The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1)
'They say Aslan is on the move. Perhaps he has already landed,' whispered the Beaver. Edmund felt a sensation of mysterious horror. Peter felt brave and adventurous. Susan felt as if some delightful strain of music had just floated by. And Lucy got that feeling when you realize it's the beginning of summer. So, deep in the bewitched land of Narnia, the adventure begins.They opened a door and entered a world--Narnia--the land beyond the wardrobe, the secret country known only to Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. Lucy is the first to stumble through the back of the enormous wardrobe in the professor's mysterious old country house, discovering the magic world beyond. At first, no one believes her. But soon Edmund, Peter and Susan, too, discover the magic and meet Aslan, the Great Lion, for themselves. And in the blink of an eye, they are changed forever.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1) Details

TitleThe Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1)
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 29th, 2017
PublisherHarperCollins Publishers
ISBN0060764899
ISBN-139780060764890
Number of pages206 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Classics, Fiction, Young Adult, Childrens, Adventure, Christian, Magic, Science Fiction Fantasy, Christian Fiction

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1) Review

  • Patrick
    November 20, 2015
    This is the first book where I chronicled my thoughts as I read through it with my son. I don't know how easy it is for y'all to access the record of those here on Goodreads, but if you're looking for a detailed account of my thoughts on the book, you can look there.I'll say this. I've read a lot of books to my little boy these last couple years, and I can honestly say that This book is among the best. Good, tight writing, good description. Good action. Also there's not a lot of dead space or tr This is the first book where I chronicled my thoughts as I read through it with my son. I don't know how easy it is for y'all to access the record of those here on Goodreads, but if you're looking for a detailed account of my thoughts on the book, you can look there.I'll say this. I've read a lot of books to my little boy these last couple years, and I can honestly say that This book is among the best. Good, tight writing, good description. Good action. Also there's not a lot of dead space or trashy empty dialogue that just seems to be there to take up space. (That's become a particular peeve lately. And when you're reading a book aloud, it becomes really obvious.) The British slang will be a stumbling block to some. But it's not too bad. And there were a few slight pieces of sexism that I ignored, skipped over, or re-worded on the fly. But honestly, this book was written 60 years ago, and you need to cut it a little slack because of that. And in my opinion, it only needs a little slack. Truth be told, I've read books written this year that have ten times the sexism this one does. Also, I'd like to make it clear that this is the FIRST book of the Narnia Chronicles. This is where you start the series. I'm sorry if you read them in the wrong order, but if you did, it's better than you admit it now, come to grips, and move on with your life knowing the truth.
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  • J.G. Keely
    April 24, 2011
    My greatest disappointment in 'The Screwtape Letters' was that Lewis was not able to demonstrate what made his good people good or his bad people bad. The closest he got to defining goodness was that you could tell the good people from the vague aura of light that surrounded them--and which even shone in their cat. In this book, the cat is much bigger.Aslan had no character, he was just a big, dull stand-in. Lewis often tells us how great he is, but never demonstrates what it is that makes him g My greatest disappointment in 'The Screwtape Letters' was that Lewis was not able to demonstrate what made his good people good or his bad people bad. The closest he got to defining goodness was that you could tell the good people from the vague aura of light that surrounded them--and which even shone in their cat. In this book, the cat is much bigger.Aslan had no character, he was just a big, dull stand-in. Lewis often tells us how great he is, but never demonstrates what it is that makes him great or impressive. Sure, he helps the kids, but all that makes him is a plot facilitator. He also has his big Jesus moment, but that has the same problem as the original: if he already knows that there will be no lasting negative outcome, how much of a sacrifice is it, really?But then, Aslan isn't based on the original fig-cursing, church-rejecting, rebel Jesus, but the whitewashed version. Like Mickey Mouse, Jesus started out as an oddball troublemaker with his fair share of personality, but becoming the smiling face of a multinational organization bent on world domination takes a lot out of a mascot, whether your magic castle is in California or Rome.Such a visible figure must become universally appealing, universally friendly and loving, lest some subset of followers feel left out. And it's this 'Buddy Christ' tradition from which Aslan springs. Devoid of insight, wisdom, or charm, Aslan is just here to do all the things that our protagonists can't do.This also beggars the question: why didn't Aslan just take care of all this stuff long before the kids arrived? Why did all the animals and fairies and giants have to suffer the pain of an endless winter? We're never given any good reason Aslan had to wait for the kids--since in the end, he does it all on his own, anyways. Sure, Lewis mentions something vague about a prophecy, but in fantasy, prophecy is always a bandaid authors stick over their plot holes: 'Uh, the shlubby nobody is a hero because the prophecy says he is--he defeats the ultimate evil because the prophecy says he can'. The only thing the kids do is help run the battle, but this is only necessary because Aslan is absent, and he's only absent because the kids screwed up, meaning the entire thing would have gone off without a hitch if they had never showed up in the first place.In that regard, I have to say Lewis did an excellent job boiling down Christianity into a fable, and leaving the problem of evil completely intact. Some readers suggest that Aslan lets the queen take over to teach the kids a lesson, but is it really worthwhile to let all the inhabitants of a kingdom suffer a century of misery just to teach a few kids about the true meaning of friendship?The villain is just as poorly-constructed, and seems less concerned with defeating her enemies than with being pointlessly capricious. She manages to trick one of the children, but instead of taking advantage of this fact, she immediately makes it clear that she tricked him. I mean, how did someone that incompetent take over in the first place?Selectively stupid characters are silly and convenient, especially as villains, because this completely undermines their role as foil. It is impressive when characters overcome challenges, but not when challenges simply crumble before them. The children are lucky the Queen was more of a fart-stealing Old Nick than a Miltonian Satan, otherwise they never would have stood a chance.It is interesting to look at how many Christian authors have tried to reconcile their faith with complex fairy mythologies; not that Christianity doesn't have its own magical fairy tales, but these other traditions are not exactly compatible. Dante has Virgil lead him through hell, the Buddha was made into a saint, holidays were given new meanings (even if they often kept old symbols and names), and magical monsters were also given a place in the new faith.In the Middle Ages, monks compiled 'Bestiaries', which described the roles of dragons, unicorns, and real animals in Christian synbolism; there were even century-spanning debates about whether dog-headed men were descended from Adam. These books were rarely accurate, but allowed Christian theology to adopt many stories and superstitions from earlier periods; for instance, the connection between unicorns and virginity or the belief that pelicans fed their own blood to their young, in imitation of communion.So Lewis' attempt to take myth and adapt it to a Christian cosmology is hardly new--there is a long and storied tradition explored throughout the Chivalric period and recognizable today in books like The Once and Future King, but Lewis doesn't do a very good job of reconciling these disparate mythologies.Like most Protestants, Lewis' religion was a modern one--not magical and mystical, but reasonable and utilitarian. He did not draw on the elaborate, convoluted apocrypha of hallucinatory monsters and miracles that mystics obsess over, instead, he made a small, sane, reasonable magical world--which rather defeats the point. It is unfortunate that many of today's readers think of Lewis' writings as defining English fairy tales, since his late additions to the genre are not original, nor are they particularly well-executed examples.Many authors have come to the genre with much more imagination, a deeper sense of wonder, and a more far-reaching exploration of magic. We have examples from Kipling, Lewis Carroll, Dunsany, Eddison, Morris, and even modern updates by Gaiman and Clarke. Lewis, like Tolkien, may be a well-known example, but both are rather short-sighted, and neither one achieves as much as the many talented authors who came before.I'm not saying Lewis is bad, merely that he is unremarkable, and is hardly preeminent in fantasy, or even in children's fantasy. However, I do think his fundamental message is a bad one, even if he didn't realize he was creating it. In all his worlds, all his stories, he takes the sorts of people he dislikes, defines them as 'evil', then sets himself apart from them. There is no attempt to comprehend or to come to mutual understanding. I cannot respect a book which encourages people to vilify what they don't understand and to call isolation righteous. If any worldview deserves the epithet of 'evil', it is the sort of willful, prideful, self-indulgent ignorance Lewis displays.My List of Suggested Fantasy Books
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  • Bookdragon Sean
    November 15, 2016
    “If ever they remembered their life in this world it was as one remembers a dream.” The real world is boring; it’s mundane, unimaginative and dry. So humans create fantasy as a means of escape. We watch movies or go to the theatre to see something more interesting than the standard realities of the everyday. We paint pictures and gaze up at the stars. We play video games and roleplay. We dream. Authors like C.S Lewis and J.K Rowling show us this miserable world; they show us its tones of grey. “If ever they remembered their life in this world it was as one remembers a dream.” The real world is boring; it’s mundane, unimaginative and dry. So humans create fantasy as a means of escape. We watch movies or go to the theatre to see something more interesting than the standard realities of the everyday. We paint pictures and gaze up at the stars. We play video games and roleplay. We dream. Authors like C.S Lewis and J.K Rowling show us this miserable world; they show us its tones of grey. Then underneath it all they reveal something spectacular: they reveal fantasy. So we have four rather ordinary children about to embark on an extraordinary adventure. As a child I used to always daydream. I’ve always been somewhat introverted and would prefer imagining faraway places than existing in the now. I still do this as an adult. And this is why I love fantasy so much because it is so immersive; it literally takes my mind away. Lucy, Susan, Edward and Peter are the lucky ones. When they stumble across the wardrobe, the gateway into a more interesting realm, they experience something spectacular. “She did not shut it properly because she knew that it is very silly to shut oneself into a wardrobe, even if it is not a magic one.” Sure, there’s a war going on. And, certainly, there’s an evil witch going around murdering people. But, for me, that’d be a price worth paying. For in Narnia there is also Aslan and a whole bunch of interesting characters. There is hope, magic and companionship. The wise old Aslan though is the star of the show. He sacrifices himself for his friends, for his people. Though one issue I have with the book, and one that makes me very much aware of the text as a construct, is the questions over why Aslan actually needed to the four children. He pretty much deals with the problems by himself. There’s prophecy involved, but on a plot level he clearly could have sorted this mess out without any outside interference. I’ve seen a lot of hate over these books because of the Christian allegories involved in the storytelling. Now I find this somewhat stupid. I’m not a Christian, far from it, but you can’t really criticise a book because of this. It’s incredibly naïve. It would be like judging Jane Eyre based on its feminism aspects or Shakespeare’s exploration of colonialism in The Tempest. It’s silly. This book is, undeniable, full of Christian dogmatism. But it’s what the author wanted it to be. If you read Tolkien’s work there are so many allusions the world wars; this doesn’t affect the overall storytelling. It’s simply what is there. Read this with an open mind, as an English Literature student, I read the bible. I don’t believe the words inside, but I can still enjoy the experience. And this story is no different. Take it for what it is. “Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight,At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more,When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death,And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.” And that’s something special. I do, however, much prefer the works of Tolkien. I feel that his writing is more universal in terms of age audience. With this though, I’m very much aware of it as a children’s book. The prose is designed to sound like a children’s bedtime story in places. That’s not exactly a bad thing though. I love Narnia but I can, at least from my perspective, objectively say that Tolkien was a better writer. Though what Narnia does have is Aslan. It’s hard not to Aslan. Wouldn’t it be just wonderful if he met Gandalf? Could you imagine the stories those two could share? I'm dreaming again.
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  • Manuel
    May 6, 2008
    I loved this book.It was first read to me in 4th grade. We would all come in from lunch and our teacher would read to us for about 30 minutes before we would start class. I remember this book because it wasnt read to us by Mrs Graham, but instead it would be read by Mr Goodwin, her long-haired, bearded, Birkenstock wearing teacher's aid. Over the next few weeks we were enthralled by this story, we couldnt wait for lunch period to be over so we could hear what was happening in this magic kingdom I loved this book.It was first read to me in 4th grade. We would all come in from lunch and our teacher would read to us for about 30 minutes before we would start class. I remember this book because it wasnt read to us by Mrs Graham, but instead it would be read by Mr Goodwin, her long-haired, bearded, Birkenstock wearing teacher's aid. Over the next few weeks we were enthralled by this story, we couldnt wait for lunch period to be over so we could hear what was happening in this magic kingdom, called Narnia. From the begining we all identified with Lucy and her siblings. How was it possible that an English girl could transport herself to another place, simply by hiding in a wardrobe? And once through the wardrobe, there was this wonderful and friendly creature called a faun, Mr Tumnus. All this in only the first chapter. As the chapters progressed we got to know more about the siblings and the other creatures who inhabit Narnia. Some people critisize C.S Lewis for using too much Christian symbolism, but I was in 4th grade and to me this was the most wonderful and exciting book ever written for children. When Mr Goodwin finished the book. I instantly went to the library so I could read it myself. I was very proud this was the first book I read "without pictures". To my joy, I discovered there were other books about Narnia and I eventually read all of them too. Evenutually I discovered other wonderful places in other books and I continue to look for them today. I will always be grateful to Mr Goodwin, he started off by telling me about Narnia, but in the end, he introduced me to so much more through my on going love of books. Thank you Mr Goodwin, for everything.
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  • Jonathan
    September 15, 2011
    A Defence of C.S. Lewis...or a brief attempt at suchSome thoughts recently crossed my mind no doubt on their way down-town to relax in regards to arguments one could offer as a defence of the Christian side of this novel. The main arguments against this novel as a 'Christian allegory' that I have heard are: 1)Aslan is not a strong Christ-figure 2)That C.S. Lewis 'preaches' a black and white morality. So I'm going to roughly address them from my perspective and hope it encourages some discussion. A Defence of C.S. Lewis...or a brief attempt at suchSome thoughts recently crossed my mind no doubt on their way down-town to relax in regards to arguments one could offer as a defence of the Christian side of this novel. The main arguments against this novel as a 'Christian allegory' that I have heard are: 1)Aslan is not a strong Christ-figure 2)That C.S. Lewis 'preaches' a black and white morality. So I'm going to roughly address them from my perspective and hope it encourages some discussion.1) I will agree that Aslan is not a strong Christ-figure. Firstly for Aslan to really represent Christ he would have to be true to the gospel story. In other words he would have to be god made into man come to die for all mankind. However as he only dies for the one traitor again it's not sticking true to the Biblical gospel that all have sinned and that Christ was needed as a sacrifice for that sin. If you take things too literally here, C.S. Lewis' novel doesn't make much that much sense theologically as a result. I'll explain where I am/was going with that in a moment.2) I debate that C.S. Lewis preaches in his novel. Occasionally he can be a touch patronising but compared to many authors he rarely slips into such condescension. As for his morality I think you must understand it from the perspective of Christianity. Christianity is about black and white morality essentially: good versus evil, light vs. dark and truth vs. lies etc. It is also very grey in that Christianity is about life and the fact that no one is perfect, that everyone fits into that moral grey area. Of course I explain roughly and inadequately.Ultimately I see that there is room to argue that C.S. Lewis does a poor job of writing an allegorical novel. However I see it as a very subtle novel that unlike others (for instance The Alchemist) does not build its story around expressing an ideology but rather incorporates an ideology into its storytelling. I think that if one wants to criticise this novel it should be for not properly showing the gospel rather than for 'preaching'. I know that I and many others enjoyed the story first before seeing the connection between it and the Biblical tales. I enjoyed it even more afterwards so, then again I could be a tad biased.Original ReviewTo begin I must note that I grant this such a high rating due to the impact it had on my life. It to me is one novel that were I to pick the one novel that forged a love of books for me it would be The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe. Why? Because I can remember back about twelve years ago when I was homeschooled by my mother as a five year old. We wandered down during winter into the warm back room and she read the first Narnia book to us. The image of a red faun carrying parcels as he passed a growing lamppost would stick with me from that moment (as it stuck with C.S. Lewis). As I learned to read the Narnia books were the first novels I sunk my growing reading teeth into. And to this day I have read and re read the novels back to front (and maybe front to back).The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is a novel written for both children and adults. It contains highly allegorical elements as C.S.Lewis was a well-known apologetics writer. However he wrote that he did not write his novel as a pure allegory but as a story. And that is what The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is, a story to be enjoyed by everyone. And although written in simple language the reader can quickly, concisely and easily imagine the world without the clumsy constraints of overused words. I personally cannot imagine a world without these novels.Additional thoughts:1. Just a question at last. And one with a highly philosophical twist to it. Why is it that people so readily condemn those books which are considered as moral tales? You'd think we could do with more morality in such a twisted and confused world regardless of accepting the belief systems. 2. I have heard many people describe the entire series as silly and far too preachy. I do not see it that way at all. Trust me if C.S.Lewis wanted to be preachy he would have written a lot more philosophy and less story. Yes I can see how some would call this silly but then I argue that they are missing the point. It's a fairytale type fantasy intended mainly for children (and for those children again as adults or for their parents perhaps). But I argue that as Lewis only wrote this story based on the story of the crucifixion in many ways that it was not intended as a preachy book. My question is that why is it that if I were to base a story along what some call the 'Christian myth' it is claimed as preaching while as if I were to base it on any other mythology or story it would be deemed as merely copying the themes of another mythology? Is this yet another example of doublethink?**See 1984 (yes go and read it - you'll get what I mean)
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  • Dem
    February 25, 2017
    Novels were not a part of my life until my mid teens and therefore I missed out wonderful reading experiences like the Chronicles of Narnia but while I wish I had read more as a child I am having an absolute ball catching up on all these enchanting books when I can appreciate them on a different levelimage: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is a compelling story that is both enchanting and filled with fantasy and adventure and I think can be appreciated by both adults and children alike.Write Novels were not a part of my life until my mid teens and therefore I missed out wonderful reading experiences like the Chronicles of Narnia but while I wish I had read more as a child I am having an absolute ball catching up on all these enchanting books when I can appreciate them on a different levelimage: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is a compelling story that is both enchanting and filled with fantasy and adventure and I think can be appreciated by both adults and children alike.Writen by C.S. Lewis in 1950 for his god daughter Lucy, The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is part of a book series which is known as The Chronicles of Narnia. Set in England during the Second World War and tells the story of four children who are sent to the country to stay with a wealthy, eccentric professor in large county house. While playing hide and seek in the many rooms of the house on a rainy day one of the children discover a Wardrobe and the fantasy and adventure begins.Beautifully written, intriguing even for someone like me with a low tolerance for fantasy. I was charmed with the setting, the atmosphere and the wonderful complex and charming characters I met along the way. I loved the themes explored in the novel and really enjoyed the reading experience as an adult.
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  • Aimee
    April 19, 2008
    I just re-read this book and got so much more out of it than the first time. The symbolism & parallels to basic Christianity stuck out. *turkish delight is our human nature, prone to addiction, selfishness and wrongdoing*Peter said about Edmund, "We should go after him. After all he is our brother." Even though he had just betrayed them and was causing grief they didn't mistreat or disown him. *The very mention of Aslan's name caused certain positive feelings to come over them all they didn' I just re-read this book and got so much more out of it than the first time. The symbolism & parallels to basic Christianity stuck out. *turkish delight is our human nature, prone to addiction, selfishness and wrongdoing*Peter said about Edmund, "We should go after him. After all he is our brother." Even though he had just betrayed them and was causing grief they didn't mistreat or disown him. *The very mention of Aslan's name caused certain positive feelings to come over them all they didn't know why. But it made Edmund feel guilty.*After Ed was returned and his siblings saw him for the first time Aslan said, "Here is your brother and there's no need to talk about what's in the past." They forgave their brother. Aslan neither excused him nor condemned him.*They all knew better than to go into a wardrobe & shut the door as the book mentions a whole bunch of times. We regularly do things when we know better.*The professor makes them think and questions their disbelief in Lucy's story. This is something the movie totally leaves out. "Who would you usually believe, Lucy or Edmund?" etc. Edmund shows the worst side of human nature, to betray & let others down.*I love that Father Christmas comes giving gifts that represent the gifts & talents we each have to help others with and to overcome evil with.There's more but I have to go! Loved the book. And the movie.
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  • Shovelmonkey1
    February 28, 2012
    The Role (bibli)call:The big cuddly cat = Jesus. Strange that a lion should be chosen to represent the big man when Lions are notoriously aggressive, solitary carnivores who are more likely to eat any potential apostles than than teach or lead them.The white witch = Satan or Eve the temptress depending on which side of the tree of knowledge you're most likely to be barking up. Famed for a monochrome wardrobe in the A/W line only. Like Alan Rickman in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, she has cancel The Role (bibli)call:The big cuddly cat = Jesus. Strange that a lion should be chosen to represent the big man when Lions are notoriously aggressive, solitary carnivores who are more likely to eat any potential apostles than than teach or lead them.The white witch = Satan or Eve the temptress depending on which side of the tree of knowledge you're most likely to be barking up. Famed for a monochrome wardrobe in the A/W line only. Like Alan Rickman in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, she has cancelled Christmas.Edmund = Judas Iscariot. Judas has been proven to be a more astute bargain maker and walks off with 30 pieces of silver for his denials. Edmund gets a box of sweets. Lucy, Peter, Susan = apostles, knights and other positive biblical forces. An unusual scenario given the general hoo-hah about whether or not any of apostles were female (see last supper male/female image debate).Mr Tumnus the faun = an aberration. With his goat like legs and general caprine features you might be forgiven for imagining that he might be an agent of Satan, or Pan or some other pagan deity. Nope. He's on the side of good and not evil and that there throws the nice set of biblical allusions into chaos.Beavers, birds, satyrs, fauns and other ancillary creatures = collateral damage.Plot summary: Icing sugar, picture perfect winter wonderland accessible through the rear of roomy wardrobe handily equipped with high-end (but non PETA approved) all weather garb. Ruled in supremely effective manner by single minded, highly organised, independent woman until arrival of children and large pet. Maybe this book is actually a metaphor for home life in the modern age.
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  • Jason Koivu
    August 27, 2011
    It dawned on me the other day that I'd never read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. What an oversight! I had to fix this.I knew the story. When we were kids, one of my cousins was all about this book and liked to tell me about it. I remember absolutely bawling my eyes out when the 1979 cartoon version aired on tv and Aslan was subdued. And then I also knew it through the more recent movie adaptation. Now, having read the actual book, it turns out I already as good as read the book. It varie It dawned on me the other day that I'd never read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. What an oversight! I had to fix this.I knew the story. When we were kids, one of my cousins was all about this book and liked to tell me about it. I remember absolutely bawling my eyes out when the 1979 cartoon version aired on tv and Aslan was subdued. And then I also knew it through the more recent movie adaptation. Now, having read the actual book, it turns out I already as good as read the book. It varies very little, especially from the most recent movie version. And why should it? It's simple, straight forward, short and with very little story-fat to trim off. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is seriously a sleek book! There's barely any filler, just a straight forward narrative that takes you through the adventure. And what an adventure! This is the kind of story young dreams are made of! What impressionable young mind could not get caught up in a fantasy of monsters, magic, evil queens, heroic lions and more with boys and girls to follow into a mystical land, leaving behind the mundane?The only thing about the story that I could speak negatively about is its everything-and-the-kitchen-sink tossing in of whatever legendary beast Lewis could think of, plus, what the hell, let's throw in Santa Claus, too! African savanna animals, Greek mythological beasts and Old Saint Nick...sure, why not?! Maybe it wouldn't bug me as much if I didn't know that Lewis made fun of his friend Tolkien for writing fairy tales, and then he comes out with this, one of the most fanciful of fairy tales, where any manner of childhood fancy comes true. Bah, let's leave these sour grapes.I respect Lewis the writer and thinker. I've enjoyed reading and contemplating a variety of his works. And even at the advanced age of 43, I found myself sucked into this story. I may be over 30 years beyond the target audience, but I still found plenty to love about The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe!
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  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    October 28, 2009
    The Lion, The Witch, The Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1), C.S. Lewis عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا کتاب نخست: شیر، کمد، جادوگر؛ نویسنده: سی. (کلایو) اس. (استیپلز) لوئیس؛ مترجم: امید اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، انتشارات ایران، 1377؛ در 218 ص؛ شابک: 9646038085؛ چاپ دیگر: هرمس، 1379، در 166 ص، چاپ بعدی 1382؛ در 169 ص؛ شابک: 9647100116؛ چاپ سوم 1384؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی برای نوجوانان - قرن 20 معنوان: شیر ساحره و کمد لباس؛ نویسنده: سی. (کلایو) اس. (استیپلز) لوئیس؛ مترجم: پیمان اسماع The Lion, The Witch, The Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1), C.S. Lewis عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا کتاب نخست: شیر، کمد، جادوگر؛ نویسنده: سی. (کلایو) اس. (استیپلز) لوئیس؛ مترجم: امید اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، انتشارات ایران، 1377؛ در 218 ص؛ شابک: 9646038085؛ چاپ دیگر: هرمس، 1379، در 166 ص، چاپ بعدی 1382؛ در 169 ص؛ شابک: 9647100116؛ چاپ سوم 1384؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی برای نوجوانان - قرن 20 معنوان: شیر ساحره و کمد لباس؛ نویسنده: سی. (کلایو) اس. (استیپلز) لوئیس؛ مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان خامنه؛ تهران، قدیانی، بنفشه، 1386؛ در 236 ص؛ شابک: 9644178505؛ چاپ بعدی 1392؛ در 238 ص؛ شابک: 9789644178504؛عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا 1: شیر و کمد و جادوگر؛ نویسنده: سی. (کلایو) اس. (استیپلز) لوئیس؛ مترجم: فریبا کلهر؛ تهران، پنجره، 1387؛ در 168 ص؛ شابک: 9789648890846؛ شیر، کمد و جادوگرعنوان نخستین جلد از سری هفت رمان سرگذشت نارنیاست. لوئیس برای نوشتن این رمانهای این مجموعه، از شخصیت‌ها و ایده‌ هایی از اساطیر یونان و روم و همچنین از افسانه‌ های کهن بریتانیا و ایرلند سود برده‌ است. نارنیا دنیایی ست که در آن حیوانات سخن می‌گویند، جادو امری رایج است و خوبی به جنگ با بدی می‌رود. داستان آفرینش نارنیا در روز نخست با آواز اصلان شیر، و سخنگو شدن حیوانات با جادوی او در کتاب خواهرزاده جادوگر و داستان پایان آن در کتاب آخرین نبرد آمده‌ است. اما ماجراهای سرزمین نارنیا، انگار برایم همان داستانهای دل انگیز هزار و یک شب است. چند سال پیشتر مجموعه را دو بار خواندم. مرا نیز نوجوان کرد، سرشار از خیال و دلشوره برای ماجراجوئی. شاید راز ماندگاریش نیز، که هم اکنون یکی از آثار کلاسیک ادبیات انگستان به شمار است، همین باشد. زنده کردن خیال، تعلق داشتن به یک سرزمین، تلاش برای پیروز شدن رویاهای نیک ا. شربیانی
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  • Laz
    May 6, 2014
    Well, can you blame me for loving this? I certainly hope not. It's Christmas and I feel like a little kid and I was craving something to make me feel like I am one, indeed, and this book travelled me to a wondrous world full of heroes and of course a villain. The ride was awesome and I found the characters warm and fuzzy despite the eternal cold that had been placed upon Narnia. Now, they're all free of the curse of the White Witch thanks to Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy. The kings and queens of Well, can you blame me for loving this? I certainly hope not. It's Christmas and I feel like a little kid and I was craving something to make me feel like I am one, indeed, and this book travelled me to a wondrous world full of heroes and of course a villain. The ride was awesome and I found the characters warm and fuzzy despite the eternal cold that had been placed upon Narnia. Now, they're all free of the curse of the White Witch thanks to Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy. The kings and queens of Narnia. “Once a king or queen of Narnia, always a king or queen of Narnia.” This is remarkable. It's amazing how short it is, I only read it in one and a half hour, I simply devoured it. It's short but so detailed and concentrated. It's like a fairytale. I'll certainly be reading this to my kids in the future. “I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again. You can then take it down from some upper shelf, dust it, and tell me what you think of it. I shall probably be too deaf to hear, and too old to understand a word you say, but I shall still be your affectionate Godfather, C. S. Lewis.”
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  • Mandy Crider
    December 3, 2015
    Read as a little girl and loved it. Loved the mysterious places and fantasy lives and I always wanted my wardrobe to enter into a magical land. This book is worth more than 5 stars.
  • Dyuti
    June 18, 2012
    What an amazingly delightful book! I regret not reading it earlier ** Before I begin, let me clarify that as I am not a Christian, I had no idea that this book was written by keeping the image of Jesus (as Aslan) in mind. I just came across this revelation on Goodreads, and it just added another layer to the story! The review below is written only by treating it as a fun-filled and action packed novel!I had seen the movie based on the book a couple of years ago, and had really loved it! On readi What an amazingly delightful book! I regret not reading it earlier ** Before I begin, let me clarify that as I am not a Christian, I had no idea that this book was written by keeping the image of Jesus (as Aslan) in mind. I just came across this revelation on Goodreads, and it just added another layer to the story! The review below is written only by treating it as a fun-filled and action packed novel!I had seen the movie based on the book a couple of years ago, and had really loved it! On reading the book, I realized it's just an extention of the movie(Should have been the other way round, but then, the one which comes first usually forms the greater impression). I'm glad the scripwriters did not destroy the essence of the story, which is (though simple), a charming tale!Anyway, coming back to the story, it is about four adventurous children, who accidentally discover the magical world of Narnia behind a wardrobe in an old strange house. But all in not well in this magical land! It's under the reign of the evil queen -- the WHite Witch! Together with the help of a Magnificant Lion -- Aslan, the children go on to kill the witch and themselves become the Four Kings(and Queens!) of Narnia.Though lacking much plot twists, I loved it simply because it was so easy-flowing! I altually wished I had a naughty kid near me whom I could catch hold of and read the book aloud to! I would love to see his wide-eyed amazement when Lucy would open the wardrobe for the first time, see his dissapointment when Edmund would betray them, (view spoiler)[hear his sigh when Aslan would sacrifice his life, (hide spoiler)] and catch that gleeful smile when they would win the Battle!Maybe someday, sometime!P.S: I really liked the dedication. It read: " My dear Lucy,I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again. You can then take it down from some upper shelf, dust it, and tell me what you think of it. I shall probably be too deaf to hear, and too old to understand, a word you say, but I shall still be,your affectionate Godfather,C.S.Lewis." Dear God, I hope I'm NEVER too old for fairy tales!
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  • Rebekah Rodda
    February 10, 2017
    What a great family read aloud. My eight, six and four year old (and husband) enjoyed hearing this. The four year old flagged a bit but the eight year old got the allegory. A fantastic story, so well told.
  • Denisse
    November 4, 2015
    A beautiful read. There's no other way to say it. The story knows what it is, knows the public it wants to catch, children, but leaves details every now and then for we the grown ups to appreciate, turning a great children story into one of The fantasy novels this world has. Great messages, and unique style. Light but direct to the point, like all children stories should be. The lion, the witch and the wardrobe is a must for all the lovers of the genre. Solo hay una cosa que de verdad se puede d A beautiful read. There's no other way to say it. The story knows what it is, knows the public it wants to catch, children, but leaves details every now and then for we the grown ups to appreciate, turning a great children story into one of The fantasy novels this world has. Great messages, and unique style. Light but direct to the point, like all children stories should be. The lion, the witch and the wardrobe is a must for all the lovers of the genre. Solo hay una cosa que de verdad se puede decir sobre los cuentos para niños: Si es una buena historia, se puede disfrutar a cualquier edad.Llena de enseñanzas perfectas para los pequeños y con detalles muy interesantes para los grandes, Narnia en definitiva es una gran historia. No es ningun secreto las millones de referencias biblicas que tiene, aunque estoy segura que no capte todas. Pero todo Aslan es una hermosa referencia que adore por completo, sobretodo porque es un leon y Narnia una tierra de bestias parlantes, asi como tambien todo lo relacionado con Edmund.Lo que mas me emociono fue darme cuenta de la increible adaptacion que tiene. Increible nivel: Catching Fire. O sea, las ligas mayores. Respetaron muchisimos detalles, gracias Disney! La batalla entre el bien y el mal puede escucharse muy mainstream pero cuando se escribe bien, se nota. Este libro no esta hecho para la gente que solo disfruta de las descripciones y explicaciones largas y a detalle. Es un clasico de niños y te encontraras con muchos "pero eso no es importante para esta historia, asi que volvamos a..." o varios "porque asi son las cosas". Si estas en el mood para algo asi, El leon, la bruja y el armario cumplira con la funcion a la perfeccion. Altamente recomendado. Seguire leyendo las cronicas a como se fueron publicando. Gran forma de terminar el año. Sorry por tener la reseña hasta el 2016 xDlol
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  • Pooja
    October 25, 2015
    This is one of those books that takes you to a land where you feel like you've come to this place many times before, it feels like home, you keep hugging this book, every time enchanted and when you return to your world.All you feel is MAGICAL. "I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enou This is one of those books that takes you to a land where you feel like you've come to this place many times before, it feels like home, you keep hugging this book, every time enchanted and when you return to your world.All you feel is MAGICAL. "I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again."
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  • Kenny
    November 12, 2008
    I am tempted to give this book a zero but the idea of going through the wardrobe to another land is fantastic. Everything else, however, is not fantastic, including:The over-the-top Christian allegory.The complete absence of dramatic tension - the characters are static and the conclusion is foregone. There is nothing to keep you reading, to challenge you, or to even vaguely interest you.The writing is mediocre at best.The dialogue is mediocre at best.Awful book, it as if someone read Matthew thr I am tempted to give this book a zero but the idea of going through the wardrobe to another land is fantastic. Everything else, however, is not fantastic, including:The over-the-top Christian allegory.The complete absence of dramatic tension - the characters are static and the conclusion is foregone. There is nothing to keep you reading, to challenge you, or to even vaguely interest you.The writing is mediocre at best.The dialogue is mediocre at best.Awful book, it as if someone read Matthew through John, and then said these four gospels are good but it would take a master writer to retell them with talking animals and have it be worse to the point of complete boredom.
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  • Mark my words
    June 7, 2015
    "What are you doing in that wardrobe?""Narnia business!"
  • Ler com Lobos
    January 2, 2015
    A primeira leitura que fiz em 2015 foi o "O Sobrinho do Mágico" porque tinha como objetivo para este ano ler todas as Crónicas de Nárnia por ordem cronológica, mas tal não se concretizou. Nem a ordem, nem a leitura em si. Acabei por deixar passar os meses e nunca mais continuei a minha aventura, até que chegou o mês de Dezembro!Achei que não haveria mês melhor para ler "O Leão, A Feiticeira e o Guarda-Roupa" por isso peguei nele. O filme é um mais especiais para mim porque vi e revi e revi e o e A primeira leitura que fiz em 2015 foi o "O Sobrinho do Mágico" porque tinha como objetivo para este ano ler todas as Crónicas de Nárnia por ordem cronológica, mas tal não se concretizou. Nem a ordem, nem a leitura em si. Acabei por deixar passar os meses e nunca mais continuei a minha aventura, até que chegou o mês de Dezembro!Achei que não haveria mês melhor para ler "O Leão, A Feiticeira e o Guarda-Roupa" por isso peguei nele. O filme é um mais especiais para mim porque vi e revi e revi e o encanto nunca se perdeu e admito que estava com medo que isso acontecesse ao ler a história original. Mas não. Achei o filme muito fiel à obra de C.S.Lewis e, embora ainda ocupe um lugar mais especial no meu coração, gostei imenso desta leitura. Penso que o que também contribuiu muito para isso foi a minha edição que tem ilustrações muito bonitas a cores de Pauline Bayne e mesmo a disposição das páginas é muito prazerosa de ler. Mas claro que a história em si é o que mais importa e custa-me imenso a entender como toda ela nos é contada de uma forma tão fácil de visualizar mas em tão poucas páginas! O autor tem uma escrita magnífica e incrivelmente simples que nunca se torna aborrecida. Há sempre algum conflito, algo a acontecer. Ah e o inglês não é complicado ;) Aconselho este livrinho a toda a gente, especialmente nesta época!
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  • Jessika
    June 30, 2008
    Every time I read this wonderful story, it's like catching up with an old friend. I've read this particular Narnia book so many different times, but it never ever gets old. I love the fact that I can pick up this (or any of the other Narnia books, for that matter) and step into a whole other world. I also particularly enjoyed the fact that I found that I could relate with each one of the children, although I must say that I was partial to Lucy! Additionally, I love the role Aslan plays in this b Every time I read this wonderful story, it's like catching up with an old friend. I've read this particular Narnia book so many different times, but it never ever gets old. I love the fact that I can pick up this (or any of the other Narnia books, for that matter) and step into a whole other world. I also particularly enjoyed the fact that I found that I could relate with each one of the children, although I must say that I was partial to Lucy! Additionally, I love the role Aslan plays in this book because I think the ultimate sacrifice that he chooses to make shows how innately good he is. Even though this book is an easy read for me now at 18, this is one of those kinds of stories that you can never grow too old for. I really liked the line C.S. Lewis wrote in his dedication: "But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." Isn't that the truth? Overall, I'd definitely have to call this a classic that everyone should read at some point or another.
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  • Megan Baxter
    July 5, 2011
    Reading books is so inherently subjective. Books I have loved fall flat for my friends; ones they enjoy strike sometimes strike no chord in me. Sometimes it has everything to do with what is going on my life when I'm reading, or even what type of mood I'm in. When I write reviews, I try to keep that subjectivity first and foremost in my mind, explaining what about the book struck me in such a particular way as best I can.This is heightened when writing about books that are, in many ways formativ Reading books is so inherently subjective. Books I have loved fall flat for my friends; ones they enjoy strike sometimes strike no chord in me. Sometimes it has everything to do with what is going on my life when I'm reading, or even what type of mood I'm in. When I write reviews, I try to keep that subjectivity first and foremost in my mind, explaining what about the book struck me in such a particular way as best I can.This is heightened when writing about books that are, in many ways formative. And so, with that in mind, sit down a while and let me tell you about The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe and me. This isn't a book that I can possibly separate from how much I loved it when I was young, and that, while I have grown, continues to be a very favourite.Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook
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  • Ryan
    November 1, 2016
    This book will forever hold a special place in my heart.Review to come.
  • Luke Taylor
    March 6, 2016
    So what is The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe?It is without a doubt, one of the finest examples of children’s storytelling I’ve ever come across, seamless and cyclical, ushering the imagination toward that which is so fantastic it must be true, buried somwhere within in our heart of hearts, where the deep and unending magic set about before the dawn of time wove within in all creatures the desire for adventure, heroism, sacrifice, morality, greatness, grandeur, light, beauty, and loveliness.W So what is The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe?It is without a doubt, one of the finest examples of children’s storytelling I’ve ever come across, seamless and cyclical, ushering the imagination toward that which is so fantastic it must be true, buried somwhere within in our heart of hearts, where the deep and unending magic set about before the dawn of time wove within in all creatures the desire for adventure, heroism, sacrifice, morality, greatness, grandeur, light, beauty, and loveliness.With a plot dualistically hewn from Alsan’s Christ-like metaphor and the perilously greedy gaze of a fearsome Witch who embodies all that within the universe that seeks to devour and destroy, to take and possess and ruin for selfish gain, The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe ignites the unforgettable fire of magic, myth, and creation that Narnia will forever remain to be to the soul that allows itself the chance to drink up its potent visuals, its subtle wisdoms, and its perfect balance of all that which is real and resonant within the human condition even all these years after publication, since those things are so well-wrought within a pretty pastiche of the outlandish and the fantastic, divinely majestic and dramatically magnificent, as C.S. Lewis lets flourish the holy and hallowed ground of the wit, the wisdom, and the magic that is the storyteller's beautiful ritual of virtue and vision.Recommended for everybody, for all ages and races and beliefs, as no one should deny their soul the chance to see Narnia but once in their life, and if not just once, then to cherish the ability to go there as often as possible.
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  • Werner
    March 22, 2008
    While I first read this book in the mid-70s, I read it again to my wife a couple of years ago (we both loved it then as much as I did the first time). Most people know that C. S. Lewis was an effective Christian nonfiction apologist, using the tools of reason and logic to build the philosophical case for Christian faith. But he ultimately became convinced that an even more effective apologetic is available through the "truth of art," the instinctive and emotional appeal that stories exert -- esp While I first read this book in the mid-70s, I read it again to my wife a couple of years ago (we both loved it then as much as I did the first time). Most people know that C. S. Lewis was an effective Christian nonfiction apologist, using the tools of reason and logic to build the philosophical case for Christian faith. But he ultimately became convinced that an even more effective apologetic is available through the "truth of art," the instinctive and emotional appeal that stories exert -- especially the kinds of stories that draw on the deep, mythical archetypes of fantasy to illuminate the real universe. The Chronicles of Narnia, his classic fantasy series, was the fruit of that discovery, set in Narnia, a magical land whose world lies in another universe, in which magic works and time moves differently than it does here, and in which Christ is incarnate as the great talking lion Aslan. This first book of the series presents one of the most powerful symbolic literary presentations of the Christian gospel ever written. Although the intended audience, in Lewis' mind, was children (and his author's various direct addresses to the readers presuppose this), there is nothing invidiously "juvenile" about the quality of the writing; it can be enthusiastically appreciated by anyone who loves tales of imagination and adventure, fantasy and wonder; and the truths here, like those in Jesus' parables, are simple enough to speak to children but profound enough to challenge adults.This is the "first" book of the series in the sense of first to be written (and usually the first to be read). However, The Magicians Nephew is a prequel which describes the creation of Narnia, and the origins of the White Witch and of the wardrobe that serves as a gateway to Narnia; Lewis himself recommended that this prequel be read first.
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  • Nikoleta
    November 17, 2015
    Ένα υπέροχο μαγικό παραμύθι. Είναι φανερό πως γράφτηκε για κοινό μικρότερης ηλικίας και πραγματικά άμα το είχα διαβάσει στα δέκα μου θα είχα ξετρελαθεί. Και πόσο κρίμα που δεν είχα την Νάρνια να την διαβάσω… θυμάμαι εκεί, γύρω στα οχτώ μου χρόνια, κάποιος μου διηγήθηκε για μια ντουλάπα που βγάζει σε μια μαγική χώρα. Ακόμα θυμάμαι σαν σε όνειρο τον μικρό μου εαυτό να χώνεται στην ντουλάπα και να παλεύει με τα ρούχα της μάμας μου. Ακόμα θυμάμαι την τσαντίλα μου όταν φώναζα «Τζίφος»! Ποτέ όμως δεν Ένα υπέροχο μαγικό παραμύθι. Είναι φανερό πως γράφτηκε για κοινό μικρότερης ηλικίας και πραγματικά άμα το είχα διαβάσει στα δέκα μου θα είχα ξετρελαθεί. Και πόσο κρίμα που δεν είχα την Νάρνια να την διαβάσω… θυμάμαι εκεί, γύρω στα οχτώ μου χρόνια, κάποιος μου διηγήθηκε για μια ντουλάπα που βγάζει σε μια μαγική χώρα. Ακόμα θυμάμαι σαν σε όνειρο τον μικρό μου εαυτό να χώνεται στην ντουλάπα και να παλεύει με τα ρούχα της μάμας μου. Ακόμα θυμάμαι την τσαντίλα μου όταν φώναζα «Τζίφος»! Ποτέ όμως δεν απογοητευόμουν, συνέχιζα να ανοίγω όλα τα ντουλάπια και να κοιτάζω πίσω από κάθε πόρτα! Έχουν περάσει πολλά χρόνια από τότε, και είχα ξεχάσει αυτή μου την μανία, αν κ μέσα μου ακόμα ονειρευόμουν το μαγικό μου μέρος κι ας μην έλπιζα όπως παλιά. Έτσι λοιπόν ήρθε η ώρα που η Νάρνια έπεσε στα χέρια μου. Ναι γράφτηκε για παιδιά, αλλά ξέρετε κάτι; Ο Πήτερ, η Λούσυ, η Σούζαν και ο Έντουαρντ όταν πλέον μεγάλωσαν και ξαναπέρασαν την ντουλάπα έγιναν και πάλι παιδιά. Αυτό το βιβλίο ήταν η δική μου μαγική ντουλάπα!
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  • Madeline
    July 22, 2009
    Rather than spend this review explaining what I thought of the book, I will instead devote my time to justifying placing this on my "the movie is better" shelf.Reasons the Movie Version Is Better:1. Watching it will take about the same amount of time it takes to read the book, because good lord does everything get wrapped up quick.2. We actually get to see some real fight scenes, and even though there's no blood and it's all very PG, at least it's not just "There was a battle going on but then A Rather than spend this review explaining what I thought of the book, I will instead devote my time to justifying placing this on my "the movie is better" shelf.Reasons the Movie Version Is Better:1. Watching it will take about the same amount of time it takes to read the book, because good lord does everything get wrapped up quick.2. We actually get to see some real fight scenes, and even though there's no blood and it's all very PG, at least it's not just "There was a battle going on but then Aslan showed up and it was over yay!" 3. The dialogue is considerably less dated and irritating. The kids in the book speak like plummy old British men watching a cricket match in 1800: "'We've fallen on our feet and no mistake,' said Peter. 'This is going to be perfectly splendid. That old chap will let us do anything we like.'" Meanwhile, the movie has lines like this: "When Adam's Flesh and Adam's bone sits at Cair Paravel in throne, the evil time will be over and done." "You know that doesn't really rhyme." 4. Aslan becomes much less of a dick when he's voiced by Liam Neeson. 5. Since the book is so short (see Reason 1) there's plenty of time for the film to do justice to everything in C.S. Lewis's material, and even add some things. For instance, did you know the Pevensie kids actually have a mother? With a face? Shocking, I know. 6. William Mosely is a pretty, pretty boy. Peter the Magnificent, indeed.DON'T YOU JUDGE ME. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0608440/
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  • Hugo
    October 12, 2015
    Even I don't know what it is.In my opinion,this book was really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really re Even I don't know what it is.In my opinion,this book was really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really really boring.I'll never ever to read this book.
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  • Manny
    September 17, 2015
    Some useful German words and phrases that I learned from reading this book:Alle Wetter, ich bin ja ganz in Schweiß gebadet! - Blowed if I ain't all in a muck sweat!Biberin - female beaverFeeneden - Cair ParavelHeiliger Bimbam! - Great Scott!Ich frage mich wirklich, was sie ihnen eigentlich auf den Schulen beibringen - I do wonder what they do teach them at these schoolsPfui Teufel, was für eine Gemeinheit! - Well, of all the poisonous little beasts!tiefer Urzauber aus der Zeiten Dämmerung - deep Some useful German words and phrases that I learned from reading this book:Alle Wetter, ich bin ja ganz in Schweiß gebadet! - Blowed if I ain't all in a muck sweat!Biberin - female beaverFeeneden - Cair ParavelHeiliger Bimbam! - Great Scott!Ich frage mich wirklich, was sie ihnen eigentlich auf den Schulen beibringen - I do wonder what they do teach them at these schoolsPfui Teufel, was für eine Gemeinheit! - Well, of all the poisonous little beasts!tiefer Urzauber aus der Zeiten Dämmerung - deep magic from the dawn of timetürkischer Hönig - Turkish delightWandschrankzimmer - room containing a wardrobezwei Adamssöhner und zwei Evastöchter - Two sons of Adam and two daughters of Eve
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  • Jesica
    July 9, 2015
    Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight,At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more,When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death,And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.I always love the adventures of Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy in Narnia. Both the book and the movie are amazing. The world is enchanting even with the eternal winter. The book felt too quick, though.. the character, especially Peter, developed a lot in a very short of time. Or maybe it’s just me w Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight,At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more,When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death,And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.I always love the adventures of Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy in Narnia. Both the book and the movie are amazing. The world is enchanting even with the eternal winter. The book felt too quick, though.. the character, especially Peter, developed a lot in a very short of time. Or maybe it’s just me wishing the book is a bit longer :p but otherwise, I love the whole book.
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  • Paul
    January 4, 2013
    Still an all-time favorite. I've read it out loud to each of our three children now, plus at least once with my wife years ago, and who knows how many times as a kid. One of the few childhood classics that arguably deepens and becomes more meaningful as I age.
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