to herself, but there is still that nagging thought of Why? The book follows through Cornelia's accounts of what happens and who she meets along her coming of age journey. I love the decisions she makes, and I think she made the right ones. Other reviews have critisised this book as being too predictable, I highly disagree with this view point, but seriously how many books aren't predictable ? In fact I think that the whole world LOVES and craves predictable books, who didn't know that Bella would, eventually, end up with Edward? Or that Clary would end up with Jace? And ultimately, I loved both of those books and I loved this one too. Perhaps more so as it was so unique. And I love an underdog.I wonder why this book isn't as popular as other young adult books, but I suppose the historical factor deters most teens. I wish that weren't true.
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