Vagabonding
Vagabonding is about taking time off from your normal life - from six weeks to four months to two years - to discover and experience the world on your own terms. Veteran shoestring traveler Rolf Potts shows how anyone armed with an independent spirit can achieve the dream of extended overseas travel. Potts gives the necessary information on:- financing your travel time - determining your destination - adjusting to life on the road- working and volunteering overseas - handling travel adversity - re-assimilating back into ordinary lifeNot just a plan of action, vagabonding is an outlook on life that emphasizes creativity, discovery, and the growth of the spirit. Visit the vagabonding community's hub at www.vagabonding.net.

Vagabonding Details

TitleVagabonding
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 24th, 2002
PublisherVillard Books
ISBN-139780812992182
Rating
GenreTravel, Nonfiction, Adventure, Philosophy, Self Help

Vagabonding Review

  • Matthew Trinetti
    January 1, 1970
    I finished reading Vagabonding for the second time. The first time I read it was about four years ago, when I first started to experience serious wanderlust. It was inspiring and echoed the way I felt about traveling, but it wasn’t applicable yet. One Day, I mused, I will go on a long-term trip. One day, I will go “vagabonding.” It put the bug in my ear that long-term travel is possible.But finishing it now, in the midst of an extended journey, is incredibly satisfying and comforting. It’s satis I finished reading Vagabonding for the second time. The first time I read it was about four years ago, when I first started to experience serious wanderlust. It was inspiring and echoed the way I felt about traveling, but it wasn’t applicable yet. One Day, I mused, I will go on a long-term trip. One day, I will go “vagabonding.” It put the bug in my ear that long-term travel is possible.But finishing it now, in the midst of an extended journey, is incredibly satisfying and comforting. It’s satisfying to know that I am actually DOING IT — realizing my ambition and living out a dream. And it’s comforting to read something that describes exactly what I’m experiencing physically, mentally, and emotionally. I feel welcomed among a league of travelers who have come before me, walk alongside me, and will follow in our footsteps.Here are my favorite takeaways from the book.1. Long-term travel is possible regardless of demographics, age, or income.It really comes down to priorities. I believe if you have a burning desire to travel or do anything really, you can make it happen [See: Desire + Decision = Magic]. But this isn’t just a lesson I’ve learned from the book — I’m seeing it firsthand with the people I’ve met on the road:- A young Texas couple traveling and working in Europe indefinitely;- An Australian architect taking year career break to travel from Europe to Asia;- A few German university students hitchhiking around Europe during a three month summer break;- A Japanese woman dropping everything to travel the world for a year after living through Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami;- A 70-year-old Estonian man who escaped the Soviet rule at nineteen and vowed to travel around the world and return to Estonia only when it became a free nation (which finally happened in 1991).The only common thread between these people is a strong desire to see the world and making the decision to do it. Where there’s a will, there’s a way. It just requires removing the reductive lens from which we view our lives and the world and expand our belief of what’s possible.2. Vagabonding represents an uncommon outlook and attitude about life.Although Vagabonding teaches the techniques to affordably travel for extended periods of time, it more importantly introduces a way to find adventure in everyday life."Vagabonding is an attitude — a friendly interest in people, places, and things that makes a person an explorer in the truest, most vivid sense of the word.""[Vagabonding is] the ongoing practice of looking and learning, of facing fears and altering habits, of cultivating a new fascination with people and places."This mentality isn’t reserved just for long-term journeys; it can be achieved by looking at the everyday world with new, curious eyes. It’s about seeing things for what they are, and not for what you think they should or want them to be. It’s about being intensely curious and observant about about the lives around you at the moment, whether that’s your neighbor from Ohio, your hostel roommate from Chile, or the local Latvian you meet at a bar.3. Your freedom is earned, not given.Potts introduces the concept of how work and pleasure fit into our lives, and how the first step of vagabonding is earning your freedom to take an extended journey. Yes, this speaks to financially preparing yourself to live on little or zero income. But it also advises how to handle your career, relationships, and attitude prior to taking a leap."Ultimately, then, the first step of vagabonding is simply a matter of making work serve your interests, instead of the other way around. Believe it or not, this is a radical departure from how most people view work and leisure."It’s interesting how this represents the same belief of the entrepreneurs profiled in Chris Guillebeau’s $100 Startup, while echoing the lesson about the Deferred Life Plan in The Monk and the Riddle. I love when seemingly unrelated books communicate a similar message.Like most things, long-term travel starts with taking ownership of your actions and fate. It won’t happen unless you make it a priority."Vagabonding is about refusing to exile travel to some other, seemingly more appropriate, time of your life. Vagabonding is about taking control of your circumstances instead of passively waiting for them to decide your fate."4. For the most fulfilling travel experience, keep it simple, take it slow, and don’t set limits.When I first fantasized about taking a long-term trip, my goal was simply to experience life in different places around the world and to learn about the culture firsthand. Vagabonding suggests the best way to achieve this is to travel simply, slowly, and without the confines of a specific agenda.Traveling simply means freeing yourself from “stuff”, leaving you with only the bare necessities to live. By freeing yourself physically from the stuff that defines you, you’re stripped down to just yourself — a sometimes scary reality that forces to figure out who you actually are."Simplicity — both at home and on the road — affords you the time to seek renewed meaning in an oft-neglected commodity that can’t be bought at any price: life itself."Traveling slowly represents engaging with your surroundings, absorbing a place rather than “ticking it off”, and seeing and listening rather than looking and hearing. It’s the difference between being a traveler and being a tourist: one is active, the other is passive."Vagabonding is about not merely reallotting a portion of your life for travel but rediscovering the entire concept of time."Traveling without a strict agenda or bulleted to-do list, you’re led mostly by heart instead of brain. You do what feels right. And without a feeling like you need to be somewhere or get things done, you give people and places the love and attention they deserve."In leaving behind the routines and assumptions of home — in taking that resolute first step into the world — you’ll find yourself entering a much larger and less constrictive paradigm."For me, vagabonding has led to incredible experiences, most of which revolve around conversations with people: spending hours at a cafe talking to an Estonian about growing up under Soviet rule; sharing a typical Icelandic Sunday dinner with locals and discussing elves; hitching with a car full of Lithuanians and learning about their love for the countryside and local beer. Contrast this with my attitude a few short months ago, while working under a strict hour-by-hour daily agenda. I would have rarely allowed myself the time to have such conversations.This review and more at GiveLiveExplore.com
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I hit the road for 8 months--7 countries, 4 continents--because of this book. College behind me, an ex-fiance, and a wad of cash in the bank (invested since I was a child)--that was when I discovered this book. I boarded the plane 5 months later.I carried it with me the whole trip (it's very light). When I was feeling homesick or just sick, down, or in a rut I'd read a bit of this book and it would fire me up and give me ideas of what to do next. Being on the road for an extended period of time I hit the road for 8 months--7 countries, 4 continents--because of this book. College behind me, an ex-fiance, and a wad of cash in the bank (invested since I was a child)--that was when I discovered this book. I boarded the plane 5 months later.I carried it with me the whole trip (it's very light). When I was feeling homesick or just sick, down, or in a rut I'd read a bit of this book and it would fire me up and give me ideas of what to do next. Being on the road for an extended period of time has a LOT of challenges. Potts doesn't tell you what each of these challenges would be--that's impossible--but he does show you ways of thinking and doing that can help you get the most out of these challenges.This book isn't necessary for a successful trip. Hardly. People learn on their feet all the time, and what better way to learn than to jump in head first. I will say I'm glad I had this little guide to help me open my eyes to the world of long term travel when I never even knew it existed.
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  • Derek
    January 1, 1970
    Rolf Potts’ Vagabonding was recommended to me by a friend who apparently thinks I:a) Need to get out of the house (and the city/state/country)b) Enjoy books that heavily rely on quoting Walt Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road”It’s not a bad book, certainly not the type I would pick up on my own, but there’s nothing really life-changing here either. Potts is conversational (almost to a fault), and he makes some fine points about living with less and accepting circumstances on the road for what they Rolf Potts’ Vagabonding was recommended to me by a friend who apparently thinks I:a) Need to get out of the house (and the city/state/country)b) Enjoy books that heavily rely on quoting Walt Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road”It’s not a bad book, certainly not the type I would pick up on my own, but there’s nothing really life-changing here either. Potts is conversational (almost to a fault), and he makes some fine points about living with less and accepting circumstances on the road for what they are: experience. It’s standard self-help book advice that works at home as well as abroad, of course, and the book does leave one with an itch to travel.He briefly touches on his own experiences, and the passages where he makes flippant remarks about the diversity encountered in his travels (think, “Ah yes, it was in Borneo where I met a half-Korean, half-Polish French émigré who discussed with me the politics of Ugandan foreign policy”) struck me as pretentious even if they were true. I don’t doubt my knee-jerk reaction has much to do with my un-travelled life, but I think I would still feel he’s propping himself up even if I were a fellow globetrotter. In Potts’ defense, he makes fine points about the commoditization of travel, such as “extreme” sports or the dubious desire of the ultra-rich to visit “unspoiled” cultures. As a Gen Xer who seems to have taken the lessons of On the Road to heart, he’s in a good place to critique the way in which everything has been bought and sold, including the “alternative” lifestyle of travel. I only wish these thoughts could have been expounded.He seems well-read, but I think he wrote a book specifically designed for people who don’t do much reading. The exceedingly short chapters lack depth, the columns are unbecomingly wide, and the whole thing is peppered with “profound” quotes from Eastern philosophers, famous travel writers, and American poets. One gets the impression these chapters would function better as blog posts or magazine articles than in a book. And maybe that’s the point. Perhaps we’re just supposed to flip through quickly and get our asses out the door.
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  • Chrissy
    January 1, 1970
    Rolf Potts gives a ton of good resources for how to travel long-term. This is not for the person who wants to take a week vacation in Cabo, but for someone who wants to hang out in a country or two or however many for a long time -- several weeks to several years. It's inspiring and helpful to know that I'm not the only one who wants to travel this way!
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  • Priya
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book Strictly OK and I fail to understand the hype this book has generated so much so that it comes under "Top 10 books travel books".Given that the author is well-travelled, there could have been a lot of meaningful things to be shared with the readers from his personal experiences. Unfortunately, all that the book contains is a whole bunch of website links and references to read. And an equal number of quotes from all kinds of travellers. At best, this book can serve as a dictiona I found this book Strictly OK and I fail to understand the hype this book has generated so much so that it comes under "Top 10 books travel books".Given that the author is well-travelled, there could have been a lot of meaningful things to be shared with the readers from his personal experiences. Unfortunately, all that the book contains is a whole bunch of website links and references to read. And an equal number of quotes from all kinds of travellers. At best, this book can serve as a dictionary for one who is looking for sources of reference on how to travel on your own. Even those references appear inadequate. Saying things like 'speak to people who have traveled extensively for advice' or 'you must always travel safe', 'save money for travel' makes no sense whatsoever unless the target audience is a five year old. They certainly do not warrant whole chapters.It looks like the author has randomly aggregated a bunch of blogposts, thrown in a long list of weblinks and created a book. I would give two stars simply for some of the weblinks which I found useful.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This is a short read that I intend to read over and over. Basically, it explains that you don't have to be in college or retired to experience long-distance travel. Hiking the Appalachian Trail or spending a year in Thailand is completely do-able for even 30 or 40-somethings. It's a reminder for me not to get caught up in the rat race and the sequence of school, job, marriage, kids, more job, 1 week vacations at a time, retirement, and then death. Although I take away a bit of inspiration and li This is a short read that I intend to read over and over. Basically, it explains that you don't have to be in college or retired to experience long-distance travel. Hiking the Appalachian Trail or spending a year in Thailand is completely do-able for even 30 or 40-somethings. It's a reminder for me not to get caught up in the rat race and the sequence of school, job, marriage, kids, more job, 1 week vacations at a time, retirement, and then death. Although I take away a bit of inspiration and liberation from this book, it's actually a practical piece with tips on how to incorporate long distance travel in your life and not spend eterninty looking forward to a one-week vacation every year. It's my little escape from routine reality.
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  • rahul
    January 1, 1970
    XXXIIIHow happy is the little stone That rambles in the road alone, And does n’t care about careers, And exigencies never fears; Whose coat of elemental brown A passing universe put on; And independent as the sun, Associates or glows alone, Fulfilling absolute decree In casual simplicity. -Emily Dickinson (1830–86).
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who lives a nomadic life, I found enriching what he has to say about long-term travel and living an alternative lifestyle. He give some excellent, concrete ideas to those who want to travel but claim they can't afford to. He also helps us see how living a traveling life can be greatly rewarding. And also how "vagabonding" is really about being open to life.Some of my favorite quotes:"Vagabonding is about not merely reallotting a portion of your life for travel but rediscovering the en As someone who lives a nomadic life, I found enriching what he has to say about long-term travel and living an alternative lifestyle. He give some excellent, concrete ideas to those who want to travel but claim they can't afford to. He also helps us see how living a traveling life can be greatly rewarding. And also how "vagabonding" is really about being open to life.Some of my favorite quotes:"Vagabonding is about not merely reallotting a portion of your life for travel but rediscovering the entire concept of time.""As Pico Iyer pointed out, the act of quitting 'means not giving up, but moving on; changing direction not because something doesn't agree with you, but because you don't agree with something. It's not a complaint...but a positive choice, and not a stop in one's journey but a step in a better direction. Quitting--whether a job or a habit--means taking a turn so as to be sure you're still moving in the direction of your dreams.'""There are always people who dare to seek on the margin of society, who are not dependent on social routine, and prefer a kind of free-floating existence." (Thomas Merton)"There is still an overwhelming social compulsion--an insanity of consensus, if you will--to get rich from life rather than to live life richly.""Vagabonding is, was, and always will be a private undertaking--and its goal is to improve your life not in relation to your neighbors but it relation to yourself.""I refuse to spend money on haircuts."Thoreau: "Money is not required to buy one necessity of the soul."Kurt Vonnegut: "Peculiar travel suggestions are dancing lessons from God."Antonio Machado: "Paths are made by walking."Eknath Easwaran: "Excitement and depressions, fortune and misfortune, pleasure and pain are storms in a tiny, private, shell-bound realm--which we take to be the whole of existence. yet we can break out of this shell and enter a new world.""On the road, you learn to improvise your days, take a second look at everything you see, and not obsess over your schedule."Robert Pirsig: "I don't want to hurry it. That itself is a poisonous ... attitude. When you want to hurry something, that means you no longer care about it and want to get on to other things."Ed Buryn: "The challenges you face offer no alternative but to cope with them. And in doing so, your live is being fully lived.""Vagabonding is like a pilgrimage without a specific destination or goal--not a quest for answers so much as a celebration of the questions, an embrace of the ambiguous, and an openness to anything that comes your way.""When in doubt about what to do in a place, just start walking through your new environment. Walk until your day becomes interesting."Buddha: "We see as we are.""Should sickness or crime catch you off guard, the best response is to humbly accept these things as part of life's adventure.""Break through the static postcard of fantasy and emerge into the intense beauty of the real. in this way, 'seeing' as you travel is somewhat of a spiritual exercise: a process not of seeking interesting surroundings, but of being continually interested in whatever surrounds you.""As anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss pointed out fifty years ago, mourning the perceived purity of yesterday will only cause us to miss the true dynamic of today.""Long-term travel is not the exclusive realm of rebels and mystics but is open to anyone willing to embrace the vivid textures of reality.""The vagabond frees in himself the latent urge to live closer to the edge of experience."Annie Dillard: "What we know, at least for starters, is: here we--so incontrovertibly--are. This is our life, these are our lighted seasons, and then we die. In the meantime, in between time, we can see."
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  • Dorai Thodla
    January 1, 1970
    Not a fast moving one but an amazing book. I think I will go back and read parts of it again. There are lots of things to like about the book. First of all it provides a different view of life. I wish I had something like this in my twenties. I have a friend who spends about 6 months in a year traveling. I did not understand him. After reading this book, I can imagine why he does that. A few snippets from the book: Vagabonding involves taking an extended time-out from your normal life— six weeks Not a fast moving one but an amazing book. I think I will go back and read parts of it again. There are lots of things to like about the book. First of all it provides a different view of life. I wish I had something like this in my twenties. I have a friend who spends about 6 months in a year traveling. I did not understand him. After reading this book, I can imagine why he does that. A few snippets from the book: Vagabonding involves taking an extended time-out from your normal life— six weeks, four months, two years— to travel the world on your own terms. But beyond travel, vagabonding is an outlook on life. Vagabonding is about using the prosperity and possibility of the information age to increase your personal options instead of your personal possessions.Vagabonding is about gaining the courage to loosen your grip on the so-called certainties of this world. Vagabonding is about refusing to exile travel to some other, seemingly more appropriate, time of your life.This requires a different mindset. To some this comes naturally (the possessions/options dilemma). But I think, it goes a little beyond that. We are addicted to relationships and continuity. We build routines of social interactions. When you are vagabonding, you miss these activities. You need to switch from known/familiar patterns of interactions with familiar people in familiar surroundings to very different somewhat unknown patterns of interactions with strangers. The more we associate experience with cash value, the more we think that money is what we need to live. And the more we associate And the more we associate money with life, the more we convince ourselves that we’re too poor to buy our freedom.This book covers various ways of earning your living while traveling and provides extensive links to resources. I love this quote in the book. “I don’t like work,” says Marlow in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, “but I like what is in the work— the chance to find yourself.” I have mixed feelings about work. I like it but only parts of it. I always wondered how I can do parts of the work that I like and chuck the parts, I don't.A vacation, after all, merely rewards work. Vagabonding justifies it.
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  • Ru Viljoen
    January 1, 1970
    "...deliberately not carrying a camera and sedulously avoiding the standard sights, the anti-tourist doesn't have much integrity or agenda beyond his self conscious decision to stand apart from other tourists."That comes half way into a book that at first states that vagabonding is all about your personal lifestyle choices and not about contrasting with or criticizing other people's choices. I have read of at least 5 labels for travelers which RP stereo typically dismisses.The book is filled to "...deliberately not carrying a camera and sedulously avoiding the standard sights, the anti-tourist doesn't have much integrity or agenda beyond his self conscious decision to stand apart from other tourists."That comes half way into a book that at first states that vagabonding is all about your personal lifestyle choices and not about contrasting with or criticizing other people's choices. I have read of at least 5 labels for travelers which RP stereo typically dismisses.The book is filled to the brim with useful tips and resources but the hypocritical criticisms are wearying. Does RP expect people to identify other travelers by these few tip offs label them as pretentious travel snobs and judge them to be "dong it wrong"?RP spends a lot of time teaching people the correct mindset as he perceives it. I expected more travel tips and less attitude conditioning. Admittedly his advice, condensed into, keep an open mind and travel with spontaneity, seems sound. However it applies to everything else too, so it is hardly vagabonding specific.The majority of the book is an attempt to cover each contingency wherein open mindedness would be useful and a description of where others have gone wrong. Very disappointing.
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  • Feliks
    January 1, 1970
    Simplistic reading. Contains a lot of material I've seen reiterated before in other guidebooks; holds a lot of stuff which is well-covered elsewhere; yields a lot of info which should already be common-sense to the experienced (or even mildly-experienced) traveler...so, I confess I'm merely going to skim this thing.Listen--in my experience--if you have an opportunity to travel; just do it and don't worry all that much about pre-planning or logistics.Seriously. Don't ever worry yourself too much Simplistic reading. Contains a lot of material I've seen reiterated before in other guidebooks; holds a lot of stuff which is well-covered elsewhere; yields a lot of info which should already be common-sense to the experienced (or even mildly-experienced) traveler...so, I confess I'm merely going to skim this thing.Listen--in my experience--if you have an opportunity to travel; just do it and don't worry all that much about pre-planning or logistics.Seriously. Don't ever worry yourself too much about getting everything correct and proper and perfect. If you are of that mindset, stay home. Travel is inherently messy, sloppy, dirty, sweaty, awkward, costly, and embarrassing. Embrace this. Revel in it.Another tip: don't expect luxuries when globetrotting. It's ridiculous to go abroad and expect high-quality comforts and fawning service. Again: if this is your mentality, you may as well save your money and remain in America. Travel to Florida, Palm Springs, or someplace safe like that.Travel is about unpredictability, getting lost, getting detoured, getting ambushed, getting robbed, getting swindled, and having your plans disrupted. Just don't worry about it, that's all. Just roll with whatever comes your way.You will either get back alive --with great memories and stories to tell--or you will die...but so what? Think about it. Better to die somewhere out there in the wilderness, representing your country and your beliefs--better to perish exploring the world and its peoples, than sitting at home in an easy chair with your feet up. Even if the very worst were to befall you overseas--you and everyone else--will at least recognize that you thrived on adventure!Get it? Just don't WORRY. Be a man, not a mamby-pamby, hand-wringing, little old lady.
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  • Clackamas
    January 1, 1970
    ***I keep trying to find a better book for the type of travel I plan, and haven't yet, so I re-read this one... I can't quite upgrade it though, even though part of me wants to. Originally read 1/2008***This is a pretty simple book, designed for those who have never traveled but always wanted to. By "travel" I'm referring to long-term, low-budget travel. This is definitely not intended for the independently wealthy or those who don't know how to function without all of the conveniences of home. ***I keep trying to find a better book for the type of travel I plan, and haven't yet, so I re-read this one... I can't quite upgrade it though, even though part of me wants to. Originally read 1/2008***This is a pretty simple book, designed for those who have never traveled but always wanted to. By "travel" I'm referring to long-term, low-budget travel. This is definitely not intended for the independently wealthy or those who don't know how to function without all of the conveniences of home. Nor is meant for the person who has a couple of weeks off of work and just wants to get out of town. The author describes several different approaches to travel and refrains from passing judgment on any of them. He lays out the pros and cons of each style and lets you decide what's right for you. He provides dozens of resources and is continually adding to them on his website. Somehow, he passes on all of this information without making the book feel like a typical travel book. I took six months off after college and traveled around the U.S. with my then-toddler son. Sustained travel can be difficult even in this country. When my son graduates high school, I plan to try long-term international travel. This book was a great jumping off point for me. I was surprisingly impressed.
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  • Yair Zumaeta Acero
    January 1, 1970
    Para todos aquellos que hemos llenado nuestras vidas con viajes de largo tiempo y corto presupuesto, "Vagabonding" tal vez no será más que un compilado de consejos que con nuestra propia experiencia hemos estado construyendo a punta de errores y aciertos sin que nadie nos los haya enseñado de antemano. Con cada viaje hemos aprendido que lo hermoso de "mochilear" no es en sí el destino, sino todos los detalles que rodean al propio viaje y que la belleza está en lo imprevisto, en los autobuses ave Para todos aquellos que hemos llenado nuestras vidas con viajes de largo tiempo y corto presupuesto, "Vagabonding" tal vez no será más que un compilado de consejos que con nuestra propia experiencia hemos estado construyendo a punta de errores y aciertos sin que nadie nos los haya enseñado de antemano. Con cada viaje hemos aprendido que lo hermoso de "mochilear" no es en sí el destino, sino todos los detalles que rodean al propio viaje y que la belleza está en lo imprevisto, en los autobuses averiados en la mitad de la noche de una carretera desconocida, en la hospitalidad de las personas más inesperadas, en la gente que conoces en el camino, en los cambios de planes e itinerarios, en los templos y senderos que no aparecen en las guías de viajes, en el uso de la creatividad más enrevesada para extender el presupuesto y en el simple hecho de sentirse dueño absoluto del propio tiempo y la libertad. Todo esto puede aprenderse sin necesidad de un libro como este, basta con tener un poco de disciplina, ahorrar, investigar y escoger un destino, ponerse en marcha y esperar lo inesperado de la carretera. A pesar de todo, creo que este libro podrá ayudar enormemente a quienes sueñan con un viaje de largo tiempo pero no han encontrado el suficiente coraje para ponerse en marcha. Hay varios consejos para alistar la travesía, que me parecen interesantes y que harán comprender al lector que el viaje empieza incluso meses antes de dar el primer paso cuando nos decidimos a concretar nuestros planes, empezamos a ahorrar dinero, a estudiar con ansiedad narcótica los mapas de nuestro lugar de destino, cambiamos nuestra actitud y enfocamos nuestros hábitos en pos de nuestro futuro viaje. Otro punto a favor son las sugerencias bibliográficas que hace Potts. Cada capítulo del libro finaliza con un listado de publicaciones de sitios web que ayudarán en la planificación y ejecución del viaje, con temas que van desde trabajos en el extranjero, salud y seguridad en el exterior, guías de viaje independientes, comunidades de viajeros, voluntariados, entre otros.Para quienes nos podemos considerar ya como "viajeros expertos", este libro más que un relato de auto-ayuda, sirve para recordarnos por qué hacemos eso, por qué destinamos todo nuestro tiempo, ingenio, recursos y energías para seguir viajando, por qué el significado de nuestras existencias está definido por la carretera, las noches llenas de estrellas, lo desconocido y la libertad de viajar a donde queramos. El mayor mérito de "Vagabonding" fue el de revivir en mi el impulso de recorrer el camino una vez más.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Pure sophistry. Included in this work are maybe two or three genuinely handy bits of advice, mainly found in links to external readings and resources. The rest of these 203 pages are filled with bland bits of armchair philosophy and anecdotes from dozens of other people who are not collecting checks for writing this book.Perhaps it would not have been so very disappointing to me if I hadn't shelled out the ridiculously overpriced $10 expecting to receive some concrete advice on exactly how to tr Pure sophistry. Included in this work are maybe two or three genuinely handy bits of advice, mainly found in links to external readings and resources. The rest of these 203 pages are filled with bland bits of armchair philosophy and anecdotes from dozens of other people who are not collecting checks for writing this book.Perhaps it would not have been so very disappointing to me if I hadn't shelled out the ridiculously overpriced $10 expecting to receive some concrete advice on exactly how to travel long term. Topics of the book include "Keep It Simple", "Keep It Real", "Meet Your Neighbors" and "Be Creative". In between telling you how awesome it is to be doing the things he's not actually telling you how to do, Potts will throw in a couple pages per chapter of links to real resources with actual information - pretty much the sole helpful advice in the entire book. Walt Whitman's descendants should be paid royalties, given how often he is quoted in the book.Save yourself a few dollars and buy a book from the self-help section if you're really that hard up for platitudes and vapid encouragements. I wouldn't give this book to my worst enemy because half the punishment is that you paid for it.
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  • Scott Dinsmore
    January 1, 1970
    Why I Read this Book: Travel and exploration is an essential part of the development of a successful and fulfilled life. Rolf provides an awesome and inspirational guide.Review:All I can think of is travel right now. Not just travel, but moreso exploring, adventure and discovery. Where will my next adventure be? I have that excited feeling right now that only the best possibilities bring us. You know, that one we used to all feel the night before Christmas? Something like that, but for adults. M Why I Read this Book: Travel and exploration is an essential part of the development of a successful and fulfilled life. Rolf provides an awesome and inspirational guide.Review:All I can think of is travel right now. Not just travel, but moreso exploring, adventure and discovery. Where will my next adventure be? I have that excited feeling right now that only the best possibilities bring us. You know, that one we used to all feel the night before Christmas? Something like that, but for adults. My long term travel adventures have been occurring off and on for the past few years ever since spending eighteen months exploring the south of Spain, Portugal and Morocco. Since then the addiction has taken over, and Rolf Potts has fully fired me up again with Vagabonding.When I first saw the title of this book, Vagabonding, An uncommon guide to the art of long-term world travel, I thought it was a joke, as unfortunately most people probably did. But the truth is, this should be required reading for anyone about to enter the real world after university. In fact it should be required for everyone period. Tim Ferris, author of The Four Hour Work Week, first recommeneded it to me and given my great admiration for him, Vagabonding was the next book on my list.Excitement and inspiration are some of the words that come to mind to describe the feelings that go through the reader’s body as they hear of Rolf’s adventures throughout the world. Whether it was his 9-month adventure through Southern Asia, his experience hitch-hiking through Russia or simply a curious conversation he had a with a farmer in Africa (there’s no doubt he has done all of these), there is something to learn from each. Some of his stories are extreme and have you reading in disbelief whereas just as many make you realize the simplicities in life that we so often let pass us by.Travel is not something that should be reserved for one or two weeks out of the year where you blow through 10 attractions in just as many days. It is a time to go out and learn from those whom you’ve never come in contact. A time to get out of your comfort zone and be a stanger as you learn how others approach life. To you that might mean spending six months or a year on a beach in Thailand contemplating the “simple life”, or to the more adventurous, it may mean spending a few months with nomads wandering through the Sahara. Or it could be anything in between.The point is that travel and exploration are a fundamental part of life and development. We can only understand and learn so much from what we read, see on TV or experience in a class room. It is hard to have true compassion and understanding for life outside of your life if you never get out there. My mind was first opened on six month study abroad adventure in Spain and England. I can’t tell you how close I was to not going because I thought I’d be ‘missing’ something back home. I’m grateful for making the right decision ever since. In fact, study and experience abroad should be a requirement in our socitey as far as I’m concerned, but that’s another topic. For those in question, I have simple advice. If you are ever on the fence about going somewhere, just go. You won’t regret it.The wonderful thing is that these opportunities are available to everyone. They are are not just for the mega-rich as so many of us have been trained to believe. In fact, often times it is overabundance that causes us to lose those first-hand experiences with other cultures. As nice as a five-star hotel is in Oman, it is showing you next to nothing about the Omani culture. Quite often one or two-week long travelers, especially the wealthy, travel far and wide to experience the same nice comforts and amenities and even people as at home. Why not just save the travel time and stay home?Part of what’s so inspiring about this book is the way Rolf explains the incredible possibilities that exist for long-term travel regardless of our economic situation. Did you hear that? Please read it over again to let it sink in. Regardless of our our economic situation. He often travels on five or 10 dollars a day. How many of you could afford that? Could you imagine traveling using only your daily Starbucks budget? The next time you head out for a party-filled weekend, think of how far that $250 could go at $5/day in Indonesia. That’s almost two months of pure and original exploring! So think about the the next time you tell someone (or worse off, yourself) that you don’t have the money to travel. We all have the money, it’s just a matter of knowing what exists and making it a priority. No excuses. And if you have happen to doubt it, Rolf is quite convincing in his first-hand accounts as well as his seemingly endless resources he provides to guide you through making it possible. Whether that means tips on the cheapest countries and towns, or how to get quick international jobs here and there to fund your way through, you’ll find the advice you need.I am saddened by the ever-growing frequency and list of excuses that so many young people have. If I had a euro or pent (or whatever currency is relevant on your next journey), for every time I heard someone say “I wish I could do what he’s (or she’s) doing, but…”, I would spend every last day of my life traveling and exploring the world. Then again, maybe I’ll do that anyway.It is so easy to have excuses for inactivity and simply revert to the norm, especially when our institutions and generations before us tend to tell us that things like vagabonding just aren’t possible. Well it’s becoming clear that they are, and it is those very things that lead to truly great success. I challenge you to find someone who has experienced genuine and extreme success and fulfillment by always listening to others. That’s just it. Be different. Learn from different people, places, things and experiences. After all, our life is made up of one experience to the next. Why not make them unique and wonderful? You, and the people you touch, will no doubt be better for having done it. And the wonderful thing about travel is the more you do it, the more you have to do it. If only all personal development could be like that.Rolf has given us the inspiration, tools and stories to guide us on an endless string of journey’s. We all have the resources if we want them. So this leaves us only with the important questions. Where will you be heading for the next six months, a year, or more? Who might you meet? How might your life be changed for the better?Where ever it is, I look forward to running into you.-Reading for Your Success
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    So I didn't exactly expect this one to actually be a GUIDE. I thought it was going to be a novel of some sort.Having already done my fair share of journeys across the US of A and a few other places, I didn't really take much from this book. Most of my time reading this book was like this: "Yes, I already know that *turns page* Yes, I already know that, duh *turns page* Oh, nice inspirational quote *turns page* Already know that" and so on. I'm not bashing this book by any means, I'm just saying So I didn't exactly expect this one to actually be a GUIDE. I thought it was going to be a novel of some sort.Having already done my fair share of journeys across the US of A and a few other places, I didn't really take much from this book. Most of my time reading this book was like this: "Yes, I already know that *turns page* Yes, I already know that, duh *turns page* Oh, nice inspirational quote *turns page* Already know that" and so on. I'm not bashing this book by any means, I'm just saying due to my own experience, I've already figured out most of what Potts wrote.However, I would say Mr. Rolf's book is great for people who don't have a knack for overseas travel or just travel in general. Potts provides probably over 50 different resources to help prepare yourself for long term travel. There are sections in the book about being a senior traveler, a female solo traveler, getting over the language gap somewhere, what to take with you on a long term trip and so on. The book is also full of little comments from other every-day travelers and common sense tips to help a newbie feel comfortable.
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  • Melissa Luna
    January 1, 1970
    If you have already gone on open-ended adventures into the world, the first two-thirds (or more) of this book are a bore. Not until I got to the end did I start to enjoy and appreciate it. If you haven't had the opportunity to travel freely then this is a well-grounded book full of lots of great advice. Highlights (for anyone) include; good quotes, interesting excerpts from other travel writers, and tons and tons of resources, links, and other channels for research and planning.
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  • Sarah K
    January 1, 1970
    This book was phennomal, it is one of the best books Ive read in a while! It inspired me to travel the world more and not be so worried about life and money. It made me realize that if one of your passions is traveling, than just start taveling. All you need is a backpack to travel! It gave some really great tips on travleing! One of my hobbies is traveling so I really enjoyed this book! This book was really well written and included some great inforamtion! I recommand this book to who ever like This book was phennomal, it is one of the best books Ive read in a while! It inspired me to travel the world more and not be so worried about life and money. It made me realize that if one of your passions is traveling, than just start taveling. All you need is a backpack to travel! It gave some really great tips on travleing! One of my hobbies is traveling so I really enjoyed this book! This book was really well written and included some great inforamtion! I recommand this book to who ever likes to travel! (Im for leaving for AZ tomorrow!)
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Have an itch to quit your job pack a bag and wander the planet for a few years? This handy guide will make that itch that much worse. I miss traveling.
  • Vtanos
    January 1, 1970
    I would recommend this to everyone who has the travel-virus, its mostly about how to manage and enjoy long term travel, but it also delivers great values how to come by with less, don't hold on physical items, seek for experiences.
  • Anastasia
    January 1, 1970
    I read bits of this book before my recent six-month adventure in India, then during that trip, and just now finished it a few months after coming home. Primarily, this book was a revelation that other people out there view travel as intrinsically valuable to one's life education and spiritual growth, as I do. After having my wanderlust written off as a form of indulgent escapism by some or just simply a bewildering need by others, copying down quote after quote from this book was highly gratifyi I read bits of this book before my recent six-month adventure in India, then during that trip, and just now finished it a few months after coming home. Primarily, this book was a revelation that other people out there view travel as intrinsically valuable to one's life education and spiritual growth, as I do. After having my wanderlust written off as a form of indulgent escapism by some or just simply a bewildering need by others, copying down quote after quote from this book was highly gratifying. ;)I found this book inspiring, entertaining, filled with heaps of practical advice, and a uniquely patient and broad perspective on the world. Highly recommend!Potts also includes a ton of awesome quotes from authors who have in turn inspired him, but here are a couple of his originals:"Vagabonding is not about merely realotting a portion of your life for travel but rediscovering the entire concept of time.""Vagabonding is like a pilgrimage without a specific destination or goal -- not a quest for answers so much as a celebration of the questions, an embrace of the ambiguous, and an openness to anything that comes your way. "
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  • Andy
    January 1, 1970
    part philosophical view on how a journey, exploration or life should be prepared for, live, enjoyed and reflected upon, part how-to guide for would-be vagabondersperfect blend of idealism and practicality and none of the rarified mysticism I feared and had associated with the idea of 'dropping out to travel the world and find yourself'touches on stoicism ,asceticism, mindfulness, cultural awareness, readiness, willingness to to take chances...each section includes extensive notes on online resou part philosophical view on how a journey, exploration or life should be prepared for, live, enjoyed and reflected upon, part how-to guide for would-be vagabondersperfect blend of idealism and practicality and none of the rarified mysticism I feared and had associated with the idea of 'dropping out to travel the world and find yourself'touches on stoicism ,asceticism, mindfulness, cultural awareness, readiness, willingness to to take chances...each section includes extensive notes on online resources, reading lists, organisations to support the reader and also first hand notes from other travellers and from noted travellers / travel writers.if life is a journey, then much of what Rolf Potts has shared can be appliedFor some reason, we see long-term travel to faraway lands as a recurring dream or an exotic temptation, but not something that applies to the here and now. Instead - out of our insane duty to fear, fashion, and monthly payments on things we don’t really need - we quarantine our travels to short, frenzied bursts.rooting ourselves to a home or a career and using the future as a kind of phony ritual that justifies the present. In this way, we end up spending (as Thoreau put it) ‘the best part of one’s life earning money in order to enjoy a questionable liberty during the least valuable part of it.’ We’d love to drop all and explore the world outside, we tell ourselves, but the time never seems rightWork is a time to dream about travel and write notes to yourself, but it’s also the time to tie up your loose ends. Work is when you confront the problems you might otherwise be tempted to run away from. Work is how you settle your financial and emotional debts - so that your travels are not an escape from your real life but a discovery of your real lifeThe key to preparation is to strike a balance between knowing what’s out there and being optimistically ignorant. The gift of the information age, after all, is knowing your options - not your destiny - and those people who plan their travels with the idea of eliminating all uncertainty and unpredictability are missing out on the whole point of leaving home in the first place.If your idea of a constructive afternoon in Cambodia is, say, identifying flora on the jungle floor, you probably shouldn’t pick a partner who’d prefer a seedy bar and a half dozen hookersIn reality it’s just that politics are naturally reductive, and the world is infinitely complex. Cling too fiercely to your ideologies and you’ll miss the subtle realities that politics can’t address. You’ll also miss the chance to learn from people who don’t share your worldview., travel is not a social contest, and vagabonding has never represented a caste on the tourist/traveller hierarchy.Knowing your science - not your politics - is what will best inform your decisions as you tread lightly through the worldIf travel truly is in the journey and not the destination, if travel really is an attitude of awareness and openness to new things, then any moment can be considered travel.
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    Although I do admire Rolf Potts, I think that the advice written in this book is less practical information and more spiritual inspiration. Most of what he writes are things to motivate the reader, to show that a vagabonding lifestyle is desirable and possible.Unfortunately, Rolf Potts gives very little specific, actionable advice. Some of the things that he writes are very true, but they are also incredibly general, such as 'be gracious', 'simplify your life by getting rid of excess material th Although I do admire Rolf Potts, I think that the advice written in this book is less practical information and more spiritual inspiration. Most of what he writes are things to motivate the reader, to show that a vagabonding lifestyle is desirable and possible.Unfortunately, Rolf Potts gives very little specific, actionable advice. Some of the things that he writes are very true, but they are also incredibly general, such as 'be gracious', 'simplify your life by getting rid of excess material things' and 'be willing to adapt to new circumstances'. Those are all true and I strongly agree with them. However, there is very little advice that is of practical use to a traveler.Some of the advice is already out of date (I'm writing this is 2013). Some of the prices that he describes (such as meals in Brazil or a train ride across China) are no longer correct. He recommends against doing all of your travel planning online, a recommendation which I heartily disagree with. But some of the advice he gives is also a bit silly. He says that you can meet people "merely by strolling around with a smile," which I find to be quite a ludicrous idea. A smile is a good start, but you will need to initiate a conversation or a shared activity rather than merely smiling.Still, there are plenty of good thoughts in the book. At one point Potts rights about the balance and the difference between researching a location before going, as opposed to being open to the new experiences and the feeling of wonder while traveling.At some points Potts is a bit ethnocentric, assuming that people all over the world from various different cultures will all welcome a stranger with open arms. He writes that immigrant neighborhoods can be used to get news and information about different countries. Certainly this maybe true for some groups of people, but I know that other cultures normally treat outsiders with suspicion rather than with open arms. He also assumes that all travelers have similar motivations and interests, a strange assumption from a man who has seen so many different cultures and so much human diversity across the globe. In his defense, he does have a bit of recognition of cultural differences when he writes that "Most cultures... aren't familiar with the rigorous American standards of customer service, and few people in the world make a fetish of personal 'rights' quite the way we do in the industrialized west." Potts also briefly describes learning from other people's world views, which I think is incredibly important.
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  • Alex Pyatetsky
    January 1, 1970
    I'm surprised by the rather scathing remarks here. They all seem to have in common the expectation this this will either be 1) a checklist or 2) a reinforcement of their personal travel identity (or lack thereof).So, perhaps, you should pick up this book with the expectation of learning a mindset and exploring the paradigm of someone with extensive experience in a subject, not "Travel for Dummies."As someone with no longterm residence, I found Rolf's exploration valuable and fulfilling. Perhaps I'm surprised by the rather scathing remarks here. They all seem to have in common the expectation this this will either be 1) a checklist or 2) a reinforcement of their personal travel identity (or lack thereof).So, perhaps, you should pick up this book with the expectation of learning a mindset and exploring the paradigm of someone with extensive experience in a subject, not "Travel for Dummies."As someone with no longterm residence, I found Rolf's exploration valuable and fulfilling. Perhaps its specifically because I've experienced the things that he talks about, the subjects he explores are of interest. But I think there is something in here for the non-vagabond as well.Rolf explores the questions of how to liberate yourself to live the life you want, how to appreciate where you are when you're there, how to deal with loneliness, how to make friends in strange places, the virtues and limits of companionship and the broken paradigm of "travel" as escape. If you can't get anything out of that, you're either highly enlightened or not trying hard enough.Look, long term travel isn't a "vacation." It's not a "trip." Long term travel is life, and a lifestyle if you choose to make it one. I have lived in different cities for ~1-4 months at a time for almost 2 years now, and one of the most annoying statements I hear is "enjoy your trip." I'm not going on a trip. I'm going to another place. To live. Once I get off the airplane, the trip is over. And life begins. And if you've never lived this life, it may be hard to appreciate the discussion of both its virtues and its challenges. But if you're at all interested in getting inside the life and mindset of someone that does, and perhaps incorporating some of that into your own life, I think RP does it justice.
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  • Ari
    January 1, 1970
    This talks about the mindset and philosophy of someone who feels more comfortable on the road than anywhere else. He has explored many places and many options and lists a good number of resources to use as you travel. It helped put me in the right mindset as I set off for my trip, but didn't teach me much I wasn't already aware of. He writes in a straightforward manner, much like you would see in any travel blog.I was most appreciative of his selective quotes. "Adventurous men enjoy shipwrecks, This talks about the mindset and philosophy of someone who feels more comfortable on the road than anywhere else. He has explored many places and many options and lists a good number of resources to use as you travel. It helped put me in the right mindset as I set off for my trip, but didn't teach me much I wasn't already aware of. He writes in a straightforward manner, much like you would see in any travel blog.I was most appreciative of his selective quotes. "Adventurous men enjoy shipwrecks, mutinies, earthquakes, conflagrations, and all kinds of unpleasant experiences," wrote Bertrand Russell. "They say to themselves, for example, 'So this is what an earthquake is like,' and it gives them pleasure to have their knowledge of the world increased by this new item."His advice on drugs is also sound. "The problem with marijuana, however, is that it's the travel equivalent of watching television: It replaces real sensations with artificially enhanced ones. Because it doesn't force you to work for a feeling, it creates passive experiences that are only vaguely connected to the rest of your life. 'The drug vision remains a sort of dream that cannot be brought over into daily life,' wrote Peter Matthiessen in The Snow Leopard. 'Old mists may be banished, that is true, but the alien chemical agent forms another mist, maintaining the separation of the 'I' from the true experience of the 'One.''"At the end of each chapter is a tip sheet and resources guide, which are useful but due to their scattered organization, I'm unlikely to use. Still, it's a starting place.
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  • Dovofthegalilee
    January 1, 1970
    Even a bad book has something in it that we can learn from and this isn’t a bad book but it’s misguided. First off one third to half of it is internet sites that you could find yourself if you have a pulse and the other bit is constant quotes from other notable writers that I guess is supposed to set the mindset for the potential vagabond.I've done a bit of traveling myself, I left my native country for another completely different culture a dozen years ago and I’m a professional guide in Israel Even a bad book has something in it that we can learn from and this isn’t a bad book but it’s misguided. First off one third to half of it is internet sites that you could find yourself if you have a pulse and the other bit is constant quotes from other notable writers that I guess is supposed to set the mindset for the potential vagabond.I've done a bit of traveling myself, I left my native country for another completely different culture a dozen years ago and I’m a professional guide in Israel.I remember when a college student would be adventurous to backpack Europe for the summer and then came the “gap” year, it was so necessary, so liberating and then that wasn’t enough enter the’ Vagabum’ as I call them. The author I’m sure is a fine outstanding fellow but there is a whole slew of copy-cats out there who are nothing more than freeloaders and like parasites they feed off their hosts with nothing in return save for perhaps an illness to the host! The author writes about his time in Israel, little jobs he did to make money.’ Little’ or ‘big’ working in Israel as probably in most countries as a tourist is illegal. But what I’ve seen over a dozen years of these people coming and going is that the rules don’t apply to them, they are a band of brothers roaming the world to have real die hard travel experiences on nearly nothing a day. Now a days you get arrested and deported same goes for Israelis to work in malls in the USA, you get caught, processed and deported and that there is on record for life. Know the facts beyond the stories. Peace and happy trails.
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  • Arimo
    January 1, 1970
    A good book. It gave me lots of concrete ideas for my traveling – even though many parts of the text can feel familiar for a traveler with some experience who has already read some other travel guides and searched information online.I'd recommend this book for anyone who's planning long trips abroad, but I only gave it three stars. First of all, the book is very short and if you'd skip all the (somewhat dated) website links and ignore the numerous quotes and biographies and travel experiences fr A good book. It gave me lots of concrete ideas for my traveling – even though many parts of the text can feel familiar for a traveler with some experience who has already read some other travel guides and searched information online.I'd recommend this book for anyone who's planning long trips abroad, but I only gave it three stars. First of all, the book is very short and if you'd skip all the (somewhat dated) website links and ignore the numerous quotes and biographies and travel experiences from different vagabonders, you can read "the actual information" in less than an hour. It's probably possible to find similar advice quickly online without the need of ordering a hard-to-find physical book.Secondly: The viewpoint of the writer seems a bit... well, sometimes you realise that he has his own point of view. Even though the books mentions traveling with a family or at an older age, a lot of the advice and examples deals wild partying or holiday romances et cetera. But this is only a very, very minor issue.We Finns are lucky to have the best traveling guide ever written – "Madventures: Kansainvälisen seikkailijan opas" ("International Adventurist's Manual") and it's newer version "Uusi kansainvälisen seikkailijan opas" written in our language and for our culture. Too bad it's not available in any other languages. :)
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  • Ren
    January 1, 1970
    I can sum up my review with the following quote: "Interestingly one of the initial impediments to open mindedness is not ignorance but ideology. This is especially true in America where a particularly in progressive circles we have politicized open mindedness to the point that it isn't so open minded anymore. Indeed regardless of whether your sympathies lean to the left or the right, you're not going to learn anything new if continue to use politics as a lens thru which to view the world....on t I can sum up my review with the following quote: "Interestingly one of the initial impediments to open mindedness is not ignorance but ideology. This is especially true in America where a particularly in progressive circles we have politicized open mindedness to the point that it isn't so open minded anymore. Indeed regardless of whether your sympathies lean to the left or the right, you're not going to learn anything new if continue to use politics as a lens thru which to view the world....on the road political convictions are a set experiential blinders, compelling you to seek evidence for conclusions you've already drawn. This is not to say that holding political beliefs is wrong, it's just that politics are naturally reductive in a world as infinitely complex. Cling too fiercely to your ideologies and you will miss the subtle realities that politics can't address. You'll also miss the chance to learn from people who don't share your world view... In this way open mindedness is a process of hearing and considering, of muting your compulsion of judging what's right and wrong, good and bad, proper and improper, and having the tolerance and patience for trying to see things for what they are."
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  • Christopher Cordry
    January 1, 1970
    Everything in this book is old news to anyone who has already undertaken "long-term world travel." However, its basic premise is sound, and it would serve as a good wake-up call for those who have previously limited their travel experiences to the safety, comfort, and ease of--for lack of a better word, tourism, or rather the petty-bourgeois approach to travel. If I sound like a travel snob, it's because I am. Sorry, no apologies.Potts's core message is this: get off your duff, forget your lugga Everything in this book is old news to anyone who has already undertaken "long-term world travel." However, its basic premise is sound, and it would serve as a good wake-up call for those who have previously limited their travel experiences to the safety, comfort, and ease of--for lack of a better word, tourism, or rather the petty-bourgeois approach to travel. If I sound like a travel snob, it's because I am. Sorry, no apologies.Potts's core message is this: get off your duff, forget your luggage and your guidebook, book a cheap ticket to wherever you want to go, and get the fuck lost. Or perhaps Potts is a little more diplomatic about it. Potts isn't a particularly skilled litterateur, but then again this is basically a self-help book. Probably the best thing about it was Potts's inclusion of a plethora of quotations from more original writers on travel--I managed to add a few books to my to-read list based on his recommendations.The verdict? Despite my seeming ambivalence, I would easily recommend this book to anyone who has entertained the fantasy of traveling the world. But for those of you who have already been initiated into the art of travel--go read something else.
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  • Alexander Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    The reason this book has received a number of bad reviews is because people fail to understand this is a philosophy book on travel. To be fair, it's not like the cover really makes that clear.The other reason this book has received several bad reviews is because many people sincerely want to travel, but they have it fixed in their mind that they are unable to do so. They read books such as this one looking for a magical bullet, and they become frustrated when they don't find one. I know these pe The reason this book has received a number of bad reviews is because people fail to understand this is a philosophy book on travel. To be fair, it's not like the cover really makes that clear.The other reason this book has received several bad reviews is because many people sincerely want to travel, but they have it fixed in their mind that they are unable to do so. They read books such as this one looking for a magical bullet, and they become frustrated when they don't find one. I know these people exist, because I used to be one of them.As a philosophical entry, Rolf Potts work is unparalleled. He has many profound thoughts on the true nature and purpose of travelling the Earth. His practical tips on travel are not numerous, but they are indeed uncommon. They are valuable in that they are so hard to come by. Clearly, the author paid for these insights with his own hardships.The audio book is also a special treat. Rolf Potts turns out to be an incredible reader of his own work. It's like having a calm and appreciative friend telling you his well-practiced wisdom on how to enjoy life more. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to get the most out of travel.
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